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August 2010

incorporating The Number One magazine for the care sector

no.171 • £4.75 In association with

Nursing home de-registers over shortage By Dominic Musgrave A CUMBRIAN owner has blamed a shortage of nurses for her decision to de-register and become a care home. Francesca Windsor has run Hazel Bank near Penrith with her husband Daniel under the name Number One Care Ltd for the past three years. She told Caring UK the ‘unavoidable’ decision has affected 11 of her 18 residents, with five staff also leaving to work at a nearby home. Francesca added: “A nursing agency has been supplying us with nurses who have had to travel all the way from Liverpool to work with us. “Even then we have had them turning down the work because the location is too remote, which has put extra pressure on our staff who have had to cancel holidays to come in and cover the shifts. “This isn’t a decision we have taken lightly, but it was a situation that was unsustainable and, although the nurses always gave their best, it was going to affect the quality of care we provided, which is why we took the decision to de-register.” Francesca made the request to the CQC back in April, before meeting

with residents’ families and staff to inform them of her decision. She said during a three-month consultation process the manager has worked closely with families, NHS Cumbria and the county council to find alternative places elsewhere. “To stay as a nursing home we could have done with three more full-time nurses here, which we simply could not attract,” Francesca added. “I know we are not the only home that has this problem, and it is a real worry because one day I will be one of these residents if I am lucky. “I have spoken to a friend of mine about the reasons why we cannot attract them, and he seems to think it is because when nurses graduate they would rather work in a plush hospital rather than a home. “The differences in pay may also have something to do with it because we have to make sure we are financially viable, which is not easy given the massive increases in utility bills and other costs.” Francesca says she now plans an extensive refurbishment of the home to attract new residents.  For more turn to Page 6

Care home residents’ business thriving

David Bellamy OBE officially opened a new £4m five-star luxury care home and botanical gardens in Gosforth. The environmentalist played croquet and boules at the launch of Hadrian Healthcare’s The Manor House at the exclusive garden party, which is set to create 40 new jobs. The 46-bed residential home is modelled on the concept of a village and boasts a hair salon, bistro, library, cinema and a bar area named in memory of the former Royal George pub, which previously stood in the home’s place.

ENTERPRISING residents at a Norfolk care home have turned a new activities room into a thriving cottage industry. The residents at Barking Hall in Needham Market are using the facility, part of a recently opened purpose-built wing, to create items they can sell in the foyer of the home. Activities co-ordinator Marion Haxell said all money raised will be put straight back into activities. She added: “The residents have been making cards and knitting cardigans for children. They’ve also got the use of a sewing machine, so they’ve been making peg bags and pinafores. “The residents run the room – they can use it whenever they like and do whatever they choose. We then sell what they make in the foyer to visitors to the home, like family and friends. “We’ve also been taking pieces to local craft fairs.


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Call for star rating search tool to be removed from site By Dominic Musgrave Prime Minister David Cameron with Madley Park resident Eveline Oldroyd, who has just celebrated her 100th birthday.

David pays residents a surprise call PRIME Minister David Cameron surprised residents at a care home in his Witney constituency by dropping in for a cup of tea and a chat. He also thanked them for the congratulations cards they made and sent him following the recent General Election. David also visited Madley Park’s ‘beach’ – an area of the garden complete with sand, red umbrella and deck-chairs.

THE tool for searching care homes via star ratings should be immediately removed from the inspectorate’s website, it has been claimed. Ian Hudson, managing director, at Colten Care says every home inspected since the demise of the system earlier in the year is being penalised as they no longer appear in search results. And he told Caring UK it could have dire financial consequences for independent home owners looking to fill their empty beds, who may be unaware of the situation. He added: “We had to reregister all of our homes due to a change in our business structure, and five of them which previously had three stars will not now appear in a search of ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ ones because, even though it has maintained this standard, ratings are no longer being allocated. This is the case for all homes that have been inspected since the CQC took this decision, which leaves them hugely disadvantaged. “Homes will continue to be listed as ‘not yet rated’ despite them being inspected. It could have dire consequences for those independent home owners looking to fill

their empty beds.” Ian says the company restructured its business due to the collapse of the banking system a couple of years ago, separating several of its homes into a new subsidiary business but remaining under the Colten Care banner. He added: “We were told by CSCI that it was just a paper exercise that could be done on a local level, but it ended up getting confused and being sent to their offices in Newcastle. “We were then told by the CQC that the homes affected would be regulated as if it was a new service, and the star rating would be cancelled as the new registration process wasn’t coming until October. “When I spoke to somebody at the CQC they told me that is what it says in the legislation and there is nothing they can do about it. “Clearly nobody has thought about it and they are only interested in implementing the letter of the law.” He added that the company’s solicitor has written to the inspectorate, but has not received a response. “It is the kind of organisation that doesn’t see common sense so we are just going to have to live with it, but this should never have happened,” said Ian.

www.caring-uk.co.uk Advertising Sales and Marketing Director: Tony Barry Group Sales Manager: Jackie Brook Tel: 01226 734479 Email: jb@whpl.net Product Manager: Ailsa Bedford Tel: 01226 734480 Email: ab@whpl.net National Sales Executives: Rebecca Hazell Tel: 01226 734685 Email: rh@whpl.net Mandy Edwards Tel: 01226 734333 Email: mandye@caring-uk.co.uk Fax: 01226 734477

Publishers Wharncliffe Publishing Ltd. 47 Church Street, Barnsley, South Yorkshire S70 2AS. Email: info@caring-uk.co.uk

Editorial Group Editor: Andrew Harrod Tel: 01226 734639 Fax: 01226 734478 Healthcare Editor: Dominic Musgrave Tel: 01226 734407 Group Deputy Editor: Judith Halkerston Tel: 01226 734458 Database enquiries to: 01226 734695 E-mail: circulation@ wharncliffepublishing.co.uk Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of all content, the publishers do not accept liability for error, printed or otherwise, that may occur. You can now follow us on Twitter at caringuk


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Home owner found guilty of neglect

Care home residents enjoyed a day by the sea without having to leave the garden. Wendy Lawther, manager at Sanctuary Care’s Hatfield care home, brought the beach to them, building a seaside scene in the grounds. The home held a beach party to celebrate the creation of the new area, complete with a wooden boat, sand, pebbles, shells and deckchairs. The staff also built a Punch and Judy façade and an ice cream cart to add to the authentic feel.

THE owner and manager of a Southampton care home have been found guilty of ill-treating and neglecting residents. Annette Hopkins, 63, who owned Briars Retirement Home, and Margaret Priest, 54, faced charges relating to the care of 16 people aged between 77 to 96. Hopkins was found guilty on 10 charges of wilful neglect and Priest on four. Southampton Crown Court heard how residents were left in soiled sheets for lengthy periods, were underweight and suffered painful bed sores. The pair, who had denied 16 charges, will be sentenced at a later date. The judge directed the jury to acquit them on three charges and the jury acquitted the pair on the remaining charges. Senior district crown prosecutor for CPS Hampshire and Isle of Wight Ruth Bowskill said: “The treatment received by residents at the Briars care home in Bitterne Park, Southampton, was far below what they deserved. “They were gravely let down by the owner, Annette Hopkins, and manager, Margaret Priest, who had a duty of care but who denied any

wrongdoing.” An investigation into the home was triggered by staff at Southampton General Hospital after the admission to hospital of one of the residents last year. Ruth added: “All of the residents involved in this case were vulnerable and lacked the mental capacity to make decisions relating to their personal care needs. “They totally relied on staff at The Briars, but some residents were found to be underweight, with gaps in their records relating to medication and food charts. This meant they were suffering pain and dehydration. ”I hope this conviction sends the clear message that the CPS is committed to prosecuting crimes committed against older people in care homes, and as our Policy For Prosecuting Crimes Against Older People makes clear, to working with police, social services and healthcare professionals to bring those responsible to justice. “Where there is the evidence, the public interest will usually require a prosecution when the victim is vulnerable and the suspect is in a position of authority or trust.” Briars Retirement Home was closed last September.

Successful home honours its staff A LINCOLNSHIRE care home held a special event to celebrate its ongoing success and to honour its staff. The Cedars in Bourne, which is run by Avery Healthcare, held its ‘Celebration of Success’ day to mark a list of honours won by the home. These include an ‘excellent’ rating from the CQC; a ‘Gold’ standard and ‘Beacon’ status from the Gold Standards Framework For Care Homes; an ‘excellent’ status from the county council and a five-star rating

from environmental health for the quality of its kitchens and food. Matron Helen Brewster, who was presented with a special award for suggesting and organising the event, said: “We’re really proud of what we’ve achieved here over the past few years and felt it only right to award our hard-working staff.” Managing director John Strowbridge presented special awards to staff members, while guests also enjoyed a garden party.


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Benbridge residential rest home

Lisa oversees big changes at parents’ home By Dominic Musgrave A FAMILY run Southport care home is undergoing a major refurbishment under its new manager. Since Lisa McLaughlin took over at the helm of her parents’ home, Benridge, at the beginning of the year, it has had a major transformation. The former banker, who has 17 years’ experience of project managing, told Caring UK it needed bringing up to date. She added: “I initially came in to look at the administration of the home. The home has had three very loyal managers over the 20 plus years, but like anywhere it needed some fresh ideas to bring it into the 21st Century. “I had to troubleshoot the whole place, everything from the decor to staff morale and training to the residents’ person-centred care, individual activities and nutrition. “I also spoke to local health experts, social services and other industry professionals. Their feedback initially was difficult to take on board; however, we have now addressed all of the issues raised and listened to their advice.” The home is now in the process of setting up a working group of residents and relatives to work with the

management in developing new ideas and activities. Over the last three months the ground floor has had a major revamp, which includes a lounge featuring stimulating activities such as a sewing, painting and music. Another room decorated with memorabilia from the 1950s and 1960s to trigger conversations is also being created, which leads to a secured garden area. The addition of two rabbits and a tropical fish tank also help provide sensory therapy. Lisa added: “Relatives often tell us they are unsure of what to talk about with the residents, so we hope the room will help them. As part of our work to build our reputation again we recently held a Victorian Tea Party, and invited healthcare professionals. It raised £200 for the Alzheimer’s Society and for our minibus fund. It was touch and go for a moment, as the decorating to the whole of the ground floor was only just finished at five in the morning on the day of the event.” Lisa says the changes have received a positive response from everybody who has visited the home, and she has noticed a change in the atmosphere at the home among both the residents and the staff.

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Why nurse recruitment headache continues to nag for care homes By Frank Ursell THE shortage of nurses and its affect on the ability of nursing homes to secure sufficient supply has been simmering under the surface for many years. The problem lies in the supply chain. The Department of Health used to train nurses and they would increase or decrease courses as their workforces strategy changed, but always with the sole target of training only enough nurses for the NHS. The independent sector (acute and long term) had never been able to train nurses and so were subject to the ‘boom and bust’ approach of the NHS, with little other opportunity to source nurses from elsewhere. Universities then became the training route, and degrees replaced a specific nurse qualification, with students having more affinity to their university than to a hospital, as was the case with the previous training route. Fallout was greater, as was the decision at graduation to use their degree for purposes other than nursing. To this has to be added the

Frank Ursell university’s need to adhere to its business plan. Muddying the water all of the way through has been the impact of overseas nurses. A ready supply in early years, when all nurses were considered to be on the ‘shortage occupation’ list, has since been severely affected by various

immigration policies introduced by (in the main) the previous Government. Another muddying aspect has been the ‘boom and bust’ problem of PCTs running over budget. All were required to ‘break even’ which resulted in mass redundancies among staff, including nurses. Nursing homes then had a small respite as there were sufficient numbers of local nurses together with large numbers of newly qualified nurses who didn’t have a job to go to as a consequence of losing the affinity to the hospital in which they were trained under the earlier process. For 2008 and 2009 we saw an improvement in our ability to recruit nurses without relying upon overseas nurses. But then PCTs started to respond to other targets which resulted in increasing their recruitment of nurses, many from nursing homes, and so the downwards spiral started up again.  Frank is chief executive of the Registered Nursing Homes Association.

Puzzled by comment on CQC AMANDA SHERLOCK, deputy director of frontline operations, CQC I’M a little puzzled by the comment in the June issue that CQC should be “more localised and personalised”, and that service operators struggle to get hold of somebody when they need advice or help. Although one of our predecessor organisations, CSCI, had a programme of office closures in order to focus its resources into people, not premises, all CQC’s inspectors are now home-based and largely work within the area in which they live. Compliance teams have a clear remit to establish good networks across health and social care so that we use local knowledge to inform our judgements. Every service provider has a relationship lead (inspector) and should have no difficulty in contacting them when they wish to. If a provider does encounter problems in this respect, they should contact the compliance manager responsible for their area or, if the query is regarding registration, the regional registration manager. Alternatively, our contact centre on 03000 616161 may be able to help if the query is of a more general nature, and our website contains extensive information and guidance.

Where’s the sense in Procedures change? ‘a cynical exercise’ LORAINE SUMMERS, manager, The Hawthorns, Worcestershire

WHEN I took over this post as a manager in 2005 we were in the traffic light system, and at that time we were in the ‘red’. With the dedication of the staff and proprietor I built this home up steadily, and in 2007 we were in ‘amber’. It was then changed to star ratings and, after an unannounced inspection in 2009, we went up to ‘excellent’. I cannot see the sense of changing this system.

What are your views? Why not write to our healthcare editor Dominic Musgrave at Caring UK newsroom, 47 Church Street, Barnsley, South Yorkshire S70 2AS. Or you can email him at dm@whpl.net or call him on 01226 734407

KAREN AND STEVEN BLAKEY, proprietors, Arden House care home, Pickering AS residential home proprietors for more than 22 years, we have experience of earlier inspection procedures as well as those current. In our opinion the present procedures are a cynical exercise in cost saving and can in no way replace the more personalised effective approach of earlier years. To use an analogy: Supermarkets often display cards in their toilets with ticks supposedly stating when they were last cleaned. The current inspection system works on the same principle and is (loosely) what we know as ‘evidencing’. How many ’dirty’ supermarket toilets have you been to that have been recently ‘ticked’ but are patently not clean? It is an understatement to say the system is ‘flawed’.


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Making a meal out of gardening By Dominic Musgrave RESIDENTS at a Norfolk nursing home are planning a special meal using only the produce grown in the garden. With the help of the staff at the 43bed Mill House in Horstead, they planted onions, carrots, runner beans, strawberries and tomatoes, and plan a meeting with the chef to discuss some of the dishes they wish to create. Manager of the Kathryn Homes facility, Carole Neil, said the project is part of a group wide policy to encourage residents to enjoy the outdoors. She added: “We want to get away from the stigma of nursing homes being boring places where nothing happens. “We want every day to be meaningful and as exciting as possible, and we have taken what started as a head office directive a step further by growing our own vegetables. “Even those residents who cannot get out and involved directly have enjoyed looking out of the window to see what was going on. “One resident even rang the nurse in the middle of the night to tell him the cover had blown off the strawberry plant and asked him to go and put it back on.” The home recently won £250 after winning the group’s Spring in Bloom

Residents Ken Futter and Monica Regan do some planting under the guidance of amenities team member Sharon Kirk. competition, and staff and residents will meet to discuss how best to spend the money. Carole, who has managed the home for two years, added: “We want the residents to feel as involved as possible in the day to day decisions as it is their home.

“Everything centres around them and, instead of having one activities co-ordinator like most care homes, we have a core team of six staff who come together to plan things. “We find it better than having a designated person because we can bounce ideas off each other

and you get more responses.” A garden fete featuring the local salvation army band and brownies group is planned for August, with recent activities including a trip to the nearby Norfolk Broads and a Victorian tea party.


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A Middlesex care home is still going as strong as ever after being run by the same family for almost 80 years. Dominic Musgrave reports.

78-year-old care home is ‘a family within a family’ SUNBURY Nursing Home is believed to be one of the oldest in the country, spanning through five generations of the White family. It is currently run by Chris White, along with his sister and two brothers, while their mother Ellen, who is in her eighties, retired from the role of matron last year after almost 50 years. Chris told Caring UK that each family member plays a key role in the running of the home, which has 81 residents. He added: “My great grandmother opened the home in 1932 and since then it has been handed down the family, and we all do a mixture of roles. “I deal with the finances, publicity and admissions and my other brother looks after the HR and payroll. One of my sisters deals with the training and the other quality assurance. “We all deferred here by various means, but that is how these things happen. I left university unsure of

what to do next so came here to help out and have remained.” Chris says they have made changes internally to the home over the years to make it fit for purpose, but have never had any plans to expand or purchase further facilities. He added: “The home is a real family concern and that is a big thing for us. A lot of the staff have been with us for a good number of years and we are a family within a family, which makes for a great support network. “The last time the home was expanded was in the 1960s, and we focus more on the people side of things and are very person orientated. We enjoy each other’s moments of celebration and come together when things are not going quite as well. “When prospective residents come to have a look around the home they either click into what we are or they don’t get it and go to a purpose-built, more luxurious

one nearby.” But, despite the home’s history and local reputation, Chris says they still have the same challenges and restraints as everyone else. He added: “There are financial constraints for us and all other home owners because not enough

money is filtering into the care system, and you have to cut your cloth accordingly. “It is becoming more and more challenging and, although we are pretty much always full, I do know of a number of homes in the area who are running with vacancies.”


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CARINGPEOPLE When Vicky Barty started working as a care assistant on the night shift at a care home she was convinced it was not right for her. Dominic Musgrave found out more.

How Vicky’s view changed on caring ... THIRTEEN years on Vicky has worked her way up through the ranks at The Minstrels in Boston, and is now managing the retirement village. Vicky told Caring UK that in her position at the Retirement Villages Ltd owned site, which incorporates a nursing home, residential home and independent living apartments, she is able to share some of her passion with the 81 staff. She added: “It’s a challenging job but I love it and am passionate about it. Every single day I go home proud that I’ve been able to help someone and make a difference to their day – whether it’s a resident, a resident’s relative or a member of staff. “I help them appreciate there is so much pleasure and pride to be had from doing a good job here. I was offered my original job the day I knocked on the door asking for work, happy to do night shifts because it fitted round my family. I’m so pleased the door opened to me.” But this was not always the case as Vicky was originally relieved to have found a job which fitted around life with a husband and two small children. She stuck at it, and said that within a year her attitude had undergone a wholesale change – she’d started to

love her position. Vicky added: “I was upset every time I went in. I saw these people who needed assistance and I didn’t know what to do. I could talk to them, help with their personal needs, provide them with drinks and food, but that never felt like enough.” “Something clicked and I realised that I was making a difference. I did something every night that helped someone and that was a great feeling.” Her new found passion gave Vicky the impetus to learn more and take on new challenges. She studied for NVQ qualifications, finding out more about the role of care assistants, management techniques and then the running of residential and nursing homes. The Minstrels provides a range of living options for the over 55s. The two bedroom apartments give residents the independence of owning their own home within a community of like-minded people. The 42-room residential home with communal areas and team of dedicated staff is ideal for those needing more care. Next door the 43-bed nursing home provides round the clock nursing care tailored to individual requirements.


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Eco-friendly home set to create jobs By Dominic Musgrave UP TO 50 new jobs will be created in Teesside this autumn with a new care home designed to be the most ecofriendly of its kind in the north of England. Building work is underway at the £3m, Maple Residential Care Home in Stockton-on-Tees, which will specialise in looking after dementia sufferers. The new 63-bed facility is being developed by North East husband and wife property developers, Billy and Karon Morgan, who have previously developed and run more than 27 care homes between the North East and Lincolnshire. It will be operated by Durhambased Whitton Care Group, also jointly owned by the Morgans, and is being built by B&K Developments another of their businesses. Billy said: “We aim to create a totally caring environment both in terms of providing the highest levels of care for dementia sufferers and developing a property which meets the latest environmental standards.

“Internally, the building is designed to meet the needs of dementia suffers in terms of spacious easy-tonegotiate rooms. All our staff will be trained to a minimum NVQ Level 2 in dementia care. “We’re very excited by this new venture which will offer a new choice to residents and their families while setting new standards of care and construction.” Building work is due to be completed in September, and it will be the first property in the region to incorporate a new Austrian construction block which makes buildings air tight and reduces the energy needed to maintain an optimum temperature. Other eco features include underfloor heating powered by an airsource heat pump, rain water harvesting from a flat roof for the toilets, laundry and external water supply and solar water heating. Only timbers from sustainable sources are being used for the doors and windows. Yorkshire Bank’s Newcastle Financial Solutions Centre provided the funding for the development.

Residents at a Lancashire care home have been keeping fit with the installation of a new games console and power plate machine. Kepplegate in Preesall have been using the two pieces of equipment to improve their well-being, while having good fun at the same time. Resident Ivy Coop is pictured on the power plate watched by carer Rachel Smith.

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CARINGNEWS A Doncaster care home is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. Dominic Musgrave found out more.

Longevity down to a good staff team – David Knitting away at Waters Edge care home are residents Julia Bateman, Julia Bickley and Iris Robson.

Residents square up to record RESIDENTS at a West Midlands care home are clicking away in a bid to break the world record for knitting the biggest blanket. Twelve residents at Waters Edge, which is owned by Alpha Care Homes, along with activities coordinator Jenny Cowley, have been knitting squares since January and are hoping their blanket will make it into the Guinness book of world records. More than 200 squares have been knitted so far at the home, but the team has a big challenge on its hands as it needs to be the size of a football pitch. Jenny said: “We’ve registered our attempt with the Guinness World

Records and are waiting for confirmation of what we need to do to beat the current record. “The residents have really enjoyed themselves knitting, as we always have a reminisce while we knit, along with coffee mornings. On nice days we sit outside to knit. “We can’t believe how big our blanket has grown – it now measures about nine feet by nine feet. There has been lots of hard work put in and all that clicking of needles is very good exercise for the fingers.” The home hopes to donate the blanket to charity after the attempt, but it might need to be cut down in to usable chunks eventually.

THE Old Rectory in Armthorpe was first opened by David Mitchell’s parents 25 years ago, and has remained in the family ever since. When it first opened it had 14 beds, but over the years has been expanded greatly and is now home to 36 residents. David said his stepmother Doreen, who had a nursing background since leaving school, ran the home after she did not like the home where she worked and thought she could do better. He added: “I came in five years after the home opened because it was getting a bit too much for them, and they were talking about getting rid. “I looked after the day-to-day running of the business, which allowed Doreen to concentrate on the nursing because like a lot of nurses she was better with people than she was with the finances. “The secret behind our longevity is that we have always had a good team of staff, not individuals. A lot of them have been here around 10 years, and they now tell the family what to do so we can take a back step.” As well as the extra bedrooms, the home’s developments over the years include a residents’ relatives room, board room, conservatory, hairdressing salon, external laundry and new offices. There is also a summer house in the garden that serves tea and coffee during the summer. Close links have also been forged with Sheffield Hallam

David Mitchell with Doncaster civic mayor Margaret Pinkney University, and student nurses work at the home as part of their placements. David added: “Myself and the family have never really been interested in expanding the business further. I wouldn’t want to start another home from scratch these days because there is so much red tape and regulation that you have to abide by. “I can honestly say that I go to sleep at night knowing my staff have done their best. We all make mistakes and strive for perfection, but I know we will never get there. I am proud of what I have achieved here. I remember seeing my dad sitting at the front of the home thinking how things have changed here, and I now find myself doing the same thing.” The home celebrated with a garden party featuring a local brass band, dance school and other entertainers. It raised £600 for the Help for Heroes charity.

Boat race boost for residents A TEAM of employees from a North West charitable care home provider raised £3,000 for residents’ activities and outings when they took part in the Chester dragon boat race. The ‘CLS Vikings’, a crew of 16 rowers, including care staff from the organisation’s Chester and Ellesmere Port homes, managing director Robert Black and members of the central office management team, competed against 30 teams to complete the 250-metre course on the River Dee. The team was formed by learning and development manager Emma

McCarthy and captained by Jenny Jobber, home manager of Florence Grogan House in Chester. Joining them were care staff Gemma Spencer, Gemma Thomas, Katie Roberts, Emmie Jones (Florence Grogan House); Jodie Barnett, Sam Nash (Wealstone); Lyndsey McNally, Zoe Moore, Steve Maddock (Astbury Lodge); Elaine Smith, Georgie Herbert (Whetstone Hey); central office staff Zoey Nightingale and Sophie Whittingham; operations manager Sheila Wood-Townend and managing director Robert Black.

Care home goes green for charity A WEST Sussex care home turned green as part of a fundraising event for a local hospice. Residents and staff at Valerie Manor dressed up for the Go Green tea party in aid of St Barnabas,

with visitors asked to make a donation for their refreshments. The home was also decorated green, with special events including a quiz and flower arranging session also held for the residents.


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Grant boosts care home activities Riverside Grange residents with artist Michaela Bullivant and activities leader Nancy Brown.

Staff encouraged by art results RESIDENTS with dementia and special needs at a Hull care home are showing levels of concentration and co-ordination never seen before thanks to a new arts project. And staff at Riverside Grange say they are so encouraged by the results of the project they are planning to adopt the artists’ techniques so that they can continue their work. Activities leader Nancy Brown said: “The results of the project have been very encouraging. Professional artists working for the City Arts Unit brought music, dance, arts, crafts, drama and story telling into the lives of our residents, who responded in an amazing way. “An 88-year-old resident who does

not communicate and has not displayed any signs of recognition in the past showed a remarkable reaction when one of the artists produced drawings of her. “The resident recognised herself and started to touch the drawings. She now looks and touches them all the time and gets an awful lot of pleasure from them.” The 12-week art project was run in care homes and day centres throughout the city, and is being evaluated by the University of Hull’s Centre for Applied Research and Evaluation (CARE). The pilot may pave the way for the development of future arts opportunities for older people.

THE owners of a Barnet care home have improved the activities on offer to residents following a grant from the local council. Since manager Patricia Waldron’s successful bid for an £8,000 grant from social services, a new movie room showing old films four days a week has been installed at the Appletree Court. She told Caring UK that the residents were involved from the outset in deciding how the money was spent. “We applied for £10,000 from the pot of £50,000 that was made available, but were more than happy when we were told we had got £8,000,” Patricia added. “The residents and their relatives have been involved with the decision making from the start, and came up with various ideas of how we could create a better environment at the home. “Everybody seems really happy with what we have done here, and it seems to have encouraged one or two of the residents who have dementia out of their bubbles to get involved a bit more.”

The remainder of the grant was spent on equipping the home’s sensory room, kitting out the hairdressing and grooming room so it offers more services and creating raised beds in the garden. Patricia added: “We divided the money into eight projects, and part of that was used on converting an unused bedroom into a user friendly sensory area that could be used by everyone. The raised garden beds have been a real success, and we have been able to tell the chef not to buy fresh herbs in any more because we have plenty outside. “We are also growing vegetable and flowers, and the residents enjoy watching them grow and looking after them. Others enjoying just sitting in the nice environment with a cup of coffee.” The home recently held a series of musical events as part of NAPA’s Music in the Air week, and a garden fete this summer will raise funds for residents’ activities.  Are you doing any new developments at your care home? Let Dominic Musgrave know by ringing 01226 734407 or email dm@whpl.net

Struggling Cardiff home sees a turn in fortunes A CARDIFF manager and her staff have turned the fortunes of a oncestruggling home around. Barclay Court Care Home, a 40-bed home, had been struggling to meet its inspection requirements and needed help with fee management. A Hertfordshire care group let off balloons at all of its homes to mark World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. All 26 of Quantum Care’s home held a tea party for residents, relatives and friends to mark the day, and to talk about how communities can work together. Residents at Fosse House in St Albans (pictured above) prepare to release their balloons.

Care charity launches updated version of its factsheets A CARE charity has launched updated versions of its 62 guides that can support people in understanding their rights and entitlements. The Counsel and Care factsheets cover a range of issues including accessing care and support in your own home, going into and returning home from hospital, adapting and maintaining a property, finding and paying for a care home place and the benefits, allowances and grants available.

Advice services manager Elizabeth Lodge said: “The information and advice in Counsel and Care’s range of guides and factsheets have been fully updated to reflect the many changes in legislation and policy affecting older people over the last year. “These include the developments in personalisation, the use of Mental Capacity Act and changes in how care homes and home care agencies are inspected by the CQC.”

Landlord at the time, Sidney Jay, decided he could not let the home and its residents down, so took over the running of the home in August 2008. He decided to work with care home consultants, Wright Care Home Solutions, to implement a survival plan. Along with the company’s managing director Julie Wright they recruited experienced Rose Grimaldi and, with support, she has implemented new policies and procedures, rewritten care plans, begun a refurbishment plan and made sure all staff training had been completed. Rose added: “We’ve celebrated our success by introducing a pet, Barclay the bunny, to the home for our residents’ therapy, and a Nintendo Wii for their fitness and coordination.”

Barclay Court Care Home


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Care group set to create 100 new jobs A HERTFORDSHIRE care group has opened its first wholly-owned and operated care home in neighbouring Bedfordshire. Quantum Care, which was set up when the county council tendered out the running of its homes in the 1990s, has built its first 70-bed facility in Luton, which once fully operational is expected to create up to 100 jobs. Director of operations Sam Cheekoory said Trefoil House is the first development to open as part of an expansion plan. He added: “All of the other homes we run are leased from the council and we provide the care service. These homes have been significantly refurbished during that time to ensure they meet standards and keep up with the expectations of the regulators. “The new home is the first that we are developing as we start to build a portfolio of our own, and strengthens our relationship with Luton Borough Council, who in the past have sent people to our other homes. “We plan to add an extra 500 beds to our group over the next five years, all of which will be new builds. We

are in negotiations regarding various sites, predominantly across Hertfordshire, where we feel there are still demands to meet the needs of the community.” The new home, which was opened by Luton mayor, councillor Muhammad Riaz, will provide residential, nursing and specialist dementia services. It also features the Quantum Care Plaza, which includes a cafe, hairdresser, mini shop and recreation lounge. The facilities will also be open to the local community. Sam added: “We consulted a number of specialist architects for the new facility, as well as consulting the managers and care teams across our other homes because they have the knowledge of how one functions. “We also listened to the views of our services users and their families and friends as part of our quality assurance process, as well as professionals who come into the homes. The plaza has been designed to give the residents and their families a different experience – somewhere to go away from the living areas and enjoy a drink or a meal without having to leave the site.”

Mayor Muhammad Riaz with representatives of Quantum Care and the children from Warden Hill Junior School, who chose the name for the new home.

Caring UK Commerce section brings you all the latest property, business and training news every month.

In this issue:  ‘Frontline

services must be protected’ Page 18

 Mayor launches England World Cup winning rugby player Ben Cohen opened Staffordshire’s newest care home, Hempstalls Hall. Friends and families of guests, along with district nurses and social workers from around the area, were also at the event, which had an ‘Ascot’ theme. Ben received a bottle of champagne from the first resident of the home, Bob Lloyd, along with a NewcastleUnder-Lyme Rugby Club tie. The 40-bed Avery Healthcare home offers hotel-style accommodation, with all its rooms having en suite toilets and wet room showers, along with a TV, DVD and a drinks fridge.

specialist dementia project Page 20

 Where do we

stand with the CQC? Page 19


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Lillian Faithfull Homes has appointed John Jabangwe as new manager of St. Faith’s Nursing Home in Cheltenham. John has joined the company from Crofters Lodge Hospital in Bristol with over 13 years’ experience in mental health care and four years’ experience of management roles. Meridian Healthcare’s quality assurance officer Sharon Wood has been approved as an internal reviewer for Investors in People. Sharon received approval following a four-day course and scrutiny of her interview and evidence gathering techniques. She will play more of a role in collecting evidence in preparation for Meridian’s Investors in People accreditation. All of the group’s homes are recognised by the scheme.

‘Frontline services must be protected at all costs’ By Dominic Musgrave ANY cuts that take place in the care industry must be in systems rather than frontline services, the head of a care association has claimed. And Martin Green, chief executive of ECCA, said direct service delivery must be “protected at all cost”. He told Caring UK that the first half of 2010 has been hectic for the care sector, and that a new Government combined with the financial crisis has created a lot of uncertainty. Martin added: “The association is trying to ensure that, when councils are looking at where to make cut backs, they don’t look at cutting the commissioned services that are in the independent sector. “The next six months are going to be difficult, but what we have got ensure is that as a sector we are very clear about giving the message about what we produce and who we support. “We also must show we are providing good value services that are providing good value services that are delivering clear outcomes for vulnerable people.” And he said ECCA will be playing a key role in shaping the future of the industry. “We as an association are making sure Government has all the information about the sector it needs,” Martin added. “But we are also making them aware that we can not only deliver the service it is doing currently, but also how we can creatively innovate to deliver a range of services that might currently be delivered by statutory health

Martin Green providers. “Regulation is going to be a key theme over the next few months and, in particular, how regulators are going to ensure there is a good quality assurance system as well as regulation of care services.” And he added that funding for not only services but also ensuring the workforce is suitably trained and skilled, will continue to be a major factor, particularly for a Government that is restricted. ECCA’s annual conference takes place at the Holiday Inn, Bloomsbury, on November 17. Paul Allen, chief executive of the Abbeyfield Society, and Liz McSheehy, chief executive of the National Skills Academy, have been confirmed as speakers.


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Where do we stand with CQC? By Stuart Marchant PRIOR to the advent of the CQC, care providers had been used to dealing with a regulator, in the shape of CSCI, which was outspoken and tough. At the time, Dame Denise Platt came across to the sector as dictatorial and uncompromising. But at least everyone knew where they stood, unlike with CQC. The new regulator has not had an easy start to life. The former chair, Baroness Barbara Young, was combative in her style but politically unpopular. Although she resigned over six months ago, she has still not been replaced – Jo Williams has been acting chair since February. Chief executive Cynthia Bower has long been tarnished by her role in the Mid Staffordshire Hospitals scandal, and is not liked by health secretary Andrew Lansley, who said: “We have to ask whether it is right that the person in charge of the West Midlands SHA at the time, Cynthia Bower, is now to be put in charge of the national regulator.” But this is old news, even if it remains relevant. More interestingly we have seen the following recent developments: Jamie Rentoul and Gary Needle have resigned from CQC’s executive board, prompting questions of an internal power struggle about how CQC will regulate services. CQC has drafted in external consultants “to help develop its relationship with the sector” in the form of Bill Hodson (formerly City of York Council and ADASS) and Barbara Laing (formerly Anchor). CQC has announced the scrap-

ping of the star rating system which will be replaced by a new quality rating mechanism. Cynthia Bower heralded: “From October 1 we will have new standards and a new registration system, so it makes sense to develop a new way to compare quality across adult social care services.” We have also been told that it will be transparent and fair. What does this tell us about the current star ratings? Can we really trust the new system to be any better? The biggest current challenge for CQC is the task of re-registering adult social care providers. In the last week, I have spoken to (a) a provider who has found the process straight forward; (b) a provider who questions the legality of making providers jump through hoops in a way that was not required by the more fundamental switch from Registered Homes Act 1984 to Care Standards Act 2000 – in the process asking for essays about human rights and equality; (c) a provider who has a team of people getting on top of the major logistical project of preparing to re-register dozens of locations; and (d) various providers who are getting mixed messages from the industry and the regulator about which ‘service category’ boxes they should be ticking to protect their position. And will the threats of poor providers not being re-registered be made good? I certainly hope not. There are proper processes to follow and this cannot be used as a back door means of cancelling registrations.  Stuart Marchant is a partner at regulatory law firm Bates Wells and Braithwaite.

It’s all good (or excellent) at East Anglia care company AN East Anglia care company has now achieved a ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ rating in all of its care homes and home care services. The results were revealed after the CQC carried out its latest inspections at homes and homecare branches owned by Healthcare Homes. Hillcroft House in Stowmarket and The Manor House in North Walsham were recently rated ‘good’. Chief executive Richard Clough said: “This is a tremendous achievement and one of which we are very proud. “As one of the larger independent care companies we continually strive to ensure that we attain the highest standards. At the heart of what we do is always to provide care and support appropriate to the needs of each individual.” The group recently acquired John Stanley’s Care Agency Limited, which delivers home care services across Thurrock, Havering, Barking,

Dagenham and Southend. And almost nine in every 10 Four Seasons Health Care homes in England are rated ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, it has been revealed. 88 per cent of homes have the two or three-star rating, which represents a dramatic turnaround since the first regulatory inspections were conducted in 2006 when the group was below the sector average. Chief executive Pete Calveley said: “One of our home managers captured what quality is all about when she said ‘I would happily put my mother into my home’. “Being able to provide assurance of quality of care has become a pre-requisite to be able to continue to operate and to attract customers. “It is not coincidence that along with our improvement in quality ratings we have seen occupancy rise at a time when many other care home groups are experiencing falling demand.”

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Fears that care could fall victim to cuts By Dominic Musgrave

Mayor launches specialist dementia facility project BOURNEMOUTH Mayor Barry Goldbart launched a new project which will see an existing care home demolished and rebuilt as a purposebuilt specialist dementia facility. The new Highfield Manor will include 45 bedrooms, and incorporate many of the latest design features for people who have the condition. Manager David Vaitilingon told Caring UK that staff and the 30 residents at the current home will be moved to the nearby Sheridan facility, where an extension has also recently been completed. He added: “We are hoping to create another haven for the people with dementia to be themselves, with

careful design to facilitate a higher degree of independence by providing new technology in each room and communal area and a sensory garden. “This will allow us to offer another strand of care, and the home will have its own local dedicated staff, while also being an integral part of Bournemouth. It will not compromise our high standard or dilute the philosophy of care we offer in any way. “The project designers were innovative in their approach to the building, following studies which have found that a good design can reduce the need of drugs for people suffering from dementia.”

PROVIDING adequate elderly care may fall victim to local authority cuts when councils try to balance their books, it has been claimed. Tony Banks, chairman of the Balhousie Care Group, said the funding situation for elderly care is ‘absolutely dire’. He added: “Caring correctly for our ageing population is an issue that will affect everyone at sometime. “The funding for elderly care comes from several different pots, mainly NHS, social services, housing and government benefits. The coalition government has to ensure that funding is not diluted by departmental and council spending cuts.” He believes that savings would be made if local authorities were not the providers of residential care while they are also the major funders. “Local authorities are the ‘gatekeepers’ who assess individuals for care,” Tony added. “They then dictate the fee regardless of the provider’s costs. “They also directly provide care at a higher cost than other providers, taking all the funding required for their own facilities out of the pot on day one of the financial year – even if their beds are not full. “This leaves other providers having to compensate for the unjust distribution of funds, which is not

Tony Banks reflecting the true cost of care provided by the private sector. “I believe that local authorities should be enablers of care and not providers. The current relationship can be incestuous.” Tony, whose company is the fastest growing provider of residential care for the elderly in Scotland, said he thought there is a huge amount of overlap of funding, and money was money wasted between different agencies. “There is no real discussion between the different bodies and no individual with overall responsibility,” he added. “Despite the financial situation money needs to be ring fenced for elderly care and the coalition should designate a government minister.”  Do you agree with Tony, and what would you like to see happen in future? Let Dominic Musgrave know by emailing dm@whpl.net or ring 01226 734407. DC Care has completed the acquisition of two care homes in the North West on behalf of an established operator. Mr Rehman has purchased the 49-bed Brooklands Care Home in Liverpool and the 40-bed Polefield Nursing Home in Manchester (pictured).


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Libraries for those with dementia IT is good news care staff are increasingly being encouraged to have more positive and meaningful interaction with residents with dementia, as well as taking care of their physical needs. But care staff need easy to use resources to be available that will help them connect more effectively and enjoyably with their residents. Not many dementia care lounges have a library with bright and attractive books, yet this is the easiest and most effective resource that can be provided. Not only does it make the lounge look great, it provides wonderful communication tools for use by residents with both staff and visitors. Trials have shown that when properly used, a small Pictures to Share library has the capacity to make a huge difference. It can also make relatives’ visits easier and more enjoyable, so encouraging them to visit more. Enquiries: For details of special offers telephone Michelle on 01829 770024 or visit www.picturestoshare.co.uk

SJB to host first conference SJB Associates are delighted to host their inaugural conference and exhibition entitled Nutrition and Stimulation for People Living with Dementia on September 30 at the Xcel Centre, Newton Aycliffe, Co Durham. The venue is located in close to the A1, and within walking distance of Heighington Railway Station. SJB Associates, dementia design consultants, were established in 2008 and are suppliers of wayfinding signage, memory boxes, murals, tactile boards, memorabilia and cognitive stimulation equipment to all major care homes looking after people with dementia. Keynote speakers will be Dr Daniel Nightingale and Sharon Butler from Priory Care Homes. The topic of their presentation will be ‘A Positive Dining Experience for People with Dementia’. Other speakers have yet to be confirmed. Enquiries: For information about delegate, exhibitor or sponsorship costs or a free catalogue, email info@sjbassociates.org.uk or telephone 01325 464562.

Advice on grab rails The CQC is advising care homes to install coloured grab rails for the visually impaired and dementia clients. This allows clients to access areas they might not otherwise be able to – giving rise to feelings of independence and self-confidence, so improving their overall quality of life. Simplicare, in conjunction with market leading manufacturers, has sourced specifically designed grab rails to be used in any setting, with great contrast against background colours. They are comfortable to use and the fluted design means extra grip for wet hands.

FIND gave away one of its activity boards worth £165 at the National Care Homes Congress in Birmingham. To promote the launch of the Activity Board and Orientation Board special offer, the company gave away one of the boards, which is a robust, attention-grabbing, dry-wipe board that is great for letting everyone know what activities are going on in the home. It can be wall mounted or free-standing on the floor if required. Jackie Brayford, Dukeries Healthcare operations director, was the winner and she is pictured with Maggie Blower and the board.

Simple cost-effective method for labelling clothing RESIDENTS with dementia often experience distress if they cannot find the clothing that they are familiar with and, as with all residents, it is important that an individual’s garments are correctly returned to them after washing. Attach-a-Tag is a simple, cost effective method of labelling clothing and soft objects, and is an ideal way to quickly label short term and respite residents’ clothing as well as

normal laundry. Replicating a button, it attaches in seconds to the garment seam or laundry label, making it discreet and comfortable to the wearer. The patented design is easy to attach but difficult to remove, and cannot be taken off by accident or come off during the laundry process. Each tag has the owner’s name etched onto it, which is guaranteed not to wear off in the wash.


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Mohinda wins dementia award MOHINDA Dosanjh received the grand champion of dementia care award at a group’s fourth annual ceremony. Mohinda, who works at Quantum Care’s Freeman House in Letchworth, received her award from Paul Dunnery, East Anglia and Central Area manager for The Alzheimer’s Society for her commitment and dedication. More than 200 staff and guests attended the ceremony, which celebrates the outstanding achievements of members of staff. Other winners: Care newcomer – Dawn Curtis (Belmont View, Hoddesdon); Carer (nights) – Emmanuel Chabala (Courtland Lodge, Watford); Carer (days) – Maureen Bonney (Elmhurst); Activity worker partnership – Annette

Mohinda Dosanjh receives her award from Paul Dunnery Caminade, Sue O’Brien and Sophie Anthony (Courtland Lodge, Watford); Housekeeping team – Vesta Lodge (St Albans); Catering team – Richard Cox House (Royston); Special recognition – Heath House, Vesta Lodge (St Albans); Leadership – Juile OakleyReid (Jane Campbell House, St Albans); Outstanding contribution in supporting homes – Ann Whall (Fourfields, Cheshunt).

Provider appoints dementia champion A SOUTH West care provider has appointed its first dementia care champion to spearhead innovation in training, service development and research. Stuart Wright, who has spent the last six years working directly with people living with dementia, is taking up the role which has been specially created by Brunelcare. The job will cover a range of responsibilities, and he will also be identifying how the charity can make further

improvements to quality of life and service. Stuart said: “My objective is to build an organisation-wide programme which lays the foundations for a feelings led, congruent service with innovation in training, service development and research. I will also be leading a service review across the organisation to identify opportunities for improvement and innovation in dementia care.”

Dementia Life supports Alzheimer’s Society DEMENTIA Life is supporting the Alzheimer’s Society, the leading UK care and research charity for people with dementia, through sales of its innovative, interactive technology to assist people with the condition. The company’s pioneering reminiscence therapy software helps stimulate conversation and memories through various multimedia channels. It was developed over 10 years, in partnership with leading academics specifically for the elderly and people with dementia. Martin Valentine, director of Dementia Life said: “The system has already proved to be a valuable tool in the battle against dementia. It’s therefore important to everyone at Dementia Life that we support a charity that works tirelessly to support people living with the condition. “As part of this, we plan to donate a percentage from the sale of each system to the Alzheimer’s Society.” Enquiries: Visit www.dementialife.com, call 0800 083 4553 or email sales@dementialife.com

Automatic doors are a warm welcome yet safe and secure KABA Door Systems’ range of automatic sliding, folding and swinging doors offer care homes safe and secure access compliant to BS 7036 and DDA legislation. Automatic doors offer a better quality of life and convenience for all. Kaba automatic doors provide contact-free access, exceed current safety legislation and can be designed to meet bespoke requirements including being interfaced with existing security. Manual doors can often be left open, wasting valuable energy and compromising security. Energy efficient, Kaba’s Swiss engineered operators ensure the doors only open when required but, more importantly, remain closed and secure when not in use. Kaba has also developed the technologically advanced SLX – SB sliding fire protection door, offering the flexibility of a safe reliable, convenient and comfortable entrance system, which allows access to be matched to pedestrian flow requirements, together with flame resistance and thermal shield. Enquiries: Visit www.kabadoorsystems.co.uk for further information

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CARINGNEWS

An award-winning senior care leader says she dreamed of working with flowers and not elderly people when she was younger. Dominic Musgrave found out more.

How award-winning Cheryl’s caring career blossomed CHERYL Gilderdale wanted to be a florist when she was at school, and never thought of a career in care. But growing up with a mother who had MS meant that caring was always in her life, so it was a natural progression when she got her first job as a night carer in a Lincolnshire home. She said it was more for the convenience that she went for the job, but years later it is something she enjoys doing. Cheryl, who now works at the Orders of St John Care Trust-owned Boultham Park House in Lincoln, added: “I have always had empathy for people, and seeing the sort of care that my mum needed gave me an understanding of treating people how you would want to be treated yourself. “It was convenient for me to work night shifts when I first got a job in a home, but after a few years I was successful in applying for a senior carer’s role, which involved taking the lead on a shift – administering medication and generally running the home.

“Last year I went on a six months’ secondment to another of the group’s homes, Hartsholme House, which specialises in dementia, to learn a bit more because we have a couple of beds, and on my return was offered the role that I have now.” Not only was Cheryl named employee of the year and win the leadership award, but she has also been given a permanent contract after the new job was initially only part of a pilot scheme. She added: “Winning the awards was a really nice surprise, and it is always good to be recognised for doing your job and something you enjoy. “With my new job in some ways I do miss the hands on side of things, but I always try to make myself available. I always get involved with the residents and find time to do things for them. “I know a lot of people complain about the amount of paperwork there is, but it is a job that suits me and I like doing care plans and

Cheryl Gilderdale assessing people. It gives me a lot of fulfilment.” More than 100 Lincolnshire care home and office staff were rewarded for their work achievements at the ceremony. Other individual winners: Unsung hero – Tony Dyer, volunteer at

Hartsholme House; Employee under 25 – Helen Shotton (South Field House, Spalding); Employee over 25 – Annie Minkley (Jack Parkinson Court, Mablethorpe); 35 years’ service – Lynne Woodhouse (Patchett Lodge, Holbeach); 25 years’ service – Julie Quincey (Hartsholme House).

Are you struggling to recruit staff for your care home? Do you have any immigration issues? Are you worried how the new rule changes may affect your business? If so, editor Dominic Musgrave would like to hear your story for a special feature he is putting together for the September issue. You can email him at dm@whpl.net or ring 01226 734407.


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Helping Care home is fined after Care Trust providers admitting sewage offence adds to its understand portfolio process By Dominic Musgrave

NETWORKCAREUK is a leading health and social care consultancy company working nationally to support care providers in the private sector with quality improvement within their services. The firm is currently assisting providers who unsurprisingly have been caught up in the difficult and confusing process of reregistration under the new Health and Social Care Act. Many of Networkcare’s clients have been critical of the new process, particularly those who are small organisations and those under closer scrutiny from the CQC for other reasons. As a result, the company has teamed up with a group of solicitors to organise national seminars with guest speakers from the CQC and financial institutions to discuss some of the concerns and worries about the future of regulation and inspection. Details will be available in the near future.

THE owners of a West Sussex care home have been fined more than £10,000 for causing sewage to be illegally discharged into a tributary of the River Arun. Shafik Sachedina and Shiraz Boghani, who run Clemsford House near Horsham, pleaded guilty to the offence at Crawley Magistrates Court. Each was fined £5,000 and both ordered to pay costs of £537 in addition to £15 each in victim surcharge. The court heard that the home has a consent that allows carefully monitored discharges from the sewage treatment works at the care home to a tributary of the River Arun which should not exceed the level of 25mg/l of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and 45mg/l of suspended solids. On February 12 an Environment Agency officer visited the care home to take routine samples of the sewage treatment works that serves the property. When analysed, the sample showed the BOD level was 122mg/l, almost five times

the permitted figure, and the suspended solids level was 70.2mg/l. Jackie Yeates, of the Environment Agency, said: “Mr Sachedina and Mr Boghani were both responsible for ensuring that their sewage discharge complied with the strict conditions that we put in place to protect the local environment. “Despite this, two serious discharges of sewage occurred from their property and also the possibility of harm to an environmentally sensitive watercourse.” In mitigation, the owners apologised for the incident and have spent nearly £180,000 in providing a new sewage treatment plant for the care home. The installation of the new plant began in April this year and the facility is now operational. Also taken into consideration by the Court was a further offence that took place in October 2008 when the BOD level was 44.2mg/l and the suspended solids level was 337mg/l – over seven times the allowed limit.

Group returns to the swinging sixties THE swinging sixties returned to Lincolnshire when more than 400 residents, staff and volunteers attended a care group’s annual dance. Special guests at the Orders of St John Care Trust event at Fosse House in Lincoln included the city’s mayor, councillor Geoff Kirby and city sheriff

Roy South. The highlight was an appearance by sixties tribute band The Piggies, who performed covers from The Beatles, Cliff Richard and The Rolling Stones. All proceeds raised are being donated to the Lincolnshire Residents Wish Tree Fund, which has been set up to fulfill residents’ special wishes.

THE Orders of St John Care Trust has added another care home to its group in Oxfordshire. Old Station House in Abingdon is a modern 43-bed home with rooms arranged on three floors, and was previously owned and operated by Servite Houses. Manager Carol Flynn said: “The home has excellent links with the local community, local GPs and health care services. “We also offer activities and personal services at the home, such as hairdressing, chiropody, gardening and art and craft as well as musical movement, and we will be introducing reminiscence sessions for residents to take part in.”

Business booming BUSINESS is booming for a Bradford based healthcare furniture and equipment manufacturer. James Spencer and Co Ltd has received a repeat order from the Devaglade-owned Two Acres Care Home in Norwich for the second phase of a new-build extension project. The company also supplied lounge, dining room and bedroom furniture for the first phase.


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Nesting birds halt workers at care home By Dominic Musgrave NESTING birds have delayed work on an eight bed extension to a Brighton care home. Valerie Manor owner/manager Zoe Bates had hoped phase one of the new development, which includes a new dining room, kitchen and several of the bedrooms, would be completed by August. But she told Caring UK, jackdaws nesting in a chimney being demolished at the 17th century former manor have meant work has had to stop until they fledge, delaying the project by at least three weeks. Zoe added: “The planned demolition of part of the old extension had been progressing well, but one thing I didn’t expect to cause a delay was jackdaws. “Unfortunately they have nested in the chimney so things are rather quiet here at the moment until they ‘fledge. “It is disappointing and and has had a huge impact on the project, but there is nothing we can do about it I’m sorry to say.” Zoe said a next door neighbour pointed the birds out to her, with a conservation officer from the local council telling her that work must stop on the site. She added: “We have got relatives writing to the local MPs telling them how stupid it is, and some have even said they plan to cancel their RSPB membership. “The conservation officer originally told us that if the birds were strong enough he would talk us through how we could lift them out, but when we then contacted them they said they had decided at an emergency

Jenny Jobber, manager of Florence Grogan House, celebrates her masters degree in business management

Staff achievements recognised at awards meeting we couldn’t touch them. “We were warned that if we did we would be prosecuted. The law is so frustrating and there is nothing we can do about it because the builders are not allowed to make any noise.” Zoe initially got planning permission for the expansion, which is expected to double the number of staff from 13 to 26, more than a year ago, but the financial climate meant she found getting the necessary funding difficult. The home recently turned green for the day as part of a fundraising event which raised more than £300 for a local hospice. Residents and staff at Valerie Manor dressed up for the Go Green tea party in aid of St Barnabas, with visitors asked to make a donation for their refreshments. The home was also decorated green, with special events including a quiz and flower arranging session also held for the residents.

Industry must address ‘smart living’ agenda A NATIONAL overall coherent plan to develop fully integrated systems and services which meet the needs of the elderly should be developed, it has been claimed. Speakers at a seminar held at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills [BIS] and organised by the charity PhoneAbility, a variety of experts said although there were many excellent pilot schemes for providing various components of such smart living systems and services, there was a serious lack of an overall plan. They added that the roles of many sectors needed to be taken into

account, including architecture, professional engineering, building, medicine, energy, communications, transport and organisations providing caring resources. The plea was supported by Peter Bonfield, chief executive of Building Research Establishment. He added: “The homes and communities we build and retrofit today have to meet the needs of our future population. “Our industry must begin to address the ‘smart living’ agenda and embrace the technologies that will keep us all living independently for longer in our own communities.”

Music hits the right note with residents A DORSET-based care group’s homes found different ways of bringing music into the daily lives of its residents. All 16 of Care South’s homes across the county were singing, strumming and tapping to the sights and sounds of the music of Glenn Miller, morris

and ballet dancing, the movies Mand much more a part of NAPA’s Music in the Air Week. There were also music therapy workshops and musical pub quizzes, while staff showed residents how to use the latest methods of accessing music.

THE professional and specialist achievements of almost 200 members of staff were recognised at a care provider’s awards ceremony. CLS Care Services’ annual event at Nantwich Civic Hall celebrated a range of accomplishments including NVQs in health and social care, catering, cleaning building interiors, customer service, business adminis-

tration and team leadership, as well as specialist qualifications in medication and provision of activities. A number of managers also completed the registered managers award, while Jenny Jobber, manager of Florence Grogan House in Chester, achieved a masters degree in business management.


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CARINGPRODUCT NEWS

Advancing laundry care technology MIELE Professional continues the advancement of laundry care technology with the introduction of its DryPlus PT 8000 generation tumble dryers in a range of five sizes and varying control sets to suit all types of commercial laundry operations. The DryPlus series features drum volumes for load capacities from 10 to 40 kg, faster drying times and offers cost-saving benefits thanks to

heating by the most efficient forms of energy. All models in the PT8000 range feature Miele patented innovations such as the honeycomb drum, Air Recycling system and PerfectDry electronic residual moisture controls. The dryers are available with a choice of heat power sources – electric, gas or steam – to ensure a sustainable, cost effective performance.

How Shaun saved the holiday A THREE-night holiday turned into one from hell cut short for Mrs Richardson due to the lack of disabled facilities. Mrs Richardson who relies heavily on her wheelchair, found her room insufficient for those with a disability, and the lack of space and specialist equipment meant her stay was reduced to only one night when she and her family decided to depart. Upon reading the article, Shaun Atkinson co-owner of Bond Holidays,

immediately wrote to Mrs Richardson and invited her and a guest to spend a weekend at The Bond Hotel to help her discover that Blackpool can provide the facilities required for the disabled visitor. Bond Holidays provide specialist accommodation, including fully adapted rooms with adjoining bathrooms, equipment to hire free of charge including hoists, fully accessible transport and a range of accessible excursions.

Protecting high-risk rooms from fire PLUMIS Ltd has launched Automist, a unique fire suppression appliance that automatically protects high-risk rooms from fire. Inspired by the difficulty of retrofitting sprinklers to existing buildings, Automist is a lower-cost solution that targets kitchens, laundry and sluice rooms.

It consists of a discreet spray head that mounts under an ordinary tap, a small high pressure pump that tucks away under the sink, and a heat alarm that triggers the system when a fire starts. Automist has been extensively tested by BRE and shown to protect life and suppress fires in rooms up to 8m by 4m in size.

Lawrence to speak at NACC conference LAWRENCE Leyton will combine his skills as an ex-professional magician, a human behaviour expert and a successful business entrepreneur when he speaks at the annual NACC conference. Lawrence, who recently starred in Channel Four’s ‘Fear of Flying’ series, will be joined at the event for those who cater for people in care and in the community by Hans Becker from the Humanitas Foundation, Terry Tucker, Barchester Healthcare’s director of learning, development and hospitality and David Sinclair, head of policy and research for International Longevity Centre UK. Between them they will be highlighting key issues and sharing plans for the improvement of nutrition among the care catering

communities, including the elderly. They will also be discussing the importance of eating well for people with dementia and their carers, how to meet the registration criteria, global trends in ageing and humanitas experiences for seniors with dementia. This year the NACC is hosting the meeting of Healthcare Caterers International so more than 40 international delegates from across the globe will be attending. An exhibition will also run alongside the conference, which takes place at Hilton Blackpool from September 15-17. The Association’s annual awards will be handed out at a gala dinner on the 16th.

Seek help in times of difficulty OPERATORS should not leave it too late to get advice on running their homes if they hit difficulties, it has been claimed. Wendy Smith, a consultant advisor at WM Healthcare Ltd, said it is far worse when someone else sets the timescales. She added that she has visited two very different care homes in the last couple of months. Wendy said: “One owner was at risk of falling into concerns that could be

highlighted by CQC if they were inspected very soon because they really didn’t understand the new paperwork, and had no idea what to do. “The other owner employed the wrong people in the organisation, who were trusted to do a job of management and got it very wrong. “When this happens it is the responsibility of the registered person, namely the owner.”


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Deal doubles size of care business By Dominic Musgrave A NORTH West domiciliary care business has doubled in size after acquiring Colne-based Heritage Homecare Services Ltd for an undisclosed sum. Total Care, which provides a range of home care services across North Lancashire and South Lakeland, will move Heritage Homecare’s office to a larger site in Nelson, and also open a new training business as part of the expansion. Co-founder and director Angela Hughes said the deal will double Total Care’s turnover and staff numbers, and gives the business a strategic foothold in East Lancashire and parts of West Yorkshire. She added: “We have been looking at different ways to expand the business, either through tendering or acquiring a competitor. “Heritage were not direct competition for us, but they are a similar setup, which is why they were attractive. And it enabled us to move into new regions of the North West. “We also considered going into different areas of care, such as residential or learning disabilities, but ultimately decided to stick with what we know with domiciliary care.” The Heritage Homecare name will be retained in East Lancashire, but the offices will be moved from Colne

to more modern premises in Nelson. Angela and her business partner Kay Randle were advised on the purchase by the corporate finance team at Moore and Smalley, and she says there are plans to look at further acquisitions in the New Year. She added: “We have recruited a new regional manager and 14 support staff, and we are continuing to recruit in Kendal as we have just got another contract with Cumbria County Council. “We are also looking at any tendering opportunities that are available as another way of expanding the business, and after Christmas we will start looking at possible acquisitions, though we haven’t set any timescales.” And the firm, which was formed in 2006, has also launched a new training business for its staff and other care providers. Angela added: “It made sense for us to open our own training side of the business because previously we were having to outsource it to different locations. Some staff are a bit uncomfortable going to other places, and often they request a minimum of eight people at a time, which can be a bit difficult for us. By running our own we can do it in much smaller groups of two or three to ensure the needs of staff are being met.”

Jenny Hill with the award

Carers win award for second year RISBOROUGH Carers was named CM2000 independent care provider of the year for the second consecutive year. The awards are presented to the council and independent provider who achieves the highest quality ratings based on data from the company’s CallConfirmLive! monitoring system. CM2000 managing director Peter Longman said: “Research has shown the positive impact

care monitoring has on satisfaction levels amongst service users. “Data taken from our system showed that Risborough Carers achieved the highest ratings on key satisfaction indicators, including care worker punctuality, continuity and missed calls. Understandably these are the things that really matter to vulnerable service users.” The award was presented to Jenny Hill by CQC regional director Andrea Gordon.


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CARINGINFECTION CONTROL

Beaucare marks 18 year company anniversary BEAUCARE Medical Ltd celebrates 18 years of business, since its conception in 1992. Now with over 4000 products, including the company’s flagship Beaulift patient lifting hoist and Pro-bed ranges, a £2m stock base and a team of over 20, Beaucare is going from strength to strength as it continues to exceed the requirements of all its existing customers, and winning new group contracts from throughout the UK. Managing director Jonathan Brown said: “I’m incredibly proud of where we’ve come from and what we’ve achieved in the past 18 years. I’m also very pleased that we’re still working to our original premise of delivering the right product, at the right price, on the right day.” The company would like to thank all its customers for their loyalty and support over the years, and looks forward to developing new business opportunities throughout the UK. Enquiries: Telephone 01423 878899, email sales@beaucare.com or visit www.beaucare.com

Renray advise on ways to improve infection control FURNITURE and soft furnishings manufacturer Renray Healthcare is continuing to help and advise on one important aspect of infection control procedures. The 2008 Health and Social Care Act, which comes into force on October 1, sets out regulations describing the care standards of quality and safety that people who use social care have a right to expect, whether that be in a small care home or an acute NHS hospital. CQC have published guidance titled ‘Essential Standards of Quality and Safety’, and they have also announced they will be using a new ‘Quality and Risk Profile’ tool to track and gather information about healthcare services. It is against this changing compliance and regulatory background that Renray are helping providers by flagging up important issues connected to proper cleaning to improve infection control in respect of furniture. This is based on the company’s broad experience over many years of supplying furniture and soft furnishings to the NHS, the majority of the major care home groups, as well as individual care homes. Enquiries: Visit www.renrayhealthcare.com for free guidance.

Alliance aims to improve infection control A NEW strategic business alliance has been formed which aims to improve infection control, general cleaning and care home safety within this rapidly growing sector. The coalition, between Shackletons Furniture, supplier of high quality contract furniture to the healthcare sector, and Proventec Healthcare, provider of specialist steam cleaning decontamination equipment and a validated range of infection prevention consumables into the NHS, addresses the concerns about hygiene, infection control and general cleaning of equipment, furniture and furnishings. Coming soon after the publication of the Department of Health’s code of practice for health and adult social care on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance, it is one of the first to address the issue in terms of bringing together experiences from both sectors.

One of the major concerns for care home proprietors is how to maintain hygienic conditions without degrading furniture coverings or affecting the required fire retardancy. The two-year alliance will also see a continuous product development programme initiated to design and develop a range of easy care furniture specifically intended for steam cleaning and general maintenance. This has initially seen the launch of a DUO collection of chairs which combines the elegance of fabric and the durability of faux leather.

Virus washers constantly clean the air using technology ENVIRONMENTAL Hygiene Solutions are the official UK distributor of the Health Protection Agency certified SANYO Virus Washer range of air disinfection units. Specifically designed for the healthcare environment to combat the transmission of airborne viruses and bacteria such as norovirus and influenza, the washers constantly clean the air using patented

Electrolysed Water Technology, making them 100 per cent safe for use in occupied rooms and areas. Recent independent testing has shown that the perfectly safe hydroxyl radicals produced by the Virus Washers also act on surfaces, permanently inactivating over 99.8 per cent of settled contaminants within 30 minutes.


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Caring UK A-Z Directory Art Print and Framing

Furniture Specialists

Easy Art Unit 1-4 Tylers Business Park Lewis Road Blackboys Uckfield PN22 5LF Tel 0845 1662 732 customercare@easyart.com www.easyart.com

Care Chair Enterprise House Cranswick Industrial Estate Driffield YO25 9PF Tel 01377 271700 sales@carechair.uk.com www.carechair.uk.com

Bathrooms/ Hygiene

Crombie and Paul Belle View Barn Mansergh Kirky Lonsdale Cumbria LA6 2EJ info@crombieandpaul.com www.crombieandpaul.com

Cistermiser Unit 1 Woodley Park Estate 59-69 Reading RG5 3AN pr@wardturner.co.uk www.cistermiser.co.uk 0118 9691611

Business Services Network Care 15-16 Queen Square Leeds LS2 8AJ Tel:0113 281 6772 info@networkcareuk.com www.networkcare.com

Catering Fowler UK Unit 9 Link 59 Business Park Deanfield Drive Clitheroe BB7 1QJ 0800 6199337 david@fowleruk.com www.fowleruk.com

Clothing

Holidays/ Excursions The Bond Hotel 120 Bond Street Blackpool 01253 341218 karen-dixon@bondhotel.co.uk www.bondhotel.co.uk

Home Care Providers Caremark Domiciliary Care Providers Unit 4 The Colonnades 17 London Road Pulborough West Sussex RH20 1AS Tel 01798 873770 info@caremarkuk.com www.caremarkuk.com

Infection Control

Boyd Cooper 3 Long Acre Willow Farm business park Castle Donington DE74 2UG Tel: 01332856566 catalogue@boydcooper.com www.dimensions.co.uk/Boyd_Cooper

Environmental Hygiene Solutions 65 Riverside 3 Medway city estate Rochester Kent ME2 4BH Tel: 08000 434270 www.enhys.com

Construction

Insurance

Jab Enterprises 1 Bickenhall Mansions Bickenhall Street London W1U 6BP Tel: 0800 0141 366 jon@jabenterprises.com www.jabenterprises.co.uk

Towergate Patrick Britannic House 230 Burlington Road New Malden Surrey KT3 4NW Tel 020 8336 0099 www.carehome-insurance.co.uk carehomes@towergate.co.uk ‘Insurance for Care’

Corporate Badges Big Badge 111 Waldegrave Road Teddington TW11 8B Tel 020 8614 8880 sales@big.co.uk www.biggroup.com

Towergate Patrick is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Registered in England no. 4043759. Authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority

Laundry

Safety & Security

Electrolux Laundry Systems 99 Oakley Road Luton Bedfordshire LU4 9GE Tel: 08444 631 260 info.elsuk@electrolux.co.uk www.laundrysystems.electrolux.co.uk

Universal Hardware Direct UK Ltd Unit 202 Kingspark Business Centre 152 178 Kingston Rd New Malden Surrey KT3 3ST

Miele Fairacres Marcham Rd Abingdon OX14 1TW 0845 3650555 slawrenson@themediashop.co.uk www.miele.co.uk

Fireco 31-32 High Street Brighton BN2 1RP 01273 696007 Alan.buckle@b3partnership.co.uk www.firecoltd.com

Legionella Testing Aquacert Sentinel House 11 High street Long Buckby Northants NN6 7RE Tel: 0800 7835226 info@aquacert.co.uk www.aquacert.co.uk

Nurse call/Patient Safety Systems Safety Systems Distribution Ltd Unit 11B Hobson Industrial Estate Newcastle NE16 6EA neilrobson@safetysystemsdistribution.c o.uk www.safetysystemsdistribution.co.uk 0800 3282951 Sensorcare Systems TP House Prince Of Wales Business Park Vulcan Street Oldham OL1 4ER 0870 4214288 Paula.matsikidze@tpgroup.co.uk www.sensorcare.co.uk

Solicitors/ Legal Services Bates Wells & Braithwaite 2-6 Cannon St London EC4M 6YH 020 7551 7652 020 7551 7741 s.marchant@bwbllp.com d.tuck@bwbllp.com www.bwbllp.com

Training Healthcare Training College 7200 the Quorum Oxford Business Park North Oxford 6X4 2JZ 0844 8006801 info@healthcaretrainingcollege.com


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PRODUCTNEWS

Tax reclaims for commercial property owners CAPITAL allowances are among the most valuable and least exploited methods of reducing property owners’ income tax or corporation tax liabilities. Capital allowances arise from capital expenditure on purchasing or constructing a new property along with extensions and refurbishments. We carry out retrospective, current year, and new build capital allowance claims, both for individuals and companies in relation to commercial properties right across the commercial sector. Most retrospective capital allowance claims that we handle lead to a significant tax refund for the client. We will quickly identify the validity of a claim without obligation. If a claim does not proceed, there will be no fee. We comprehensively survey the property which allows us to identify any qualifying items that, for numerous reasons, have previously not been claimed. Enquiries: Telephone 01246 293011 or visit www.salmon-business.com

Specialist shower company supports lifetime homes initiative LEADING healthcare showering company Impey UK Ltd discusses how local authorities and building developers can invest in lifetime homes while at the same time catering for the needs of an ageing population and those with limited mobility. As people get older their ability to climb into a bath or negotiate a step-up onto a shower tray can diminish, and the likelihood of trips and falls increases, as does the risk of injury. In order for people to remain independent in their own home, changes or adaptations to existing layouts often need to be made.

Argyll unveils two applications for lone workers ARGYLL, the UK leader in lone worker safety, introduces two new health and safety software applications specifically designed to discreetly monitor those at risk without the need to deploy expensive ‘specialised’ devices. ‘Blac’ for Blackberry and ‘Blu’ for Windows Mobile devices enable any ‘at risk’ lone worker to maintain reliable contact with an in-house response team and a BS8484 compliant endto-end solution incorporating a police preferred status Alarm Receiving Centre (ARC). At any given time the worker is able to update the ARC with data relating to their personal safety. If immediate assistance is needed, this can be summoned by pressing the assigned ‘DURESS’ button on the mobile device. The application is fully configurable enabling employers to control lone worker policy, manage compliance and view current status. The ARC is constantly updated with the geographic location of the device using its GPS coordinates, and other device status information, such as battery life or signal strength, means the applications easily exceed the BS8484 minimum requirements. Enquiries: Visit www.argyll-loneworker.co.uk

Kent and Sussex Security install system at Essex site KENT and Sussex Security installed an access control system at Peterhouse retirement home in Bexhill-on-Sea in both its sheltered housing accommodation and registered care home. The solution in the case of the NABS owned and managed facility was a networked proximity access control system made by Paxton Access. Rather than relying on keys or keypads, the system uses a proximity fob, which may be carried on a keyring or worn on a necklace. The device simply has to be placed close to a reader outside a door for the lock to release. As it is an intelligent, networked system, controlled by a PC in an office, each door and each user of the system may be assigned an appropriate profile. For instance, a main entrance door may permit free access during the day when reception staff are on duty, but then automatically revert to controlled access outside those hours. Enquiries: Telephone 01233 622025.

A practical and stylish flooring solution from Gerflor TARALAY Premium is one of the most durable and easy-tomaintain vinyl flooring solutions on the market and is available in two ranges: Comfort and Compact. A versatile solution for architects, end users and contractors who have new and refurbishment projects in the healthcare, education, office, retail and leisure markets, Taralay Premium offers both practicality and an impressive high-end range of designs at affordable prices. Where excellent acoustic and shock absorption properties are required, Taralay Premium Comfort is ideal as it incorporates a Very High Density (VHD) foam yielding a 16dB sound insulation rating, while also providing safe underfoot cushioning. Taralay Premium Compact has an outstanding resistance to static and dynamic loads, with excellent indentation recovery (0.03mm) and dimensional stability Both the Gerflor ranges offer ultra-low whole lifecycle costs due to Protecsol, a UV cured surface treatment, which facilitates easy maintenance and permanently eliminates the need for acrylic emulsion. Enquiries: Telephone 01926 622600 or visit www.gerflor.co.uk.

Removing a bath and replacing it with a level-access shower floor can prove to be of great benefit, although such adaptations can often be expensive and time-consuming to carry out - a prospect which is quite unappealing to the landlord and inconvenient for the tenant. To address this problem an increasingly popular solution with developers involves installing a level-access shower floor into all new properties from the outset, and then installing a bath over the top using the Impey bath-adapter. This helps to meet the demands of tenants with full mobility, while future-proofing the room for easy adaptation when a level-access shower is required. Because all structural work is done at the time of construction there are corresponding savings to be made both financially and in terms of limiting the time and disruption. In addition to the bath-adapter, Impey UK also produce a broad range of products such as level-access shower floor solutions, shower trays, shower seats, grab rails, half-height carer doors and so on to help people with limited mobility shower in comfort and safety. Enquiries: For further details on lifetime homes or Impey UK Ltd, visit www.impey-uk.com, email info@impey-uk.com or telephone 01460 256080.

SimplyUnite home wins IT Innovator Award SIMPLYUNITE are delighted with the award winning successes of one of its customers who use its system to improve the quality of care provided to their residents. TV presenter Fiona Phillips presented Karen Cooper, manager of Mount Ephraim House in Tunbridge Wells (part of Greensleeves Home Trust), the award for IT Innovator at the Great British National Care Home Awards. Karen said: “We are delighted that our efforts to introduce IT to our residents have been recognised. “It is so refreshing to see our residents, some of whom are in their nineties, embracing new technology and so keen to learn new skills.” With the Get Connected Fund available from SCIE there has never been a better time to bring email, life stories and the internet to those in registered care homes, as well as providing easy access to online training materials for carers. Enquiries: Telephone 0845 388 4453, email info@simplyunite.com or visit www.simplyunite.com

IDS adds market leading Altro wall cladding brand to its portfolio IDS has become the exclusive national distributor for the marketleading Altro brand of PVC wall cladding, Altro Whiterock, with ex -stock product availability from its 16 regional branches across the UK. Guaranteeing swift supply for projects, Altro Whiterock will be available over the trade counter or with a 24-48 hour delivery, whether for a single project or national call-off programme. With an estimated 55 per cent market share, Altro is recognised as the best-inclass supplier of PVC wall cladding. Altro Whiterock is a 2.5mm thick semi rigid wallpanel system which provides a hygienic surface certified to EU hygiene standards, as well as fire resistance to Class O (BS476 Part6). In addition it is exceptionally resistant to impact, does not crack or chip and is almost maintenance free thanks to careful detailing on joints which eliminate bacteria traps. The Altro panels come in widths of 2.5m or 3m x 1.2m high along with extrusions and accessories which ensure a professional and long-lasting finish. Enquiries: Telephone 08457 298 298.


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PRODUCTNEWS

Barnetson Court selects Girbau laundry STAFF at Barnetson Court Care Home in Great Dunmow, Essex are delighted with the quality, reliability, versatility and outstanding cleaning performance of Girbau’s new highspeed HS-6008 washer and accompanying tumble dryer. The company recently supplied the new laundry equipment to replace the home’s ageing machines. A popular and successful care home which caters for up to sixteen residents, Barnetson Court is owned by the news trade charity NewstrAid Benevolent Fund. Effective, energy efficient and reliable laundry equipment plays an essential part in helping the home to maintain the highest standards of overall care while tackling a daily flow of soiled sheets, towels and residents’ clothing. Strong and durable, Girbau’s 6 Series washer range offer spin speeds of up to 1,000rpm and is designed to provide excellent washing performance with reduced cycle times. The HS-6008 model chosen by Barnetson Court has been named the most energy-efficient in its class by US body Energy Star. Enquiries: Telephone 01462 427780.

Revolutionary back-saving boost for gardeners GARDENING is on the agenda this summer for back pain sufferers and the less mobile thanks to the award-winning EziMate. The accessory is part of a range of equipment available from Nottingham Rehab Supplies that can help ease the strain and ensure that anyone with restricted movements can continue to tend to their flowerbeds and lawns. It can be attached to all long-handled household and garden tools and, apart from reducing back-ache, is also proven to relieve hand and arm pain and help prevent blisters. EziMate encourages a posture that is less stressful on the back by altering the pivot point, where the hand meets the tool. And the improved leverage point minimises unnecessary bending and strain. Other products available from NRS that will help the less mobile to enjoy gardening include the Garden Stool on Wheels, and the Garden Kneeler. Enquiries: Visit www.nrs-uk.co.uk or telephone 0845 121 8111 to request the new catalogue.

Exciting developments in IT from Zest Solutions ZEST Solutions’ staff have more than 40 years’ experience of the care sector between them, making them the number one specialists in the provision of IT to the industry. The company is already preferred suppliers to a number of privately owned care operators, both large and small throughout the UK. The unique service Zest provides means the company work alongside their customers as partners, to assist them to achieve their goals and objectives. This approach means it has established and maintained a loyal client base, creating honest working relationships with many care providers. Zest’s services range from the latest computer hardware and software installations to state-of-the-art networking. The company has nationwide reach, with offices in Leeds, Bedford and Northampton providing coverage for operators whose property portfolios cover the length and breadth of the country. Zest will advise, consult and meet all your IT needs to take advantage of new opportunities quickly and cost-effectively. Enquiries: Telephone directors Mick Sheehan or Martin Jones on 0844 504 4883 or email info@zestcare.com

To advertise in our Product News section please contact:

01226 734 480

Access’ door systems help you meet DDA requirements ACCESS Protection Ltd are experts in the installation of access controlled fully automatic and low energy door systems to help meet the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). The ‘semi-automatic’ operator is the Yorkshire-based company’s most popular and cost effective solution, consisting of a simple retrofit installation to an existing door. This system allows a door to operate as a conventional manual door until assistance is required. Then, by pressing a push pad, the door opens automatically and stays open for a fixed time. Complete adaptive entrance packages are available, integrated with fire, access control and other entry systems. Access Protection offer a full range of complementary integrated solutions including audio/video entry, access control, platform lifts, sliding doors, exit doors and mechanical locks. Enquiries: Visit www.accessprotection.com

Plenty of choice in new Elective cabinet furniture range KNIGHTSBRIDGE Furniture has extended its collection of cabinet furniture for care and residential homes with the introduction of the extensive new Elective range. All Elective furniture is dominated by a geometric framed look: inset doors and drawer fronts are complemented by metal D-handles to present a stylish square profile, while coordinated interior surfaces add to the design appeal. The range comprises bedside cabinets in four different configurations, together with a writing desk, 3/4/5-drawer chests, and wardrobes in single, double and combination styles. Matching single and double headboards are also available. Cabinet carcases are in a sturdy 25mm MFC with 18mm solid backs, and all unit tops, drawers and doors are in vinyl-wrapped MDF. 2mm PVC lipping gives added protection to vulnerable areas and durability is enhanced further by the use of metal drawer runners and the fitting of 170o hinges to all doors. Enquiries: Telephone 01274 731442 for a healthcare collection catalogue.

New Clinell hand sanitiser gel THE Clinell Infection Control range from Steroplast has been extended with the launch of a new hand sanitiser gel to meet the needs of organisations that prefer an alcohol based infection control system. This innovative product combines a unique blend of 70 per cent alcohol and biocides to provide a superior level of effectiveness against superbugs, offering a 99.999 per cent kill rate like the rest of the range. The new hand gel uses a formula developed by doctors, which incorporates natural moisturisers, aloe vera and green tea to leave hands feeling clean and refreshed with no sticky residue. It comprises gel in 50ml, both with and without belt clips, 100ml sizes, along with 250ml and 500ml pumps. Enquiries: Telephone 0161 902 3030 or email janice@steroplast.co.uk for further information and prices for the Clinell Hand Sanitiser Gel and the range of products.

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CARINGNEWS

Firm offers infection Fire safety company offers control services one-stop online shop nationwide FALCON Swift Environmental Ltd provides specialist infection control services to the care industry nationwide. Tried and tested products and services supplied by the company are used in confidence by private and council run care homes, Harley Street medical practices and the NHS. The unique approach of Falcon Swift is based around removal of pathogens from an environment either as a preventative programme or as a reactionary measure should a site be experiencing an outbreak. Our approach combines the best aspects of air sanitation, high quality hygiene products and fast professional decontamination services to provide clients with the highest level of protection available. Our expert technicians have experience in the industry and will tailor packages to suit clients’ needs, whether it is to help raise CQC ratings, deal with an outbreak or provide protection from future outbreaks.

Signs

SAFELINCS offers a one-stop online shop together with telephone support from its friendly and knowledgeable team to enable you to fulfil your responsibility for fire safety. The product range includes:  Portable and automatic fire extinguishers.  Fire extinguisher servicing.  Smoke alarms and fire alarm systems.  Emergency lighting and signage.  On-site fire risk assessment.  Fire escape chutes, fire escape ladders and rescue hoods.  Carbon monoxide and gas alarms.

 Fire doors and fire door retainers.  Fire and Data safes.

Why Safelincs is your best option for fire safety:  User-friendly site with ‘drilldown’ product information.  Our overviews and questionnaires put you in the driving seat.  Telephone support to help you make the right decisions.  Price guarantee. We pay the difference should you find a product cheaper anywhere else on the internet.  Next day delivery for most products.  Low shipping charges (£4

including VAT per order).  Fire extinguisher servicing and risk assessments at fixed nationwide prices.  All services available without being tied down by contracts.  Brand names with excellent warranty periods.  Clear prices to avoid nasty surprises.  Secure online checkout process.  Most health sector organisations can request 30 days’ payment terms.  Attractive discounts offered for larger orders.  Strong work ethics: The customer is always our priority.

New systems set to ‘revolutionise’ AIDCALL’S new Touchsafe CP5000 and ATX5000 are set to revolutionise efficiency and safety in the nurse call market.

combine unique features that make it the most reliable, efficient and safest wireless system available.

Most nurse call systems display alarm calls from patients on a central display panel, possibly some distance from the patient’s rooms.

The centrally placed Touchsafe CP5000 display panel shows location, patient’s name and attending nurse’s identification on its high visibility display, whilst permanently logging all information.

Response times can be slow as nurses attend to the call and then return to the central screen to pick up details of their next alarm call. It is inefficient for your staff, costly for you and causes potentially dangerous delays for your patients. Aid Call’s new Touchsafe range of products

Follow us on twitter @CaringUK

The new Touchsafe ATX5000 call points feature an LCD screen which displays a ‘next call waiting’ message, enabling staff to access their next call from the current patient’s room without having to revisit the central display panel.

Transport

No.1 in used Wheelchair Accessible Transport ACCESSIBLE TRANSPORT AT AFFORDABLE PRICES • We specialise in the sale and purchase of quality used wheelchair accessible and ambulance vehicles. • They can be bought as seen or refurbished and signwritten to your own requirements. • 12 months MOT Class 5, and 12 months warranty. • Independent engineers report supplied FOC. • Delivery service available. • All buses fitted with seatbelts and comply to seatbelt legislation.

Always wanted late wheelchair accessible vehicles Gardiners Lane North, Crays Hill, Billericay, Essex CM11 2XE Tel: 01268 521033 • Mobile: 07860 894331 • Fax: 01268 284951 • sales@hwpickrell.co.uk

Visit our website for photos of current stock www.hwpickrell.co.uk


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Caring UK (August 2010)