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2020-2024 WORK PLAN


Introduction

Downtown West Palm Beach is the heart of the Palm Beach County region. With historical assets, culture, entertainment, and being the central place for community participation in civic activities, the district holds a special meaning for its residents, business owners, citizens of West Palm Beach, and visitors to the area. A perfect blend of old and new, Downtown West Palm Beach provides a high quality of life that has attracted employers, investors, visitors, and residents for 125 years. Within the immediate area, there are the region’s most important civic and community places, art and history museums, dozens of public art installations, and over 100 historic structures. There are also nearly 1,500 hotel rooms, providing out of town visitors the opportunity to experience all that Downtown West Palm Beach has to offer. Over the past three decades, Downtown West Palm Beach has experienced an amazing renaissance. During this time, hundreds of millions of dollars of investment have poured into the area in the form of residential and commercial buildings, infrastructure improvements, public space enhancements, and public art. All of this has reinforced the significance of Downtown West Palm Beach, positioning it to continue its trajectory of growth and improvement. Downtown West Palm Beach must continue to transform and adapt to the needs of changing stakeholders, economic conditions, and social trends. To be successful as the leading driver for the region, the district will remain valuable, dynamic, diverse, and resilient. This plan describes the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority’s (DDA) strategies, programs, and projects designed to help guide Downtown West Palm Beach to achieve these goals over the next 5 years. The goals of this plan are designed to improve local economic conditions, broaden the tax base, and enhance quality of life. Economic and community development does not occur overnight. It only happens as the result of a sustained effort over time and requires the cooperation and coordination of efforts from multiple organizations, City departments, and community stakeholders.


Data and Reports

Several reports and studies have provided the basis for elements of this plan. A review of the data contained in these various documents has revealed both opportunities and challenges for Downtown West Palm Beach and has provided a data-based foundation from which to form community and economic development strategies.

The State of the Downtown Report DDA Market Area and Community Surveys City of West Palm Beach Economic Development Plan Community Redevelopment Agency Strategic Finance Plan City of West Palm Beach Mobility Plan City of West Palm Beach Public Realm Action Plan Most importantly, this plan recognizes the need to adapt to local and national market realities, neighborhood character, and community values. Only in this way will the DDA succeed in creating value for all stakeholder groups in the Downtown community.

The DDA’s 2020-2024 Work Plan defines the organization’s overall mission, scope, and plan for community enhancement programs and projects. The intense concentration of businesses, residents, visitors, and economic activity within the Downtown area necessitates an increased level of maintenance, security, promotion, and coordination. This is a comprehensive plan that represents the DDA’s efforts to deliver outcomes above and beyond standard municipal services provided by the City of West Palm Beach within the Downtown District. This plan has been developed with input from the City of West Palm Beach and the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA). The CRA is a tax increment funded agency that also serves Downtown by facilitating redevelopment to improve the economic vitality and quality of life in designated areas. Since 2006 the CRA and DDA have worked in close cooperation to administer necessary programs within the Downtown core. The DDA’s 2020-2024 Work Plan represents the continued evolution of the previous 5 years work and considers the changes that have occurred over that period. The DDA Work Plan for FY 2020-2024 is divided into four areas of focus: Public Realm Maintenance Attractive and appealing public spaces are the top priority for any urban district as they affect quality of life, business attraction and retention, property values, and marketability of the area. Programs in this area of the

work plan will address public space maintenance and beautification through traditional means as well as trial programs and pilot projects. Neighborhood Services Programs in this area of the Work Plan are designed to ensure that Downtown is a great urban neighborhood – walkable, safe, vibrant and attractive. Advocacy, stewardship, and action on enhancing livability and quality of life are top priorities. Business Development Programs, including those that support existing businesses, are essential to sustaining and improving the vibrancy and economic vitality of the Downtown. A diverse mix of businesses also contributes to quality of life for residents in the area. Marketing and Public Relations Strengthening and promoting the brand identity and image of the Downtown by using its amenities, history, location, businesses, and collection of arts and cultural offerings is essential to keeping the area competitive for investment, tourism growth, and consumer spending. While no single program or project will reposition and redefine Downtown, the ongoing implementation of this strategically developed plan, combined with a commitment for continued improvement of conditions in the Downtown area, will result in sustainable long-term revitalization by supporting private sector investment, increasing business revenues, raising property values, and improving quality of life for residents. The success of this plan will be measured by the redevelopment activity in the targeted area, and fulfillment of each program and objective. Visible changes to the area will be a reminder that revitalization is underway.


About The Downtown Development Authority

Mission Statement: To promote and enhance a vibrant Downtown West Palm Beach for all. The DDA is an independent special taxing district established to: • Analyze the economic conditions and changes occurring in the downtown area, including the effect of such factors as metropolitan growth, traffic congestion, parking, and structural obsolescence and deterioration. • Formulate long-range plans for improving the appeal, use, and public accessibility of downtown facilities, remedying any deterioration of property values and developing the downtown area. The DDA is actively involved in planning, marketing, serving and developing our City’s center.  Principle services include Downtown retail recruitment and retention, community planning, community

advocacy, placemaking, public space maintenance programs, public art projects and programs, marketing, events, trolley operations, and capital improvement project planning and implementation. The DDA is funded through an ad valorem tax levied annually on all property within the Downtown Development District as well as selected partnership, sponsorships, and grants when available. The current tax rate is 1 mil (.001) on each dollar of tax base. Although Florida statute enables the DDA to levy 2 mils (.002), the DDA has only levied 1 mil since 2007. Funding in an amount equal to the value to the 2nd mil is provided to the DDA by the City’s Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) through an agreement between the City, CRA, and the DDA. The funds provided by the CRA are utilized for additional marketing of the area, community services, residential services, security, and other programs that further the goals of the City and CRA within the Downtown Core. Since 2006, the DDA has been party to an interagency agreement that allows a pass-through of the 1st mil of tax increment funding from the CRA back to the DDA. The CRA has also agreed to provide funding from the CRA to the DDA that is equal to the 2nd mil and specific project funding for projects that further the goals of both organizations. Through this partnership the DDA can maintain the tax rate of 1 mil while ensuring the continuation of programs to improve the Downtown community for all stakeholders.


DDA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

DDA BOUNDARIES Boundaries of the DDA district are from 7th Street to the north, Flagler Drive to the east, Okeechobee Boulevard to the south and Australian Avenue to the west. The area is a blend of commercial, residential and vacant property. AGLE N FL IVE R DR

The DDA Board is composed of seven members who are appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Commission. To qualify for the appointment, prospective members must reside, have their major business, or own property in the Downtown Development Authority district. Each member serves a three-year term and may be reappointed.  

PALM BEACH LAKE BLVD PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD

The Board establishes policy and approves the work plan for the organization, working closely with the Executive Director who is a fulltime professional employee of the DDA. The Executive Director directs and supervises the DDA staff.

GLER N FLA

N OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

DRIVE

N DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

N R OS E MAR Y AVE

HE NR I E T TA AVE

10TH ST

R OU T E 1

OAD AVE N RAILR

INTRACOASTAL

11TH ST

9TH ST

8TH ST 8TH ST HE NR I E T TA AVE

DDA Board Robert Sanders, DDA Chairman Rick Reikenis, DDA Vice-Chairman Lisa Gerard Mary Hurley Lane William Jacobson Cynthia Nalley Upendo Shabazz

7TH ST

EUCALYPTUS ST

AG LER

N FL

7TH ST

DR

6TH ST

IVE

6TH ST N R OS E MAR Y AVE

OAD AVE W RAILR

N S AP ODI L L A AVE

DI VI S I ON AVE

DOU GL AS S AVE

N TAMAR I ND AVE NU E

6TH ST

N OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

N DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

7TH ST

TO FLAGLER MEMORIAL BRIDGE

QUADRILLE STREET

5TH ST 5TH ST 5TH ST

4TH ST

3RD ST N R OS E MAR Y AVE N QU ADR I L L E B LVD

2ND ST 2ND ST

4TH ST

N F L AGL E R DR I VE

N S AP ODI L L A AVE

DI VI S I ON AVE

DOU GL AS S AVE

N TAMAR I ND AVE NU E 3RD ST

N OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

N DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

4TH ST

DDA Staff Raphael Clemente, Executive Director Teneka James-Feaman, Associate Executive Director Shelly Williams, Director of Administration Catherine Ast, District Services Manager Tiffany Faublas, Marketing Director Sherryl Muriente, Manager of Urban Placemaking Michelle Barascout, Marketing Coordinator Samantha Murrell, Office Manager

3RD ST

2ND ST

BANYAN BOULEVARD BANYAN BOULEVARD

N CLEMATIS ST.

CLEMATIS ST.

SC

S F L AGL E R DR I VE

CLEMATIS STREET

NAR CI S S U S AVE .

S OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

S DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

S QU ADR I L L E B LVD

S R OS E MAR Y AVE

S S AP ODI L L A AVE

S TAMAR I ND AVE NU E

CLEMATIS STREET

BANYAN BOULEVARD

LE

MAT

IS

ST .

DATURA STREET S TAMAR I ND AVE NU E

DATURA STREET DATURA ST S R OS E MAR Y AVE

S S AP ODI L L A AVE

EVERNIA STREET EVERNIA ST.

S QU ADR I L L E B LVD FERN STREET

FERN ST.

GARDENIA STREET

S TAMAR I ND AVE NU E

S F L AGL E R DR I VE

S OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

S DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

GARDENIA STREET

HIBISCUS ST HIBISCUS ST

S R OS E MAR Y AVE

S S AP ODI L L A AVE

IRIS STREET

CONTRACT SERVICES

INTRACOASTAL

FERN STREET

AU S T R AL I AN AVE NU E

CLEAR LAKE

EVERNIA STREET

Due to the scope of the DDA’s work, additional partners and resources are required. Key deliverables are provided through ongoing contracts: Public Relations

TANGLEWOOD COURT IRIS ST S QU ADR I L L E B LVD

TRINITY PLACE

S F L AGL E R DR I VE

LAKEVIEW AVE CHAS E S T

OKEECHOBEE BLVD

S OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

OKEECHOBEE BLVD

S DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

ROUTE 704 TO I-95

LAKEVIEW AVE

TO ROYAL PARK BRIDGE

OKEECHOBEE BLVD

PEMBROKE PLACE

S OL I VE AVE / F E DE R AL HI GHWAY

S DI XI E HI GHWAY / R OU T E 1

PAR K E R AVE NU E

BE HO EC OKE OLD

F L OR I DA AVE NU E

L AK E AVE NU E

GE OR GI A AVE NU E

N ST PAR K E R AVE NU E

KEY

ACADIA ROAD

n

E RO AD

CHADBOURNE COURT

S F L AGL E R DR I VE

GRUBER PLACE

NEWARK ST

downtown boundary JEFFERSON ROAD

Private Security Service Provider/ Security Ambassador Program

Holiday Lighting and Decorations Legal Services

Downtown Trolley System Operator

Annual Independent Audit

Landscape Maintenance

IT Services

Pressure Washing

Accounting Services

Janitorial and Public Space Maintenance


MARKET AREA INFORMATION The Downtown core comprises approximately 7/10 of a square mile and contains approximately 7,700 residential units, over 10,000,000 square feet of non-residential development, and nearly 1,500 hotel rooms. Included in the non-residential square footage is 1 million square feet of retail and restaurant space in two main clusters: 640,000 square feet in Rosemary Square and 737,000 square feet in the Clematis District. There are roughly 15,000 businesses or institutions in operation within the Downtown District. The Trade Area analysis considers demand generated by three groups, as follows: Residents This represents approximately 128,000 people and is the group that can be relied upon to have the greatest consumer impact on Downtown West Palm Beach. Geographically they will favor Downtown over other locations due to distance and convenience. Visitors and Tourism Over 8 million people per year, an average of or more than 15,000 visitors per day who do not work in the Downtown. Local Workforce Approximately 30,000 people work in the trade area.

THE MARKET The local market for Downtown West Palm Beach is divided into the following zones:

The Primary Market is within a three-mile radius of the Downtown core. This area includes zip codes: 33408, 33405 and 33401 The Secondary Market is defined as being between three and five miles from the Downtown core. This area includes zip code: 33406 The Tertiary Market includes areas five miles away from the Downtown core and beyond. This market includes Wellington, Delray Beach, Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter, and Ft. Lauderdale. Additional target markets may be identified with input from the City of West Palm Beach, Discover the Palm Beaches, the Chamber of Commerce, and other industry groups.

PEDESTRIAN ACTIVITY Pedestrian traffic increases each year in Downtown West Palm Beach. To quantify this data, the electronic counters are used to measure pedestrian traffic in strategically selected locations. In the highest traffic areas, pedestrian trips average over 4,000 people per day in primary locations within the core area of Downtown. In addition to the number of pedestrians in Downtown, qualitative analysis will be used to better understand how people are using public spaces within the District.

MUNICIPAL PARKING GARAGE USAGE RATES Annual counts of vehicles utilizing City Parking facilities in the Downtown are an important metric of visitation. This will include weekday and weekend usage, as well as usage during special events.


PRESSURE WASHING, CLEANING & MAINTENANCE

Objective: Public Realm Maintenance

Maintenance of the public realm is directly connected to quality of life, economic development, and community pride. The cleanliness of streets and sidewalks, the condition of undeveloped parcels of land, and the maintenance of landscaping are important elements in shaping perceptions of a place.

• Conduct monthly maintenance surveys to address problem areas and conditions. • Contract with service providers pressure washing. • Expand the scope of services and areas serviced by the Downtown Clean Team.

SIGNAGE AND PEDESTRIAN WAYFINDING Coordinate signage for trolley system and pedestrian signage with City’s way-finding program.

LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Contract with service providers to beautify and enhance landscaped areas of the district with a focus on areas with high pedestrian traffic, gateways into downtown, or concentrations of business activity.

GRAFFITI REMOVAL In coordination with the Police Department’s graffiti program and a contract with service providers, the removal of graffiti of all types from public areas are accomplished.

CAPITAL PROJECTS Prototyping low cost, simple public space interventions is an effective and efficient way to test concepts for public space improvements that lead to community enhancing projects or policy changes. • Work with various stakeholder groups to test new approaches to activating, programming, and maintaining public spaces using prototyping and pilot projects. • Perform district-wide assessments of infrastructure, accessibility, public spaces and amenities. • Improve lighting in deficient areas. • Coordinate with City to install new streetlights. • Conduct annual district-wide lighting survey. • Fund additional camera locations to supplement additional security cameras in the district.


Objective: Neighborhood Services

RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMMING Goal: Increase quality of life and well-being of residential community by engaging them through placemaking programs and projects. • Conduct wellness programming that is free to the public in connection to residential public realm. • Create special projects and programs that are responsive to the needs of residents in Downtown WPB. • Increase opportunities to meet your neighbors through downtown activities. • Increase opportunities to volunteer in programs and projects in the public realm. • Complementary programs that respond to residential needs. • Conduct meetups with residential building managers to address communication strategies and have periodic engagement on needs/wants of community. • Conduct meetups at residential buildings to engage residents and inform them about what the DDA does for them. • Compile information through brainstorming sessions, surveys, or other engagement sessions to identify downtown residents’ needs.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Goal: Inform, involve, and collaborate with local community on the improvement of the downtown’s quality of life. Inform • Expert lectures (Emergence). • Community-based presentations (Assemblage). • Interviews/Surveys on programming (Mailchimp). • Mapping of public space use per interventions. (Gehl method/MotionLoft/etc). • Urban Placemaking webinars/lectures. Involve • Visioning brainstorm sessions. • Digital engagement – story mapping. • Volunteer program for placemaking programs. • Volunteer and training for public space measurement/analysis. • Downtown Storytelling and periodic engagement on needs/wants of the community.

Collaborate/Empower • Identification of Community Champions – training and call to action. • Stewardship guide for placemaking programs and physical projects. • Community action incubator based on placemaking principles. • Workshops for design/build of placemaking physical interventions. • Operation and Management of Placemaking programs by community champions.

PUBLIC SPACE PROGRAMS Goal: Increase use and add community focused programming to public spaces through placemaking programs and projects throughout the downtown area. • Create special projects and programs on privately-owned public space and/or vacant land to demonstrate temporary improvements to the public realm. • Create pop up programming in both private and public open space that enhances the overall quality of life of downtown. • Measure special projects and pop up projects through observational research and quantitative research. • Increase wellness and environmental programming in public space.s • Increase creative placemaking and art-based programming with a focus on performance art and temporary/ephemeral art installations.

Intimate, welcoming public spaces support a wide range of activities. Small spaces provide opportunities to “seed” activity in areas where none previously existed. Activating small public spaces allows for planning from the perspective of the most important – and vulnerable user of public space: the pedestrian. TRANSPORTATION • Manage trolley system operations through contracted service provider. • Actively participate in the identification, procurement, and management of mobility options in Downtown. • Continue investment and projects focused on improving the pedestrian experience thought-out the Downtown District, with a special focus on areas near residential buildings and hotels.


SECURITY AND POLICING Goal: Enhance the safety of the Downtown area. • Solicit feedback from residents, business owners and law enforcement to identify strategies to address safety concerns and develop solutions to security issues. • Expand and improve the Downtown Security Ambassador Program. • Expand coverage area in response to increased development, changing use patterns, and stakeholder input. • Recommend customer service training programs for the Security Ambassador program to improve the customer service component of their presence. • Improve lighting in deficient areas. • Coordinate with City to install new streetlights. • Conduct annual district-wide lighting survey. • Support Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) programs for residential and commercial properties. • Participate in City’s security camera program. • Fund additional camera locations to supplement additional security cameras in the district. • Perform district-wide assessments of infrastructure, accessibility, public spaces and amenities.

Finding solutions to the challenges of homelessness is the responsibility of the entire community. The DDA allocates funding and staff resources to provide the greatest possible impact for those in need and for community stakeholders who are peripherally affected by this national problem. HOMELESS OUTREACH Street outreach engages people experiencing homelessness who would not typically seek out services to address their health and housing needs. Outreach “seeks to establish a personal connection that provides the spark for the journey back to a vital and dignified life.” Outreach is the fundamental link between people experiencing homelessness and available services and resources. Effective street outreach requires client engagement to occur outside of the traditional office setting, meeting clients where they are, and connecting them with services to meet their housing and healthcare needs.


Objective: Business Development

LEASING/BROKERS MEETINGS

The DDA’s economic development efforts are in harmony with the City’s vision of West Palm Beach as a vibrant, world-class city with a diverse and thriving economy. The DDA’s programs align with the City’s stated economic development goals:

• Create marketing materials focused on downtown development available to area brokers, property managers and leasing agents. 

• Market Downtown in targeted industry publications. • Leverage partnerships with economic development partners.   • Schedule and conduct tours of the downtown district for investors and brokers.  

1. Talent attraction 2. A Healthy Business Climate  3. Supportive infrastructure  4. Quality of Place  5. Innovation and Entrepreneurship 

BUSINESS TRAINING AND SUPPORT • Participate in downtown stakeholder association groups.  • Conduct annual stakeholder surveys.  • Distribute market information to businesses.  • Create “New Business Welcome Kit” with information on services and programs as well as contact information for key City departments.  • Host educational programs to strengthen business competitiveness.  • Inform businesses of promotional marketing opportunities.   • Expand the number of value-added events targeting new customer growth. 

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVE PROGRAMS • Promote available incentive programs in the downtown district through industry specific publications.   • Maintain a data base of targeted redevelopment properties.   • Strategically utilize development incentive grants to qualifying businesses for façade and leasehold improvements.  • Identify and execute programs to activate vacant spaces. 

PARTNERSHIPS

• Identify and execute programs adaptive reuse of large vacant spaces. • Research innovative programs to activate vacant spaces. • Partner with arts organizations to produce art and cultural exhibitions i in storefronts and other underutilized locations. • Research and apply for available grants via a contracted grant-writer to supplement DDA incentives in areas relating to cultural, community enhancement and business initiatives.


Marketing and Public Relations

Goal: Strengthen Downtown’s appeal as a tourism and entertainment destination. Advertising  • Compile a full inventory of special events taking place in and around Downtown.  • Develop strategies for marketing Downtown and its key attractions including the use of local and national media.  • Market to targeted audiences to expand the reach and diversity of ad purchases.  • Utilize seasonal promotions in various media publications within the trade area and in select industry publications.  • Track results via analytics and metrics through social and website using marketing platforms.  • Place branded advertising in all marketing collateral including tourism and destination based, cultural hospitality, and lifestyle publications.  • Public Relations.  • Coordinate with PR firm to brand Downtown as unique, friendly, safe and innovative district.  • Distribute regular press releases about Downtown including new businesses, events, cultural opportunities and accomplishments.   • Update Crisis Management Manual annually with appropriate City departments.  

The brand identity of a place must consider its unique identity, character, and local priorities. Capturing and expressing local identity boosts pride, encourages community participation, and supports economic development initiatives.

Evaluation

Retail Promotions   • Utilize owned media to promote special opportunities and activities.   • Produce collateral materials focused on leveraging promotions to drive consumer visitation to the district.

Community and Cultural Promotions Strategy Strategy: Increase awareness of Downtown as a tourism destination for arts, culture, and entertainment.   • Explore opportunities for non-profits, arts organizations and special event organizers to collaborate and combine efforts to maintain consistent activation in Downtown.  • Create and promote tours that highlight West Palm Beach’s history and culture  • Continued integration of arts into public spaces.  • Further promotion of the arts and increase in arts-related events and activities.  • Coordinate with tourism industry partners to promote the entire district to the tourism market.  • Leverage partnerships with hoteliers and attractions to increase awareness of Downtown as a tourism destination.   • Produce promotional materials and distribute to appropriate tourism focused outlets.  • Develop a series of educational opportunities specifically for industry professionals such as concierge services, property managers, hospitality and retail businesses.    Value Added Events Strategy Strategy: Identify creative and unique events that showcase the District’s qualities and attributes.  • Partner with industry organizations or downtown stakeholders to produce events designed to market and promote the unique attributes of the district  

Evaluation of this plan will be based on the following measurable outcomes: • Monitoring of key indicators - Pedestrian traffic - Parking usage - Trolley ridership • Quantification of deliverables and impacts of programs and projects. • Tracking media placements and quantification of annual value earned. • Establishing business revenue benchmarks and tracking them over time. • Community and market area perception survey results. • Vacancy rates.


West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority 300 Clematis Street, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 T: (561) 833-8873 | F: (561) 833-5870 @WestPalmDDA DowntownWPB.com

Profile for WestPalmDDA

2020 - 2024 Work Plan  

The goals of this plan are designed to improve local economic conditions, broaden the tax base, and enhance quality of life. Economic and co...

2020 - 2024 Work Plan  

The goals of this plan are designed to improve local economic conditions, broaden the tax base, and enhance quality of life. Economic and co...

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