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HOME C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E

DESIGN

IMPROVE

GARDEN

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COOL

spaces inside and out

SUMMER SOIREES

Local flavors and southern spreads

EASY UPDATES

BATHROOM FIXTURES, PANTRY ORGANIZATION

DESIGNER RENOVATION

MID-CENTURY MAKEOVER CHANNELS HOLLYWOOD GLAM July/August 2015, vol. 2, No. 3


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HOME C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E

DESIGN

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GARDEN

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Volume 2 I ssue 3 PUBLISHER

Julie Pierce EDITOR

Meridith Ingram CHARLOTTESVILLE EDITOR

Heather Towe ART DIRECTOR

Trisha Roth CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

BUILDERS OF THE

Deniz Ataman Rachel Beanland Lucy Cook Phoebe Dinsmore Charlotte A.F. Farley Laurel Feinman Katherine Fulghum Knopf Jessie Thompson GRAPHIC ARTIST

Amanda Adams PRODUCTION COORDINATOR

Beth Moore PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andrea Hubbell KG Thienemann BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Pam Whorley ADVERTISING SALES

Susan Creasy Liz Houhoulis Janet Lampman Anne Marie Poore Pam Whorley SUBSCRIPTIONS

Charlottesville HOME is published bimonthly by West Willow Publishing Group, LLC. For an annual subscription, please send $20 and your name, address and telephone number to: Charlottesville HOME 3831 Old Forest Road Lynchburg, VA 24501 For advertising information please call (434) 386-5667 or sales@charlottesvillehomemagazine.com. To discuss coverage of an event relating to home or garden, please contact Charlottesville HOME at info@charlottesvillehomemagazine.com.

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IDEA HOUSE PARTNERS: DEVELOPER: NATURAL RETREATS BUILDER: JAYSON COLLIER, SUMMIT CUSTOM HOMES ARCHITECT: THE ROSNEY COMPANY ARCHITECTS INTERIOR DESIGNER: BUNNY WILLIAMS, INC.

FEATURED IN THE 2015 IDEA HOUSE:

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West Willow Publishing Group, LLC (434) 386-5667 westwillowpublishing.com Copyright 2015 by West Willow Publishing Group, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from West Willow Publishing Group, LLC. All pictorial material reproduced in this magazine, whether in a produced ad or by itself, has been accepted on the condition that it is with the knowledge and prior consent of the photographer or the artist concerned. As such, West Willow Publishing Group, LLC is not responsible for any infringement of copyright or otherwise arising out of publication thereof. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. However, West Willow Publishing Group, LLC makes no warrant to the accuracy or reliability of this information. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of ownership or management.

C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


n P U B L I S H E r ’ s note It’s hard to believe that it’s been more than two years since we started planning Charlottesville HOME magazine! This issue is the ninth since our debut in March 2014—time really does fly when you’re having fun! In this short time, HOME has grown rapidly in response to an enthusiastic community of readers and advertisers. To support our growth and the exciting plans we have in store, I’ve expanded our editorial team to include Heather Towe as our Charlottesville editor. Heather brings so much to HOME! A Southern girl at heart, she grew up in Augusta, Georgia, came to Charlottesville in 1996 to attend then graduate from UVA—and never left! She worked as an editor and project manager for a global publishing company for 14 years, and is currently a real estate agent. She’s always been actively involved in this community, from raising money for MS research by riding in the Tour de Vine, to volunteering and working as an overnight manager at the Shelter for Help in Emergency. She also volunteers with other local organizations, including her networking group, which she created to help local businesses grow and succeed. Heather’s hobbies are as diverse as she is dynamic, and include knitting, painting, gardening, cooking, SCUBA, traveling and camping. She loves live music, physical activity and the outdoors,

so you will probably see her dancing at Fridays After Five, working with her trainer at ACAC or hiking the trail. If you see her around, I hope you’ll say hello! Heather, along with our long-standing editor, Meridith Ingram, will bring you the best and brightest ideas and information that Charlottesville has to offer to enrich your home and garden. I’m grateful to have both of them on our team. I’m also grateful to all of you who make this publication possible: our readers, local businesses and our advertisers. I appreciate your continued support and feedback. Send me a note—I’d love to hear from you.

—JULIE PIERCE, PUBLISHER julie@westwillowpublishing.com

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contents Ch a r l ot t e s v ill e h o m e J u l y /Au gu s t 2 0 15

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features LOCA L F L AVO R

A neighborhood butcher can be a home cook’s best ally BY J es s i e T h o m p s o n

A M id - C entury M arvel

Designer’s home reclaims era’s glam in masterful renovation BY Lau r e l F e i n ma n

Decorating with portrait photography

Tips from the pros on creating the ultimate personal display BY Lau r e l F e i n ma n

Cover photography by Andrea Hubbell at the home of Kurt and Alana Woerpel. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK Charlottesville HOME Magazine c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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Ch a r l ot t e s v ill e h o m e J u l y /Au gu s t 2 0 15

departments 54

57

62

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DESIGN

IMPROVE

GARDEN

LIVE

17 S U M MER R E A DING LIST Favorite design books

30 BATH BAUBLE S Update your bath without renovating

18 SOCIABLE CLIMBERS Ornamental vines create colorful strongholds

26 Pantry P erf ection Organization tips make meals and snack time easy

BY Rac h e l B ean lan d

BY K ath e r i n e F u lg h u m K n o p f

BY Lau r e l f e i n man

22 G I N GER JARS Porcelain beauties are a classic look for any space BY C har lotte A.F. Far ley

57 L I G HTEN UP F O R SUMMER Coverlets add cool colors, textures and patterns

54 ON THE SURFA C E : DECK MATERI A L S Your top choices, demystified BY Lau r e l F e i n man

44 SPICE IT UP Grow the ingredients for homemade salsa BY D e n i z ATAMAN

62 SOUTHERN SPREADS Summery snacks with a southern accent BY Lu cy C o o k

BY P h o e b e D i n s m o r e

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22 S pecial I nterest 6 6 Index of advertisers 8

26 C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


503 Faulconer Drive, Ste. 5 Charlottesville, Virginia 22903

434.295.1131 office | homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

EDNAM VILLAGE

$965,000

INGLECRESS

Walk to Boar’s Head Sports Club & Birdwood golf course! Quality 3,006 sq.ft. brick home, 9’ ceilings, hardwood floors, 2 wood-burning FP’s. Low-maintenance living just 5 minutes to UVA & town.

CAAR MLS# 528153

$1,048,000

Beautiful brick residence on 3.27 parklike acres, minutes west of Charlottesville. Over 4,400 finished sq.ft., 4BR, 3.5BA, 1st floor master & Florida room offering spectacular Blue Ridge Mountain views.

FARMINGTON

$2,850,000

CAAR MLS# 529146

Designed by Eugene Bradbury, this meticulously updated c. 1913 residence occupies two lots of just under 2.5 acres on one of Charlottesville’s most prominent streets, within walking distance to UVA. 6BR/5.5BA, heart pine flooring, 5 fireplaces, stunning kitchen, library, wine celler & so much more.

CAAR MLS# 532683

WAVERLY

$695,000

Classic 5BR/3.5BA solid brick home on mature 3 acre lot in coveted Western Albemarle neighborhood. Charming details, built-in bookshelves/cabinetry, finished basement, large screened porch. Excellent condition.

RUGBY ROAD

$2,750,000

FREE UNION

$1,395,000

Designed by Eugene Bradbury, this meticulously updated 6 bedroom 5.5 bath home, built c. 1913, occupies two lots of just under 2.5 acres within walking distance to UVA and Barracks Road. CAAR MLS# 530390

CAAR MLS# 524005

IVY FARMS

$1,295,000

Beautiful park-like setting, large pond, 5 acres, less than 5 miles west. Well-built 2 story traditional brick residence, great interior and exterior spaces including several covered porches for relaxing and entertaining; huge kitchen/dining/ family room; detached guest house with garage below.

NEXT TO MONTICELLO

$689,000

CAAR MLS# 529174

Lovely 3.28 acre park-like property 5 minutes to Charlottesville, almost 7,000 sq.ft. brick home, c. 1942, up to 5-6 bedrooms. Many unique architectural features, cottage, basement apartment.

Panoramic Blue Ridge view & water view from this meticulously maintained 5 BR luxury home. Private 21 acre hilltop sanctuary, heart of Farmington Hunt Country, 10 miles NW of Charlottesville.

CAAR MLS# 533105

CAAR MLS# 529868

IVY CONTEMPORARY ACOURT

$2,595,000

Custom stone residence, old world inspired interior & exterior. Fully appointed home & carriage home, stable and kennel, 20 fenced acres, mt. views, close to Charlottesville in Keswick Hunt Country.

CAAR MLS# 530692

$1,145,000

Spectacular, world-class Blue Ridge views 10 minutes to town from this extraordinary Jim Tuley designed contemporary. Totally unique, beautifully built and dramatic in every way, this distinct 3BR/2.5BA home is extremely livable and attractive. 11.73 acres, mostly wooded with complete privacy.

CAAR MLS# 533291

WEST LEIGH

$650,000

Like-new 2 story traditional home, with full basement, in EXCELLENT CONDITION. Features include: hardwood floors on main level, large eat-in kitchen, spacious master BR suite. On 3.05 acres, approx. 3,000 sq.ft.

CAAR MLS# 529930

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


A CUT ABOVE Local butchers, farms focus on quality By J es s i e T h o m p s o n

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C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


As the weather warms and cookouts are on everyone’s minds and calendars, there is one thing all self-respecting cooks should have in their back pockets: The name of a good butcher. Although the funky apron, oversized spatula and branding iron are cool tools in a griller’s arsenal, you have to start with good meat. And the best source for good meat is your local butcher—someone who both acts as friend and who works as a culinary artist. Here’s where people in and around Charlottesville have a distinct advantage: there are high-quality farms in the region committed to growing and processing a wide variety of meats (and veggies too). And if you’re like Julia Child—“The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for the steak to cook”—there are a few places to check out before your next cookout, including JM Stock Provisions on West Main Street. “We specialize in grass-fed beef, and pasture-raised meats,” explains Stock’s James Lum, the “J” in “JM.” “Finding farms and farmers that are willing to go the extra mile to meticulously care for their animals every step of the way in ethical and sustainable ways is not always easy to find. We’ve been fortunate enough to work with some really amazing folks who not only care immensely about the animals during their lives, but know that a high-quality end product is what makes it all worthwhile.”

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Long, Long Ago

Cleaning Up

In a time before supermarkets—before meat came pre-cut and shrink-wrapped— shopping was a longer process. Meat was purchased from either a butcher or a corner store, or, for some, from the farm where it was raised. The butcher or farmer who supplied the meat could help tight budgets go farther. He could offer recipes to make tougher, cheaper cuts of meat taste more tender; he could suggest ways to stretch a cut into two or more meals. Then came supermarkets. In the beginning, many had meat counters with actual butchers. As bottom lines were evaluated, stores began purchasing meat in bulk; butchering was centralized, and refrigerated trucks full of pre-packaged meat—cuts with the highest profit margins—distributed products across hundreds, if not thousands, of miles. Butchers almost became extinct. And then some people started talking publicly, loudly, about their food. They questioned whether antibiotics and hormones used in huge, commercial farms might be affecting our health. They became concerned about the treatment of animals. They sparked an interest in the benefits of eating locally grown food.

Farmers like Joel Salatin really spearheaded a movement to bring back the traditional approach. Salatin, a second-generation farmer, has been working the land at Polyface Farms in Swoope since his parents purchased it in 1961. He credits his father for turning around the “most worn-out, cheapest, gullied farm” by planting perennials to build soil, and, for the animals, pasturebased systems with portable electric fences and shelters. “I grew up here,” Salatin explains. “I started a flock of laying hens when I was 10, and had my egg and gardening enterprises through high school, selling at the Curb Market in Staunton.” After college and a brief stint as a reporter for the Staunton Daily News Leader, he returned to the farm with his wife. “We immediately began direct marketing, developing a customer base. Pastured chickens came next, followed by pastured eggs, and then pigs to do large-scale compost turning. Each enterprise complemented the others in symbiosis— and created additional income.” His way of farming, Salatin says, is redemptive for both the land and

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the animals. He believes our “ultimate mandate” is to “heal the land” from abuse and stagnation. He calls this his own special brand of “active, participatory environmentalism.” To this end, Salatin says “We’ve been building soil, building ponds for landscape hydration, growing animals with nutrient density, sacred models that respect the pigness of the pig, and increased immunological function.” Polyface, now run by three generations, offers what Salatin says is “beyond organic” beef, pork, broilers, turkeys, eggs, rabbit, duck eggs and lamb. In an ideal world, Polyface would have every customer visit their farm and see their methods. They realize, though, it’s just not possible. While they do not ship their meat, they do deliver to a number of stores in Charlottesville, including Darby Farm, Feast, Foods of All Nations, and Rebecca’s Natural Foods, along with Greenwood in Crozet. Increasing the Quality

Polyface is one of many area farms committed to increasing the quality of their products. Over at Stock, the beef comes from Timbercreek Organics in Albemarle County. C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


“When we say our beef is grass-fed, we aren’t trying to pull any tricks,” says Lum. “The beef we source is grass fed 100 percent of the time.” The store also buys pork from Timbercreek, along with Autumn Olive Farms; chicken is sourced from River Oak Farm in Lowesville. What Lum and his business partner (who happens to also be his brother-in-law) Matthew Greene bring to the table (literally) is the expertise of food professionals. Greene was working as a professional chef in New York City before getting a job at The Meat Hook, a whole-animal butcher shop in Brooklyn. He ended up getting Lum a job there, too, where employees learned by doing. In years-long apprenticeships, they were taught the proper way to cut various types of meat, how to prepare a variety of charcuterie, and how to not waste a single sliver. “I was pretty quickly and completely fascinated by the process,” says Lum. “Within a couple months I was apprenticing every free moment I had and juggling two part-time jobs. It was about two years into my time at The Meat Hook that Matt and I started formulating a plan for Stock.”

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Butchers can act as consultants in other ways, too. If you’re planning on steak, they can give you options; filet, ribeye and strip are all premium cuts that many shoppers are already familiar with. But butchers can also offer a variety of cuts you may not have considered (skirt, hanger, flank) along with recipes to get the most taste from any cut. Core to the idea, they knew, was employee training. Because they run a whole-animal operation, there is a lot that goes into the “processing.” “We want everyone who works for us to know how to do every step,” says Lum. “The guy that has been training under us for the longest has been with us for more than a year, and still learning everyday. Like all trades, you can’t just buy a set of tools and take off running.” Foodie Fun

Another part of what’s fueling the back-to-the-butcher movement is the rise of the “foodie” culture—people with refined tastes who make eating and drinking a hobby. They are well educated and are looking for food as close to its original state as possible. This type of “clean” eating, particularly with regard to meat, explains Salatin, has to do with how animals are raised, meaning they are “grown with respect and honor.” They live in clean air and rest outside in the sunshine, have the correct balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and other nutrients, and are slaughtered humanely. It’s a trend Salatin is happy to see. Another uptick in business has come from foodies who are willing to experiment with less-than-traditional cuts and offal. “I gotta say I sell more stock, bones and organ meats in Virginia than I ever did in New York,” says Lum. Masters of Their Craft

A good butcher, says Lum, also makes sure the meat—regardless of what animal it comes from—is trimmed properly, and at the right angle, so customers are getting less waste, and the meat will cook evenly and taste as it should. 14

C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


“It’s our mission to take the work out of buying food for our customers. That means selling the best products we can find, and making sure every customer walks out of our store with the confidence to prepare it well,” says Lum. The most common advice he gives is usually centered around how to cook steaks. “The bottom line in cooking steak is not to stress about it, just don’t forget about it. And meat thermometers never hurt anyone. I use one all the time and you’ll get no judgment from this guy,” he says. Butchers can act as consultants in other ways, too. If you’re planning on steak, they can give you options; filet, ribeye and strip are all premium cuts that many shoppers are already familiar with. But butchers can also offer a variety of cuts you may not have considered (skirt, hanger, flank) along with recipes to get the most taste from any cut. And they are happy to do it. At Stock, they also suggest beer and wine pairings, and can help plan an entire meal with items from their small grocery. (Many items are supplied by Charlottesville-based businesses, including Bellair Farm, Downbranch Farm, Farmstead Ferments, Golden Angels Apiary, Jam According to Daniel, Mountain Culture Kombucha, Rare Lynx, Steadfast Farm and others.) Salatin says everyone at Polyface “encourages domestic culinary arts,” and its website offers tips, recipes and recommended readings.

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Local Lending has a New Name–

Bank of the James

Commercial Loans and Business Lines of Credit

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These shops say that another added benefit of shopping at a specialty store is that you are in control of the portions. You only need an ounce of bacon for your dish, and not a whole pound? No problem: two slices it is. You are cooking for two and only need one chicken breast? Done. So customers aren’t paying for things they aren’t using. While Stock and other specialty store prices may be higher than the typical grocery store chain, Lum says value is not always quantified in money. “The prices will be on the higher end of the spectrum because they reflect the quality of the product and its nutritional value,” he says. “In regards to our raw meats, what this means is that you can eat less and get more out of it. You can gauge this in either nutrition or experience…Food is the base on which we build a healthy life.” Both Stock and Polyface say their customers are a mix of young and old, hip and hippy, and that the common thread is people who are interested in “integrity food.” “The local food tsunami is real,” says Salatin, “and it includes everything from meat to produce to baked items. Once you opt out of the system in one area, you naturally gravitate to opting out in other areas. It’s definitely all-encompassing.” There is value, too, say both business owners, in customers knowing they can get the best-tasting, ethically raised, locally sourced meats whenever the fancy strikes. “Feeding a family can be stressful enough,” says Lum. “Having to question what you’re feeding them shouldn’t be part of the process.”

C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


n DESIGN DESIGN BOOKS

HOME Magazine’s

Summer Reading List

Must-have design books for your home library

It’s summertime and who doesn’t like getting caught up in a good book? Here, we’ve compiled some of the best-selling books from the world of interior design. They may be too pretty to toss in your beach bag, so carve out some quiet time and take a little mental vacation with one of these enchanting reads. Scrapbook for Living By Bunny Williams

Bunny Williams is renowned for her attention to every little detail in her clients’ homes. In Scrapbook for Living, Williams takes the reader through several homes room by room, showing creative ways to organize and add personal touches.

The Perfectly Imperfect Home

How to Decorate and Live Well

By Deborah Needleman

Deborah Needleman is a publishing executive who’s spent her career focusing on homes and décor. In this book, she offers simple how-tos and techniques to put your home together for an effortlessly chic look—with all its joys and imperfections.

The Language of Interior Design By Alexa Hampton

In this book, renowned designer Alexa Hampton, who owns and operates a New York design firm, provides a look at 18 classic spaces that illustrate in rich detail the elements that govern cultivated design—contrast, proportion and balance. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

Elements of Style

Designing a Home and a Life By Erin Gates

Erin Gates is a 30-something Bostonbased interior designer and blogger who explores how interior design can be inspired by fashion, travel and pop culture. This book is a practical guide that combines honest design advice and gorgeous professional photos and illustrations with personal essays about the lessons she has learned while designing her own home and life—the first being that none of our homes or lives is perfect.

ONE MAN’S FOLLY

The Exceptional Houses of Furlow Gatewood By Julia Reed

When it comes to interiors, style, antiques and Southern vernacular architecture, Furlow Gatewood is an expert. This book presents his home in bucolic Americus, Georgia, where he has meticulously restored his family’s historic home, including its carriage house and outbuildings, saving them from demolition to become an oasis of Southern style.

CREATING A HOME By Kathryn M. Ireland

Kathryn Ireland, a California-based designer known for her French country linens and textiles, offers a fresh take on classic materials and design in her book, Creating a Home. In it she shows us how to deftly mix fabrics with international market “finds” and schools us on how to blend ironwork, wood, tile and furniture together for a sense that’s expressive of the casual way many of us live today.

Decorating is Fun!

How to be Your Own Decorator By Dorothy Draper

Dorothy Draper was the first to “professionalize” the interior design industry by establishing, in 1923, the first interior design company in the United States. Decorating is Fun! (How to be Your Own Decorator) is a book about how to have a good time decorating. The book, originally published in 1939 on the eve of World War II, is still practical, amusing and inspirational today. Draper’s enthusiasm feels fresh and contemporary. She believed that though there were troubles in the world, one’s home should be a refuge—a cheerful place for entertaining one’s friends and a comfortable shelter from the storm. 17


n GARDEN ORNAMENTAL VINES

CLIMBING VINES Let’s Go Vertical

By K at h er i n e F u lg h u m K n o p f

In the dog days of summer, who doesn’t enjoy something spectacular to view while sipping lemonade or a whiskey sour outside in the shade? Consider planting a climbing vine— there are lots of varieties, and no, these are nothing like your grandmother’s ivy. These vertical dazzlers bring color and charm to your yard. Look around and find an area in your yard that lacks interest. Planting something colorful or with fascinating leaves will catch everyone’s attention. It might be that bare brick wall on the side of your garage or your house—a large empty space like this is a great place to install a trellis for these plants to climb. Is there a shed in the backyard that could be more attractive with just the right planting? A plain spot along a garden path? This is a great place to install a trellis or archway as an entry to another part of your garden. Do you have a bare fence or wall? These structures, too, make great sites for climbing vines. Once you locate a spot, you must decide what type of plant (shade-or sun-lover) will grow there. To do this, watch the sun pattern over the next few days, and think about the other color in that area. What color would complement the surrounding plants? You may choose to keep it all one color for a serene look, or choose a climbing vine with vibrant color that calls attention to this spot. Texture is another consideration. Select a vine that either berries, flowers or hosts unusual leaves to create a real accent. Once you know your plant specifications, you will be able to find the perfect vine. 18

WISTERIA C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


HONEYSUCKLE c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

Jessamine

Clematis 19


CLIMBING ROSE Up, Up and Away

To train your vine to grow upward, you will need to tie it on to a trellis, fence or latticework with string. Another option, if you are comfortable with a little do-ityourself project and use a slow-growing, non-invasive plant, is to create a wire grid for the plant to grow on. To do this, attach small eyehooks into your brick, siding or stucco wall and connect them with wire. On a flat wall, the trellis design can be any pattern that suits your space. Draw it on paper first to decide if you want a square or a diamond grid. Measure the space and mark with a pencil the places where you want your anchor points. Make the grid by using a mason drill to form small holes where each of your pencil points are marked, fill the drilled holes with anchors, and screw eyehooks into the anchors. Start at the top and run the wire between the hooks to create the wire grid. Alternately, you can buy a wooden trellis kit at the garden store. Plant your vine according to the grower’s tag instructions. Be sure to leave room for the plant to grow and for your wall or other structure to “breathe.” Attach loose strands to the trellis 2 0

CHOCOLATE VINE or grid to train the vine’s ascent upward and outward. If you want to add more depth to the vignette, place a small garden statue in front of it. Or consider putting a birdbath in front of the vine, providing another dimension and offering birds a cool spot to land. So Many Choices

Flowering vines come in many types, so it should be easy to find one that enhances your garden and grows well in our climate. Traditional vines that work well here include clematis, climbing roses and honeysuckle. Clematis comes in vibrant colors—pinks, purples, reds, yellows, and blues, as well as shades of white (and black, called “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil”)—and the flower petals and stamen are miniature works of art. Some look like pieces of candy dangling from a leafy green vine. Climbing roses offer beautiful colors and shapes. Some even stray from the traditional look of a rose, with rufflededged petals or tiny flowers that look like clusters of buttons from a distance. Climbing roses look stunning ascending up a bare wall of a garage or garden

shed. They like lots of sun and their colorful petals contrast with the thorny green stalk that supports them. And honeysuckle vines smell divine and bring to mind memories of summer days. Their flowers are smaller dots of color, but there are so many on the vine that they give a textured look when they climb up a wall. There is a lot of color and pattern to see, and when the wind blows, you get whiffs of their deep perfume. Honeysuckle comes in reds, whites and yellows, and lends that traditional southern look to a yard. If you are looking for something a little more unusual, consider a chocolate vine, jessamine or climbing hydrangea. Chocolate vine features sweet-smelling lilac flowers, and the vine produces edible fruit that tastes like tapioca pudding. Chocolate vine is known for this oblong blue fruit that makes wonderful jams and preserves. Jessamine vine is easy to grow, and flowers abound on its glossy, greenleafed stems. A beautiful southern vine, jessamine grows well on fences and trellises, spreading a coat of yellow when it flowers each spring. The “Yellow” or C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


“Carolina� varieties are likely the hardiest for our zone. They produce fragrant flowers and will grow unsupported if you choose to let them mound in your garden rather than train them on a trellis or fence. Climbing hydrangeas are simple, serene vines that take a little more care, but the rewards are worth it when those flowers bloom. Climbing hydrangea need extra protection during extremely cold winters until they are well established in your garden. They come in several shades of pink as well as a beautiful white with deep green leaves. One variety offers a textured bark that peels in the winter to keep your garden interesting all year long. Vines with a little more edge include trumpet and wisteria vines, which catch your eye with their prolific, colorful flowers. Trumpet vines call attention with their long, bright orange flowers; hummingbirds love them too, bringing active nature to your yard. They grow aggressively, and can fill in a bare spot quickly, so if you are not interested in pruning, you might want to choose a different plant. Wisteria evokes wistful sighs, with its dangling purple clumps and twisting vines. It requires patience and shears as it climbs quickly and sends runners to create little wisteria. It also requires a strong trellis for support. Climbing vines give so much to your yard by growing up and out, pulling the eye in a different direction than your old faithful garden beds. Paired with big pots or sculptures on the ground, your vine can be part of a garden vignette, camouflaging spots that are otherwise barren or unattractive. And they are so much fun to watch as they grow and change over the years. It’s time to try one and see what a splash they make in your yard this summer.

TRUMPET VINES c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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n DESIGN GINGER JARS

VALUABLE VESSELS FOR EVERY HOME By Ch a r lott e A . F. Fa r l e y

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There are few decorative accessories that can speak to lovers of both traditional, classic home design as well as contemporary, modern design. Much like the peonies that look great inside them, ginger jars are the quintessential accessory for enhancing just about any space in any home. From a single, oversized jar to an exhibit of graceful urns en masse, these pieces of earthenware provide color, texture and grace to help you make an impact through your home décor. Also known as temple jars or general jars, porcelain ginger jars became the inspiration for the ever-popular Dutch Delftware. Oddly enough, their roots are as far from the Netherlands as could be: the urns have a rich history with roots stemming from Chinese culture and royalty. In fact, experts say some of the blue and white vessels we see today reflect the designs preferred by the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368). Originally intended as storage for salts, oils and herbs, ginger jars earned their name from serving as containers for ginger during shipping and transport to c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

Western countries. It was only in the 19th century that Western culture began collecting these jars for the love of their form over function; in fact, people started such a craze that local potteries began mass-producing imitations of the genuine Chinese jars at this time. Characterized by domed lids, globular shapes, and tall shoulders, authentic ginger jars depict landscapes, birds, dragons and floral designs, have been painted by hand, and are typically seen in blue and white. It’s also common to see a rose medallionstyle embossment around another scene on the urn, essentially creating a kind of a framed story. An authentic Chinese ginger jar is indeed a rare find; these delicate jars are centuries old. Even if you find one that doesn’t show signs of age or wear, it’s unlikely that you’ll find a lid that matches exactly. Just as we don’t keep our ginger in these beautiful jars (although we certainly could), they no longer come in just shades of blue or white: today’s ginger jars can be found in an array of colors, shapes and sizes. From bold and vibrant reds and yellows to soft and subtle grays and whites, today’s ginger jars also feature a variety of motifs—chevron patterns, animal prints, Swiss dots and more. You can purchase brand-new jars from home furnishings dealers locally or online, or you can enjoy a Saturday afternoon of antiquing or browsing thrift shops. Either way, you’re bound to find a jar that appeals to you and your preferred budget. 23


New Ways with Old Jars

We love to feature our most cherished treasures in our home. So when you come across a ginger jar that you find simply divine, you’ll want to show that off that, too. But how do you show off a simple jar? Won’t it get lost in the sea of family photos and artwork you already have on display? Actually, you can celebrate the beauty of your jar (or collection of jars, as it might be) in any way that you like; the possibilities are only limited by your physical space or your imagination. A fresh, natural way to present your ginger jar is to use it as a vase that celebrates the seasons. To build contrast, fill a blue and white ginger jar with pink tulips or peonies in the spring, and pumpkin-colored marigolds in the fall. On the other hand, you can go for a tone-on-tone look in the summer with white and blue hydrangeas. When the cold weather comes, swap those summer blooms out for branches of holly or other winter greens; you can even attach small pinecones with floral wire for a truly wintry look. If you want an all-seasons arrangement, stand two vessels of the same size beside each other as holders for topiaries. Create textural contrast by placing traditional ginger jars in rooms that feature otherwise rustic textures like sisal and burlap. To that end, don’t feel that you’re limited to using jars only with interior design; illuminate white wicker tabletops with a sweet vignette that includes a ginger jar, or adorn your patio or porch floor with large vessels to brighten your outdoor living space. For a truly one-of-a-kind decoration that is both fun and functional, bring your ginger jar to your local lamp shop and have it converted into a custom lamp. If you want, you can give your jar a makeover and paint it in a shade that goes best with your personal furnishings and style.

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The living room, study or home office are prime spots for using your ginger jars. Style your bookcases artistically by using ginger jars at the finishing touch to your design. Select a spot on each shelf for a small piece of porcelain to take up residence. You can also cluster your jars in the fireplace after winter passes, or combine jars of different heights and shapes to be the focus of your mantel. Use two jars as anchors to showcase another beloved item. Any ledge deep enough to hold your jars is the proper place for your collection—even a deep ledge over a set of French doors. Ginger jars don’t just come in small sizes; an extra-large urn serves as a statement piece for holding dramatic arrangements on the dining room table or for sitting at the base of a stately staircase. Tall, wide vessels are also perfect for filling in the empty space under a console table. If you like to avoid bridal registries, consider bestowing a bride and groom with a pure white ginger jar to commemorate their special day. One customary Chinese wedding gift is a ginger jar that carries the image of a dragon to represent the groom and a phoenix to represent the bride. From their Chinese cultural heritage and 19th-century knock-offs to the updated designs of today, ginger jars belong to a unique set of decorative items that can have both aesthetic and utilitarian value, and can find a place in any home. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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n LIVE PANTRY ORGANIZATION

pantry

PERFECTION By L au r e l F ei n m a n

A new baby is coming home from the hospital today and a casserole is due next door before you can say “Cream of Mushroom soup.” The swim team just climbed the shelves reaching for the Little Debbies and sent your collection of plastic tubs and lids rolling across the kitchen floor. (And, did you even know that flour can go bad?)   Honey, your pantry is a hot mess! But you don’t need a label-maker or color-coordinated wicker baskets to get the job done. Really, all you need is time and a sense of your kitchen habits. An organized pantry makes mealtime prep less stressful and so much more enjoyable for everyone in your household. Peggy Woodall, senior design consultant at Closet Factory says, “There is nothing nicer than opening your pantry door and seeing all the ingredients you need to make dinner. Dinnertime is often stress time because parents are tired from work and kids are hungry and cranky, so a quick, easy dinner is imperative. An organized pantry helps you pull this off.” 2 6

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Step One: Start With a Clean Slate

Whether yours is a luxurious walk-in pantry outfitted with builtin custom shelving or just a couple of cabinets you’ve designated for the purpose of holding your canned groceries and dry goods, the route to achieving nirvana in your pantry is the same: clearing the way for the organization system to come Pull everything out of the pantry, and throw away anything that’s past its expiration date. Next, consider giving away the items that you know in your heart you will not eat—even if you read somewhere that it is a “superfood,” and even if you had good intentions to try Asian-fusion cooking but just never got around to it. As long as the food packages are in good condition/ unopened, most local food pantries will accept them and say that ingredients from regional cuisines can be a welcome sight for some people. So if that jar of tamarind paste you bought has a better chance of helping someone else feel connected to home than you’re going to ever have actually cooking with it, consider donating it to your local food pantry. If there’s an opportunity to consolidate boxes of rice or pasta into one container instead of several, now’s the time do it. Woodall says, “It’s not unusual for me to look into people’s pantries and see the same item duplicated on different shelves. People feel sure they have an item somewhere, but when they can’t locate it, they’ll buy it again.” (Oh! Why hello, Light Brown Sugar!) Woodall says to use this cleaning-out time as an opportunity to study your cooking habits and think about the ingredients you’re frequently using (or not using), in order to devise an organization plan for your pantry. She suggests, “It’s a good time to evaluate where is the best place to store items like spices—if you see them, you’ll use them. It is so important to be able to see everything you have! Sizing the shelves correctly, having adjustable shelves to make maximum use of vertical space, and using pull-outs and sliding baskets so you can see all the way to the back of the pantry is the key.” Step Two: Put the PB with the J

Woodall says the answer to an organized pantry can be found at the very place we go to fill it: the grocery store. She says, “I like to stock my shelves like a grocery store, with rows of canned beans and tomatoes, and jars of spaghetti sauce one behind the other. That way the only things hidden are more of the same, and it makes it easy for me to know when I have to restock.” Woodall

c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

says that if your pantry shelves are deeper than 12 inches, you should consider installing a pull-out shelf that helps bring the products to you, since it can be hard to see and reach into a deep cabinet. She adds, “I’ve found it convenient to store bulk beans, grains and flours in identically sized storage containers and keep them on a lower pull-out.” In keeping with the grocery-store concept, you should also store ingredients and supplies together for your go-to meals, so that you can reach in and easily grab everything you need. Cooking-soups go with cooking-soups, meal-soups go with mealsoups, and sort your canned vegetables by type. Line everything up so you can scan labels and keep stock of ingredients. Woodall says, “If the children typically get their own breakfast in the morning, the cereal, raisins and breakfast bars should be together where the child can reach. Same for afternoon snacks. A basket of approved snacks keeps the pantry from being ransacked for something to eat.” An adult household might set aside space for more grown-up treats such as water crackers, fancy olives and other goodies you might serve when friends drop in for an unexpected visit. Woodall says people should evaluate their priorities and routines, and plan accordingly. For instance, she says that if you like to bake a lot, keep everything that’s needed to bake a cake or brownies together in spot. “Storing cake pans and cupcake tins together, with the ingredients and decorating supplies, will make baking day truly easy!” This same idea could be applied in many ways—from pizza to tacos! The only “right” way to organize a pantry is the way that best serves your needs and routine. Step Three: Apply Pantry Principles to Every Cabinet


Don’t be surprised if your pantry organization project morphs into a global kitchen reorganization makeover. You’re going to find yourself throwing away or donating all kinds of stuff you don’t use, gathering all your paper goods into one spot, and moving your cups and coffee mugs closer to the sink/above the coffee pot. As you ponder whether your things are stored in the most logical place, pretend you’re a visitor in your home. Would someone unfamiliar with your kitchen be able to guess which drawer holds the silverware—or would they have to test three different drawers before finding the correct one?

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THE ONLY “RIGHT” WAY TO ORGANIZE A PANTRY IS THE WAY THAT BEST SERVES YOUR NEEDS AND ROUTINE.

P h ot o p rov i d e d by Cl o set Fa c t o r y 2 8

Woodall says, “Whether you are looking in your pantry or any other kitchen cabinet, the shelves at eye level and just below are the sweet spot for the items you use and need every day. You should always be able to access your day-to-day items without stretching up or bending over—taking into account that you don’t want your little ones having to climb up the shelves either.” She says the top shelves should be reserved for infrequently used items—like the good china, stored in dust-proof covers—and the lower shelves and pull-outs for heavy and bulky items, like bread makers, fondue pots and blenders. One final consideration as you decide what-goes-where is the size and weight of your items. Heavy things should go down low, lighter things up top. Most shelving is adjustable to accommodate the right amount of headspace needed for a box of cereal versus a can of corn. Organizing tools, cubbies and risers can easily be found in any home improvement store—but take some measurements of problem spots and untapped potential storage areas before you go shopping. Woodall says she likes using baskets or bins to hold items that don’t stand well on their own, like bags of chips and nuts. She also says that narrow spaces like the backs of the doors are great opportunities for adjustable shelves to hold things like paper towels if your door space is deep enough, or boxes of tin foil and plastic wrap if the space is shallow. If you have the inclination, trick out your pantry with fresh shelf-lining paper, a crisp white coat of paint, and in-cabinet lighting. But realize those embellishments are not necessary to have a good, working pantry. Pantry perfection lies in grouping items in a way that makes sense, staying on top of expiration dates, having a spare supply of your most-used items, and a set of ingredients for that signature casserole you love to bake and share on happy occasions. C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


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n IMPROVE BATH FIXTURES

BATH Easy Updates for Your Bathroom BY Rach el B e a n la n d

According to the National Kitchen and Bath Association, the average mid-range bathroom renovation costs more than $17,000 and—unless homeowners are extremely handy— requires the use of a general contractor. The average bathroom update, on the other hand, can cost as little as $1,000 (or less!) and be accomplished by do-it-yourselfers. A down-to-the-studs renovation is the obvious solution to many homeowners’ bathroom woes. A renovation can solve for everything from a bad layout to ongoing water and mildew issues to faulty appliances. But when a bathroom is completely functional—just ugly and outdated—choosing to renovate can be a tough call for homeowners to make. It becomes harder to justify the cost of a full renovation, and it can be equally difficult to envision the impact a few simple and inexpensive updates can have on the bathroom’s big picture. Here are a few ideas to inspire that update-over-renovate mindset. 3 0

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Upgrade the Fixtures

When people tackle small bathroom updates, they often start with swapping out their hardware and accessories. “Whether you like a contemporary, transitional or traditional look, you’re going to find that fixtures are less ornamental than they were 20 years ago,” says Trish DeLuc, who is the showroom manager at Ferguson Bath, Kitchen and Lighting Gallery in Charlottesville. “Polished nickel is a popular finish. People love it in a bathroom and it’s just beautiful.” Swapping one faucet out for another is an easy Saturday afternoon project, assuming both the old and new faucet are comparably configured. DeLuc sees lots of people keep their vanity base but replace the countertop—usually with a solid surface like marble or granite and an undermounted sink. If purchasing a new countertop and basin isn’t in the plan, it’s important to choose a faucet type that will work with the sink’s existing drillings. Upgrading to a touch-free faucet has become a popular splurge for customers, says DeLuc. Towel rings, bars and hooks, along with toilet paper dispensers, are all relatively inexpensive and can be swapped out to match the finish of the new faucet. Cabinet hardware is another low-cost upgrade and comes in a variety of finishes and styles. Tubular or flat-edged pulls give bathrooms a more contemporary look while footed pulls are more traditional. For an eclectic accent, consider going with glass knobs. Lighting fixtures are also easy to upgrade and can make a big difference in the bathroom’s overall appearance. Having the right amount of light is key to making a bathroom feel airy and inviting, so it’s worth adding more light if the room is windowless or dark. “Sconces offer much better grooming light because the light’s beside your face, instead of above your head,” says DeLuc. “You don’t have to spend a lot to layer lighting.” With some research, most homeowners can tackle replacing one light fixture with another. Just be sure to cut the bathroom’s power off at the fuse box. For new installations, a licensed electrician should be able to add a junction box and accompanying light switch in a couple of hours. Deck the Walls

It’s been said before and it will be said again: never underestimate the power of paint. For bathrooms, look for a mildew-resistant paint. Most brands sell a specific paint product just for bathrooms and kitchens. It’s a good idea to use primer on the walls, particularly if the bathroom has had mildew issues in the past. If it’s a moisture-free powder room that’s getting made over, wallpaper might be the right solution. Wallpaper has come a long way in the past few decades. Designers like Kate Spade and Amy Butler have jumped on the wallpaper train and the results are striking graphic designs in vibrant colors. DeLuc sees people taking bigger risks in their powder rooms. “Since there’s only the sink and the water closet, they can do fun things in there. A master bathroom’s got to be very functional since you use it all the time.” Beadboard wainscoting is another popular wall fix. Traditional beadboard was installed one board at a time, but now home improvement stores sell it by the sheet. It’s extremely affordable, easy to install, and can give a bathroom a fresh feel. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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For a slightly more formal look, there’s raised-panel wainscoting, made of a combination of flat paneling and decorative trim. Once installed, most homeowners paint wainscoting white, which makes for good visual contrast when there’s color on the walls. While the paintbrush is out, don’t overlook that old oak vanity. Painting the grainy wood a bright white or a cool gray will instantly make the bathroom look 20 years younger. To make sure the cabinet is adequately prepped, many homeowners will remove a door and take it with them to their local paint store. Painting pros can give great advice on sanding, priming and the right kind of paint to use for the job. Build in More Storage

CREATE SOMETHING TIMELESS

While it’s easier to design new storage solutions with a full bathroom renovation, it’s not impossible to build in some extra space with an update. Think about how to incorporate shelving into the bathroom’s existing design. Floating shelves can be installed over a toilet and are easy to find at many local and online retailers. If the bathroom is big enough, look for an antique dresser that can act as a de facto cabinet. In small bathrooms, it may be choosing a hard-working medicine cabinet over a decorative, statement-making mirror. DeLuc says medicine cabinets have become much smarter in recent years. “There are medicine cabinets with USB charging stations, defogger attributes, interior magnifying glasses, and nightlights. I see cabinets with lockboxes and even ones with small refrigeration units in them. They’re helpful for seniors who need to keep medicine cold.” Even existing cabinetry can be retrofitted to provide better storage. Consider purchasing tray dividers for drawers as well as rollout shelves for under-sink cabinets. One space-creating solution people often overlook is their shower curtain rod. Most retailers now sell shower curtain rods like the ones in hotels. They’re curved, and the result is more arm room in the shower.

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A NEW SHOWER CURTAIN AND A NON-SKID AREA RUG THAT TIES THE BATHROOM’S COLOR SCHEME TOGETHER WILL GO A LONG WAY IN REFRESHING THE LOOK OF YOUR BATHROOM. Don’t Forget Décor

With the fixtures installed and the paint dry, it might be tempting to call the bathroom update finished. Resist the temptation, and keep shopping. A new shower curtain and a non-skid area rug that ties the bathroom’s color scheme together will go a long way in refreshing the look of your bathroom. Don’t overdo it on the tchotchkes, but do shop for a vase, some glass jars or a pretty ceramic tray that can lend the bathroom a sense of detail and interest. And remember, a bathroom update provides the perfect excuse to pitch those old ratty towels and shop for nice new ones. Look for art that ties the bathroom together. In a bathroom with muted colors, a bold, bright painting can make the room pop. DeLuc thinks it’s the sheer number of choices that can make a full remodel feel so overwhelming to homeowners. The benefit of a smaller update is that it becomes possible to take things one step at a time, as budget and time allow.

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So Fetching! How a home reclaimed its glamour BY L au r e l F ei n m a n P h ot o g r a p hy by A n d re a H u b b e ll

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W

hen you take a 100-pound golden retriever out for an excursion, you expect him to fetch a big stick or enthusiastically sniff out a long-lost tennis ball. After all, he has that natural instinct to seek and deliver things he thinks will please his owner. That’s why Charlottesville homeowner Alana Woerpel credits her dog Oscar as being responsible for finding her family’s new home when she and a friend were out walking one morning last year. The Woerpels lived in the neighborhood but had never paid much attention to the 1950s split-level home on the heavily wooded lot down the street. “It was one of those houses you passed a thousand times, but never really saw,” Alana explains. The house is set down from the roadway and the driveway switches back, so you really don’t see it from the street. She adds, “The lot feels very private, even though it’s in the middle of the city. And, of course, at that time, the lot was heavily overgrown.” But, on this particular dog-walking morning, Alana noticed an unusual flurry of activity at the home—lots of workmen and trucks—so she stopped to inquire. One of the workmen explained that the elderly homeowner had recently passed away and the house was being cleaned out and prepared to be put on the market. Curious, Alana asked permission to look around. Though the home appeared to have seen its heyday several decades earlier and there were ladders, toolboxes and drop cloths everywhere, Alana could immediately see the home’s potential. Alana is an interior decorator with over 27 years of experience and has that knack for seeing past a home’s outward appearance, visualizing other possibilities for it. She says, “Despite the disarray, I was immediately taken with this home.” Alana and her husband Kurt made an offer before the house ever hit the market; and, as fate would have it, their house sold just as quickly. With those quick real estate transactions, Alana had to shift into high gear—she had one month to get the new home habitable before moving day. She says, “Right away, we had to do asbestos remediation. Then, we worried about aesthetics.”

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B E F O R E P H OTO P R OV I D E D BY A L A N A WO E R P E L

Alana has an extensive collection of “before” photos on her iPad, and comparing them to the way the home appears now provides a stark contrast. Alana has made drastic improvements to every room in the house, but has done so mostly by reconfiguring and redecorating spaces, rather than gutting rooms all the way down to the studs and starting over completely. The stylishly refurbished home preserves the home’s design intention for the dramatic—seen in the many elevation changes from room to room, the Juliet balcony in the soaring foyer, the sinuous curve of the floating staircase and the elaborate millwork throughout the main rooms of the house. Alana says, “I like old things. There’s an integrity in old things and I think there’s a way to make old things lovely without having to resort to tearing them down.” Alana says it helps to have a practical sensibility when it comes to making decisions when you’re dealing with an older home—especially when the needs are so great. She says, “It was a triage mindset, where we had to quickly become conscious of, ‘What you can live with?’ Decide, ‘What’s good for now?’ And say, ‘Okay, time to move on to the next thing.’” 36

She says, “There were certain features about this home that I immediately loved and wanted to preserve—the windows, the glamorous curving stairway, the polished stone floors, the steps down into sunken entertaining rooms, the pocket doors—all those things create the home’s Hollywood vibe. Don’t you sort of expect to step around the corner and see Cary Grant mixing a cocktail for Doris Day? It’s so...1950s glam.” From the formal foyer with its soaring ceilings and double doors, it’s a few steps down to the kitchen on the right, a few steps down to the den straight ahead, and a few steps down to the formal living room and sunroom on the left. The walls are covered in an ivory and pale gray Osborne and Little wallpaper in an oversized, contemporary trellis pattern—echoing designs on the decorative wooden trim on the dramatically swooping stairway at the far left end of the foyer. Alana says the kitchen has seen a great transformation, but has retained many of its original elements like the doors that can hide it from the foyer, the exterior Dutch door, the butler’s pantry and the kitchen cabinetry. She explains, “With the indispensable help of builder Rich Bell, we took out a couple of walls and C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


FROM THE FORMAL FOYER WITH ITS SOARING CEILINGS AND DOUBLE DOORS, IT’S A FEW STEPS DOWN TO THE KITCHEN ON THE RIGHT, A FEW STEPS DOWN TO THE DEN STRAIGHT AHEAD, AND A FEW STEPS DOWN TO THE FORMAL LIVING ROOM AND SUNROOM ON THE LEFT.

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THE WALL COLORS THROUGHOUT THE WOERPEL HOME ARE BENJAMIN MOORE’S WHITE DOVE. ALANA SAYS, “WE HAVE SO MANY WINDOWS, I WANTED TO ENSURE OUR INTERIOR LIVING SPACES WOULD BE SERENE. PAINTING THE WALLS AND TRIM THE SAME COLOR, BUT VARYING THE SHEEN, GIVES THE CONTRAST.” reconfigured the space, and arranged it so the dining table can go down the center of the room. We liked the character of the original cabinetry, but painted it and added new hardware. We installed new soapstone countertops, added new appliances and fixtures and put down Mountain Lumber’s pre-engineered Chinese Elm flooring, which is great for our pets.” Alana says that one of the hallmarks of her style is that she prefers a quiet color palette of solid neutrals, accented by textures. Her personal favorites are shades of ivory, gold and green. The wall colors throughout her home are Benjamin 38

BENJAMIN MOORE’S WHITE DOVE

Moore’s White Dove. She says, “We have so many windows, I wanted to ensure our interior living spaces would be serene. Painting the walls and trim the same color, but varying the sheen, gives the contrast.” The walls are painted in a flat latex, the trim is an oil-based semi-gloss. On the floors in every room besides the kitchen and baths is polished flagstone, sisal installed as carpeting—or a combination of the two. The flagstone is original to the house. Alana explains that outside on the patios, the flagstone was left unpolished, giving it a weathered, charcoal-gray appearance. When they bought the home, Alana says the floors

were carpeted in yellow-gold carpet. She chose sisal to replace it because it’s costeffective and durable. She used sisal with a tiny weave upstairs and sisal with a chunky weave downstairs. She says you don’t often see sisal used as carpeting (it’s more commonly used for area rugs), and she finds it to be a budget-friendly, versatile floor covering because you can layer area rugs on top of it for an interesting, textural effect. The den is the central entertaining room in the home, next to the kitchen with a clever bar tucked into a back hallway that passes through to the formal living room on the other side. In the corner stands a sculpture created by Alana and Kurt’s older son, who graduated from the Pratt Institute of Art in New York last year. Floor-to-ceiling windows and sliding glass doors open onto a tree-top level, elegant flagstone entertaining balcony set with tables and chic black and white cushioned lounging chairs. Blanketed here by a thick canopy of trees and surrounded by lush plant life, one truly has the feeling of relaxing in a private woodland retreat. Another interesting detail, original to the home, is the decorative border of stone where it meets the carpet. This decorative C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


B E F O R E P H OTO P R OV I D E D BY A L A N A WO E R P E L

B E F O R E P H OTO P R OV I D E D BY A L A N A WO E R P E L

touch not only helps blur the transition from outdoors to indoors, but adds flair to it. Alana says there are other cutting-edgefor-its-day details about the home that she’s discovered (though they may be less apparent), such as the radiant heating in the floors and the way the heating and cooling ducts are concealed in the decorative trim work in the ceiling in the living room. The wet bar between the den and the formal living room is a fun little space. Alana amped up its appearance with metallic Lee Jofa wallpaper that has a retro vibe. She also painted the bar’s original shelving and cabinetry in a creamy caramel color and added new pulls and countertops. The formal living room has a pair of deep, plush green velvet sofas that face one another—just beckoning you to have a seat by the fireplace. Though the room is dressy, it’s not fussy. Alana says that’s her chief design goal for a room—to draw you in and give you places to comfortably linger. On the wall across from the fireplace is a pair of handsome built-in floor-toceiling bookcases on each side of the cased opening that leads to the sun porch— Alana’s favorite room. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

THE WET BAR BETWEEN THE DEN AND THE FORMAL LIVING ROOM IS A FUN LITTLE SPACE. ALANA AMPED UP ITS APPEARANCE WITH METALLIC LEE JOFA WALLPAPER THAT HAS A RETRO VIBE. SHE ALSO PAINTED THE BAR’S ORIGINAL SHELVING AND CABINETRY IN A CREAMY CARAMEL COLOR AND ADDED NEW PULLS AND COUNTERTOPS. 39


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B E F O R E P H OTO P R OV I D E D BY A L A N A WO E R P E L

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Alana says she gravitates to the sun porch year round and loves watching the outdoor fountain and the seasons change from this room. At one end is an antique wooden day bed covered by a matelassé slipcover and a collection of pillows, while at the other end, a vintage iron café set is the perfect spot to enjoy a cup of coffee and the morning news. The sun porch opens onto one of the most interesting spaces of all—the sunken patio courtyard, which you catch just a glimpse of when you first approach the home from the driveway. It’s a favorite spot for entertaining, and Kurt and Alana have had extensive work done on the landscaping around it so they can fully enjoy the beauty of the space. Alana says this patio is not only charming, but perhaps is also a charmed space. She explains, “Things were so overgrown, leaves were everywhere, and we were busy with other concerns, so we didn’t see them at first.” Inlaid into the patio floor like a mosaic are the patterns of a fish, a crab, a cross and a star. In the massive curved stone wall that surrounds the sunken patio are relief designs of a giant clamshell and a giant conch shell, a unicorn and a Greek god made of terra cotta. They’ve also unearthed sand-dollarpatterned stepping-stones. Since the discovery of these patterns on the patio, Alana has learned that in the foyer, on wooden display plaques installed above the doorways, the homeowner used to keep statues of elephants. “Clearly, she had a magical, mystical sense about her and kept these talismans, probably for good luck,” she says. Alana says upstairs was a bit of a time capsule and was arranged differently from new homes of today. She says the threebedroom/two-and-a-half bath home had originally been built in the early 1950s for a family who had six children. All the kids slept dormitory-style in one bedroom together with a Jack-and-Jill bath connected to the father’s home office. The parents’ bedroom was at the far end of the hall and had an en suite bath. Kurt and Alana have two sons—the college graduate, who has a career in New York, and a teenager who still lives at home. Kurt and Alana reconfigured the upstairs bed and bath arrangement and significantly modernized both upstairs bathrooms. Kurt and Alana claimed the spacious bedroom that once slept six. The former home office is now a guest 42

bedroom reserved for their grown son, and their teenager sleeps in the room that was originally the master bedroom suite. One spot where the home unapologetically shows its age is in the powder room off the foyer, where Alana decided to “keep the pink potty” and make it a point of design in the stylish little powder room. Woodworker Michael Keith helped rework the vanity. The walls are covered in glittery bronze and brown animal-print wallpaper as the pale coral-colored commode takes center stage as a rather sculptural and unique focal point in the water closet. She laughs, “Everybody loves the pink potty! I don’t think we can ever get rid of it, now.” (It just goes to show that small pleasure can be taken in even the most practical of items!) Alana’s design studio is at her home, so she had the same time constraints to establish her business in its new location as she did her family in its new home. The basement has its own entrance, and was a sunny but unfinished space with cinder-block walls and a concrete floor. Alana had a heating and cooling system installed and faux-painted the floor herself, using painter’s tape, latex paint and an oil-based polyurethane to seal and

ONE SPOT WHERE THE HOME UNAPOLOGETICALLY SHOWS ITS AGE IS IN THE POWDER ROOM, FEATURING A VINTAGE PINK COMMODE. C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


THE PATIO FEATURES INLAID PATTERNS OF STARS AND MORE, WHILE THE WALLS THAT SURROUND IT CONTAIN VARIOUS UNIQUE RELIEF DESIGNS. THE WOERPELS ALSO UNEARTHED SAND-DOLLARPATTERNED STEPPING STONES.

protect it. She laughs, “I’m one of those people that never sleeps. This is the kind of stuff I do at midnight and 2 a.m.” Her fabric and wallpaper samples are organized along an entire wall in a floorto-ceiling IKEA closet shelving system. She says, “We don’t have a design center in the area, so it’s essential that I keep my own samples.” In the center of the room is a gigantic padded work table, trimmed around the edges with wooden yardsticks. Alana says she can measure fabric and even iron on it. She also has a professional-sized sewing machine in case she ever needs to make a quick repair or an on-the-spot adjustment before an installation. She also keeps a tidy resource library of books and trade magazines, organized so she can put her fingertips on what she’s looking for in an instant. What a treat it was for this old house to be discovered by Oscar for Alana, as she and her family have an appreciation for its style and glamour and have lovingly brought it back to life for a whole new era. “Good boy, Oscar!” c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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n GARDEN SALSA GARDENS

Salsa Gardens

Plant a Fiesta in Your Yard By D en i z Ata m a n

The great thing about growing your own garden is having your favorite ingredients right at your fingertips. You can explore different flavors, textures and colors to create meals that are both healthy and oh-so-delicious. Specialty gardens, like salsa gardens, are blooming in popularity this summer. “Salsa,” meaning “sauce” in Spanish, is one of the most popular condiments in the country. And why not? Its eye-catching greens, reds, yellows and whites are perfect for your summer fiestas. Ranging from sweet to spicy flavors, salsa is a great way to accompany your favorite summer dishes and snacks. Whether you are cooking burgers and kabobs on the grill, or just need a mid-day snack while hanging by the pool, this delicious veggie combo is a great accompaniment to your appetite. Planting Your Produce

When deciding whether to plant your salsa garden in a container or in the ground, it’s all about how much space you have and how much produce you’d like to yield. In-container planting is great for those who are busy and who have limited space. If you are planting in a pot, be sure to fill the bottom with rocks prior to adding soil to help with drainage. In-ground planting is perfect for large spaces and for those who wish to devote time outside getting your hands dirty. When planting your salsa garden, make sure you do so in a spot that will receive at least 6 hours of sunlight a day. Regardless of planting in a container or in the ground, the soil should always remain damp, and pests must be kept away for a successful yield. Keep in mind that if you want to use pesticides, there are alternatives to chemical pesticides that you might want to consider, particularly since you will be consuming this garden. Natural pesticides that can help deter pests from your garden include: ■ D iatomaceous earth: As a natural compound made of tiny fossilized plants, the minerals slice insects’ exoskeletons, killing them on contact. Sprinkle a cup on the soil’s surface. ■ C opper pest stopper: To prevent snails and slugs, use their enemy: copper. Lay a wire around the plants they attack, which may act as a fence for them, due to their strong copper aversion. ■ A pple cider vinegar: Combine three parts water to one part vinegar for a safe and effective insect repellant. Be sure to spray above the plant, letting the mist settle on top. Spraying directly on your plants can harm them as the solution may be too acidic. You can even add a few drops of essential oils, such as lavender, cedar, or lemon as an extra deterrent. 4 4

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Get creative with your garden design. Even though this is a useful garden, it can still be a thing of beauty that provides visual interest in your summer yard. Consider the concentric circle, a popular salsa garden design. Since tomatoes are the base of salsas, plant them in the middle. Try Roma tomatoes, which are juicy and bursting with sweetness. Use bamboo stakes or sticks gathered from outside as a trellis to keep them upright. Tie them with twine. Next, plant some pepper plants. Jalapenos are popular since they are the perfect mix of sweet and spicy. But there are also many other varieties of peppers…habanero, serrano, and bell peppers… oh my! Peppers are the sass in your salsa. Whether you are looking to turn up the heat with habaneros or sweeten the base with bell peppers, a salsa isn’t complete without them. The next circle should be onions. Candy hybrid onions offer a bright white color to your salsa, as well as a sweet flavor. Herbs, like cilantro or basil, are great to plant on the outside of the circle. Once they grow, the leaves cascade down the side of your garden, giving you the appearance of a lush salsa jungle. Depending on how large your space is, you can plant more or less of your favorite ingredients. Another popular salsa ingredient is tomatillos; they may be tiny, but these green tomatoes pack a puckered punch. If you’re looking to add a tart flavor to your salsa, tomatillos are a great way to go. Add scallions, mint and basil, and you have salsa verde, or “green salsa.” Salsa Isn’t Just a Dance

When it comes to creating your favorite salsa, it’s all about how the two elements—texture and flavor—dance together. Depending on your favorite texture, you can use a variety of kitchen tools to get the right consistency. Finely chopped or chunky pieces make up the pico de gallo style, where you can see each ingredient with each bite. All you need is your handy chef’s knife! A smoother consistency calls for using a blender or food processor. If you’re unsure about blending or processing all at once, the “pulse” button is a great way for you to slowly achieve the desired texture. Now that you’ve grown your own salsa garden, it’s time to feast! Enjoy this recipe for a simple grilled habanero salsa at your next summer soiree using the bounty from your own garden.

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Slice tomatoes, pepper and onion into large wedges. Set aside one wedge each of the tomato and pepper, and two wedges of the onion. You will add these at the end. In a large bowl, toss the sliced tomatoes, bell pepper and onion with the habanero peppers and garlic cloves with a thin coating of oil and  a pinch of salt. Grill the veggies, except garlic, over direct heat for  10-15 minutes until the edges are charred. Place the garlic cloves in a foil pouch on the grill. If you’re using a broiler, place the tray in the upper third rack and broil for 15-20 minutes until the edges are charred, but the veggies aren’t completely cooked.

Grilled Habanero Salsa 1 1/4 lbs. tomatoes (Roma, beefsteak, heirloom—whatever you prefer)  1 bell pepper   1 small red onion  2 habanero peppers*  

Set your grilled/broiled veggies aside to cool completely. Remove stems of habaneros, leaving the seeds intact. Push the garlic out of its skin.  Using a food processor, pulse the cooled, grilled veggies with the habaneros and garlic until they are just chopped up. Transfer to a  large mixing bowl. 

1 large, juicy lime

Using a chef’s knife, finely chop the reserved raw tomato, pepper and onions to add them to the salsa mixture. Stir them in along with the salt, lime juice and cilantro. Adjust your seasoning to taste—a pinch of sugar if the tomatoes aren’t sweet, chipotle powder for a smoky/ hotter taste, or more cilantro.

1/3 cup well-chopped cilantro

Yields 2.5 cups. Keeps refrigerated for about a week.

*feel free to substitute with another type of pepper

Recipe adapted from the Sprouted Kitchen blog, sproutedkitchen.com.

3 cloves garlic, peels intact Olive oil  1 teaspoon smoked salt or sea salt 

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Decorating with Portrait Photography DISPLAYING THE MEMORIES OF A LIFETIME BY L au r e l F ei n m a n

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T

he happiest homes seem to be filled with meaningful personal treasures—hand-selected for display, either by us or for us. They’re a tangible way of saying, “This is who we are and what’s important to us.”

Our family photos, whether they are carefully posed portraits or images caught during a memory-in-the-making, are perhaps the greatest treasures of all. Therefore, they are worthy of our consideration about how and where best we should display them in our homes. Jennifer Finazzo, a Charlottesvillebased professional lifestyle portrait photographer, says that photography is all about “capturing the moment.” She says, “Oftentimes, moms or dads are the ones behind the camera, capturing the precious moment. Hiring a professional gives them the chance to jump in and be a part of that amazing memory with their family.” Finazzo also points out that having a photographer capture the candid moments that happen during a professional photography session are the images that many clients look back on as the most memorable. She says, “Those are the shots I like to see hung above the mantel.” Professional photographers help analyze their clients’ needs and come up with a plan to meet them. So, instead of haphazardly displaying your photographs along with the clutter of life (or worse, leaving them forgotten on a disc in the desk drawer), it’s wise to take the opportunity to plan and choose a method and a location to display them— thoughtfully weaving your portrait

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photography into your everyday interior décor. Finazzo says, “Each photo has a unique story…every time I walk by a portrait of my grandmother, I am reminded that I look just like her. It’s so important to print and frame photos—if not for us, for our future generations.” Displaying photographs in a skillful arrangement will decorate your home in the utmost customized style, all the while reflecting the personality of your family. Keep in mind that most professional portrait sessions will entail at least three separate appointments: the first one, to define and set the goals for the project; the second one, the photography session itself; the third one, to preview and select images. If you just do the step in the middle—the photography session— without any concern for the other two, you’re not receiving the full gamut of professional services. Finazzo says that besides lending an artistic eye to the subject in front of the lens, a professional photographer can also help you decide the best way to

display your images. She says professional photographers can help you decipher which images look best hanging on a wall versus in a book, or which ones will look best in a frame on the desk or as a holiday card. Photography Geography

Most of Finazzo’s clients come to her with an idea already formed about what they hope accomplish through the photo shoot. She says, “Usually they have a specific location in mind. It’s important to communicate and really understand the expectations when shooting with a specific photo in mind.” And while a successful photo shoot includes having a general idea for what you hope to accomplish before you get started, you still need to keep an open mind about it. Finazzo says, “Sometimes everything works perfectly as planned, and other times, the unexpected happens and it turns out even better!” When the primary assignment is to provide a portrait to hang in a specific place in a client’s home, many photographers will visit the home so they can see that spot for themselves. They’ll photograph the place in the room where the portrait will eventually hang so that when they meet with clients to review proofs, they can show them exactly what the portrait will look like in their home, using computer software to mock it up. Such software allows the photographer and client to play with layouts, framing styles and processing techniques to select the best look for the final product. Since certain settings—both the location where the portrait itself is staged and the place it will hang in your home—will convey certain feelings and

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D e si gn e d a n d f r a m e d by L a L in e a B e ll a , P h ot o gr a p hs by Er i c Ke ll ey

meanings, Finazzo advises clients to put some thought into where the portrait will eventually hang when choosing the location for the photography session and the attire that will be worn in the portrait. She explains, “A wide-angle shot of an engaged couple taken outdoors at The Market at Grelen would be a beautiful framed piece for a living area, with all those natural blue and green tones that will be in the background. A maternity session at Chiles Peach Orchard during the pink spring blooms would be gorgeous in a baby girl’s nursery.” To ensure you’ll be pleased with the outcome of your photography session, planning and thinking through all facets of the project will be time well spent. Since most photographers charge additional fees for photo sessions taken outside of the studio, this might be an important consideration as you plan for your portrait. Casual Arrangements

Unframed photographic display techniques, like “gallery wrap” prints (sometimes called “canvas wrapped” prints) offer a contemporary look that’s perfect for casual photos of children and families. Compared to matted and framed portraits hung under glass, gallery wraps are inexpensive, lightweight and easily moved. 5 0

However, Beate Casati of La Linea Bella, a custom framing and art shop in Charlottesville, knows a lot about displaying photography portraits and makes an excellent case for framing your photography portraits under protective art glass—a special kind of framer’s glass that’s been treated with filters to protect your artwork from yellowing and fading. She says, “They preserve printed photos for the future. With the protective glass choices and acid-free museum-quality treatments, along with the great papers that can be used today, these photographs will turn into family history that can be passed down to future generations.” When deciding where to hang a photograph (whether it’s under glass or on a canvas), it’s important to think about the furniture and objects that will be around it—to anchor it, give it life and integrate it into its new setting. One nice effect is to hang “found” objects or a small painting related to the scene in the portrait, to bring the display to life and tell the story of your family’s memorable moment. For instance, a large family portrait taken by the seashore could be hung in a grouping that includes smaller, candid outtakes of individuals— plus a sand dollar, framed in an acrylic shadow box, found that very day. Casual arrangements like this thrive in odd numbers and a mix of textures and tones.

A display like this would be ideal in the family room or kitchen—the family hub. Before putting hammer to nail, carefully work out your arrangement on the floor. Gather kraft paper, scissors, a pencil, a roll of painter’s tape (it won’t damage the finish on your walls), a measuring tape and a level—most smartphones now have a level as one of their handy tools. Casati advises, “Put some masking tape on the wall under the nail to avoid tearing a hole in your wall.” Hanging a single picture on the wall is easy, right? Approach a group of pictures in the same way by visualizing an imaginary frame around the grouping. This imaginary frame can help you with the horizontal and vertical placement of the photos and will ensure that your group has an organized, cohesive look. Trace and cut a template to the size of each photo and object. Shuffle them around until you find the arrangement that pleases you. Tape the templates on the wall, rearranging them until you find a look that is pleasing to you. Casati says to let the size and shape of your items determine the distance apart you should hang everything. “The width of the mats could be a good guideline for spacing,” she notes. Your eye can be your guide, she says; when objects are different sizes and shapes, there are no hard rules, but your arrangement will feel C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


more cohesive if you select one width and remain consistent with it as you hang the other items in the group. So, though there’s no set rule about it, most people will find that a spacing of 1 to 3 inches will be about right, depending on the amount of wall space to cover and the size of the framed pictures. When hanging multiple pictures on an expanse of wall and contemplating the proper amount of space to put around each one, it’s always a good idea to let a little math into the equation, too. (Measure twice, hammer once...) You can use an old-fashioned measuring tape and a jot pad, or let an online picture hanging and gallery wall calculator do the math for you! The internet is ripe with free online calculators; here’s just one: www.datawranglers.com/tools/wallhanging. Gallery Walls Go with the Flow

A gallery wall is a look that homeowners can use with great effect. Whereas a casual arrangement will be of a smaller scale and tucked in among your décor, a gallery wall can consist of photographs hung virtually from floor to ceiling over an expanse. This arrangement is especially interesting because viewers take in the entire effect, rather than focus on just one piece. Hallways and stairways are great places to set up a gallery wall because these spaces tend to have a long run of wall that makes it easy to add more photos as life goes on. A gallery wall, in other words, evolves over time.

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AFFORDABLE ANTIQUES • QUALITY USED FURNITURE 52

Black and white photography can be “the great unifier” for times when it’s difficult to coordinate people and their outfits— or if you’re taking a new photo that needs to fit in with other photos that were taken at a different time, in different locations or with different people, such as in a gallery wall. Finazzo says, “A black and white portrait commands the room. It calls your name from the wall. You want to know the story behind the black and white photograph so you take a step closer. Black and white photography, unlike the trendy bold colors of today, really makes the viewer work for the story behind it.” A storyline progresses so well through black and white photography because the focus is on the faces. Plus, black and white photography tends to give a soft, consistent tone to your complexion, which can be very flattering. Scars and blemishes are less evident in black and white (but of course some might argue that takes away from some of your character!). Because a gallery wall has a wandering nature, some people like to add to the contemporary vibe by mixing in paintings and colorful prints with the photos. Doing so helps break up the sea of faces and allows the gallery to have a more organic, freeform feeling. Choose two, three or even five pieces to be the landing pads for your gaze and place them near the middle of the gallery. To stay in control of your gallery and create a sense of order, use plain, white mats (all the same width) and similarly styled frames to unify the diverse group. For the most uniform look, you could use identical frames. But if you want to embrace an eclectic look, you can mix things up by sticking with frames of a consistent material (wood or metal) and color (black, gold, silver, red or even natural wood), but allowing slight variations in style—beaded edges, scrolled edges, ornate frames, plain frames. Each image will dictate whether a thicker or thinner version of the frame will suit it best. “When I start clients off with a gallery wall, I carefully listen to what their style is and how they see the gallery growing in the future. With all the choices out there, any style can be accommodated and blended together,” Casati says. Casati says she steers clients away from using only one type of moulding style for pictures in their gallery wall. Instead, she advises them to choose three moulding styles that complement each other. She says, “We’ll pick a main theme and then either chose three tones of a similar finish—or three variations of width of one particular style of frame.” She says this keeps the eye interested and moving, without causing confusion. Another benefit, she says, is that future photographs planned for the gallery will be easy to integrate into the collection. As with the casual arrangement, it’s best to establish a layout for your gallery wall before you start hanging pictures. If you’re just getting your gallery wall started, find the focal point of the wall and start your arrangement there. Over time, your gallery wall will fan out from that point and eventually fill the entire expanse. Remember, for most people, a gallery wall doesn’t happen all at once—it grows over time. But, you’ve got to start somewhere, right? So that you don’t end up feeling like you have a lone cluster of activity on an otherwise big blank wall, find the most interesting part of the wall to be your starting focal point. You might be living with your gallery this way for some time, until you can add to it and expand it. Not sure where it is? Look to the landing area in the stairwell or that bit of wall you first see when you enter the hallway and see if either of those spots beckons to you. C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


WHETHER YOU WISH TO DISPLAY INDIVIDUAL PORTRAITS OF YOUR CHILDREN, OR A COLLECTION OF WEDDING PHOTOS FROM SEVERAL GENERATIONS OF FAMILY MEMBERS, A SYMMETRICAL ARRANGEMENT IS THE MOST FORMAL DISPLAY AND PERFECT FOR A LIVING ROOM OR FOYER. Formal Looks

P h ot o p rov i d e d by J e nnife r F ina z zo

When you have a particular theme you wish to uphold (or if you simply prefer a more formal look), have all the photos matted and framed in an identical style and size and hang them on the wall, evenly spaced apart. Whether you wish to display individual portraits of your children, or a collection of wedding photos from several generations of family members, a symmetrical arrangement is the most formal display and perfect for a living room or foyer. For a contemporary yet timeless appeal, Casati says to consider framing portraits in a monochromatic fashion—using white frames with white mats. There are so many shades of white that she advises you to consider the skin tones of the subject in the portraits when making your selection. She says, “Warmer tones will enhance certain skin tones, while cooler whites are great for black and white images.” Your family’s portraits are works of art and an at-home gallery is sure to enliven your home with great personality and flair. After careful planning, perhaps even with the help of a professional, you can admire your family’s beauty on a daily basis when you thoughtfully display their photographs throughout your home.

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n IMPROVE DECK MATERIALS

Durable Decking Materials BY L au r e l F ei n m a n

Adding a deck is one of the most requested home improvement projects. Decks can extend your entertaining space by creating an enjoyable outdoor spot for dining, grilling or lounging. An elevated deck (rather than a ground-level patio) is an ideal solution for sloped yards where a flat area is wanted. Most decks tend to be located in proximity to the kitchen—an important site consideration when cooking outdoors.   One of the biggest decisions you’ll make about your new deck is selecting the material to construct it. A professional deck builder can make recommendations about materials, size and style and any additional structures you could add to enhance the deck and integrate it into your home’s exterior. Many work with landscapers, pool companies and other outdoor professionals to create an outdoor entertaining space that truly “elevates” the appearance and functionality of a backyard deck. 5 4

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Know Your Materials

There are three main deck material options: wood, plastic, and composite—a manufactured material that’s a combination of the first two choices. Each option has unique features and benefits to consider. Wood

Generally, wood is the most common and least expensive material used for a deck. In our area, cedar and pressure-treated pine are favorites for decks because of their budgetfriendly price and widespread availability. Zac Allen of Blue Ridge Builder’s Supply’s Crozet location says, “Cedar and pine are both really nice woods for decks—they’re versatile, easy to stain and easy to work with. They both offer lots of benefits. They’re long lasting, they’ll deter bugs, you can get nice color variations when you stain them.” He notes that these woods need to be used in a well-ventilated, dry area where moisture won’t collect. Otherwise, warping, twisting and wood rot can eventually occur. Allen says that homeowners need to be diligent with the upkeep of their cedar or pressure-treated pine decks, cleaning them regularly and sealing them every few years with the appropriate products recommended for their particular type of wood deck’s long term care. He says if homeowners steadily maintain their decks, the decks will last for many years. But if they slip on their maintenance schedule, it won’t take long for the wood to begin to deteriorate. Richard Graves of Archadeck of Charlottesville says a deck made of pressure-treated natural wood is the customer’s choice if they prefer it over the look of a composite material or a PVC (short for its laboratory name of “polyvinyl chloride”) product. Graves says, “A majority of the time, it’s simply the difference in price that makes the decision. I’m asked more and more to give homeowners a cost comparison between wood and other decking materials.” The bottom line: Domestic wood, like cedar and pressure-treated pine, is the least expensive option for deck materials, but will require the most upkeep to keep the deck looking great and protect your investment. Eventually, parts or all of a wood deck may need to be replaced. If you’re not constructing a deck for the ages, domestic lumber may be a perfect choice. Tropical hardwoods like ipe—which comes from Brazil—have become popular in recent years because of their attractive appearance and easy long-term care. Ipe wood is a highend, long-lasting choice for decking. Graves says, “Ipe is the densest wood I’ve ever seen. It is a Brazilian wood that is imported, which makes it more costly, but it’s a beautiful product when finished.” Allen says, “The tropical hardwoods are darker, redder. They are a very smooth wood with a really straight, attractive grain. You can use these woods in areas where you don’t have a lot of ventilation—areas where there’s a lot of natural moisture in the environment, such as wooded areas where trees overhang. Places that wouldn’t be appropriate for softer woods like cedar or pine.” You don’t have to do much to keep ipe decking looking great once it’s installed. Ipe is known for its incredible durability and for being weatherproof. Though it’s not necessary for longevity, ipe can be treated with a UV-protectant oil to maintain its shimmery deep reddish color, or it can be left untreated to weather to gray over time. This material is said to last 30 years or more. You will pay more for the material itself, and it is labor-intensive to install because the wood is so dense. Your contractor will spend a lot of time counter-sinking the fasteners and he’ll burn through many drill bits and saw blades during the installation of an ipe deck. However, when you consider its long-term durability and comparative ease of maintenance, it may be a wash in the end, as tropical hardwoods have better rot- and insect-resistance than their domestic wood counterparts. The bottom line: Tropical hardwoods are the most expensive materials option for decks— costing more than other woods or top-of-the-line plastic and composite materials. Tropical hardwood is heavy and difficult to install. But a deck made of tropical hardwood stands up extremely well to insects and environmental conditions, so once it’s installed, it will likely stand firm for many years to come. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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Plastic

Manufacturers boast plastic decking materials’ resistance to stains and grease, an important consideration if your deck will be used primarily for grilling and dining. Most plastics are treated with an applied finish and will need only to be washed with a mild detergent and garden hose or power washer. While it’s true that no decks are truly “maintenance free,” Graves says that some, like plastic and composite decks, can honestly claim having “fewer” maintenance requirements. He says they are generally more resistant to mold, mildew and scratches than wooden counterparts. Plastic is the least heat-resistant material of the three options, so before you choose it for your deck, consider if your deck is in the sun for the majority of the day. However, Graves says that if you like the look of the product, don’t let heat be a deal breaker for you. He says, “Any deck that sits in full sun is going to get uncomfortably hot.” So perhaps what your deck needs is a shadeproviding structure. Additionally, plastic decking isn’t as stiff as lumber, so it generally needs more support underneath it to prevent sagging. The cost per square foot of the material itself is comparable to that of a tropical hardwood, but the installation costs will likely be higher than other options, because the supporting structure of a plastic deck will need to be more extensive.

stain or treat composite decking to maintain its good looks. In fact, Allen says that most of the new composite decking materials today are wrapped in ultra-durable PVC. Graves says, “I don’t have a favorite composite or PVC decking material, but I will say that Trex is the most requested composite product name that I get asked about. Trex does a great job of advertising and they have been around longer than most of their competitors.” Today’s composite decking materials have excellent stain resistance and wood-grain looks that are extremely close to that of real wood. For homeowners who love the look of a tropical wood deck, but want the easier care of a manufactured material, homeowners should choose a high-quality composite decking. Allen says that he recommends the Trex Transcend product line because he believes their products have the most authentic looks. He says, “Transcend even has a ‘Tropics’ line that gives you the look of the exotic hardwoods. The Transcend line has the most realistic colors and deep, wood-grain patterns—they’ve really mastered that.” Composite boards often come with a warranty of 20 to 25 years and they’ll stay the same color as the day you installed them. Composite is about 40 percent more expensive than real wood initially, but because you don’t have to keep re-staining it, the cost over time can be equal to or less than real wood.

The bottom line: Though more expensive than wood and (most) composite materials, a deck made from plastic could be the closest thing to “carefree” a homeowner can get. As long as your deck isn’t in full sun or without a shade-providing structure, a deck made from plastic decking material may offer an ideal outdoor spot for hassle-free lounging.

The bottom line: Composite decking materials are a manufactured hybrid of the best qualities of wood and plastic. Composite decking materials carry reasonable guarantees for their long-term performance. If you’re looking for a product that looks like wood but performs over time like only an engineered product can, composite decking is worth your consideration.

Composite

Though the cost for deck design, materials and labor will vary, you can expect the amount of time it takes to install an averagesized deck (300 square feet) to be about two weeks. If you’re also adding a porch, pavilion or gazebo, expect it to take at least another week. Such a small investment of time, relatively speaking, will bring your family countless hours and days of relaxation and enjoyment on your new backyard deck.

For years, “Trex” was the only name in composite deck materials, but now TimberTech, Fiberon and many more companies join it. Composite decking is a hybrid product, manufactured from wood fiber and plastic to form a plank that requires less maintenance and typically has a longer lifespan than natural wood decking. Like plastic decking materials, you won’t have to 56

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n DESIGN QUILTS AND MATELASSÉ

Summery Coverlets The textures and timeless beauty of quilts and matelassé

BY P h o eb e D i ns m o r e

When the weather heats up, it feels so refreshing to lighten our dress—not just on ourselves, but also inside our homes! This is the season to pack away those wool blankets and down comforters in favor of breezy, lightweight bedding. Nothing says “summer” quite like a cheerful coverlet on a bed made with crisp, cotton sheets. Coverlets—lightweight quilted bedspreads—are intended for use as the top layer of linens on a bed. They can be decorative and warming, used alone, or with a top sheet and a light blanket. They can also be layered at the foot of the bed, simply for decorative purposes. But why relegate them to the bedroom? They can add color and texture to your home in a number of ways.

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Dream in Color with a Patchwork Quilt

If you’ve never thought that a quilt could be a part of your modern décor—think again! Their bold patterns are clean and confident, certain to infuse your home with a unique character. Quilts that feature geometric patterns especially seem inspired by modern art. Quilts have a special way of conjuring feelings and memories of family, history, tradition and simple beauty—whether they are an heirloom antique, recently made using a computerized sewing machine, or store-bought new. Whatever its origin, when you look at a quilt, it’s hard not to imagine a group of women spending many meticulous hours working together to complete it—perhaps for a special life event like a marriage or a birth. Or maybe because they were expressing themselves through the only art form they knew—creating a mosaic out of fabrics that held special memories for them. Quilts are traditionally composed of three layers of material: an insulating layer of batting sandwiched between the decorative woven top and the backing material. Patchwork quilts are unique from other bed covers because their decorative top layer is “pieced together” from many swatches of cloth and sewn into geometric designs or fanciful patterns. (Originally, this was a practical “waste not, want not” homesteader’s aesthetic of making full use of leftover scraps of fabric.) The fabric used for the backing is usually a different color or pattern than what’s found on the topside of the quilt, so when the bed covers are invitingly folded back over the foot of the bed, glimpses of the contrasting fabrics can be shown.

C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


Quilts are certainly works of art, so it makes sense that you could refashion them to be displayed on a wall. As with any other kind of displayed artwork, be mindful of where you’ll be hanging your quilt, as sunlight beaming through a nearby window will certainly fade its colorful palette and potentially damage the fibers in the fabric. Choose a spot that receives filtered or indirect sunlight, if not a place that is completely away from the sun’s rays. Quilts can be hung from special rods or clamps designed especially for the purpose. To display a quilt from a rod, you’ll need to sew tabs or loops onto the back of the quilt so you can slip the rod through. The quilt will hang from the rod, giving a homespun twist to the medieval tapestry wall hanging. Or consider kicking the style up a notch, and use an ultra-mod rod for an interesting juxtaposition of old and new. An acrylic rod or one in a contemporary square shape in a bright color could add an element of fun to the display! Also playing on this idea, you could position a quilt to drape behind your bed as a “headboard” by attaching a pair of brackets and a drapery rod to the wall then draping the quilt over the rod. What a cool twist for a contemporary Japanese- or mid-centurymodern style platform bed!

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Quilt clamps safely pinch the top edge of the quilt in a cushioned clamp that won’t damage the quilt as it suspends from the padded hanger. The benefit to displaying your quilt in this manner is twofold: you can easily remove it for cleaning, and no special tabs/loops have to be attached to the back of the quilt, possibly altering or damaging its original handicraft. If you’re a collector of quilts, quilt clamps make it easy to change your display for this same reason. A sleek, contemporary look for displaying quilts on the wall is to have them framed under glass and hang them just as you would any other framed picture. Due to size, framing just a portion of a quilt (or several different ones, hung in a grouping) is a practical choice, although there’s no question that a full-sized wall hanging of an entire quilt would be a dramatic accent if you wanted to add a strong jolt of color and pattern to a room. The interplay between a contemporary-styled frame and an antique handmade quilt would add loads of interest and become a focal point in your home. One very common out-of-bedroom use for quilts is to tuck them onto a sofa or armchair, to help protect it (similar to a slipcover). Toss pillows can also be made from quilt fragments as a delightful way to display multiple patterns and colors. This is a great way to salvage a portion of a quilt that may have suffered stains or damage. 6 0

Using a quilt as a tablecloth is a lovely way to display it, allowing you to trace the stitches with your fingertip and admire it up close. Many newer quilts are machine washable, which alleviates much of the worry about spills. But if it is a vintage quilt, have a glass top cut to fit your table to help protect it. Quiet Time with Serene Matelassé

Similar to quilts, matelassé coverlets are made from cotton but woven on a Jacquard loom, which results in a coverlet with a raised pattern upon it. This special style of weaving is thought to have been developed by an Englishman named Robert Elsden to mimic the style of handcrafted quilts made in the south of France. In fact, Elsden was honored by the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce in 1745 for his textile innovation! Matelassé coverlets are lighter-weight than most quilts, as they are made from just a single layer of fabric. Matelassé are usually in monochromatic tones—white thread stitched onto white fabric, or ivory-on-ivory—and they depend on their texture for design. Thanks to the simple textures on a neutral background, matelassé exude purity and refinement but also can make a crisp, contemporary statement, too. Of course, you could substitute a matelassé and display them in your home in any of C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


Using a quilt as a tablecloth is a lovely way to display it, allowing you to trace the stitches with your fingertip and admire it up close. the ways you would a quilt. Of course, they are terrific on a bed, but they also look great tucked onto the couch—especially if you want to lighten up your living room’s color palette for summer. You’ll need to check the care and cleaning instructions for your coverlet, of course, but many can be machine-washed (some, even bleached!), so they can be a particularly resilient choice for use as a slipcover. A few other places where matelassé look especially fresh are at the bedside, when used as a skirt on a round table or as shams on the bed, or even hung as a shower curtain in the bathroom. Matelassé look so cool and clean, even if at their heart they’re simply a humble bedcovering. It’s no wonder they call them “shabby-chic.” Quilts and matelassé coverlets can give your home so much character. Showcase your sentimental side by displaying a quilt in an unexpected way this summer. Summer is the perfect time to get your quilts out of the hope chest and into your home décor!

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n LIVE CULINARY CORNER

Southern

SPREADS

Special ingredients for light summer meals By Lu cy Co o k

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S

ummer in the south is a state of mind. We grow our own vegetables (or get stellar choices at the farmers market). We move a little slower, and drink mind-boggling amounts of iced tea. We continue to gather around the table and share food, but the style of food changes to match the weather. We hesitate to heat up the kitchen after a warm day, and tend to eat lighter and savor the fresh flavors of the season. Meals shared on the porch seem to be more casual, and more about grazing than a formal meal. Summertime meals are often centered around the bounty of the garden: fresh tomatoes, corn, green beans, okra and other vegetables. The centerpiece of a meal consumed outdoors may be all about the abundance of available heirloom tomatoes, with some mozzarella, fresh herbs and olive oil. Sometimes, we’ll add a biscuit or some fried chicken from the store down the road to round things out. On the hottest days, meat becomes more of a flavoring—like a little bacon on a tomato sandwich instead of a big slab of pork as the center of the meal. I’ve included some of my favorite recipes for summer—a few simple recipes that, if served together, can make a great casual summer “grazing” meal. Or, on another night, the recipes could be great appetizers for a casual summer get-together. For a no-fuss cocktail hour, I use a collection of different sized jars that I fill with different pickled vegetables, pimento cheese, hummus, roasted nuts and other nibbles. For a summer party, I group them on a cutting board with fresh bread and crackers for spreading. The recipe for homemade mayonnaise will add a little something to every recipe in which you use it—from the pimento cheese recipe here to your own homemade potato salad. Or make some delightful cucumber sandwiches: add a little chopped dill to the mayo, slather it on thin white bread and top with sliced cucumber. Cut off the crusts and enjoy a perfect appetizer, or part of a lovely “grazing meal”! Happy Cooking!

Homemade Mayonnaise (makes about 1 ½ cups) Making mayonnaise at home might never have crossed your mind, but you probably didn’t know that it takes less than five minutes! Homemade mayonnaise will change you—especially when you start adding flavors to make it personal. Try it at least once, just to see what you’re missing! 2 egg yolks 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice   1 tablespoon wine vinegar (I like Virginia Vinegar Works)  ½ teaspoon Dijon or dry mustard  1 teaspoon salt  1 ½ cup oil (light-flavor olive oil, or canola oil, or a combination of the two) Combine egg yolks, lemon juice, vinegar and mustard in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the oil a drop at a time (I’m not joking; this is crucial!) until the mixture starts to thicken. Then, continue to add the oil slowly in a steady stream, and blend until the mixture is thick. Taste for salt and add more if necessary. Store in an airtight container for up to a week in the refrigerator. To add flavors: add minced garlic, smoked paprika, any herb or Parmesan cheese to make some of my favorites to serve as a dip with veggies or protein. c h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e m a g a z i n e . c o m

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Pickled Garden Vegetables (makes about six jars) Pickled vegetables seem to be a hot item in restaurants. They’re great with drinks, go well with cheese, and don’t spoil your appetite! These are best after a few days of pickling. I skip the sterilizing and canning procedure and store them in the fridge, but there are lots of instructions on safe canning available online if you want to preserve some for the colder months. I serve these straight out of the jar! 1 pound vegetables, like carrot sticks, cauliflower florets, green beans (trimmed), okra or cucumber sticks (Blanch carrots and cauliflower for 3 minutes in boiling salted water, then immerse in ice water to stop the cooking. All other vegetables can be pickled raw.) 6 cloves of garlic, peeled  3 cups cider vinegar  1 cup water  ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes  1 tablespoon dill seeds  1 tablespoon mustard seeds  1 ½ tablespoons kosher salt  1 tablespoon sugar Divide the vegetables between the jars, packing tightly. Add a garlic clove to each jar.

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Chopped chives, for garnish

HOME C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E

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IMPROVE

GARDEN

Corn Soup (makes about 8 cups) There is a time in the summer when the corn is just perfect and needs very little to improve. This soup makes the best use of the freshest, justfrom-the-market seasonal corn—so don’t bother if your corn is more than a few days old. This is a terrific summer soup, served chilled. It would be a great party starter in small cups. One dozen ears of fresh corn

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DESIGN

In a non-reactive saucepan, bring remaining ingredients to a boil, stirring until the sugar and salt are dissolved. Carefully ladle hot liquid over the vegetables. Cover tightly and let cool for a few hours, then refrigerate for two days, up to one month.

LIVE

With a sharp knife, cut the kernels off the cobs, scraping the cobs to get all the juice. Combine the corn, water and salt in a stock pot bring to a simmer. Cook for 15-20 minutes until quite tender.  Puree in a blender, food processor or with an immersion blender.  Strain into another large bowl and chill for a smooth soup. Taste for  seasonings and add salt and pepper if needed. Serve garnished  with chopped chives. C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


Pimento Cheese (makes about 2 ½ cups) There’s a long argument about whether its “pimento” or “pimiento”—but who cares? Pimento cheese has long been a staple in the South, but it is popping up everywhere—and for a good reason! One of our new favorite ways with it is as a burger topping—YUM! Make this classic, or jazz it up with the options listed at the end. ¾ cup mayonnaise, homemade or commercial (see recipe for Homemade Mayonnaise)  4 ounces cream cheese  2 tablespoons grated yellow onion  ½ teaspoon salt  ½ teaspoon fresh pepper  ¼ teaspoon cayenne  1 teaspoon Dijon mustard  16 ounces cheddar cheese, shredded (I like sharp, but you can use a combination of white and yellow, sharp, extra-sharp or mild, depending on your taste. Freshly shredded is best, but pre-shredded will do in a pinch!)  ¼ cup chopped, roasted red pepper (I prefer to roast my own, but jarred pimento is the classic.) In a mixer, combine the mayo, cream cheese, onion, salt, pepper, cayenne and Dijon mustard. Mix on low until smooth and combined. Add cheese and peppers and mix just until blended. Refrigerate for at least an hour, then serve with butter crackers. Optional, updated add-ins: ½ cup drained and chopped martini olives, ½ cup roasted and chopped pecans, or 3 slices crisp bacon, crumbled.

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n INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

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Cost:

DESIGN

Airflow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Women and girls of all ages! th

What:

HOME C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E

Bring a water bottle, sunscreen and either a towel or folding chair. $20 Registration Fee $15 CTC Members * Mother/daughter teams (training together, girls age 14 & younger) are $30 per team (1 woman/ 1 girl/1 training manual); additional girls (under

Allied Concrete Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Artisan Construction, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Bank of the James. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Blue Ridge Builders Supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Brenda Tatum Portraits & Fine Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 BRHBA Parade of Homes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Brown Automotive Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Carpet Plus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Charlottesville Sanitary Supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Circa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Clearview Window Tinting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Closet Factory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Custom Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

ot It’s n te too la s! nu to joi

TP M W4

Grand Home Furnishings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Grelen Nursery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Heather E. Towe, Realtor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

2015 Women’s Four Miler Training Program www.w4mtp.com

La Linea Bella!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Martha Jefferson Orthopaedics and Spine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 McLean Faulconer, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Michelle Willis Adams, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Mona Lisa Pasta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Mr. Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Our Lady of Peace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 SariSand Tile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Scott Weiss Architect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Southern Air. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Specialized Insurance Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spectrum Stone Designs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Summit Custom Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

WALK OR RUN • ANY LEVEL NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! 11 WEEKS • ATTEND ANY OR ALL SESSIONS

Sun Mountain Stoneworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 The Habitat Store. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 The Little Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 u-fab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

For up-to-date information, please visit:

www.w4mtp.com

University of Virginia Community Credit Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Waynesboro Nurseries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Window Depot USA of Richmond and Charlottesville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5


Promote your Project in HOME Magazine HOME magazine now offers you the exclusive opportunity to feature one of your projects in an upcoming issue. Beginning with the Fall 2015 issue, we will include one “Premier Project” that has been completed in our area. You can use this opportunity to highlight a small renovation or a complete remodel, a single room or a two-story addition, a newly designed interior or an outdoor living space. No matter the scale of the project, Premier Project coverage will help our readers take special notice of your work and your company. Show off your skill—our readers will love to see it and read about it in HOME magazine!

Advertising Packages include • Two-page spread includes photo and design services to complete your 225 word write-up • Up to 150 words with information about the project and up to 75 words to feature the project manager or the company • Includes a digital version promoted on charlottesvillehomemagazine.com • Embedded link to digital pages • Use of the Premier Projects logo in your marketing materials

Market your brand and increase your credibility! Our readers are looking for ideas and inspiration, and the local companies that can help them implement a new project in their home.

For more information, contact Pam Whorley at 434.227.2414 or pam@charlottesvillehomemagazine.com


Visit our showroom upst airs

YOU WOULDN’T EXPECT A PREMIUM LINE TO OUTSELL LOWER-PRICED PRODUCTS.

Real People, Real Service!

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®

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WHAT’S IN IT FOR YOU? PLENTY.

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WHERE ENGINEERING MEETS ARTISTRY THE COLLECTION ©2013 Trex Company, Inc.

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STEEL FRAMING

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Blue Ridge Builders Supply is a BBB Accredited Business C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e h o m e J u l y /A u g u s t 2 0 1 5

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Charlottesville HOME July/August 2015  

Charlottesville HOME July/August 2015