Charlottesville July/August 2016 Issue

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HOME C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E

DESIGN

IMPROVE

GARDEN

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summer

at home

IN BUNDORAN

CALM, COOL, COLLECTED

JULY/AUGUST 2016, VOL. 3, NO. 3




n EDITOR’S NOTE Summer more than any season has a particular mindset, don’t you think? It’s when we make a conscious effort to slow down a little, take a vacation, revel in our outside-time. Though Virginia is pretty temperate and we do get to enjoy the outdoors much of the year, summer is about savoring the delights unique to the season, literally and figuratively. This issue of HOME will help you on both counts. Literally, this issue is about savoring summer with your senses. Enjoy some recipes featuring the darling of the summer orchard: peaches. There’s nothing quite like a perfectly ripe peach (is your mouth watering?), so take advantage of this seasonal pleasure while you can. We also include a tribute to iced tea, including ideas and inspiration to celebrate your days with the South’s signature drink. And our article on floral arranging will help give new life to your fragrant, colorful summer bouquets. For savoring on a more figurative level, we’re here to help you relish in those perfect summer moments with ideas to make your outdoor space even more enjoyable. Our article on porch swings may inspire you to install one on your own porch (or patio, or yard—porches not required!). Love being outside but wish your yard had a little more privacy? You can create your own natural privacy screen, using our tips on what plants make lovely, living walls. And if you feel the urge to make some interior updates in between barbecues, experts say that kitchen countertops are one update that can make a big splash in your home, no matter the season. Our feature on countertops explores all the latest materials, helping you make an informed choice that’s perfect for your family and lifestyle. Swinging in the breeze in your own backyard oasis, glass of iced tea in hand, reading HOME magazine … sounds like a perfect summer day at home to me! Thanks for reading!

—MERIDITH INGRAM, EDITOR IN CHIEF meridith@westwillowpublishing.com

HOME C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E

DESIGN

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VOLUME 3 ISSUE 3 PUBLISHER

Julie Pierce EDITOR IN CHIEF

Meridith Ingram ART DIRECTOR

Edwana Coleman GRAPHIC ARTIST

Khristina Helmich CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Cynthia BeMent Lucy Cook Andie Gibson Jerry Hale Meridith Ingram Mary Ellen LaFreniere Adrienne Mand Lewin Noelle Milam Heather E. Towe PHOTOGRAPHER

Virginia Hamrick OPERATIONS MANAGER

Colleen Miller ADVERTISING SALES

Liz Houhoulis Karla Keeton Pam Whorley SUBSCRIPTIONS

Charlottesville HOME is published bimonthly by West Willow Publishing Group, LLC. For an annual subscription, please send $20 and your name, address and telephone number to: Charlottesville HOME 2003 Graves Mill Road, Suite B Forest, VA 24551 For advertising information please call (434) 386-5667 or sales@charlottesvillehomemagazine.com. To discuss coverage of an event relating to home or garden, please contact Charlottesville HOME at info@charlottesvillehomemagazine.com.

West Willow Publishing Group, LLC (434) 386-5667 westwillowpublishing.com Copyright 2016 by West Willow Publishing Group, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from West Willow Publishing Group, LLC. All pictorial material reproduced in this magazine, whether in a produced ad or by itself, has been accepted on the condition that it is with the knowledge and prior consent of the photographer or the artist concerned. As such, West Willow Publishing Group, LLC is not responsible for any infringement of copyright or otherwise arising out of publication thereof. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. However, West Willow Publishing Group, LLC makes no warrant to the accuracy or reliability of this information. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of ownership or management.

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contents Ch a r l ot t e s v ill e H O M E J u l y /Au gu s t 2 0 1 6

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features TREND S I N C OU N T ER T OP S

What material will dazzle in your kitchen? BY N O E L L E M I L A M

A BUN DORA N FA RM H OU SE

How one couple’s new home reflects importance of family BY H E ATH E R E. TOW E

REGAL ROSES

Summer's superstars add drama to your garden BY M E R I D ITH I N G R AM Cover photography by Virginia Hamrick at the home of Cindy and Kent Woodward

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK Charlottesville HOME Magazine c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 7


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DESIGN

IMPROVE

GARDEN

LIVE

18 C H A NG E U P Y O U R C HAIR S A few new pieces, a whole new look

37 ROOF MA I N TENANCE How to keep your roof in good repair

21 N AT U RA L BOU N DA RI ES Tips for growing a privacy screen in your yard

16 SOU T H ERN S I P S Quench your thirst with the South’s signature drink: iced tea

BY CYNTH IA B E M E NT

BY J E R RY HALE

BY N O E LLE M I LAM

BY AN D I E G I B S O N

34 T H E A R T OF F L ORA L A RRA N G EM EN T S Put your best bloom forward with tips from a pro

40 I T ’ S P EA C H S E A S O N Recipes to savor the perfection of peaches BY LU CY C O O K

BY MARY E LLE N LAF R E N I E R E

43 BEST I N L OU N G I N G Porch swings provide a place to relax and enjoy your garden

43

BY AD R I E N N E MAN D LEWI N

SPECI AL I N TER EST 50 Index of advertisers

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BEYOND THE SURFACE All you need to know about choosing kitchen countertops BY N O EL L E M I L A M

W

hile cabinets, appliances and fixtures are important parts of any kitchen, we all know that it is the countertops that bear the brunt of our daily lives. From fixing that first morning cup of coffee, to mixing, chopping, and assembling meals, to serving as a buffet or homework station, countertops are the one part of your kitchen that gets nearly constant and varied use. If you’re in the market for a countertop update, it’s important to evaluate all of your choices for this all-important kitchen feature, gathering as much information as you can. After all, today’s countertops are made to last for decades, if not generations, so this could be a long-term relationship. It’s easy to fall in love while watching a cooking show, with say, a Carrara marble countertop, as the host enthuses about how wonderful it is for rolling out dough. But despite its beauty (and handiness for pastry-making), is Carrara the right choice for your family’s countertops? What about a sleek, stainless-steel prep area, or a rustic butcher block top? Countertops offer large expanses of flat space that will immediately draw the eye, making them a very visible investment. In fact, countertops are often the first thing most people will register when walking into a kitchen for the first time. Savvy buyers, looking to replace an old countertop or install a new one, will have one eye on the functionality of a material and the other on the aesthetics of their material of choice and how it works within the decor of the kitchen and the home itself.

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Today’s homeowners are fortunate to have so many choices when it comes to countertop materials—from real quarried stone, to manufactured stone, to solid surfaces, laminate, or sustainable, “green” alternatives such as recycled glass, your choices are nearly endless…and possibly overwhelming. Which surface is right for you, your kitchen, and your family? Natural Stone (Granite, Marble, Soapstone, Limestone)

Natural stone remains the number-one choice for most countertops in our area. Unmatched in beauty and completely unique, every slab will have differences in pattern and hue, complements of Mother Nature. Because of this uniqueness, natural stone will never look completely uniform or colorconsistent, and while this is seen as attractive to some, it can be a drawback to others. Emily Miller, a design consultant at Albemarle Countertop Company in Charlottesville, explains that while certain clients can be frustrated by stone’s lack of uniform pattern—particularly when trying to match countertop materials at the inevitable seams—most find that the natural beauty is worth it. “Natural stone is still the most popular countertop choice,” she explains, noting that clients see the choice as timeless. “The beauty of a natural stone lies in its imperfections and variability,” she says. Miller sees a growing trend of using honed or leathered finishes that are a relatively new alternative to high gloss in the fabrication of natural stone countertops. These matte finishes solve some of the issues of ultra-reflective highly polished stone, such as reflecting the underside of the cabinets. The leathered finish gives a softer look to natural stone countertops and is proving to be a popular choice, especially in historic homes. Natural stone refers to granite as well as other, relatively softer stones, such as limestone, marble or soapstone. Of the natural stone choices, granite is the most beloved (and most used) because of its durability. If properly sealed, granite is virtually stain-proof, and is impervious to scratches and heat

and water damage. In fact, if you cut vegetables directly on a granite countertop with regularity, you’ll find your knives will dull quickly. Whatever finish you choose, keep in mind that all natural stone will need to be professionally sealed before installation, and depending on your stone, at regular intervals in the years to come. For most natural stone countertops, subsequent sealing can usually be done by the homeowner with ease. “Softer” stones, like marble, limestone or soapstone are also very popular choices, due to their color and texture. But often, because of their softness, they will chip or scar in the daily wear and tear of family life, and are vulnerable to staining by acids and oils. With its matte finish and soft “soaplike” feel, soapstone is a perennial favorite. Soapstone is particularly popular in our area, as we are home to the sole soapstone quarry (Alberene in Nelson County) left in the United States. In Virginia, soapstone is the “buy local” of countertop materials. Engineered Stone (Also Known as Quartz)

Engineered stone, or quartz, is indeed real stone (usually 93 percent reclaimed marble, granite or quartz) that is finely ground, and mixed with a durable binding material. The engineered stone products of today display the beauty of the natural stone they are made from, yet are very uniform, which makes it easier for installers to hide seams, and they are slightly easier to fabricate and install. Different manufacturers such as Caesarstone, Silestone, Cambria and Hanstone specialize in mimicking specific natural stones. Amy Hart, owner of Albemarle Cabinet Company in Charlottesville, has been designing with quartz since she moved here in 2005, and has seen sales grow each year. She explains that there are generally two reasons that her clients seem to gravitate to this countertop choice. One reason is the durability. “While natural stones are porous and vulnerable to staining without regular sealing, quartz has extremely low porosity and is virtually maintenance free. That is very attractive to homeowners.”

COUNTERTOPS OFFER LARGE EXPANSES OF FLAT SPACE THAT WILL IMMEDIATELY DRAW THE EYE, MAKING THEM A VERY VISIBLE INVESTMENT. 1 2 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


The other reason quartz has become more popular is what Hart describes as “the amazing array of color options.” She explains that the brand Cambria alone, for example, has more that 126 colors from which to choose. Homeowners in the Charlottesville area can find a quartz that mimics the soft, light neutral colors of (notoriously high-maintenance) Carrara marble or limestone without stressing about stains or etching every time they pour a glass of wine. With its non-existent maintenance requirements, natural look and excellent durability, it’s easy to see why quartz is the “up and coming” material for many of today’s countertops. Synthetic Solid Surface (Examples: Corian, Living Stone)

Synthetic solid surface countertops are made of polyester resins, acrylic and pigments. They stand up to natural stone and engineered stone in terms of durability and often come with generous warranties. They are completely non-porous, and stain-, mildew- and germ-resistant, and these days can be made to look like virtually anything from stone, to copper, to beach sand. For those with a strict decorating palette, the color choices are extensive, and can come in finishes from glossy to matte. While synthetic solid surfaces shouldn’t have hot pots or pans placed on them, and shouldn’t be cut directly upon, it is a simple matter to buff out most light scratches, and homeowners appreciate that there is zero maintenance for these countertops. Laminate/Formica

Laminate countertops are a budget-friendly alternative as a countertop material, and as such, have been popular since the 1950s. Laminate countertops are made from wood, or pressed wood, wrapped in a “laminate”—a heavy-duty vinyl material imprinted with the customer’s choice of color or pattern. Laminate is generally easy to install, and because it does not require specialized tools and is relatively lightweight, it is a solid choice for a DIY countertop project. These days laminate comes in every color under the sun, including patterns and finishes, and if treated gently—no cutting directly on laminate, and don’t place hot dishes or pots directly on it—will stand up to years of use. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 1 3


Wood/Butcher Block

Wood countertops, made from hardwoods such as maple, oak or walnut, and increasingly bamboo, are naturally antibacterial and infuse the home with a warmth unachievable in other countertop materials. Wood countertops are formed by running the wooden rails parallel to each other (known as “edge grain”) or by fusing the end of the rails in a chessboard pattern (known as “end grain”). Of the two, end grain will be the most durable, but will also be the most expensive. Proponents of wooden countertops cite the convenience of being able to chop and dice right on the countertop, assuming it is sealed with a food-safe sealant, rather than polyurethane, and the ease of cleaning (usually just warm soapy water), as well as the warm, rustic feel wood imparts to any room. Be advised that wood will scorch if hot pans are placed on it directly, and it requires regular sanding and oiling to keep it looking its best. It is also advisable to wipe up water spills and drips as standing water can cause warping or mildew. Because of the upkeep and care requirements, experts recommend wood countertops in more of an “accent” role. Concrete

Concrete is no longer just a material to be used in foundations and flooring, but is becoming increasingly popular as a countertop material. Concrete can be poured into any shape, and is often a “green” choice due to its use of recycled or recyclable elements such as glass and aggregate. Concrete is naturally porous and needs to be carefully mixed to minimize chipping or stains, and professionally sealed to preserve its durability. But in terms of shape, texture and color, it is almost endlessly customizable. The thing that often attracts homeowners to trying out this versatile material in their homes is that objects such as shells, glass, or metal can be actually manufactured into the countertop itself, making for an ultra-customized countertop with heirloom potential. Recycled Glass

Another countertop material quickly gaining popularity due to its beauty and sustainability is recycled glass. Usually made by grinding up post-commercial or industrial glass and mixing it with a binding material (typically concrete or resin), the effect is a beautiful mosaic look and comes in a practically unlimited

profusion of colors and patterns. Additionally, 100 percent recycled glass is also emerging as a uniquely beautiful option which is even more earth-friendly as it is made solely from glass salvaged from landfills and melted, reshaped, and repurposed as countertop material. Miller at Albemarle Countertops describes the 100 percent recycled glass countertops manufactured locally as “the most unique countertop material I have worked with,” and notes that it is enjoying increasing popularity with their clients. Recycled glass countertops have minimal care requirements and their durability stands up to marble, though trivets and cutting boards are a must. Stainless Steel

Stainless steel is the material of choice in commercial or industrial kitchens, but it is increasingly becoming popular as a countertop material in residential kitchens as well. Prized for its durability, it has found a new place in the sleek, modernindustrial look which is very popular today. Taking its place next to the stainless appliances that have been popular for years, stainless steel is relatively easy to install (professional installers will “wrap” it around a backing material like plywood to give added strength and to attach it to the cabinets). Stainless has practically no upkeep and is easy to clean. It doesn’t scorch, stain, or mildew, and scratches can be buffed out easily, though dents can sometimes be a problem. Stainless is 100 percent recyclable, making it an earth-friendly alternative as well. Other than the material itself, what else can affect the price of your new countertops? Pricing of most countertops is done by square foot, and there are three basic things that can affect this cost. First, the availability and location of the material: If you choose limestone from India, for example, you can expect the per-square-foot price to reflect not only the stone but the quarrying and transport costs for the stone. Even if you think you know the stone you want, it’s a good idea to take time to see and choose the slab of stone yourself at the supplier. “Rarely do my clients purchase a stone countertop, either natural stone or quartz, without going to my supplier to choose their slab,” says Amy Hart. “I tell them to be prepared to change their minds when they see all the beauty nature and man have to offer. The options are sometimes overwhelming, but when you are

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investing that much of your hard-earned money into a countertop, you really deserve to see all of your options.” You should also plan to meet with your fabricator, the person who will take your slab and make it into your counter. Miller suggests discussing your material choice with your local fabricator. “There’s a lot of misinformation out there,” she says. “Ask questions. If they can’t answer your question, they will know the best resources to find the answer.” Be sure you, your designer, and your fabricator are on the same page with respect to your design, finishes, sink placement and any other countertop inserts, like integrated drain boards or trivets—these affect the complexity (and therefore cost) of fabrication and are challenging to change once fabrication is complete. Your choice of edge for your countertops—round, ogee, bevel, bullnose, waterfall and many more depending on your fabricator—will also affect your final price. Be sure you know what is included with your per-squarefoot-price and what might be an upcharge to avoid any unpleasant surprises when the bill arrives. It’s also a good idea to ask about warranties available for the material and the installation, just in case. A countertop is an investment and one you’ll likely have a long-term daily relationship with for many years, and like any relationship, you are wise to know its strengths and limits before going in. Choose wisely, and stay on top of the recommended maintenance, and your countertops should reward you and your family with years of good service and good looks.

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n LIVE ICED TEA

SIT AND SIP A tribute to iced tea BY A N D I E G I B S O N

In the South, iced tea is as sacred a summertime tradition as a game of kick the can at dusk. The first hint of warm weather signals it’s time to brew up a big batch, fill a tall glass full of ice and sip to your heart’s content—preferably on a shady porch in the company of a good friend. In addition to its thirst-quenching properties, there are a number of reasons iced tea is a staple of summer. It’s inexpensive and easy to make, offers a variety of health benefits and can be customized in endless ways to suit your personal taste. 1 6 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


Beyond Sweet Tea

True Southerners may insist that sweetened heavily with sugar is the only way to drink iced tea, but equal parts sweet and unsweet can be just as refreshing—and with half the calories. Or, if you’re a tea purist, it’s perfectly acceptable to skip the sweetener all together (just don’t mention it to your Southern friends). A variation of iced tea that’s an especially big hit with kids is the Arnold Palmer, a concoction popularized by the legendary professional golfer. Often mistakenly made with equal parts tea and lemonade, the proper way to prepare the drink, according to Palmer himself, is with three parts iced tea and one part lemonade poured over ice and served with a wedge of lemon. Infusing tea with the flavors of fruit, flowers and even vegetables also has become prevalent and can be a great way to jazz up an outdoor party. Peach, raspberry, strawberry, blackberry, lemon, lime, mango and cranberry are all great choices. A quick search online turns up tons of recipes for these fresh mixtures, as well as more unusual variations such as rhubarb, grapefruit and hibiscus. Infusing with spices and herbs such as mint, ginger, basil, lavender and cinnamon can also provide refreshing results. For a more personalized creation, combine two of your favorite flavors—raspberry/lemon, blackberry/mint, strawberry/basil or blueberry/ginger, for example. If you’re a fan of cucumbers, try a mixture of cucumber and mint iced tea. Not Just Good, Good for You

Tea contains powerful antioxidants, which experts say may reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer. In fact, according to Dr. John Weisburger, a senior researcher at the Institute for Cancer Prevention, tea has 8 to 10 times the number of antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables. The power of those antioxidants is increased when you add citrus (such as lemon or lime), which also contributes beneficial vitamin C.

Adding citrus, mint or other flavors also enhances flavor, which can reduce the urge to add sugar or other sweeteners to your tea. Brewed at home, most unsweetened tea has no calories so choosing a tall glass in lieu of soda or a sports drink will cut sugar intake and unnecessary calories from your diet. How to Make Iced Tea

There are two ways to create refreshing iced tea—traditional boiling and cold brewing. (Skip “sun tea” as it promotes the growth of harmful bacteria). To make a half gallon of tea on the stove, bring two quarts of water to a boil. Remove from heat and steep eight regular-size tea bags (with the tags hanging over the edge of the pan) for five minutes. Discard bags and add sugar to taste, if desired. Allow to cool. Just as effective is making tea in the fridge. It takes some advanced planning and produces a slightly milder flavor some tea drinkers prefer. To make a half gallon, add eight tea bags to two quarts of water and place in the refrigerator for at least six hours. Discard the bags and sweeten, if desired. Adding an Extra Kick

If you’re looking for iced tea with a little extra jolt (and not just from caffeine), try a boozy iced tea recipe. Such adult-only versions of the summertime favorite can add a festive touch to your next pool party or backyard barbecue. Try tea creations mixed with bourbon and ginger (or mint), lemon or strawberry with a shot of vodka, or the Leland Palmer—jasmine tea combined with honey, gin, limoncello, grapefruit juice and club soda. You can find a wide range of porch-worthy recipes in a snap by searching online. June may have been National Iced Tea month, but this is a drink that hits the spot all summer long. Time to trade in your coffee mug for a tall, refreshing glass of your favorite iced concoction.

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n DESIGN DINING CHAIRS

CHANGE UP YOUR CHAIRS

CREATE AN EXCITING NEW LOOK FOR YOUR DINING SPACE BY CY N T H I A B EM EN T

A

great group of chairs can define the style of your dining space and even your whole home. With great opportunity comes great responsibility, however: your dining chairs have to perform in the areas of durability, comfort, and ease of care while they’re hanging around looking good in one of the most-used areas of your home. So when your chairs start to show their age, or if your dining space could use a style reboot, seize the opportunity to upgrade form, function and aesthetic in one fell swoop by bringing in a new—or new-to-you—set. Done well, the result can liven up your dining space and kick off a new style note for your home along the way. 1 8 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


Before You Buy: Consider Space and Function

Before you head out to hunt down new chairs, ask yourself some key questions. How many do you plan to seat—just your family, or will you need extras for guests? Will the dining chairs live around the table 24/7 or will they moonlight as desk chairs in the home office or at the homework table? Do you plan to keep arm chairs around the table or pulled aside when not in use? Consider who will be using the chairs most regularly. Upholstered host and hostess chairs look elegant but can be harder to grip and heavier to move for young children and older adults than chairs with open backs. Measure your table, as well, to determine the space between its legs on each side so you can determine how many of your new chairs can fit around it (a good rule of thumb is to allow 24 inches of width along your dining table per chair). Also measure the table’s clearance from the floor to the bottom of its apron so that any arm chairs you choose can slide fully under the table. Also allow about 10 to 12 inches between the chair seat and bottom of the table apron for comfortable leg space. Lastly, measure the size of your dining area and consider traffic patterns, so that you can allow for maneuvering room around the chairs when pulled out from the table, and for chair placement in the dining space if you are placing seldom-used or supplemental chairs. Let the Fun Begin: Mix and Match with Intent

Now comes the fun part: chair shopping. One way to create interest with chairs is to mix things up. Matchy-matchy furniture-buying mandates are a thing of the past; today’s design landscape allows for endless creativity and for creating a collected-overtime look that can spark conversation (“where’d you find that?”) over your dining chair lineup. A simple starting point is to find one unifying element to tie a set of chairs together. One effortless way is to purchase the same chair in different colors within a range (keep the color range tight). Another option is to unify random chair styles with a single color—great for thriftstore finds. Another way to achieve an eclectic look, without committing to too much color, is to pull a set together with neutrals: use a metal finish, or white, black or the same tone in different woods as the unifier. A common leg style (curved, straight, turned) can also bring together a collection of otherwise disparate chairs. If you’re considering fabric-covered seats, use them to pull together unrelated chairs with a single fabric or add personality to a matched set with a different, coordinating fabric on each chair seat. Fabric choosing tip: Avoid fabrics with heavy naps such as chenille and velvet—they’ll show wear quickly. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 1 9


Yet another option is to add a pop of color. Team matching side chairs with a pair of end chairs in a contrasting color, or switch up both color and style at the ends (a modern end pair with traditional side chairs, or vice versa). Slipcovers in these same grouping patterns can also be a great way to experiment with color and texture; opt for easy-care and consider purchasing spare covers. Approach the Bench

Another seating option to consider is a bench on one or two sides of your table. Benches optimize horizontal space (no chair arms means more sitting room) and visually eliminate the bulk in a dining space. When properly sized, they easily slide underneath the table when not in use. Benches actually take up less vertical space as well—you won’t bump arms or catch items while walking around chair backs which can be a boon in smaller spaces. Plus, the pulled-together look of chairs and a bench around a table creates effortless style and can lend an eclectic vibe to your dining space. Consider a single bench on either the long side or short side of a rectangular table with a suite of chairs. Benches also provide an opportunity to infuse color—and even durability—with fabric. Consider an upholstered bench seat covered in laminated fabric for the ultimate in easy-care seating. Build a Banquette

While banquettes represent a potentially bigger investment than a set of chairs, what they bring to the table in the way of intimacy, floor space economy, versatility and visual interest may make building one in your home worth considering. Whether U-shaped, semi-circle, straight or L-shaped (or a hybrid of any of these), banquettes can be placed against a recessed or standard flush wall space or under a window. Standard banquette bench seats should measure 18 inches high to work with a 29 to 30-inch table height, and can pair with a wide variety of table shapes— one legroom-friendly option is to pair with a pedestal table. Banquettes can be installed permanently or created with freestanding furniture. Style-wise, they can go casual in a breakfast nook or all-out elegant in a formal dining room, depending on accompanying chair and table styles, fabrics and finishes. Your dining space works hard in your home. With a little planning, you can unleash your creativity to enliven your dining space and create a more beautiful and functional place in which to break bread and make memories with family and friends.

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n GARDEN GROW IT YOURSELF

GREEN WALLS grow your own privacy screen

O

BY N O EL L E M I L A M

Our porches, patios and lawns are natural extensions of our home. And just as homes have areas that are public and private, so too do our yards. Sometimes, you welcome the friendly dog walker passing by to join you for a visit on the porch. Other times, it feels awkward to host supper club outside on the veranda while the neighborhood teens zoom by on their skateboards. And it’s probably fair to say that you never want to see the utility company’s access box that’s installed in plain view from your deck.

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One attractive solution is to grow your own privacy screen. Privacy screens can help delineate special hideaways in your yard, hide an unsightly view, provide shelter from wind or strong summer sun—and even control unwanted traffic through your garden. Our particular climate here (Zone 7, according to USDA’s Plant Hardiness Zone Map, a tool that helps gardeners determine what plants will thrive in particular climates) is optimum for home gardeners who wish to grow their own privacy screens. Many will take less than one growing season to implement with a little planning and forethought. Set Your Goals, Get Up and Growing

Zone 7 Screen Stars VINES Hardy jasmine Carolina Jessamine Clematis Native honeysuckle SMALL-TO-MEDIUM PLANTS THAT CAN GROW UP TO 15 FEET TALL Abelia Boxwood Camellia Colonnade or “Spire” apple Crabapple Evergreen viburnum Holly Lilac LARGE PLANTS THAT CAN GROW FROM 15-30 FEET TALL “Red” series of hollies (“Robin” or “Nellie Stevens”) Cryptoia False cypress

Whether you are trying to camouflage the air conditioning units or create a private “outdoor room” in your yard, stand in the space and give some thought to how you’ll be using the screen and if you’ll be using it for three seasons (outdoor entertaining) or four (hiding something from view). Some of your choices are evergreen and bushy, perfect for hiding that electric meter all year long, while others make a versatile backdrop that changes with the seasons before dropping leaves and going dormant for winter. Knowing these answers will dictate the amount of space you have to work with and guide your plant choices. Next, imagine how you want your natural privacy screen to look once it is fully established. Measure the height, width, and depth/density you will want it to be at maturity. According to Barbara Leach, horticulture technician with the Virginia Cooperative Extension, “Most people think they need something much larger than they actually do, or they don’t pay attention to the plant’s ultimate height.” For most backyards, she

recommends a screen height of 15 to 18 feet at maturity in order to avoid creating that claustrophobic “bottom of a well” effect, where you feel surrounded on all sides and your lawn is starved for sunlight. Is the environment where your screen will be dry or boggy? Shady or full sun? Is the site vulnerable to strong winds or is it sheltered? Leach advises, “It is infinitely easier to choose a plant that is suited to your site, than it is to permanently modify your site to suit the plant.” Use an outdoor privacy screen in your yard in the same ways you would use a decorative room divider screen inside. They are perfect for defining spaces, hiding clutter and just adding an interesting decorative touch. An outdoor privacy screen offers your yard more than just a natural barricade. A row of decorative grasses that grows taller than your deck will sway in the breeze and soften any hard lines that exist between the deck and your landscaping. A hedge of hollies planted along the fence draws your eye to that attractive corner of your lawn with their glossy green leaves and bright red berries. Know What You’re Getting Yourself Into

Single-species plantings like a hedge of boxwood or holly requires frequent pruning, so you’ll have to make a plan for that if you’re not handy with hedge clippers. Likewise, it is good to consider plant toxicity if small children or animals will be playing nearby. In varying degrees, many common Virginia garden plants like azalea, daphne, foxglove, hydrangea, oleander, rhododendron, wisteria and yew are known to be toxic. But Leach says, “They really are only potentially harmful if they are ingested, so this may not be a problem for you.”

OFTEN, MIXED HEDGES LOOK MORE NATURAL, ATTRACT A LARGER VARIETY OF BENEFICIAL WILDLIFE SUCH AS BEES, BUTTERFLIES AND BIRDS—AND PROVIDE MORE “INTEREST” THROUGH THE SEASONS.

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Know that some plants like bamboo, Japanese honeysuckle and morning glories are self-sowers and very invasive. If you’re not diligent with their upkeep, they can take over the yard (and possibly your neighbor’s as well). Vines will also need to be pruned often throughout the growing season—at least monthly. Leach says, “The golden rule for vines is never let your vine grow taller than your ladder.” Though charming on an arbor or trellis, vining plants like clematis, Dutchman’s pipe, English ivy, jasmine, Carolina jessamine, trumpet vines and wisteria can be especially challenging. “Don’t make the mistake of thinking you can restrain a thirty-foot vine and keep it on a six-foot-long fence. When nobody’s looking, it will eat the car,” Leach warns. Know what kind of gardener you are and eliminate choices that just don’t match your lifestyle. Can’t decide between stolid boxwood or cascades of ivy? Good news! You can have them both. Unless you are going for a very formal look, the best practice is to mix different specimens. A screen can be made of a single type of plant or a group of different plants, depending on your requirements and the look you’re hoping to achieve. Often, mixed hedges look more natural, attract a larger variety of beneficial wildlife such as bees, butterflies and birds—and provide more “interest” through the seasons. Don’t be afraid to mix heights and textures. This softens the edges of your screen and allows the plants to grow naturally, with minimal pruning and upkeep. Summer’s the time we enjoy our outside spaces most. With careful planning and implementation, a beautiful, natural privacy screen will enhance the landscape and help you create your own little getaway—right in your own backyard.

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DESIGN

DONE RIGHT New Home Infused with Family Memories BY H E AT H ER E . TOW E P h ot o gr a p hy by V irg ini a H a m r i c k

MAGNIFICENT AND STATELY, YET WHIMSICAL AND PERSONAL: Though at first these seem to be contradictory terms, the words perfectly capture the essence of the home of Cindy and Kent Woodward in Bundoran Farm. The structure of the house, the interior design and the landscape are pure reflections of the people who created and love their beautiful and unique home. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 2 5


The Inception

The Woodwards began to look for a place to build in Albemarle County in early 2011. Living in Virginia Beach, and with family living in Danville, they looked at several counties surrounding Albemarle, and decided to stay close to Charlottesville where Cindy’s daughter Lindsey, a UVA graduate, lived. Cindy learned about Bundoran Farm from a friend’s daughter, Christy Chattleton, also a UVA graduate, who loved the area and the Bundoran Farm agri-community concept. The houses, each on their own acreage of land, exist within the protected area of Bundoran Farm, ensuring a pastoral and largely untouched area for the future. While they loved the overall setting, Kent found himself drawn repeatedly to North Garden on many of

his trips to search for a place in the Charlottesville area where both he and his sister Bollie have established lasting friendships. Ironically, Kent had stayed at the bed and breakfast adjacent to Bundoran Farm 15 years ago when he first went house-hunting in Charlottesville. He can remember riding his bike down Plank Road and onto Edge Valley Road, which fronts their current home. After looking at a number of lots and their designated building sites, Cindy and Kent selected their lot and closed in 2011. They chose land that enabled them to have 360-degree views of the hills, trees, creeks and farm life. With the lot selected, they spent a lot of time interviewing architects. They began with Bundoran Farm’s list of approved architects, and after almost a dozen

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interviews, they chose Russell Skinner, impressed with his enthusiasm for the potential of the site and his ability to envision how to incorporate the beauty of the area into the design of the house. The Woodwards decided at this early stage that Kent would be responsible for the exterior design and Cindy would be in charge of the interior design. Regarding the design of the exterior of the house, Kent says, “Skinner’s goal was to make the house feel like it had been there for a long time. While many of the materials look traditional, many were chosen to require little or no maintenance. So in that way, they are not traditional.” With the help of Skinner, Cindy and Kent developed a short list of builders, and chose Greer & Associates. Design As We Go

As you wind along the road toward the modern farmhouse, you catch glimpses of its back and sides in the distance. The house disappears from sight and reemerges just before you reach it, at a teardrop driveway in front of the house. White columns on the two porches on the front of the house enhance the crisp, clean lines of the exterior. The main living area of the house is flanked on the left by a breezeway leading to a garage, and on the right by a screened-in porch off the master bedroom. Even though all the details of the design had not been finalized, work began in the summer of 2012, involving a “design as we build” philosophy. For example, the area above the entrance hall, originally slated to be a small alcove office for Cindy, grew in size and changed focus. As they built, they decided to enlarge the space along a hallway on either side, adding a full bathroom and closet, thereby turning the space into a large office or a possible bedroom. The landscaping, designed by Jill Trischman-Marks, is also a work in progress. Kent says, “Our plan is to develop the areas around the house in stages, so we expect to have a long-term relationship with her.” The landscape design began with the area closest to the house, and is moving out in three phases, with each phase cultivating areas further from the house. Trischman-Marks has worked and will continue to work closely with the review board at Bundoran to make sure that the materials are local or natural to the area. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 2 7


When the House Becomes a Home

Once the structure was built, Cindy began the process, with the help of designer Michelle Willis Adams, of designing the interior of the home. Cindy asserts that Willis Adams did the majority of the work, while Cindy herself added her own touches here and there. Willis Adams did an amazing job of designing the home to feature the personality of the homeowners. Cindy says, “I like to make a home a part of my life experiences. It’s not just where we live, but it’s a part of us, and we are a part of it.” The history of the family as well as the Woodwards’ love of travel and animals is apparent throughout the home. The interior design began with a chandelier that hangs in the expansive great room that is the center point of the house and connects the front foyer, the kitchen and the bedroom wings. As the story goes, they loved the chandelier, which they found in Charleston, South Carolina, so much that they knew it would be the centerpiece of their home as they were deciding to purchase it. Kent is responsible for locating the special wood used for the mantel for their fireplace as well as their newel posts, which comes from Dan River Mills in Danville, where Cindy’s grandparents worked in the 1930s and 1940s. Cindy’s father contributed several key items to the house, allowing for family history to exist as essential parts of their home. The fluorescent, LOVEthemed wallpaper found in the bathroom that adjoins the upstairs office originated in Cindy’s 1970’s childhood bedroom. As Cindy tells it, her father, who meticulously saved antiques and heirlooms, removed the wallpaper strip by strip when her family moved from their house when she was in college. As Cindy and Kent prepared their Bundoran Farm house, Cindy’s father offered her the wallpaper, which had survived several moves. Cindy took the 45-year-old wallpaper to Adams, who determined there was enough in excellent condition to wallpaper an accent wall in her upstairs office bathroom. The 70’s-style accent wall is complemented by striking orange paint on the other walls and is contrasted with modern bathroom features like chrome fixtures and a glassdoor shower. The brilliant orange continues from the bathroom into the walls, wallpaper, and accent pillows in the adjacent office. More of Cindy’s family history lives in the master bedroom, which contains glass bricks from the 1930s that her father kept in his basement for 40 years. The bricks were originally used in an auto parts store in Danville her father had frequented growing up, and when the store was demolished, he purchased them and saved them, using some in his home and offering some to Cindy to use in hers. Pete Sandford of Sarisand Tile—whom Cindy deems “magnificent” and notes how he was responsible for “every piece of tile in the house”—cleaned them up and used them in an interesting pattern in the dividing wall between the shower and sauna. 2 8 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


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A Henkel Harris hutch reveals more of the tight-knit family that contributed to making this house a home: dishes from Cindy’s greatgrandmother’s china set.

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Across the breezeway from the main house, the guest house— which provides a bedroom, bathroom, living room, dining room and kitchenette above the garage—also contains gems from Cindy’s father, who worked for a privately owned newspaper for over 50 years. His office walls were adorned with a natural-color wallpaper with newspaper-like print on it. Cindy used the same paper to line the walls of the entryway of the Bundoran Farm guest house. In the master bedroom, a rich purple color punctuated with green accents beneath a grand vaulted ceiling, a Henkel Harris hutch reveals more of the tight-knit family that contributed to making this house a home: dishes from Cindy’s greatgrandmother’s china set. Cindy shares, “My mother told me that her grandmother, Mary Timberlake Crowder, during the Great Depression, did not buy the china all at once. She had 10 children and needed the whole set, so she bought it one piece at a time, holding some on layaway.” The Woodwards’ love of travel is evident in almost every room of the house. The backsplash of the bar area off the kitchen and dining room incorporates, as part of Willis Adams’ design, ceramic tiles that Cindy and her daughter bought in Spain, to remember their experience seeing the Gaudi House Museum in Barcelona. Cindy and Kent have traveled extensively and have brought back at least one piece of art from each place they’ve visited around the world, adding their treasures to their homes in Charlottesville and Virginia Beach. Cindy and Kent’s shared love of animals contributed to the design of the interior of the house as much as the artwork that adorns the walls. Their dogs, Lillie Mae, Maggie Elizabeth and

SHOWCASE HOME INTERIOR DESIGNER

S

C

O

T

T

WEISS A R C H I T E C T TELEPHONE OR TEXT: 434.242.9288 EMAIL: SCOTT@WEISS-ARCH.COM WEBSITE: WWW.WEISS-ARCH.COM

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Jack Dixon have a room for relaxing, that, like the rest of the house, has a fantastic view. They like to rest on the window seat across from the kitchen where they can smell food cooking. Even their cat, named Kitty, has a favorite window seat: the green velvet cushioned window seat in the master bedroom. Karen Turner, who designed the cabinet space here as well as the bathrooms and the kitchen, also designed a room for the dogs to clean and bathe, complete with their own tub. Another nod to natural life, Cindy uses birdcages as decorations, adding whimsy to her living spaces. Artisans and Experts

Many artists and experts have contributed to the Woodwards’ home in Bundoran Farm. Cindy says, “We have talented and great friends!” Along the walls in the foyer as well as the halls that lead from it are beautiful portraits of birds, done by David Hoffman. Cindy explains, “Dr. David Hoffman was one of my favorite high school teachers, 40 years ago. I was a journalism student, and he was a newly graduated journalism teacher who moved on to teach at a local university, Averett, where I received my bachelor’s degree. Dr. Hoffman became one of my favorite undergraduate teachers, too.” Cindy requested that Hoffman, who sells some of his photography, create nature pictures for their home. She says, “This is another way we can have a historical connection and make this more of a home. These bring back wonderful memories for me.” Michelle Willis Adams helped Cindy showcase the things she loves, like her collection of Mackenzie Childs plates. Willis Adams placed the plates under various light fixtures in public areas of the house, so they appear like framed art work. Cindy says, “She did an excellent job working things that mean a lot to me into the design of the house.” Karen Turner, too, provided excellent direction for design ideas. Willis Adams and Turner both encouraged Cindy to highlight personal taste in the house. In addition to considering what materials to use, they also focused on aesthetics, which creates the feeling of whimsy and personality incorporated within a timeless design. In the open kitchen next to the great room, white paneled cabinets, a white farm sink, and countertops made of soapstone from Alberene create a traditional 3 2 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


The fluorescent, LOVE-themed wallpaper found in the bathroom that adjoins the upstairs office originated in Cindy’s 1970’s childhood bedroom.

backdrop for contrasting features like the creamy marble island complete with its own copper sink and multicolor tile backsplash behind the gas range. Sarisand Tile’s Sandford also played a key role in the interior design of this area. Home is Part of Us

The work on the house finished, Kent and Cindy moved in during the summer of 2013 to their new home, which is a seamless synthesis of their personalities and tastes. Throughout the house is gorgeous movement from neutral colors in certain areas to a blend of vibrant and wild colors. While soft earth tones, subdued in beige and white, represent Kent, Cindy’s personality pops with various shades of orange and purple. Cindy says, “Who you get depends on what room you are in.” The home has truly become a piece of heaven for the Woodwards. Kent does not separate the house from its surroundings. His favorite activity is to relax outdoors, sitting on one of the porches, enjoying the views and watching birds, trees and cows, or walking through the fields with Jack, their Golden Retriever. Cindy’s favorite features of the home are the exquisitely tiled master bath and steam room, as well as every one of the cozy window seats throughout the house, where she too gets to enjoy the beauty of Bundoran Farm.

T I L E R E S O U R C E & D E S I G N S H O W RO O M

434.964.4680 ■ 1226 Harris Street, Charlottesville VA Showroom Hours: 8-4:30 M-F (appointments encouraged) SARISANDTILE.COM

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P h ot o gr a p hy by M a r y Ell e n L a Fre ni e re

n GARDEN FLORAL DESIGN TUTORIAL

Bringing Your Flower Arrangements to

life

BY M A RY EL L EN L A F R EN I ER E

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O

P h ot o gr a p hy by M a r y Ell e n L a Fre ni e re

One of the most common floral mistakes: You hold an entire bunch of flowers in your hand, you trim the stems, you drop them in a vase. Lo and behold, you’re left with a sad arrangement that lacks movement and vitality.

Here, learn how to harness the personality of your flowers and create a celebration-worthy arrangement with three different elements: “face flowers,” “filler flowers,” and greenery.

Choosing Your Flowers

Try to source flowers from local farms or farmers markets as much as possible to enjoy the bounty that Central Virginia offers from now through October. When you look at flowers in the market, think of them as people you’re inviting to a dinner party. For a party, you usually take personalities into account to ensure that guests connect and enjoy themselves, right? “Face flowers” are large, showy blooms—peonies, sunflowers, dahlias and the like. They become the focal point of an arrangement. They’re the party girls, the extroverts, the ones more likely to introduce themselves in a crowd. Once you’ve chosen your party girl, grab a supporting player who is different in form and texture (these are known as “filler flowers” and add movement to the arrangement). Think of the person at the party who’s not the loudest in the room, but is delightful for one-on-one conversation: feathery celosias, foxtail grasses, Gomphrena (globe amaranth), or Queen Anne’s lace. Insider tip: Opt for flowers in one color palette for a more refined arrangement. Pair purple dahlias with lavender Gomphrena, red zinnias with a rust celosia, or a sunflower with a lime green grass. You might find foliage at the market as well, but you can probably source that from your own home. Some common Virginia shrubs that provide interesting foliage and texture are azaleas, ninebark, privet, honeysuckle, forsythia, and abelia. Take a walk around your yard or patio and clip bits of foliage that speak to you—you’ll probably be surprised by their long vase life.

P h ot o gr a p hy by M a r y Ell e n L a Fre ni e re

P h ot o gr a p hy by St a c y B au e r c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 3 5


A Flower-Arranging Tutorial

Select a vase. Cubes can be tricky—so if you’re a beginner, choose a vase with a rounded bottom. The easiest vases to design in are hourglass shape, meaning they have a wide bottom that tapers in toward the neck before flaring out again at the top. You want the narrowest point of the vase to be similar in size to the diameter of your flower stems when held in your hand, (no ruler needed; you can estimate here). Unless you’re using extratall blooms such as sunflowers, your vase should be no taller than 12 inches, but 6-8 inches is ideal for most locally grown flowers such as zinnias and dahlias. Stay away from floral foam for home arrangements; with well-placed greenery, you don’t need it. (Floral foam is not ecofriendly and those little foam particles could be inhaled—eeek!)

Now to arrange 1. Create a greenery foundation

The goal here is to build a base to support your stems, so cut a few pieces the approximate height of your vessel, and place them resting right on the lip of the container. You may need to angle these stems slightly so that the weight of the greenery is supported by the lip. If the greenery allows, let some of the foliage cascade over the edge of the vase to add interest, to craft a more seamless look. Usually it takes 2 to 4 pieces of greenery to create a secure foundation, depending on the vase size and the type of green. 2. Place your flowers

Lay your flowers on the counter and strip each stem of greenery that would sit below water level in the vase, but make sure to leave some foliage around the top portion of the stem. Now, cut each stem individually, just before you place it in the vase. Arrange 1 to 3 blooms low in the vessel, resting on top of your greenery to secure it in place, and to add depth. As you begin to place more “face flowers,” experiment with different heights, considering the final shape you want. Rather than trying to align

the flowers evenly, revisit the party idea and place them in groupings. (A few gals talking on the left side of the room, two people in center, one person in the kitchen by him or herself, know what I mean?) Allow natural spacing to occur. Save two of your “face flowers” to place at the very end. 3. Add movement with your “filler flowers” (this is where things get good)

Take a step back from your arrangement for a moment, and pay attention to the overall form. Which direction is the arrangement moving? Where does it need to move? Think of house guests in fluid motion—turning toward each other, turning away. Incorporate clustering again—two shooting off to the left-hand side, a few dripping down the bottom right. Let your imagination run wild. You’ll probably find arranging this way surprisingly difficult at first, to not space everything evenly, but after a few tries it will become second nature. When you’re happy with the “movement” you’ve created, use any remaining filler to plug holes. Conceal the lip of the vase. 4. Add your last two “face flowers”

This is where dimension happens. By now, you have at least three layers composed of greenery, focal flowers and filler flowers. Lush it up by inserting the final flowers in front of the others, as if they’re reaching out to say helloooo. This extra layer makes the arrangement look simultaneously effortless and luxurious. Now you’re ready. Make your flowers the life of the party! Mary Ellen LaFreniere got her start on Irvington Spring Farm, her parents’ 3-acre cut-flower farm in Lynchburg. She has since transplanted to Baltimore where she creates “a marriage of grit and grace” through her urban micro-farm and floral design company. You can find her on instagram @steelctuflowerco or on the web at www. steelcutflowerco.com.

HOME staff put LaFreniere’s easy-to-follow tutorial into action. ➵ Here, It really gave us a new perspective on arranging flowers. How did we do? 3 6 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


n IMPROVE ROOF MAINTENANCE

ROOF CARE

Protect the roof that protects you BY J ER RY H A L E

Every homeowner dreads discovering that the roof overhead needs major repair or replacement. Roof work is a significant expense, and one for which only the most foresighted earmark savings. So it behooves us all to think about how to extend the serviceable life of the roof that’s now keeping us dry. Roofing experts tell us there are steps we can take that will keep our roofs looking and performing better, longer. Here, we share tips—some obvious, some just shy of “classified information.”

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Keep foot traffic on the roof to a minimum. Shingles depend on the

granules molded into their surface during manufacturing. Foot traffic, especially on a sloped roof, dislodges some of that protective surface. Make sure there’s no unessential traffic on your roof, and if a satellite dish technician or chimney or gutter guy must go up there, ask them to wear minimally destructive footwear. Watch for collecting leaves and other tree debris in the “valleys” of your roof and have a professional remove them if necessary. Leaf buildup can lead

to roof leaks, and decomposing material makes for ugly tannin stains. If you have a maintenance contract with your roofer, removal of this debris should be included. Gutter cleaning is important. Clogged gutters cause water to back up, possibly seeping under shingles and causing leaks that damage walls. Have gutters checked and cleaned twice a year, or as necessary, to keep runoff flowing freely. Consider screening to keep out leaves, “pinwheels,” and other tree materials. Do not allow your shingle roof to be “power washed.” High-pressure washing

strips the roof of material that is key to its longevity. Fungus and mold can be safely removed by what is termed “soft washing,” a service some roofers offer. Roof leaks most often come from failed or improperly installed flashing around dormers, chimneys, skylights, plumbing vents and satellite dishes.

If water is coming in, have a qualified expert check these areas and repair or replace flashing as needed. What’s in attics can be a source of roof problems. Improper ventilation,

condensation, and animal or bug infestations can lead to issues with roof performance. An occasional peek into the attic with flashlight in hand can disclose developing problems before the roof itself is affected. Look especially for algae stains, mold, soaked insulation, black rings or rust around nails (a sure sign of condensation in attic spaces), and clogged air exchange vents. Have shingles checked after a hailstorm. Large, windblown hailstones

can dent shingles, break edges and wear down their surface, severely reducing their useful life. If a hailstorm has hit yours, have them checked shortly after. Your homeowners insurance should cover any repairs, including roof replacement if damage is severe.

ROOF WORK IS A SIGNIFICANT EXPENSE, AND ONE FOR WHICH ONLY THE MOST FORESIGHTED EARMARK SAVINGS. SO IT BEHOOVES US ALL TO THINK ABOUT HOW TO EXTEND THE SERVICEABLE LIFE OF THE ROOF THAT’S NOW KEEPING US DRY.

Special Advice For Metal Roofs

With metal roofs, foot traffic won’t cause the kind of damage it does to shingle roofs, but it can produce scratches, dents and other harmful alterations. Here again, hiring trained experts for inspections and repairs is by far the safest approach. Besides, metal roofs can be slippery, and whenever homeowners take to a ladder to access anything, they are at risk of finishing their day in the hospital. That said, here are some metal roof checkpoints: ■ Repair holes and open seams as soon as possible. As your metal roof expands and shrinks with weather extremes, screws become loose, and seams may separate. If this issue is not quickly addressed, your roof’s underlying structure could be damaged by condensation and water buildup around stacks. In order to prevent damage due to seam leaks, remember to inspect your home’s roof at least twice a year and after severe storms. Watch for signs of loose hardware and obvious seam separation. ■ Keep paint touched up so that corrosion won’t develop. An exposed steel surface will quickly rust and become unsightly. There are non-corrosion treatments that will also fight this form of roof decay. ■ Fasteners should be replaced when they reach the end of their expected service lives—usually 20 to 30 years. ■ Inspect and replace sealants at perimeters and wherever something protrudes through the roof surface. Most sealants last about 20 years, though some butyl sealants retain their bond and elasticity far longer. Your roof inspector can tell which you have. ■ If screws are used for repairs, make sure they are of the same metal as the roof itself. Two dissimilar metals in close proximity set up the potential for galvanic corrosion, which eats away at one or both metals.

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n LIVE CULINARY CORNER

Peach Season! BY LU CY CO O K

M

odern shipping and growing practices have spoiled us as consumers—we’re able to get reasonably good fruits and vegetables most of the year. Unfortunately, fresh peaches are one summer favorite that have not become available year-round—but that’s what makes them even more desirable! Each year, my first bite of a perfect peach brings thoughts of how short the season will be, and sends me into a peach frenzy for the short time that they are at their peak. When shopping for peaches, either at the farmers market or picking your own, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, know that peaches and nectarines are interchangeable in recipes. Clingstone peaches ripen first, but freestone peaches are easier to pit and are generally more succulent and sweet. Select peaches based on color and size; look for larger peaches that give slightly when squeezed and have a fully developed color—especially the yellow/gold tones (the rosy color varies among varieties, and isn’t a good indicator of ripeness). Speed up ripening by putting the fruit in a paper bag. They’re ready when they’re soft and have a strong peachy smell, usually about 1 to 2 days. A cotton-y texture of the flesh—almost impossible to distinguish before you ripen the peaches—is a direct result of the fruit being transported in cold storage and a good reason to buy peaches at the farmers market. And don’t forget: the best peach is eaten fully ripe, plain and drippy over the kitchen sink! Peach season is short; although my ideas of eating seasonally may tell me that I should enjoy the peaches at peak season, I’m tempted to try to extend their season by preserving them through canning, drying or freezing some of the bounty, so that I can have a moment of summer even on a dark winter day. The peach chutney recipe I’ve included would preserve well, and there are also plenty of recipes online for preserving halved peaches in a light sugar syrup. (Try adding a little star anise, a cinnamon stick and a couple of cloves to spice them up!) I also puree fresh, ripe peaches in a blender or food processor. Store the puree in sandwich-sized bags in the freezer, being careful to squeeze out all the extra air. Peach puree can be used in cocktails, smoothies, or on biscuits or pancakes. Here are a few recipes to help you make the most of peach season. Happy cooking!

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Peach Ice Cream (makes 1 ½ quarts) This is worth going out and getting an ice cream maker if you don’t have one! During blackberry season, I use this same recipe, substituting four cups of blackberries for the peaches. We also sometimes freeze this in popsicle molds—a delicious afternoon treat! 4 large very ripe peaches, peeled, pitted and halved 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 2/3 cup sugar, divided 1 cup milk 4 egg yolks 1 cup heavy cream Place the peach halves in a bowl and gently crush with your hands. Add lemon juice and 1/3 cup sugar. Cover and chill. Heat the milk almost to a boil. In a separate bowl, whisk the yolks and remaining sugar. Add the hot milk to the eggs very slowly, whisking madly. Return the mixture to the pan, and continue stirring over low heat, until thickened. Pour into a clean container; cover and chill overnight. Whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form. Fold together whipped cream, peaches and chilled milk-and-egg mixture, and freeze according to your ice cream maker’s directions. Serving idea: In a wine glass, layer two small scoops of ice cream with additional peach slices. Pour a cup of chilled Italian Muscat over each glass to make a grown-up version of a peach soda.

Fresh Peach Chutney (makes about 1½ cups) This versatile condiment is delicious with chicken or pork. Or for a meatless meal or appetizer, top a toasted slice of bread with fresh ricotta cheese and a spoonful of this relish! 1 large peach, peeled and diced ½ fresh jalapeno chili, carefully seeded and chopped 1 tablespoon finely chopped red onion 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger root 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon lemon juice Mix all ingredients together in a medium bowl; season to taste with salt and pepper.

c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 4 1


Peach and Berry Shortcakes (makes about 8) Move over strawberry shortcake: This combination of peaches and raspberries is classic, delicious and beautiful to look at! Each part can be made in advance, then assembled right before serving. For shortcakes: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons finely chopped crystallized ginger 1 ½ cups heavy cream, divided 3 tablespoons butter, melted 2 tablespoons raw sugar In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and ginger, whisking to combine. Add 1 ¼ cups cream and stir with a fork until the dough comes together, adding more cream as necessary. Turn the dough out on to a lightly floured counter and knead once or twice. Roll the dough to a ¾-inch thickness and cut with a 2-inch cutter. Reroll dough scraps and cut again. Brush each biscuit with melted butter and sprinkle with raw sugar. Bake at 425 for 1013 minutes until browned and baked through.

For the filling: 3 large peaches, peeled and sliced ½ pint raspberries (or strawberries) 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons sugar For the cream: 4 ounces mascarpone cheese 1 cup chilled whipping cream ¼ cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Prepare the filling: Gently mix peaches, berries, lemon juice and sugar; set aside for at least 30 minutes. Prepare the cream: In a medium bowl, beat the mascarpone with an electric mixer until fluffy. Add the cream and whip until soft peaks form. Mix in the sugar and vanilla. To assemble: Split warm shortcakes. Mound a heaping spoonful of peaches on bottom half, making sure to get some of the syrup on the biscuit. Sprinkle with a few raspberries. Spoon a generous ¼ cup of the cream on the peaches, and cover with the biscuit top. Sprinkle a few additional raspberries on the plate. Pass remaining cream alongside.

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n GARDEN PORCH SWINGS

GROOVE Porch swings add style and comfort to your outdoor space

BY A D R I E N N E M A N D L E W I N

Nothing says “ultimate summer day” more than a lazy afternoon lounging on a comfy porch swing. There are many options for installing a porch swing at your home—even if you don’t have a porch. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 4 3


T

he main things to consider are materials, construction and style. Style is the easy part—swings can be contemporary masterpieces with cool metals and sleek lines, incredibly rustic and natural using warm woods, or straight out of a Southern Gothic novel with intricate decorative iron scrolls and fretwork. Porch swings can be made for one or seat up to three, while some of the suspended-daybed-styles can squeeze in more. That’s all up to personal taste, but there are certain traits to consider. Most swings are made of wood, wicker or plastic, and you can even upcycle one using a chair without legs by following do-it-yourself construction plans available at garden centers or outdoor living websites. When purchasing a porch swing, the material is crucial for durability as well as aesthetics. Prices vary widely, from less than $100 to $1,000 and beyond. Many common woods are used in porch swings, including redwood, ash, Western red cedar, and pine, which stand up to weather conditions and are durable. Ipe and teak are more expensive hardwoods. Also popular is cypress for its resistance to warping and ease of painting and staining. Colors may complement your exterior or you can add a wow-factor by choosing a punch of bold color to contrast the existing design. There are many less-expensive options made of “solid wood,” but often these products are not suitable for use outdoors as they can deteriorate when left outside. Chairs should be made of at least 3/4-inch-thick wood for best support and durability. They should always be held together with screws,

especially stainless steel, galvanized and zincplated, to resist rust. Hardened steel, however, tends to corrode and should not be used for outdoor swings. When installing a porch swing, allow for at least a 4-foot arc for adequate swinging room. In addition to the fasteners, galvanized or stainless steel chains may be used to hang the swing, as can marine-grade braided nylon or polyester rope. S-hooks and eye-bolts may be used to hang from the ceiling of your porch and they should have 4- to 6-inch shafts. Professionals with experience hanging swings may be your best bet for installation. Swings always should hang from a sturdy roof joist. If yours are covered by roofing material, cut a section to find them. If they are not available, hang the swing from a free-standing frame. Seats should be about 18 inches off the ground for easy access. Measure the height of the beam, and a hardware store can cut the chains or rope for you. Swings should be supported by two chains in front and two chains in back for stability.

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PRO TIP: SIT ON THE SWING BEFORE PURCHASING IT. THE LOOK MAY BE EXACTLY WHAT YOU LIKE, BUT IF IT’S NOT COMFORTABLE IT WILL DEFEAT THE PURPOSE.

Vo te d C vi ll e’s B es t A n ti q u e St o re Pro tip: Sit on the swing before purchasing it. The look may be exactly what you like, but if it’s not comfortable it will defeat the purpose. Try tossing some attractive yet squishy throw pillows, lumbar pillows in a pretty fabric, or blankets to cuddle up in on cool nights. Another current trend in decking out your porch is sofa swings or suspended day beds. Why just sit when you can recline? These typically are between 5 and 6 feet in length and are wide enough to hold a twin- or queen-sized mattress with the pillows and cushions of your choice. These provide all of the comfort and style of the most relaxing beds transported to the outdoors. Day beds are notably heavier than swings, so consult a construction expert on the correct devices needed for safe support from your structure. There also are many options for swings or beds that are freestanding using frames that can be placed anywhere if you do not have a porch or a roof to hang them from. All of the various swings are available at garden centers, outdoor furniture stores and online. Or have a creative carpenter install a customdesigned swing in your yard. With all of the many options out there for any budget, there’s no reason not to wile away the hours swinging in the breeze.

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ROSES BY M E R I D I T H I N G R A M

4 6 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


R

oses are a little bit like celebrities. Both have a reputation for being mysterious, elusive and a little bit fussy, and yet somehow they are available everywhere—even in the grocery store checkout line. But take a closer look at this age-old flower. Roses have a lot more to offer than fodder for tabloids; they have been and always will be a star in the home and garden. Their blooms offer color and fragrance that is at home equally in formal gardens or cottage gardens, in tidy borders or wild beds, climbing trellises or lining fences. And no other flower plays quite so many roles, representing the gamut of human expression: love and sympathy, friendship and romance, beauty and peace. Even the many different colors of roses have come to express different meanings. This magically iconic flower deserves a place in everyone’s garden.

The rose has a long and storied history, dating back to ancient times. It is believed that the Chinese were the first to cultivate roses; the ancient Greeks and Romans were crazy about them too. Fortunately for us, colonists heading for the New World in the 16th century brought roses to cultivate here. In 1798, France’s Empress Josephine Bonaparte created a remarkable rose garden including every known variety at the time. In 1986, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed the rose as our country’s national flower. Roses are truly a global phenomenon. Ask any “rosarian,” the official term for a bona fide rose expert certified by the American Rose Society, if the rumors about roses being difficult to grow are true, and they’ll likely deny it. They’ll tell us there is a rose for every garden, but the key to success is picking the right one for your area, your yard and your taste. As you learn more about roses, you may quickly realize that a PhD might be necessary to understand the many thousands of rose varieties and the many ways to classify them. At the most basic level of understanding, however, it’s helpful to know that roses are divided into classes based on their date of introduction. The divisions include species roses, which have been growing in the wild for thousands of years; Old Garden roses, which include those introduced before 1867 when the first hybrid rose was created; and Modern roses, those introduced after 1867. Within these divisions, roses are further classified based upon their physical characteristics like their growth habits, foliage and flower forms. Some of the most common roses you’ll see in our area include landscape roses, which are actually flowering shrubs that bloom repeatedly throughout the season and tend to be the most fuss-free; hybrid tea roses, which are the classic long-stemmed beauties that typically hold one blossom at the end of each flowering stem; grandifloras, which are much like hybrid teas but produce small clusters of blossoms; miniatures, the scaled-down versions that bloom abundantly and repeatedly; and climbers, which produce long and strong canes that can be tied and trained to grow up to 30 feet. To learn more, it’s best to c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 47


consult the experts at the garden center where you buy your roses; they’ll have the best information about what will work for you, and can steer you in the right direction if you are new to the rose culture. Planting Roses in Your Garden

Roses are sold two ways: as bare-root plants, to be purchased and planted in early spring, and as container-grown plants, available for planting almost any time. If you are new to planting roses, it’s a good idea to check the pH of your soil; experts suggest that the soil’s pH should be in the 6.0 to 6.8 range. If it’s not, you can amend the soil for best results (agricultural limestone to raise pH, sulfur to lower it). Working some organic matter into the soil is also a great investment of time; doing so will improve the soil’s capacity to hold water and other nutrients. There are a few fundamentals critical to rose success. Roses need water—and lots of it. Because they are so thirsty, it is unlikely that they can ever get too much water if they are planted in a well-drained location. For while they love to drink, they don’t like to sit in waterlogged soil. They prefer a long, deep watering, rather than frequent light waterings; this allows the water to reach and nourish the root zone. To figure out the right amount of water for your roses, try this: Dig a hole with a small trowel a few days after you’ve watered. If the soil is still moist to a depth of 2 to 3 inches, your rose is happy. If it’s dry, it’s time to water. Watch for signs of underwatering, including wilting shoots at the top of the bush, and signs of overwatering, when lower leaves turn yellow and drop. Be sure to focus your watering efforts on the soil, not the foliage; wet foliage encourages growth of fungal diseases like black spot. Drip-irrigation systems or soaker hoses are ideal, but if you use a traditional sprinkler system, be sure to water early in the morning to give the leaves ample time to dry. Roses also need a good dose of sunlight, at least 6 hours of sun per day—though they do enjoy a little afternoon shade. A good mulching of two to four inches (pine bark, cedar chips, pine straw) around a rose bush will protect it by conserving water as well as providing a nice layer of insulation, keeping the roots cooler in summer and warmer in winter. Roses also like a regular dose of nutrients—probably every four weeks or

Ask any “rosarian,” the official term for a bona fide rose expert certified by the American Rose Society, if the rumors about roses being difficult to grow are true, and they’ll likely deny it. They’ll tell us there is a rose for every garden, but the key to success is picking the right one for your area, your yard and your taste. so during the summer—to provide the best blooms. If you have newly planted roses, wait until after their first flush of blooms before fertilizing. Water your roses before fertilizing to avoid burning the rose’s surface feeder roots. Experts at the garden center can recommend the best fertilizer and recommended application, whether organic matter (bone meal, fish emulsion, alfalfa meal) or synthetic fertilizer (dry, liquid or foliar). It’s equally important to know when to stop fertilizing; after feasting and blooming all summer, your roses need a cue to slow down on the blooms and get ready for winter dormancy. One of the main reasons roses have the reputation for being fussy is because of their susceptibility to some pests and diseases; blackspot, powdery mildew and spider mites are a few common rose ailments in our area. Though some problems are unavoidable, prevention helps stave off problems; well-tended, healthy plants are less likely to fall prey to pests. Keep the area around the plant free of fallen leaves and flowers, and remove discolored leaves when you see them. If you notice a recurring problem, take a damaged leaf to the garden center for advice. Some fungicidal or insecticidal spraying may be in order, but your solution may be as simple as removing the damaged foliage or spraying leaves with a strong blast of water to manually remove the offenders. Some types of roses that bloom only once don’t need to be deadheaded, but most roses that bloom all summer need this process to encourage more blooms. To deadhead, cut the flower back to just above a healthy leaf with five leaflets. Experts suggest,

4 8 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e H O M E J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 6


however, that if you are working with a new plant that has only a few stems, it’s best to remove as few leaves as possible, even if that means cutting just below the flower. The important thing to note is that deadheading encourages new growth. Stop deadheading about a month before the first fall frost; you don’t want your roses to produce new growth that might be damaged by cold. Enjoying Roses Inside

Cutting roses to enjoy inside is a win-win situation; you’ll be inspired by the beauty and your plant will be inspired to produce more blooms. For the best bouquets, cut early in the morning, or the late afternoon or early evening. Choose stems with flower buds that are no more than half open, and cut just above a leaf to encourage more stem growth. Place cut flowers directly in a bucket of warm water and move to a cool place; if you can spare the time, it’s worth it to leave the roses immersed like this for an hour or so. Recut the stem on an angle before placing in a vase, removing any foliage below the water level in the vase. One stem is beautifully simple in a small bud vase, but roses are also ideal companions in mixed bouquets. This summer, bring a little history, a dash of drama and a touch of celebrity to your yard by incorporating the rose. Get to know this superstar flower that truly stands the test of time. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m 4 9


n INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

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