__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

5 8 T H

A N N U A L

C O N F E R E N C E

RE-IMAGINING RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE WEST W E S T E R N

H I S T O R Y

A S S O C I A T I O N

"Histories of race and ethnicities remain vital to any understanding of Western history."

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS October 17-20, 2018


2018 Schedule at a Glance Wednesday, October 17 Writer’s Workshop: California… Tour: Fredericksburg/Pacific War WHA Council Meeting K-20 Engagement: National Hi… CWWH Roundtable: Monume… Welcoming Reception

8:00 AM 9:00 AM 9:00 AM 2:00 PM 3:30 PM 6:00 PM

12:00 PM 5:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:30 PM 5:00 PM 8:00 PM

Nueces Hotel Lobby Chula Vista Pecos Live Oak Briscoe Museum

7:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:00 PM 12:15 PM 12:30 PM 1:00 PM 3:00 PM 12:45 PM 12:45 PM 1:30 PM 2:15 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:30 PM

8:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM

Garden Terrace Chula Vista Board Rio Grande-West Mesquite Nueces Llano Rio Grande-East Rio Grande-Center Blanco Pecan Chula Vista Seguin Live Oak Directors Pecos Frio Rio Grande-East Mesquite Nueces Frio Rio Grande-Center Chula Vista Live Oak Llano Pecos Directors Pecan The Alamo Blanco Rio Grande-West Garden Terrace Q Restaurant Chula Vista Board Chula Vista Pecan Hotel Lobby Hotel Lobby Hotel Lobby Hotel Lobby Hotel Lobby Mesquite Directors Nueces Live Oak Pecos Pecan Directors Llano Pecos Pecan Frio Mesquite Rio Grande Bllrm Garden Terrace

Thursday, October 18 ASEH Breakfast Mining History Breakfast Confronting Settler Schooling:… Reconsidering Race, Gender, an… Redefining Activism: New Dire… Native American Removal, Rel… State of the Field: Environment… Gendered Labors: Women, Wor… Alamo City, Immigrant City, C… A ‘Safe-and-Sane Heartland’: F… “We Couldn’t Continue Living… Knowledge and Encounter in th… Vice, Crime, and Racialization i… Religion and Racialization in th… Reimagining Conquest: The Co… Legacies of Indigenous Power i… Western Humor: A Celebration… Native Protest and Dynamics in… Doing Scholarly Editions in the… Ageism, Ableism and Advocac… New Directions in Western Lab… Converting the Missionaries: Th… The Black Women’s West Bodies of Evidence: Health Tec… Reimagining Race and Gender… Re-imaging the Way We Teach… Documenting Hurricane Harvey… Roundtable: Changing History… Race and Sovereignty: Bringing… Re-Imagining Border Crossings Teacher/Author Lunch (Closed) WHQ Editorial Board Lunch Montana Editorial Board Lunch WHA 2019 Program Committ… 2018 Spark Session: Sexual Har… Tour: Walking Tour #1 Tour: Pearl Brewery District Tour: San Antonio Mission Trail Tour: Institute of Texan Cultures Tour: Walking Tour #2 Navigating the Historical Profes… Six Shooters: A Digital Frontier… Film & Panel: El Muro: The Wall Improving the Research Experie… CWWH Business Meeting WHA-CARES Meeting WHA Tech Committee Meeting WHA Contingent Fac. Meeting WHA Membership Committee WHA CRAW Meeting WHA Public History Committee WHA-GSC Meeting Presidential Plenary: Reimagi... Graduate Student Reception

4:15 PM 1:30 PM 3:00 PM 3:15 PM 4:45 PM 4:30 PM 6:00 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 4:30 PM 4:45 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM

Friday, October 19 CWWH Breakfast Prehistories and Afterlives of a… Indigenizing Cityscapes since t… Roundtable: Pedagogy and the… Outside the Lines: Latinx Sporti… 35 and Beyond: Celebrating 35… Re-imagining 20th-Century We… Contested Environment: Indige… New Directions in Race, Ethnic… Reimagining the Racial Lands… Race & Ethnicity in the 20th Cen... Re-Imagining Expansion: New… The Transformative Experience… Revisiting the Frontiers of Hist…

7:00 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM

10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM

Rio Grande Center Nueces Bowie C Frio Pecan Rio Grande-East Pecos Directors Blanco Llano Seguin Chula Vista Mesquite Live Oak

Moments of Agency and Activi… Sewing, Saddles, Speeches, and… Re-Imagining Race and Japanes… Religion, Race, and the State: I… The African American West in … Race, Ethnicity, and Gender: A… LOC/TPS Teaching #1 Somethings That Glitter are Ind… Protecting Air and Water: Urba… From the Mexican Generation t… Native Voices and New Method… “They Took Your Land Away a… Native Americans in the West … The Alamo: An Icon Imagined… WHA Poster Session & Reception Presidential Luncheon Celebrating Vicki Ruiz… The “Fixi”-fication of America… National Contexts, Local Probl… Race and Place in the Pacific N… Drawn by Law: A Critical Rou… Race and Ethnicity in Public Hi… Memorializing Conquest: Race… Diversity and the Managed Wes… Critical Perspectives on Native… Rethinking Jonestown Forty Ye… LOC/TPS Teaching #2 Monuments, Memorials, and Pl… Unpacking Borderlands: Origin… WHA Business Meeting Public History Reception CRAW/CWWH Reception WHA 2018 Awards Banquet

10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 12:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 3:45 PM 4:00 PM 4:30 PM 6:00 PM

12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM

7:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM

8:00 AM Garden Terrace 8:00 AM Rio Grande-Center 10:00 AM Blanco 10:00 AM Llano 10:00 AM Rio Grande-East 10:00 AM Mesquite 10:00 AM Directors 10:00 AM Pecos 10:00 AM Frio 10:00 AM Seguin 10:00 AM Live Oak 10:00 AM Pecan 10:00 AM Nueces 10:00 AM Bowie C 10:00 AM Chula Vista 10:00 AM Rio Grande-Center 10:00 AM Rio Grande-West 12:00 PM Bowie C 12:00 PM Directors 12:00 PM Chula Vista 12:00 PM Mesquite 12:00 PM Live Oak 12:00 PM Llano 12:00 PM Pecan 12:00 PM Frio 12:00 PM Blanco 12:00 PM Nueces 12:00 PM Seguin 12:00 PM Pecos 12:00 PM Rio Grande-Center 1:00 PM Rio Grande-West Rio Grande-East Rio Grande-Center 3:00 PM Frio 3:00 PM Seguin 3:00 PM Blanco 4:30 PM Live Oak 3:00 PM Nueces 3:00 PM Llano 3:00 PM Chula Vista 3:00 PM Pecan 3:00 PM Bowie C 3:00 PM Mesquite 3:00 PM Directors 3:00 PM Pecos

3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 3:45 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM

Mesquite Pecos Nueces Frio Llano Bowie C Blanco Live Oak Pecan Directors Rio Grande-East Seguin Chula Vista The Alamo Exhibits Hall Rio Grande Bllrm Live Oak Rio Grande-East Nueces Pecan Frio Llano Pecos Mesquite Directors Bowie C Blanco Chula Vista Seguin Pecan Exhibits Hall Garden Terrace Rio Grande Bllrm

Saturday, October 20 Borderlands Breakfast Contingent Fac/Prof Breakfast Gender, Race, and the State bet… Indigenous Quest for Justice in … Lightning Round: Condensed D… Excavating the Silences: (Re)ex… Film Session: Stolen Education New Mexico Peoples, Lands, an… Voces Desconocidas: Creating a… Envisioning an Alternative Futu… Borderlands of Southern Colora… The Northern Paiute History Pr… Ethnic Mexicans and Chicanas/… An Unruly Place: Land, Air, an… Roundtable: Re-imagining the … What will you do with that degr… Promoting Diversity in History… Multiple use, Contested Identiti… Film Session: Bisbee '17 State of the Field: Native Wome… Cataloging Race & Ethnicity in… This is Indian Land: Recognizin… Latino Heritage Conservation:… Contested Histories, Contested… ‘Natives,’ ‘Invaders,’ and Exoti… Washing the Dust off Indigenou… Maintaining Peace, Providing S… Shifting Ethnicities on the Edge… Blurring The Edges: Race, Ethn… LOC/TPS Teaching #3 Tamale Making and Storytelling Indian Scholars Luncheon Redd Center Awards Lunch Race and Radicalism: The Twin… Space, Place and Community: … U.S. Expansion and Its Discontent Indigenous Communities in [Ur… Travels in the Greater West: Th… Nuestra Voz in San Antonio, Te… Public Identities: Performing In… Floods, Droughts, Quakes, and… Mexican American/Chicanxs… Geographies of Religion and Race Race, Politics, Space, and the S… Power, Resistance, and Runawa…


The Western History Association

"Re-imagining Race and Ethnicity in the West"

"The WHA strives to be a congenial home for the study and teaching of all aspects of North American Wests, frontiers, homelands, and borderlands. Our mission is to cultivate the broadest appreciation of this diverse history." The 58th Annual Western History Association's Conference is an official event of the San Antonio Tricentennial. 


WELCOME TO SAN ANTONIO

TABLE OF CONTENTS

From the President

4

2018 WHA Conference Sponsors

5

From the 2018 Program Committee

7

CONFERENCE INFORMATION Schedule-at-a-Glance

1

Conference and Hotel Information

9

From the Local Arrangements Committee

11

Tours

13

Conference Meeting Rooms Map

103

RE-IMAGINING RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE WEST Meals and Receptions

21

Business & Committee Meetings

22

2018 Schedule of Sessions

23

EXHIBITORS AND ADVERTISERS Index of Exhibitors

54

Index of Ads

55

WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION WHA Executive Office

86

WHA Governance & Committees

89

Membership Past Presidents and Directors

92 92

WHA Awards & Committees

93

WHA Conference History

95

WHA 2019 Call for Papers

96

Program Index

97


From the President: DONALD L. FIXICO DISTINGUISHED FOUNDATION PROFESSOR ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY  2018 WHA PRESIDENT

“Welcome to San Antonio,” located in the Native land of the Coahuiltecan people. You may remember we were last here in 2000. San Antonio is an enriched city with extraordinary history in the Southwest. The city is one of the fastest growing urban areas representing many diverse backgrounds. You cannot think about San Antonio without envisioning the Alamo, where Mexicans and Americans fought for this area. The Alamo is only a block away from the Hyatt and you can experience the 15-mile long Riverwalk starting at the hotel. San Antonio is an historic and modern confluence of cultures, religious beliefs and popular trends. Everything is conveniently located in downtown where your shoes or boots can take you.

The theme of the 58th Annual Conference is “Reimagining Race & Ethnicity in the West.” Since its inception as a series of missions on the edge of the Spanish frontier in the early eighteenth century, San Antonio has flourished as a gathering point of several frontiers. As the Spanish pushed north and American settlement moved westward, this area experienced a diverse mixture of races & ethnicities. This year the city is having its 300-year anniversary and we are fortunate to be a part of this historic celebration!

Program Co-Chairs Kent Blansett and Farina King and the rest of the 2018 Program Committee organized a fabulous offering of sessions. I want to thank them and the WHA Staff for all of their work to make this conference a success. There are two sessions at the Alamo, a plenary session on Race and Ethnicity in the Modern West, a tamale-making session, storytelling sessions, several state of the field panels, and more than 115 sessions stressing the history of this part of the country and the rest of the West

I also want to thank Local Arrangements Co-Chairs Billy Kiser and Brian Collier and the other members of the 2018 Local Arrangements Committee who gathered sponsors and organized fantastic tours. Their efforts promise all of us a lot of fun! Beginning with the Welcoming Reception at the Briscoe Western Art Museum a couple of blocks away, the tours include a mission walk, Word War II museum, and the Pearl Brewery district. San Antonio has much to offer where you will want to meet old friends and make new ones. I look forward to seeing all of you. You will have a great time to eat, drink and be merry!  


THANK YOU TO OUR 2018 CONFERENCE SPONSORS!

2018 CONFERENCE SPONSORS Department of History, University of Alaska Fairbanks Public History Program, Arizona State University School of Historical, Philosophical, & Religious Studies, Arizona State University Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Better Way Foundation Bexar County Historical Commission Department of History, Boise State University Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, Brigham Young University Briscoe Western Art Museum The Papers of William F. Cody, Buffalo Bill Center of the West Public Lands History Center, Colorado State University Center for the American West, University of Colorado Boulder Public History Program, University of Colorado Denver Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West The Huntington Library Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Resources – Western Region Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska College of Arts and Sciences, University of Nebraska at Omaha Department of History, University of Nebraska at Omaha Dr. C.C. and Mable L. Criss Library, University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska Press


THANK YOU TO OUR 2018 CONFERENCE SPONSORS!

Public History Program, University of Nevada at Las Vegas Center for the Southwest, University of New Mexico University of North Carolina Press Public History Program, Oklahoma State University Department of History, University of Oklahoma Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries Department of History, Penn State University George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center, Penn State University Department of History, Southern Methodist University William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University St. Mary’s University Public History Program Department of History, University of Texas at Austin Institute for Texas Cultures, University of Texas at San Antonio Arts & Humanities Department, Texas A&M University - San Antonio AddRan College of Liberal Arts, Texas Christian University Department of History, Texas Christian University American West Center, University of Utah Witte Museum American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming Department of History, University of Wyoming University of Wyoming Libraries Beinecke Library, Yale University


2018 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

KENT BLANSETT UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA OMAHA PROGRAM COMMITTEE CO-CHAIR

FARINA KING NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COMMITTEE CO-CHAIR

As the 2018 Program Committee Co-Chairs for the 58th Annual Western History Association Conference, we wish to welcome everyone to San Antonio, Texas. It is incredibly important to first recognize that, as conference attendees, we are guests on the ancestral homelands and treaty lands of Native nations. This region of southern Texas represents a major confluence of complex cultures, languages, life-ways, and histories—an Indigenous past shaped by struggles to overcome competing colonial forces of genocide. Long before this region became a republic or a state, it supported a vast Intertribal network of Anadarko, Caddo, Coahuiltecan, Comanche, Hasinai, Jumano, Karankawa, Kichai, Kiowa, Lipan and Mescalero Apache, Tawakoni, Tigua, Tonkawa, Waco, Wichita, Yaqui and a number of Nations that trace a sacred and political relationship to the lands that now comprise Texas. As a consequence of colonial violence, this region evolved into a place that afforded sanctuary for Indigenous nations such as the Alabama, Biloxi, Cherokee, Choctaw, Coushatta, Creek, Chickasaw, Delaware, Kickapoo, Shawnee, and Potawatomi Nations. Today, Texas is home to three federally recognized nations: Tigua of Ysleta del Sur Pueblo, Kickapoo, and Alabama Coushatta as well as the state-recognized Lipan Apache and Texas Band of Yaqui. The meeting place for the 2018 WHA Conference is still the home to many Indigenous peoples from Nations throughout Turtle Island, and San Antonio represents the tenth largest per capita urban Indian population in the United States. We are thankful for the opportunity to gather on their lands.

San Antonio is currently celebrating its “Tricentennial Anniversary,” which the city defines by histories of revolutions. This city once inspired individuals, in 1836, to set aside their differences and rally around a common cause greater than themselves—to found a free and independent democratic republic. This revolutionary dream unified a citizenry comprised of women and men from Indigenous, American, Tejano, Spanish, and Mexican peoples who organized alongside free and enslaved African Americans. Fortified behind the walls of the Alamo, which was initially constructed in the eighteenth-century to serve as a Spanish mission for the religious conversion of Indigenous peoples. Those who sought sanctuary within the Alamo faced insurmountable odds and the prospects of certain death. The fall of the Alamo to General Antonio López de Santa Anna’s military forces, emerged as a powerful American symbol, a national monument, and UNESCO World Heritage Site that offers a solemn reminder about the costs of liberty and freedom. San Antonio represents a fitting location for a historical organization devoted to reimagining race and ethnicity throughout the North American West. The city of San Antonio is featured in several panels during this year’s conference, including the 1968 HemisFair, Chicanx City and Barrio politics, and oral history projects that promote students, community leaders, and scholars to collaborate on interpretations of Texas history. 


We are indebted to the talents of our 2018 Program Committee members who volunteered precious hours towards recruitment, design, and development of the Conference. The Program Committee reviewed and accepted several sessions that explore the history of the Alamo, including two sessions located at the Alamo; food history that involves story, life-ways, and Tamale making; a poster session promoting undergraduate student research; Native American and Indigenous politics and identity; science, technology, and health; African Americans in the American West; roundtables on careers, research, the changes in the historical profession, Latinx sports, and several panels that discuss films with creators and directors, such as El Muro: The Wall. Three separate panels honor the contributions of WHA members Vicki Ruiz, Elizabeth Jameson, and the 2018 President, Donald Fixico. We also commend the contributions and endorsements of the WHA Standing and AdHoc Committees (Teaching and Public Education, Technology, CARES, Public History, CRAW, Contingent and Adjunct), and affiliate groups (Westerners International, Coalition for Western Women’s History, WHA Graduate Student Caucus, Mormon History Association, Beinecke Library, Library of Congress Teaching Primary Sources, St. Mary’s University Public History Program, and the Center for the American West at the University of Colorado Boulder) which represent over twenty panel sponsorships throughout the 2018 Conference. One of our main initiatives as a committee was to promote gender diversity in as many sessions as possible, and to highlight sessions that cover nearly every subfield of western history—from public and digital engagement, to powerful “State of the Field” panels - one on environmental history and one on Native and Indigenous women.

We are grateful to the Western History Association Executive Office at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and want to personally thank Leah Cargin, the WHA Executive Assistant, whose help, advice, organization, and administrative support made this conference possible. Finally, we acknowledge that these are challenging and tumultuous times and commend our current WHA President Donald Fixico for his forethought to organize this year’s conference around the theme of “Reimaging Race and Ethnicity.” While we may not all share the same politics, we do share the same love and enthusiasm for Western history, and work to pursue the stories about our collective past that define our field and profession. It is our sincere hope that the 2018 WHA Conference will bring scholars together in conversations that move in positive directions to forge new networks and celebrate the unique ideas, interpretations, scholarly work, and stories that encapsulate the North American West.

See you in San Antonio!

Ahéhee

ʹ and Wado,

Farina King Kent Blansett

2018 Program Committee Members Erika M. Bsumek, University of Texas at Austin

Laura K. Muñoz, University of Nebraska - Lincoln 

Quin'Nita Cobbins, University of Washington

Keith Carlson, University of Saskatchewan                  

B. Erin Cole, Minnesota Historical Society

Joshua L. Reid, University of Washington  

Sandra Enríquez, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Brent Rogers, Joseph Smith Papers

Jason Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Gregory E. Smoak, University of Utah

Robert (Bob) F. Jefferson, Jr., University of New Mexico

Brianna Theobald, University of Rochester Lindsey Passenger Wieck, St. Mary's University, San Antonio 


CONFERENCE INFORMATION

Conference Information Registration opens July 2nd, 2018. The conference pre-registration deadline is October 1, 2018. Registration and full payment must be received by October 1, 2018 to receive the pre-registration rates. Pre – Registration Rates: WHA Member Non-Member Student K-12 Teachers Contingent Professionals Guest (Non-Member) Under/Unemployed

$115 $165 $40 $80 $65* $50** Contact WHA Office

On Site Registration Rates: Member Non-Member Student K-12 Teachers Contingent Professionals Guest (Non-Member) Under/Unemployed

$140 $190 $60 $80 $85* $75** Contact WHA Office

*Contingent faculty includes those whose primary employment, whether full-time or part-time, is not on the tenure track. ** The WHA no longer offers registration rates for Joint members. Each WHA conference attendee, regardless of membership category, must individually register – unless they qualify as a guest: The WHA defines a guest as a family member or someone who would not attend the conference except to accompany a conference attendee.

All persons attending, including program participants, are required to register. WHA Membership applications are available online at www.westernhistory.org/join and at the conference registration desk.

Refund Policy: Refunds will be given for cancelations received by October 1, 2018. All refunds after that date will be honored less a $20 handling fee.

WHA Registration Desk Hours:

Book Exhibit Hours:

Conference Registration is located outside of the Exhibits Hall in the Foyer of the Hyatt Regency Hotel.

Coffee, tea, and water will be available during the book exhibit hours. Breakfast pastries will also be available from 8-10am on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

Wednesday, October 17 Thursday & Friday, October 18-19 Saturday, October 20

Noon – 5pm 8am – 5pm 8am – 1pm

Thursday & Friday Saturday

8am – 5pm 8am – 2pm

Teachers: Please note that the Continuing Education Units (CEU) are available at the conference through the University of Notre Dame. CEU registration materials will be available onsite at the WHA Registration Desk. CEU’s are $25 per conference day. Scholarships are available for those teaching at under resourced schools. For more information, please contact Brian Collier at Brian.Collier@nd.edu or (574) 631-1637


CONFERENCE INFORMATION

Hyatt Regency Hotel Reservations: Attendees of the 2018 WHA Conference are invited to reserve their rooms under the WHA room block at the Hyatt Regency on the River Walk in San Antonio, TX. Single and Double Occupancy: $189 per night. Call 1-888-421-1442 and refer to the “Western History Association.” Book your room online by selecting the link at: https://www.westernhistory.org/Travel-and-Accommodations The WHA Room rates are only valid until September 25, 2018 or until the room block is filled. Hyatt Regency San Antonio Riverwalk 123 Losoya Street San Antonio, TX 78205 The Emily Morgan Hotel Reservations: Attendees of the 2018 WHA Conference are invited to reserve their rooms under the WHA room block at the Emily Morgan Hotel in Downtown San Antonio, TX. Single and Double Occupancy: $189 per night. For reservations call 1-800-222-TREE or contact the hotel directly at 210-225-5100 and refer to “Western History Association.” You may also secure your reservation by visiting the WHA website at https://www.westernhistory.org/Travel-and-Accommodations The WHA Room rates are only valid until September 25, 2018 or until the room block is filled. The Emily Morgan Hotel 705 East Houston Street San Antonio, TX 78205 Transportation: The conference hotel is approximately 9 miles from the San Antonio International Airport. Uber/Lyft: $15 - $20 Supershuttle: $15 Taxi: $30

Overnight parking is available at the Hyatt Regency for $30-$40 per night. For local guests the city of San Antonio offers numerous lots nearby.

Losoya Conference Center: Please note that WHA Sessions will be held in the Hyatt Regency hotel as well as the Losoya Conference Center located directly across the street. All sessions in Bowie C and Seguin will be located in the Losoya Conference Center.


Welcome to San Antonio! 2018 Local Arrangements Committee Brian Collier, Co-Chair, Notre Dame University Billy Kiser, Co-Chair, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Angelica Docog, UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures Michael Duchemin, Briscoe Western Art Museum Francis Galan, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Gilberto Hinojosa, University of the Incarnate Word Todd Kerstetter, Texas Christian University Amy Porter, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez, University of Texas at San Antonio Teresa Van Hoy, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio Edward Westermann, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Richard Bruce Winders, The Alamo

Welcome to San Antonio, a vibrant cultural and ethnic crossroads located “deep in the heart of Texas.” With 1.5 million residents, it is the third-largest city in Texas and the seventh-largest in the United States; the total suburban population of 2.5 million makes it the nation’s 24th most populous metropolitan area. Coahuiltecan Indians inhabited these ancestral homelands long before Spanish colonizers arrived in the region that indigenous peoples call Y anaguana, or “refreshing waters.” In 1718—the city’s official founding date— missionaries began construction of two neighboring compounds, Misión de San Antonio de Valero and Presidio San Antonio de Béxar. San Antonio grew around these twin symbols of European colonial power, together with a villa, or town, after the arrival of families from the Canary Islands in 1731. The area eventually became the largest crossroads on New Spain’s northeastern frontier. By the mid-eighteenth century, a string of five Catholic missions—San Antonio de Valero, Concepción, San José, San Juan, and Espada—dotted the banks of the San Antonio River. These missions, as well as the villa, suffered from Southern Plains Indian raiding throughout much of the century until the Spanish negotiated treaties with the Apaches in 1749 and the Comanches in 1785. For much of the nineteenth century, the mission compounds—with the exception of San Antonio—lay mostly in ruins until their restoration in the 1930s. But descendants of the Mission Indians continued to live on secularized lands in the area and became parish communities. American empresarios made their appearance in the 1820s and helped to bring about the Texas Revolution and the famous siege at the Alamo in 1836. The ensuing decade saw the arrival of many European immigrants, especially German, Irish, and French, who settled in towns throughout the area. During the Civil War, San Antonio—by that time a diverse town of 15,000 inhabitants that included a small African American presence—became the military headquarters of Confederate Texas. After the war, the cattle industry stimulated the South Texas economy and San Antonio sat at an intersection of the major trails leading northward. The first railroad tracks reached the city in the late 1870s, transforming San Antonio into a commercial hub that linked the Gulf Coast to the Texas hinterlands. Almost a century later, the construction of Interstate-10 reinforced the city’s importance as a national crossroads of economy and culture.


In 1968 the World’s Fair came to San Antonio. Often called “The Confluence of Civilizations in America,” HemisFair attracted 6.3 million visitors and showcased the city’s Hispanic culture. This event coincided with another critical moment, the 1960s Chicano Movement. With a Hispanic-majority population and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) headquartered in the city, San Antonio became an epicenter of the nationwide movements for civil rights that helped to define that transformative decade in American history. Today, the city’s economy revolves primarily around military, health care, financial services, oil and gas, and tourism. Known locally as “Military City U.S.A.,” San Antonio boasts one of the nation’s largest active-duty military populations, with Fort Sam Houston, Brooke Army Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, and Randolph Air Force Base all located within city limits. San Antonio ranks among the most popular tourist destinations in the country, attracting more than 20 million visitors annually. While attending the WHA, we hope that you will enjoy all that San Antonio has to offer. Take an evening stroll on the scenic Riverwalk, where you’ll find margaritas and traditional Mexican cuisine. Visit Hemisfair Park and ride an elevator atop Tower of the Americas for unparalleled views of the Alamo City. Take a tour on the Mission Trail—a UNESCO World Heritage Site—to see the Spanish missions. Walk through the Alamo and relive the most famous event in Texas history. And if you brought children along, they are sure to enjoy the roller coasters at Six Flags Fiesta Texas or an aquatic show at Sea World. Billy Kiser, Texas A&M University—San Antonio 2018 Local Arrangements Co-Chair

View of the River Walk

Tours on the River Walk

The Alamo

Historic Market Square


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17 All tours will meet in the conference hotel lobby The National  Museum  of  the  Pacific  War,  located  in  the  historic  town  of  Fredericksburg  in  the  scenic  Texas  Hill  Country,  bills  itself  as  “the  only  institution  in  the  U.S  dedicated  exclusively  to  telling  the  story  of  the  Pacific  and  Asiatic  Theaters  in  World  War  II”  and  ranks  among  the  nation’s  premier  military  museums.    The  site  occupies  a  six-acre  campus  in  downtown  Fredericksburg  and  includes  the  Memorial  Courtyard,  Plaza  of  Presidents,  and  Japanese  Garden  of  Peace.    The  33,000square-foot  George  H.W.  Bush  Gallery,  opened  in  2009,  features  40  media  installations,  900  artifacts  in  97  climate-controlled  cases,  15  macro-artifacts  (airplanes  and  tanks),  and  thousands  of  photographs,  all  accompanied  by  interpretive  signage  explaining  the  history  of  the  war.    The  museum  is  administered  through  a  special  partnership  between  the  Admiral  Nimitz  Foundation  and  the  Texas  Historical  Commission. Participants  can  choose  to  tour  the  museum  during  the  allotted  time  frame  (see  schedule  below),  or  to  explore  this  historic  German  town  (founded  in  1846)  and  its  famous  shopping  district,  art  galleries,  breweries,  and  wineries.

Fredericksburg Tour Ticket Price: $35

Schedule

9:00 AM:    Depart  Conference  Hotel   10:45:    Arrive  in  Fredericksburg   11:00-12:30:    Lunch  (On  Your  Own)   12:45-3:00:    Museum  of  the  Pacific  War   3:15: Depart  for  San  Antonio   5:00  PM:    Arrive  at  Conference  Hotel


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 All tours will meet in the conference hotel lobby

San Antonio Mission Trail Beginning in the late 1600s, as French colonizers moved westward from Louisiana, Spain began to establish missions in the region that now comprises East and South Texas. In 1718, along the San Antonio River, the Spanish built San Antonio de Valero and the presidio San Antonio de Béxar (the Alamo). A year later, Fray Antonio Margil de Jesús established San José, and three more missions—Concepción, San Juan, and Espada—were subsequently built within a 15mile stretch of the same river. The missions experienced their most active period between the 1740s and 1780s, at which time Apache and Comanche hostilities put increasing pressure on the compounds and their sedentary Native populations. By the early 1800s, residents of nearby San Antonio began dismantling the edifices and used the wood and stone to construct their own dwellings, but the parish churches remain in service to this day. The San Antonio Mission Trail Tour will visit Mission Concepción and Mission San José. The tour will be lead by Francis Galan, Gilberto Hinojosa, and Omar Valerio-Jiménez.

"Mission to Market" Tejano San Antonio Walking Tours Sponsored by the Bexar County Historical Commision

Ticket Price: $5 Tour #1   12:00 PM - 3:00 PM Tour #2   3:00 PM - 6:00 PM The capacity for each tour is 20.

Ticket Price: $20 12:30 PM - 4:45 PM

The “Mission to Market” tour emphasizes sites related to the Tejano history of San Antonio and will cover the short distance from The Alamo to Market Square. The tour begins at The Alamo, where St. Mary’s University alumnus Meagan Lozano will offer a special tour with remarks. En route we will explore the history of bloodshed and secrets at La Villita, La Catedral de San Fernando, and Military Plaza, where Tejano independence fighters were executed in 1813. One of the martyrs’ descendants, Anthony Delgado, who is also the head of “Los Bejareños” will join us there. We’ll then visit the Plaza del Zacate and the memorial honoring Emma Tenayuca, “La Pasionaria.” Finally, at the Mercado, participants can buy pan dulce and Mexican candies at “Mi Tierra” and view murals featuring prominent Hispanics and an altar commemorating the music artist Selena. The tour ends here so that WHA visitors can leisurely listen to mariachis or enjoy a drink and traditional Tex-Mex. The Mercado also offers shopping and a museum. As a special feature, participants will have access to a newly-designed virtual tour—accessible via smartphone app—designed by St. Mary’s University Public History students.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 All tours will meet in the conference hotel lobby The Institute of Texan Cultures gives voice to the experiences of people from across the globe who call Texas home, providing insight into the past, present, and future. The museum is a component of The University of Texas at San Antonio, and it plays a role in the university’s community engagement initiatives by developing quality, accessible resources for educators and lifelong learners on topics of cultural heritage. It strives to develop a rich and vibrant culture in the arts and humanities that will expand the community’s awareness and appreciation of Texas through an engaging series of exhibits and programs.  The museum has a formal affiliation agreement with the Smithsonian Institution and pursues a mandate as the state's center for multicultural education by investigating the ethnic and cultural history of Texas.  The Institute of Texan Cultures is located in downtown San Antonio on the UTSA HemisFair Campus, a short distance from the Alamo and the Riverwalk. The 182,000-square-foot complex features 65,000 square feet of exhibits and displays.  Participants will enjoy a short, guided walk (about one-half mile) through downtown San Antonio and HemisFair Park en route to the museum.

Institute of Texan Cultures Ticket Price: $20 1:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Historic Pearl Brewery District Ticket Price: $30 12:15 PM - 3:15 PM

The Pearl Brewing Company was established in 1881 on the banks of the San Antonio River. It came under the leadership of Otto Koehler, president of the San Antonio Brewing Association, in 1902.  Koehler’s wife, Emma, succeeded him in that role following his death.  Pearl was among just five Texas breweries that survived Prohibition, doing so by bottling soft drinks, making ice, opening an auto shop, and running a dry cleaning operation on the premises.  In 1985, Pabst purchased the Pearl Brewery and by 2001 had transferred all production to Ft. Worth, where Pearl beer is now produced.  Since the brewery closed, the 22-acre complex has been repurposed into a multi-use urban complex that includes residences, restaurants, bars, shops, and a farmer’s market on weekends.  This professionallyguided brewery tour lasts about 1 ½ hours, and participants will have an equal amount of time afterwards to enjoy the many restaurants, bars, and shops at the Pearl District.


A

special

ProDigital

for

thanks

to

A.

capturing

Victor

our

time

Goodpasture in

San

Diego

and 2017.  


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 12 PM

AUTHOR-TEACHER LUNCHEON GARDEN TERRACE

Authors with recent works on Western History are paired with middle and high school teachers to discuss the books. This year the committee is pleased to feature:

2017 Winners of the Charles Redd Center Teaching Award

John Bowes, Eastern Kentucky University Land Too Good for Indians: Northern Indian Removal (University of Oklahoma, 2017) Bernadette Pruitt, Sam Houston State University The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston 1900-1941 (TAMU 2017) Nicholas Villanueva, University of Colorado Boulder The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands (University of New Mexico Press, 2017) This is a private event sponsored by the CTPE. To find out more about the Committee on Teaching and Public Education, or how to get involved in the Committee, contact the Chair, Mark Johnson at Mark.Johnson@nd.edu

COMMITTEE ON TEACHING AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

TAKE A HISTORIAN TO SCHOOL PROGRAM

The Committee on Teaching and Public Education partners

George Díaz, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

historians with schools to build

Linda English, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

bridges between

Amy Porter, Texas A & M University-San Antonio

K-12 teachers and university educators. This year, the CTPE is

William S. Kiser, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Philis M. Barragán Goetz, Texas A&M University-San Antonio

pleased to feature the following partnerships:

Committee on Teaching and Public Education Members: Mark Johnson (Chair), Patricia Loughlin, William DeStefano, Brian S Collier, Peter Blodgett, Steven Fountain, Alicia Dewey, Andrea G. Radke-Moss, Lindsey Passenger-Wieck, Linda Sargent Wood, Andrea Mott, Lindsay Marshall, Sheila McManus. 


Interested in being a donor? Please consider donating to the WHA to support scholarship, travel, teaching, research, and public history.


"No one is illegal on stolen lands" (May 28, 2018) - Guadalupe Lupito Acuña (Lupito's Photography)

Indigenous Lands As attendees of the WHA Conference in San Antonio, we are guests on the ancestral homelands and treaty lands of Native nations. This region of southern Texas represents a major confluence of complex cultures, languages, life-ways, and histories—an Indigenous past shaped by struggles to overcome competing colonial forces of genocide. Long before this region became a republic or a state, it supported a vast Intertribal network of Anadarko, Caddo, Coahuiltecan, Comanche, Hasinai, Jumano, Karankawa, Kichai, Kiowa, Lipan and Mescalero Apache, Tawakoni, Tigua, Tonkawa, Waco, Wichita, Yaqui and a number of Nations that trace a sacred and political relationship to the lands that now comprise Texas. As a consequence of colonial violence, this region evolved into a place that afforded sanctuary for Indigenous nations such as the Alabama, Biloxi, Cherokee, Choctaw, Coushatta, Creek, Chickasaw, Delaware, Kickapoo, Shawnee, and Potawatomi Nations. Today, Texas is home to three federally recognized nations: Tigua of Ysleta del Sur Pueblo, Kickapoo, and Alabama Coushatta as well as the state-recognized Lipan Apache and Texas Band of Yaqui.

WHA Policy on Tribal Affiliations In the fall of 2016, the WHA Council voted, based on a recommendation brought forth by the WHA Membership Committee, to include Tribal affiliations or descendancy next to the names of participants on the conference program. Each person on the program who has a Tribal affiliation next to their name provided us with their preference for the spelling, formatting, and appearance of the Tribe(s) and/or Nation(s). If, for any reason, your affiliation was not included, please contact the WHA office and we will add the it to the 2018 Conference Program Errata. 


PRESIDENTIAL LUNCHEON

Friday, October 19, 12:15 PM in the Rio Grande Ballroom

2018 Presidential Address by Donald L. Fixico Re-Imagining Race and Ethnicity in the American West in the Twenty-First Century

PERFORMANCE BY HONOR DRUM, COMANCHE THUNDER Jim Yellowfish, Tim Yellowfish, Tennyson Yellowfish, Byron Komah, and Anthony Nauni of the Comanche Nation.


MEALS AND RECEPTIONS SAN ANTONIO 2018

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17 6:00 - 8:00 PM Welcoming Reception

Briscoe Western Art Museum

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 7:00 AM Mining History Breakfast

Chula Vista Boardroom

7:00 AM American Society For Environmental History Breakfast

Garden Terrace

12:15 PM Teacher/Author Lunch (PRIVATE EVENT)

Garden Terrace

12:15 PM Western Historical Quarterly Editorial Board Lunch 12:15 PM Montana The Magazine of Western History                         Editorial Board Lunch 6:30 PM Graduate Student Reception

Q Restaurant Chula Vista Boardroom Garden Terrace

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 7:00 AM Coalition for Western Women's History Breakfast 12:15 PM Presidential Luncheon & 2018 Presidential Address 4:00 - 5:30 PM Public History Reception 4:30 - 6:00 PM CRAW/Coalition Reception 6:00 PM WHA Awards Banquet

Rio Grande - Center Rio Grande Ballroom Garden Terrace Exhibits Hall Rio Grande Ballroom

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 7:00 AM Borderlands Breakfast 7:00 AM Contingent Faculty & Professionals Breakfast 12:15 PM Indian Scholars Luncheon 12:15 PM Charles Redd Center Teaching Awards Lunch

Garden Terrace Rio Grande - Center Rio Grande - East Rio Grande - Center

To reserve your space at any of these events please register in advance. Fill out the registration form included in your program or visit us online at www.westernhistory.org/registration2018 Please direct questions to our office at 402-554-5999 or WesternHistoryAssociation@gmail.com


MEETINGS

SAN ANTONIO 2018 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17 WHA Council Meeting 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Chula Vista

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 WHA 2019 Program Committee Meeting 12:15 - 4:15 PM

Chula Vista

Coalition for Western Women's History (CWWH) Business Meeting 1:30 - 3:00 PM

Pecos

WHA Committee on Assault Response & Educational Strategies (CARES) Meeting 1:30 - 3:00 PM

Pecan

WHA Technology Committee Meeting

Directors

3:30 - 4:45 PM WHA Ad-Hoc Committee on Contingent & Adjunct Faculty Meeting 3:30 - 4:45 PM WHA Committee on Race & the American West (CRAW) Meeting 3:30 - 4:45 PM WHA Public History Committee Meeting 3:30 - 4:45 PM WHA Membership Committee Meeting 3:30 - 4:45 PM WHA Graduate Student Caucus Meeting 3:30 - 4:45 PM

Llano Pecan Frio Pecos

Mesquite

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 WHA Business Meeting 3:45 PM

Pecan


SAN ANTONIO 2018

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17 8:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Writer’s Workshop (Closed Session): California Rising: Space, Place, and Community in Northern California Sponsored by the Library of Congress and St. Mary’s University, San Antonio Location: Nueces

2:00 P.M. – 3:30 P.M. Roundtable on K-20 Engagement: National History Day and Teaching with Public Sites

Sponsored by the WHA Public History Committee and the WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education Location: Pecos

Co-Chairs: Steven Fountain, Washington State University Vancouver Patricia Loughlin, University of Central Oklahoma Celeste Archer, National History Day in Colorado and University of Colorado Denver Brian S Collier, University of Notre Dame Mary Katherine Marshall, Texas National History Day and Texas State Historical Association Kayla Gabehart, National History Day in Colorado and University of Colorado Denver Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame and Montana National History Day

3:30 P.M. – 5:00 P.M. CWWH Roundtable – Monuments, Memorials, and Memory: Marking the Intersections of Gender in the Monumental West

Sponsored by the Coalition for Western Women’s History Location: Live Oak

Chair: Anne Hyde, University of Oklahoma Elise Boxer, University of South Dakota Cynthia Prescott, University of North Dakota Melinda Marie Jetté, Franklin Pierce University Katherine Morrissey, University of Arizona Erika Pérez, University of Arizona


SAN ANTONIO 2018

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 8:30 – 10:00 A.M.

Redefining Activism: New Directions in Latina/o Religious History

Confronting Settler Schooling: Scholars, Activists, and Students and the Fight for Native Space in K-12 Curricula

Chair & Comment: Mario T. García, University of California, Santa Barbara

Location: Rio Grande – West

Chair: Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert (Hopi), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Brian S Collier, University of Notre Dame The Challenges of Decolonizing Conquest Narratives: Catholic Settlers and Other Revisionists in Our Curriculum Rose Soza War Soldier (Mountain Maidu/Cahuilla/ Luiseño), Northern Arizona University “Tilted history is too often taught”: Activism, Advocacy, and Restoring Humanity Lindsay Marshall, University of Oklahoma Teaching Us to Forget: American History Textbooks, the Plains Wars, and Public Memory Caroline Rooney, University of Notre Dame Curriculum Review & Suggestions Maddie Corcoran, University of Notre Dame Curriculum Review & Suggestions Caitlyn Clinton, University of Notre Dame Curriculum Review & Suggestions Hailey Schultz, University of Notre Dame Curriculum Review & Suggestions

Reconsidering Race, Gender, and Power in the Mid-Nineteenth-Century Great Plains Location: Mesquite

Chair: Brent M. Rogers, The Joseph Smith Papers Stephen Hausmann, University of Pittsburgh Rethinking ‘The Beginning of the End’: Contingency, Power, and the Legacy of the Fort Laramie Treaties Amanda Hendrix-Komoto, Montana State University Cattle Ranching, the Metís, and the Politics of Reproduction Thomas Richards, Jr., Temple University Protecting ‘the Line’: Legal, Military, and Economic Contests on the Arkansas-Indian Territory Border, 1839-1846 Michael J. Barthelemy, Jr. (Hidatsa, Mandan, Tongva), University of New Mexico The Tail Feather and Antelope Society: Mandan and Hidatsa resistance and perseverance in the face of white encroachment on the Upper Missouri Comment: Juliana Barr, Duke University

Location: Nueces

Felipe Hinojosa, Texas A&M University Religious Radicals: Jorge Lara-Braud, Lydia Lopez, and Religious Politics in the 1970s Maggie J. Elmore, University of California, Berkeley Wielding the Cross: How Mexican Americans and the Catholic Church Made Immigration Reform a Civil Rights Issue, 1975-1986 Sergio M. González, Marquette University “We have the right in the name of God to protect these people”: Milwaukee’s Sanctuary Movement and Interfaith Collaboration, 1980-1990

Gendered Labors: Women, Work, and Enterprise at the Turn of the 20th Century Location: Rio Grande – Center

Chair: Amy Scott, Bradley University Andrea G. Radke-Moss, Brigham Young University-Idaho “The Products of Woman’s Hands”: Montana Women’s and Economic Self-Improvement at the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893 Sasha Coles, University of California, Santa Barbara “A Nation’s Wealth Surrounds a Worm”: Mormon Women and the Utah Silk Commission, 1896-1910s Monica Perales, University of Houston Of Love and Labor: Mexican American Women, Work, and Food in the 20th Century Texas Lori Ann Lahlum, Minnesota State University, Mankato “Many Have Left Their Farms”: Navigating the 1890s Economic Crisis in Western Norwegian American Communities Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy, University of Victoria Anishinaabeg Women’s Relationship with the Sugar Bush: A Story of Governance for Our Times Comment: Audience

Native American Removal, Relocation, and Struggles to Vote Location: Llano

Chair & Comment: Margaret Huettl, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Austin Stewart, Lehigh University The Lesser-Known Cherokee Removal: Race, Property, and Sovereignty during the Texas Revolutionary Era, 1827-1840 Matthew R. Deepe, Oklahoma State University (Re)Creating an Intertribal Identity: Nebraska Indian Relocations to the Indian Territory


SAN ANTONIO 2018 A ‘Safe-and-Sane Heartland’: Fractured Spaces in Late Twentieth-Century Flyover Country

Knowledge and Encounter in the North American Fur Trade

Location: Pecan

Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Natalia Mehlman Petrzela, The New School

Chair & Comment: Anne Hyde, University of Oklahoma

Edward H. Miller, Northeastern University The John Birch Society Strikes Back: Single-Issue Campaigns and Traditional Values in the 1970s Paul M. Renfro, Florida State University The Shadowy Threat of Terror’: Region, Whiteness, and Iowa’s Missing Paperboys, 1982-84 Clayton Trutor, Boston College Major League Phoenix: Professional Sports and the Fracturing of a Sunbelt Metropolis, 1968–2000

Collin Rohrbaugh, Texas A&M University Intimate Economics: New Mexican Market Integration and Social Change in the 19th Century. S. Matthew Despain, Rose State College Navigating Geographies of Power: Great Basin Tribes, Jedediah Smith, and the Early Far West Fur Trade. Ashley Riley Sousa, Middle Tennessee State University Indian Expertise in the Development of the Central California Fur Trade.

Religion and Racialization in the American West Location: Directors

Chair & Comment: Quincy D. Newell, Hamilton College Brandi Denison, University of North Florida Snow Dances and the Construction of Whiteness in the American West Jennifer Graber, University of Texas at Austin Making Race in the Indian Territory: Kiowa and American Conflicts over Categories Brett Hendrickson, Lafayette College Catholicism and Race during and after the Mexican-American War: New Directions W. Paul Reeve, University of Utah ‘To Save this Fallen Race’: Debating Racial Salvation at the 1852 Utah Territorial Legislature

“We Couldn’t Continue Living in These Conditions”: New Sites and Stakes of Indigenous Activism in the Twentieth-Century West Location: Chula Vista

Chair & Comment: Cathleen Cahill, Penn State University Doug Kiel (Oneida Nation), Northwestern University Toward a History of Indigenous Homelessness and Housing Advocacy Brianna Theobald, University of Rochester ‘To Defend Our Sacred Treaty Rights’: Health Activism on the Crow Reservation Douglas K. Miller, Oklahoma State University ‘UNITY is the Cry!’: Native American Prison Activism and Prisoner Consciousness, 1960s-70s

Vice, Crime, and Racialization in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands Location: Live Oak

Chair & Comment: Gabriela González, University of Texas at San Antonio James David Nichols, CUNY, Queensborough Community College ‘A Dollar’s Worth of Exciting Amusement’: The Fandango and Violence in the Age of the U.S.Mexico War Leah LaGrone Ochoa, Texas Christian University A Woman's Worth: The IWC Hearings on Prostitution and Living Wages Along the TexasMexican Border, 1919-1921 George T. Díaz, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley “A Knife-Using People” The Classification of ‘Mexicans’ in Texas State Prisons

State of the Field: Environmental History in the American West Location: Rio Grande – East

Chair: Michael Childers, Colorado State University Annie Gilbert Coleman, University of Notre Dame Andrew Needham, New York University Jedediah Rogers, Utah Historical Quarterly Jen Brown, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Joshua L. Reid (Snohomish), University of Washington Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Sara Dant, Weber State University


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Legacies of Indigenous Power in the Borderlands Location: Frio

Chair: Ari Kelman, University of California, Davis Daniel Grant, University of Wisconsin-Madison ‘The Land in this Reservation was Formerly Mexican Territory’: Cocopah Farmers and Shifting Lands Across the Border Julia C. Frankenbach, University of Colorado Boulder Strange Tasks: Indigenous Expertise and Mission Labor across the California Borderlands Alice Baumgartner, University of Southern California A Reinterpretation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo’s Article XI Comment: Brian DeLay, University of California, Berkeley

Reimagining Conquest: The Construction of Race and Gender in 19th Century California Location: Pecos

Chair & Comment: Joshua Paddison, Texas State University Camille Suárez, University of Pennsylvania This Land is Not Your Land: the Land Claims Act of 1851, Unratified Treaties, and the Dispossession of Californios and Native Americans Daniel Lynch, Marlborough School, Los Angeles Southern California Chivalry: Masculinity, Politics and Race in Early American Los Angeles Skyler Reidy, University of Southern California Lakes Die as well as Indians: Natural History and Settler Colonialism in Mid-Nineteenth-Century California

Alamo City, Immigrant City, Chicanx City: Recovering Transnational Barrio Politics in Twentieth Century San Antonio Location: Blanco

Chair & Comment: Gustavo Licón, Ithaca College Daniel Morales, James Madison University To Leave, or To Stay?: San Antonio Communities in the Age of Reparation Micaela Valadez, University of Texas at San Antonio Justice for the Gente: Communities Organized for Public Service and the Confrontational Approach to Changing Political and Physical Landscapes in San Antonio, Texas Jerry González, University of Texas at San Antonio From Chicanismo to Sin Fronteras in San Antonio and South Texas, 1963-1986


SAN ANTONIO 2018

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Western Humor: A Celebration of Western Humor and its Under-Utilized Power to Relieve Frictions and Solve Problems

Sponsored by Center of the American West, University of Colorado, Boulder

Ageism, Ableism, and Advocacy in the History Profession Location: Frio

Chair & Comment: Bonnie Lynn-Sherow, Kansas State University Alida Boorn, Independent Historian Robin C. Henry, Wichita State University Miguel Juárez, University of Texas at El Paso

Location: Rio Grande – East

Convener: Patty Limerick, Center of the American West, University of Colorado Boulder - - - - - who will be relying heavily on the good will and lively minds of the WHA members who exercise the kindness to show up at this session.

Doing Scholarly Editions in the Digital Age Location: Nueces

Chair & Comment: Sarah H. Salter, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Douglas Seefeldt, Ball State University and Papers of William F. Cody Andrew J. Torget, University of North Texas and Digital Austin Papers

Native Protest and Dynamics in Lands, Health, and Education Location: Mesquite

Chair & Comment: Roger Nichols, University of Arizona Seth Archer, Utah State University Native Antiquities and Western History Chuck Vollan, South Dakota State University Unintended Assimilation: The Failure of Alcohol Prohibition on South Dakota's American Indian Reservations Samantha M. Williams, University of California, Santa Cruz 'And to this, the student body protested': Contesting Federal Authority at the Stewart Indian School, 1890-1925

Brent M. Rogers, The Joseph Smith Papers

Documenting Hurricane Harvey Location: Pecan

Chair: Laura K. Muñoz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Tabitha Adkins, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and “Hurricane Harvey Oral History Project” Alston Cobourn, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and “Hurricane Harvey Oral History Project” Shelby Gonzalez, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and “Hurricane Harvey Oral History Project” Timothy Watts, Tuloso-Midway Independent School District and “Hurricane Harvey Oral History Project” Karina Marie Lovas, Del Mar College and “Hurricane Harvey Oral History Project” Monica Perales, University of Houston and UH Center for Public History “Resilient Houston Oral History Project” Todd Romero, University of Houston and UH Center for Public History “Resilient Houston Oral History Project” Comment: Audience

Race and Sovereignty: Bringing Critical Indigenous Theory into the American West Location: Blanco

Chair & Comment: Jean O’Brien, University of Minnesota Jennifer Andrella, Michigan State University Intersections of Politics and Race in Montana Territory Kerri Clement, University of Colorado Boulder Game of Horsepower: Robert Yellowtail, Crow horses, and Native American Sovereignty during the 1930s Neil Dodge (Diné (Navajo)), University of Nevada, Las Vegas Remembering Our Power: Oral history accounts of Diné witchcraft Julia Grummitt, Princeton University Treaty-Signing and Sovereignty in the Visual Archive Matthew Irwin, University of New Mexico Robert Duncanson and the Abolition Sentiment of Western Expansion Marcus Macktima (San Carlos Apache Tribe), University of Oklahoma Colonial Perceptions and Misidentifications of Apache Peoples in Arizona Territory from 1865 – 1875


SAN ANTONIO 2018 New Directions in Western Labor and Environmental History Location: Rio Grande – Center

Chair: Ryan Dearinger, Eastern Oregon University Thomas G. Andrews, University of Colorado Boulder Erik Loomis, University of Rhode Island Ryan Dearinger, Eastern Oregon University Kathleen Whalen Fry, Washington State University Taylor Elliott Rose, Yale University Mario Sifuentez, University of California, Merced

The Black Women’s West

Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Race in the American West (CRAW) Location: Live Oak

Chair & Comment: Elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary Brenda Jackson-Abernathy, Belmont University Ronald G. Coleman, University of Utah Marne L. Campbell, Loyola Marymount University Laura J. Arata, Oklahoma State University Lynn M. Hudson, University of Illinois at Chicago

Comment: Audience

Re-Imaging the Way We Teach Student Research Location: Directors

Chair: Brandi Hilton-Hagemann, Doane University Matthew Pearce, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Rowan Steineker, Florida Gulf Coast University Jeffrey Fortney, Florida Gulf Coast University Emily Wardrop, Casady School Brandi Hilton-Hagemann, Doane University Comment: Audience

Reimagining Race and Gender at San Antonio’s HemisFair ’68: New perspectives on the “Confluence of Civilization in the Americas” Location: Pecos

Bodies of Evidence: Health Technologies and Settler Colonialism, 1850s–1920s Location: Llano

Chair & Comment: Christian W. McMillen, University of Virginia Jennifer Seltz, Western Washington University Toxic Minerals and Strong Salts: Drugs, Medicine, and the Conflicted Settler State in Washington Territory, 1854-1868 Caroline Lieffers, Yale University Artificial Limbs, Indigeneity, and the American West Preston McBride, University of California, Los Angeles Institutionalized Negligence: Public Health, the Mechanics of Disease, and American Indian OffReservation Schools, 1879-1934 Juliet Larkin-Gilmore, Vanderbilt University Vital Signs: Colonial Measurements of Native Health, 1903–1928

Chair & Comment: Flannery Burke, St. Louis University Gene Morales, University of Texas at El Paso Second-Class Citizens at a First-Class Fair: Mexican American Civil Rights Movement and Class Struggle during the 1968 HemisFair Laura Hernández-Ehrisman, St. Edward’s University Strangers at the Crossroads: Representing Mexican America in Hemisfair ‘68 Abigail Markwyn, Carroll University ‘The Changing Role of Women in a Changing World:’ Colonialism, Cold War Politics, and Gender at the HemisFair ’68 Women’s Pavilion John Carranza, University of Texas at Austin Los Voladores and the Confluence of Ritual and Modernity at Hemisfair ’68

Converting the Missionaries: The Impact of Native Peoples on Catholic Missionaries of the Northern Great Plains Location: Chula Vista

Chair: Robert W. Galler, St. Cloud State University Paul G. Monson, Sacred Heart Seminary & School of Theology (WI) Sitting Bull's Monk: Convergence and Transformation on the High Plains, 1876-1896. Steven A. Stofferahn, Indiana State University Conversion Reconsidered: Changes of Heart at Crow Creek, 1887-1935 Robert W. Galler, St. Cloud State University Converting the Missionaries and Employing Christian Evangelicals for Tribal Agendas: Crow Creek in the late 19th and Early 20th Centuries Comment: Clyde Ellis, Elon University


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Roundtable: Changing History: Reinterpreting Sites in the Rockies, the Pacific Northwest, and the Alamo

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 12:15 – 1:30 P.M.

Offsite Location: The Alamo

2018 Spark Session: Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, and the Academy (#AcademicMeToo)

Sponsored by the WHA Public History Committee and the WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education (This session is located across the street at The Alamo. Please plan your attendance accordingly.)

Chair: Jeremy Johnston, Buffalo Bill Center of the West Rebecca A. Hunt, University of Colorado Denver Margit Nagy, Our Lady of the Lake University Linda Salvucci, Trinity University Donna Sinclair, Washington State University Vancouver The WHA Public History Committee works to raise awareness and bring opportunities to public historians in North America. Their organization hosts a reception at each WHA gathering. If you are interested in joining please contact Committee Chair Rebecca Hunt at Rebecca.hunt@ucdenver.edu for more information

Re-Imagining Border Crossings

Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Assault Response and Educational Strategies (WHA-CARES) Location: Pecan

Chair: Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Introduction: Elaine M. Nelson, University of Nebraska at Omaha and Western History Association Katrina Jagodinsky, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Jennifer McPherson, Purdue University Virginia Scharff, University of New Mexico Traci Brynne Voyles, Loyola Marymount University The WHA Committee on Assault Response & Educational Strategies (CARES) was formed in 2018 largely in response to the #AcademicMeToo movement as well as the WHA’s Spark Session from Fall 2017. If you are interested in becoming involved with this committee please attend the 2018 Spark Session. You may also contact the chair, S. Deborah Kang at sdkang@csusm.edu.

Location: Rio Grande – West

Chair: Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez, University of Texas at San Antonio

12:45 – 2:15 P.M.

Lisa Barnett, Phillips Theological Seminary Borderlands Identities in the Peyote Trade, 18901920 Holly Karibo, Oklahoma State University ‘Rebels Without a Cause’: Policing Juvenile Delinquency along the U.S.-Mexico Border, 19451960 Joseph Locke, University of Houston-Victoria An “American Congo”: The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands in the Anglo-American Imagination, 1880-1910 Katherine Massoth, University of Louisville A Note of What I Owe: Women’s Trade Networks across the U.S.-Mexico Border, 1863-1912

Navigating the Historical Profession: Different Career Options for Historians

Comment: Samuel Truett, University of New Mexico

Sponsored by WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC) Location: Mesquite

Chair: Christina Lake, Texas A&M University Alejandra Garza, American Historical Association Career Diversity Fellow, University of Texas at Austin Allison Faber, American Historical Association Career Diversity Fellow, Texas A&M University Bridget Barry, Senior Acquisitions Editor, University of Nebraska Press Rebecca González, Education & Programs Coordinator, The Briscoe Western Art Museum Dorothea Crosbie-Taylor, Public Historian, San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park


SAN ANTONIO 2018

12:45 – 2:15 P.M.

2:15 – 4:45 P.M.

Six Shooters: A Digital Frontiers Lightning Round

Improving the Research Experience: A Workshop for Graduate Students in Western American History

Sponsored by the WHA Technology Committee Location: Directors

Chair: Jason Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha Saara Kekki, University of California, Santa Barbara Andrew Torget, University of North Texas Brenden Rensink, Brigham Young University Margaret Sternbergh, Independent Scholar, San Antonio Lauren Turek, Trinity University Leslie Miller and Kyler Miller, Idaho State University Gianna May Sanchez, University of Michigan Jessica Nowlin, University of Texas at San Antonio Sarah H. Salter, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Andrew Offenburger, Miami University

Sponsored by The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University and Organized by the Western History Librarian/Archivist/Curator Group Location: Live Oak

Session requires pre-registration. Please see the WHA 2018 Conference site for more information

All WHA conference-goers are welcome to attend the session regardless of level of digital experience and are encouraged to share ideas and join the conversations with our lively WHA digital history community. If you are interested in becoming involved with the WHA Technology Committee please contact the Committee Chair, Jason Heppler at jheppler@unomaha.edu

Panelists: Laurie Arnold (Sinixt Band Colville), Gonzaga University Peter J. Blodgett, The Huntington Library Lisa Duncan, University of Arizona Tamsen Hert, University of Wyoming Special Collections Ginny Kilander, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming George Miles, Beinecke Library, Yale University Jacquelyn Reese, Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries Theresa Salazar, Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley Laurie Scrivener, University of Oklahoma Scholarly Services and Research Initiatives

1:30 – 4:30 P.M.

5:00 – 6:30 P.M.

Film Screening Session: El Muro: The Wall (2017) and Native People along the Texas-Mexico Border

Presidential Plenary: Reimagining Race and Ethnicity in the West Since 1968

This session will be a full viewing of the film El Muro: The Wall and will follow with a panel discussion.

(See also page: 31) Location: Rio Grande Ballroom

Location: Nueces

Chair: Bob Blackburn, Oklahoma History Center

Commentators: Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso Margo Tamez (Dene Nde’, Lipan Apache), University of British Columbia-Okanagan Eloisa Tamez (Lipan Apache), University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Daniel Castro Romero, Jr. (Lipan Apache), University of Texas at El Paso Ramon Resendiz, New York University Rosalva Resendiz, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Ignacio M. García, Brigham Young University Madeline Y. Hsu, University of Texas at Austin Albert S. Broussard, Texas A&M University Philip J. Deloria, Harvard University


PRESDIENTIAL PLENARY

Reimagining Race and Ethnicity in the West Since 1968 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 5:30 - 6:30 PM RIO GRANDE BALLROOM

Chair: Bob Blackburn, Oklahoma History Center Ignacio M. García, Brigham Young University Madeline Y. Hsu, University of Texas at Austin Albert S. Broussard, Texas A&M University Philip J. Deloria, Harvard University

58TH ANNUAL WHA | SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS | OCTOBER 2018


SAN ANTONIO 2018

Friday, OCTOBER 19 8:30 – 10:00 A.M. Reimagining the Racial Landscape at Hanford and in the Tri-Cities Location: Llano

Chair: Quintard Taylor, University of Washington Laura S. Arata, Oklahoma State University African American Women and Civil Rights in the Tri-Cities Robert Bauman, Washington State University Tri-Cities “What is an American?” The Yamauchi Family, Race and Citizenship in World War II Tri-Cities Tanya Bowers, Tanya Bowers Consulting Community Efforts to Preserve African-American History in the Tri-Cities Robert Franklin, Washington State University Tri-Cities African American Workers at Hanford and Civil Rights in the Tri-Cities Comment: Audience

Roundtable: Pedagogy and the Western Road Trip Location: Frio

Jeff Nichols, Westminster College Brent Olson, Westminster College Phil Brick, Whitman College Kara Hall, Westminster College Naomi Shapiro, Westminster College

Prehistories and Afterlives of a War: Indigenous Territorialities and Settler Subjectivities on Puget Sound Location: Nueces

Chair: Coll Thrush, University of British Columbia Corey Larson, Simon Fraser University Violent Negotiations on the South Salish Sea: Conflict and Diplomacy before the Puget Sound War Josh Cerretti, Western Washington University “Forty thousand Indians had risen against the settlers”: Remembering the Puget Sound Wars in the “Deep North” Coll Thrush, University of British Columbia Mr. Brannan’s Rage: The Afterlives of Settler Violence in a Coast Salish Landscape Theresa Warburton, Brown University Battles of/in Seattle: Discovering and Commemorating a ‘Frontier Metropolis’ in the Pacific Northwest Comment: Audience


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Indigenizing Cityscapes since the Twentieth Century

Race & Ethnicity in the 20th-Century Mining West

Location: Bowie C (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Katherine Benton-Cohen, Georgetown University

Chair: Nicolas Rosenthal, Loyola Marymount University Madison Heslop, University of Washington Cities and Seas: How the Salish Sea Makes the Urban Indigenous in the Pacific Northwest Matthew Hooley, Clemson University Indigenous Assemblage and the Aesthetics of Settler Liberalism Azusa Ono, Osaka University of Economics, Osaka, Japan To Keep Native Family Together: Indian Child Welfare in Denver since the 1950s Farina King (Diné), Northeastern State University Voices of Indigenous Dallas from Relocation to the Dakota Access Pipeline Controversy Comment: Audience

Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

Brian Leech, Augustana College Relocating Montana’s Little Las Vegas: Copper Mines, Italian Traditions, and the Near Death of White Ethnicity Eric Nystrom, Arizona State University Laboring for Invisible Gold: Demography of the Carlin Trend in Historical Perspective Robynne Mellow, Georgetown University Race and Radiation: Understanding Miners in Grants, New Mexico during the Cold War

Contested Environment: Indigenous Landscapes, Resources, and Sovereignty Location: Directors

Outside the Lines: Latinx Sporting Lives Location: Pecan

Chair & Comment: Ignacio M. García, Brigham Young University Christina Abreu, Northern Illinois University “I only believe in the revolution”: Afro-Cuban Boxer Teófilo Stevenson and the 1972 Olympic Games José Alamillo, California State University Channel Islands Warriors on and off the Court: Chicano/a Activism and the Struggle for Sport Justice Frank Guridy, Columbia University Loving Los Spurs: A History of Basketball Fandom in San Antonio Priscilla Leiva, Loyola Marymount University The People’s Field: Claims to the City from the Parking Lot

Re-imagining 20th-Century West Texas: Race, Politics, & Space in the Giant Side of the State Sponsored by Westerners International Location: Pecos

Chair & Comment: Jeff Roche, The College of Wooster Brian M. Ingrassia, West Texas A&M University Freedom to Sprawl: Planning Automotive Suburbia in Postwar Amarillo James Vice, Texas Tech University Surging Political Climates in Texas and Environmental Activism: Rejecting the “Complex 21” Nuclear Expansion at Pantex Tim Bowman, West Texas A&M University You Will Never be One of Us: A Teacher, a Court Case, and the Culture Wars in a High Plains Town

Chair & Comment: Marsha Weisiger, University of Oregon Monika Bilka, Chandler-Gilbert Community College Tribal Governance through an Environmental Lens Margaret Huettl, University of Nebraska-Lincoln An Anishinaabe History of Gichigami (Lake Superior) Katrina Lacher, University of Central Oklahoma Mauna Kea: The Sacred and the Scientific Chelsea Mead, Minnesota State University, Mankato Activism in the Educational Landscapes of the 1960s and 1970s

Revisiting the Frontiers of Historical Imagination Location: Live Oak

Chair: Kevin Adams, Kent State University William Deverell, University of Southern California The Elasticity of Historical Imagination Juliana Barr, Duke University Ethnohistory, Anthropology, and Archaeology and the Historical Imagination Jay Taylor, Simon Fraser University The End of Exceptionalism, Sort Of Virginia Scharff, University of New Mexico Finding a Way with Words: The Language of History Comment: Kerwin Klein, University of California, Berkeley


SAN ANTONIO 2018 New Directions in Race, Ethnicity, and Agricultural History Location: Blanco

Chair: Elizabeth Escobedo, University of Denver Shana Bernstein, Northwestern University An Environmental, Labor, and Consumer History of the California Strawberry Industry in the 1990s Connie Chiang, Bowdoin College Spores of Death: Valley Fever and the Nature of Inequality in the Southwest Lori Flores, Stony Brook University Latino Agricultural Labor and Activism in Maine, 1990 to 2005 Comment: Cecilia Tsu, University of California, Davis

Re-Imagining Expansion: New Narratives of Race, Gender, and Violence Location: Chula Vista

Co-Chairs: James F. Brooks, University of California, Santa Barbara Dee Garceau, University of Montana Diana Di Stefano, Montana Historical Society Catharine R. Franklin, Texas Tech University Carol L. Higham, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Celeste Menchaca, Texas Christian University Gregory Smithers, Virginia Commonwealth University Comment: Audience

The Transformative Experiences of War Location: Mesquite

Chair: John P. Langellier, Consulting Historian Ryan W. Booth (Upper Skagit), Washington State University Radical Republicans and their Quest to Change the West Evan Habkirk, University of Western Ontario Veterans as Advocates of Government: Six Nations Veterans of the First World War Lora Key, University of Arizona Fighting for Citizenship: Mexican American Identity and Patriotism in the World War II Era Comment: Audience

35 and Beyond: Celebrating 35 Years of The Coalition for Western Women's History and New Directions in Research Sponsored by the Coalition for Western Women’s History Location: Rio Grande – East

Chair: Cathleen Cahill, Penn State University Elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary Renée M. Laegreid, University of Wyoming Katrina Jagodinsky, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University Sheila McManus, University of Lethbridge Comment: Audience


SAN ANTONIO 2018

Friday, OCTOBER 19 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Sewing, Saddles, Speeches, and Sustenance: Indigenous Women’s Ordinary Acts of Extraordinary Resistance Location: Pecos

Chair & Comment: Maria John, University of Massachusetts Boston Allyson Stevenson (Métis), University of Regina “A Cry from an Indian Wife:” Mary Ann Lavallee appeals to a Nation Cheryl Troupe (Métis), University of Saskatchewan Acts of Everyday Resistance: Métis Women Contest Government Regulation, Surveillance and Intervention, 1900-1950 Claire Thomson (Lakota), University of Alberta Lakota wiŋyaŋ ikčéká: Ordinary Lakota Women in Extraordinary Circumstances, 1881-1930 Sarah Nickel (Tk’emlupsemc), University of Saskatchewan Sewing the Threads of Resistance: Twentieth Century Indian Homemakers’ Clubs in Canada’s West

Protecting Air and Water: Urban Environments on the US-Mexico Border Location: Pecan

Chair & Comment: Char Miller, Pomona College Amahia Mallea, Drake University A Local Perspective on International Sewage in Ambos Nogales John J. Dwyer, Duquesne University Saving California’s Tijuana Estuary from Commercial Development in the late Twentieth Century Laura M. Uribarri, University of Texas at El Paso The Paso del Norte Air Quality Task Force: “A Case Study in Cross-Border Community Advocacy and Cooperation” Kevan Q. Malone, University of California, San Diego Urbanization and Environmental Crisis in the Tijuana River Basin, 1920-1935

Re-Imagining Race and Japanese Migration and Diaspora Across the Pacific Location: Nueces

Chair & Comment: Derek Chang, Cornell University Denise Khor, University of Massachusetts Boston Chrissy Yee Lau, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Religion, Race, and the State: Investigations into the Complex Roles of Sisters, Mormons, and Campbellites in the West

Meredith Oda, University of Nevada, Reno Michael Jin, University of Illinois, Chicago

Location: Frio

Chair & Comment: Todd Kerstetter, Texas Christian University Danae Jacobson, Notre Dame University Sisters as Collaborators With the State?: The Conflicted and Complicated Identities of 19th c Religious Women Jeffrey Mahas, University of Utah “We Wish to have Nothing to do With Them”: Mormons as Reluctant Agents of the State in the Mid-1840s Charlotte Hansen Terry, University of California, Davis Mormon Fascination with the Samoan Body in the Nineteenth Century Jessica Nelson, LDS Church History Library How about this? Family History— Who is Doing It? Race and Genealogy in Mormonism in the Late Twentieth Century James Dupey, Arizona State University Printer, Postman, Preacher: Alexander Campbell and the Correlative Interests of Business, the State, and Religion in the American West

Moments of Agency and Activism in the Lives of Mexicanas & Chicanas in the U.S.-Mexico Border Location: Mesquite

Chair & Comment: Emilio Zamora, University of Texas at Austin Cassandra Rincones, Lone Star College – Kingwood Tejana Agency in a Patriarchal Society Carolina Monsivais, University of Texas at El Paso Virtues in Vice: Women's Agency in Prohibition South Texas Maritza De La Trinidad, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Mexicana/Chicana Leadership of La Union Pueblo Entero (LUPE)


SAN ANTONIO 2018 “They Took Your Land Away and Gave You Powdered Milk:” Ethnic Empowerment and the Reimagining of Nuevomexicana/o Identity, 18481975

Native Voices and New Methodologies: Using Historical Native Accounts to Re-Imagine the Lakota Ghost Dance in Rani Andersson’s A Whirlwind Passed Through Our Country

Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

Location: Rio Grande – East

Chair & Comment: Ernesto Chávez, University of Texas at El Paso

Chair: Francis Flavin, Washington, D.C.

Karen R. Roybal, Colorado College Racial, Ethnic, and Gendered Terrains of the Nineteenth-Century U.S. Legal System Alicia Romero, University of New Mexico Vernacular Photography and the Assertion of Identity: Cultural Survival in an Albuquerque Barrio, 1930-1973 Dennis Aguirre, University of Northern Colorado The Halls of Montezuma: Chicanos Unidos Para Justicia, La Escuela Antonio José Martínez, and the Chicana/o Insurgency in New Mexico, 19731975

Richard Meyers (Oglala Sioux Tribe), Oglala Lakota College

Comment: Ernesto Chávez, University of Texas at El Paso

Teaching the North American West: Session #1 The Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources – Western Region Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education and the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program – Western Region Location: Blanco

Discussant: Kurt Kinbacher, Chadron State College Scholar: Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez, University of Texas at San Antonio

The Brown Berets & Public History: Constructing Counter Narratives in Aztlan

Teaching Demonstrations: Frank J. Perez, San Benito High School, Hollister, California Jennifer Kendrick, New Braunfels High School, New Braunfels, Texas Sam Jezak, Cristo Rey High School, San Jose, California Ryan McKinley, Santa Cruz Middle School, Buda, Texas The WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education works to unite K-12 Affiliates with the WHA and Western History. Each year they organize “Take a Historian to School” which provides students the opportunity to learn from trained historians. For more information on CTPE please contact Mark Johnson at Mark.Jonhnson@nd.edu

Louis Warren, University of California, Davis

Tiffany Hale (Afro-Cherokee Descent), Yale University Robert Brave Heart (Oglala Sioux Tribe), Red Cloud Indian School Comment: Rani-Henrik Andersson, University of Helsinki

From the Mexican Generation to the Chicano Movement: The Legacies of Social, Cultural, and Political Reform in the Fight for Social Justice throughout the Twentieth Century Location: Directors

Chair: Sandra Enríquez, University of Missouri-Kansas City Paul Joseph Rodriguez, University of Texas at San Antonio One Genuine English Speaking Church: The Arrival of the Redemptorist Order and the 'Mexican Problem' in South Texas Raúl Muñoz, Lone Star College – CyFair They Won the Battle, but Lost the War: 1936 Racial Reclassification of ethnic Mexicans Mario T. García, University of California, Santa Barbara Transgenerational Chicano politics: Bert Corona, the Mexican American Generation, and the Chicano Generation Moisés Acuña-Gurrla, Texas Christian University Reynell Parkins and Creative Tension in Corpus Christi, Texas, 1960-1968 David Robles, Kansas State University Challenging Boss Politics: A.C. Jaime's Political Approach to Reforming Social Woes and Political Inequality in Pharr, Texas After the 1971 Police Riot. Guadalupe San Miguel, University of Houston In the Midst of Radicalism: Moderate Activists during the Chicano Movement, 1968-1978 Roberto R. Calderón, University of North Texas The Mexican Press and Civil Rights during the Great Migration in South Texas Comment: Audience


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Native Americans in the West in the Civil War Era Location: Chula Vista

Chair: Brian DeLay, University of California, Berkeley

A Presidential Roundtable Discussion – The Alamo: An Icon Imagined, Interpreted and Restored Offsite Location: The Alamo

Susanna Lee, North Carolina State University Ari Kelman, University of California, Davis

(This session is located across the street at The Alamo. Please plan your attendance accordingly.)

Megan Kate Nelson, Freelance Writer and Columnist

Chair: Paul Hutton, University of New Mexico

Khal Schneider, California State University, Sacramento

Jesús F. de la Teja, Texas State University

Joseph Genetin-Pilawa, George Mason University

Stephen Harrigan, University of Texas at Austin Laura Hernández-Ehrisman, St. Edward's University

The African American West in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Century

Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Race and the American West (CRAW)

Paul Hutton, University of New Mexico Bruce Winders, The Alamo Pam Rosser, The Alamo

Location: Llano

Chair & Comment: Robert F. Jefferson, University of New Mexico Alison Rose Jefferson, Jr. , Independent Historian Reimagining African American Leisure in the Jim Crow Era in Southern California Tales at Bruce’s Beach Herbert G. Ruffin II, Syracuse University Freedom's Frontier: The African American West in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century History Dwayne A. Mack, Berea College Freedom's Frontier: The African American West in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century History Katherine Kasckow, Alliance for Historic Wyoming Places and Spaces of Cheyenne's African American Community: A Cultural Landscape Study The WHA Committee on Race and the American West (CRAW) sponsors initiatives for scholarship on race in the North American West and supports scholars of color in the profession. For more information on CRAW please contact the chair, Mary Mendoza at marye.mendoza@psu.edu

2018 WHA Poster Session – Titles and Presenters on Page 38

Sponsored by the Committee on Teaching and Public Education & St. Mary’s University Public History Program Location: Exhibits Hall

The 2018 WHA Poster Session is in the Exhibits Hall. Judging and reception begin at 10:30 A.M. Posters will be on display Thursday-Saturday during the conference.

Somethings That Glitter are Indeed Gold: Celebrating the Career of Elizabeth Jameson Location: Live Oak

Chair: Susan L. Johnson, University of WisconsinMadison Sarah Deutsch, Duke University Peter Boag, Washington State University Matthew L. Basso, University of Utah Benny J. Andrés, Jr., University of North Carolina at Charlotte Shannon Murray, Calgary Stampede John W. Heaton, University of Alaska Fairbanks Response: Elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary

Race, Ethnicity, and Gender: Authenticity and Identity in the Workplace and at Home Location: Bowie C (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Rosina Lozano, Princeton University Michelle M. Martin, University of New Mexico “The Dreadful Burden of This Worthless Indian”: Racial Scripts and Interracial Marriage in Kate Edwards Bemo’s Indian Territory Diary 18701896 Erik Bernardino, University of California, Santa Cruz Immigrant Policing as Labor Policing: Workers and Authentic Forms of Labor in the U.S. Southwest, 1903-1917 Christina Lake, Texas A&M University Women’s Roles in Tourism: Production of an Authentic Native American Experience in the Southwest


2018 WHA Poster Session

Sponsored by: Committee on Teaching and Public Education and the St. Mary's University Public History program. The posters will be displayed during the conference in the Exhibits Hall. The judging and reception is as follows: Location: Exhibits Hall Friday, October 19, 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Coffee and pastries will be provided by the generosity of St. Mary’s University Carly Boerringter and Kim Selinske Colorado State University Touring Through Tensions

Dominic Carrasco University of Texas at San Antonio The 1933 San Antonio City plan and today’s San Antonio

Midge Dellinger Northeastern State University An Indigenous Perspective Concerning the Battle of Honey Springs: Changing the Narrative of a Civil War Battle

Jennifer Dunn Montana State University Superfunded: Recreating Nature in the Postindustrial West

Nicole Johnson St. Mary’s University Isolation and Injustice: German Internment during World War II

Jack Johnson Clancy School From Battlefields to Beet Fields: German POWs on Montana Farms

Nicolas McKay St. Mary’s University A Heroine Forgotten: The Life of Emma Tenayuca

Christopher Repka The University of Texas at Austin "EL MUTUALISTA: Labor, Politics and Civic Mobilization in San Antonio, 1885-1900"

Rebecca Miller Stanford University The Adoption of Prescribed Burns in California

Natasha R. Beck Texas State University Creating Racialized Spaces in the Highland Park Neighborhood of San Antonio

Jacqueline Molina, Alexander Barrera, John Hernandez, and Alexis Soto St. Mary’s University Mariachi in San Antonio and beyond

Madeline Ochoa, Jacob Henson, Eric Villalpando St. Mary’s University The Taste of San Antonio: A Closer Look at Ingredients Found in Mexican Dishes

Frank J. Perez San Benito High School Mexican California: A Unit Plan

Molly Richey and Patricia Richey Jacksonville College Tragedy for the Killoughs and the Cherokees

Victoria L. Sanchez St. Mary’s University Symbol of Sacrifice: Master Sgt. Cleto Rodriguez

Avni Singh Academy for Global Studies at Stephen F. Austin High School Documenting Mainstream Understanding

Jennifer Smith University of Washington Reproducing Subjects: US Imperialism and Horse Breeding on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, 1935-1952

Michael L. Stephen University of Colorado Colorado Springs Chinese in Silver City, Idaho: A Contemporary, Visual Assessment of On-site Historic Interpretation

Rachel Williams, Kailea Fink, and Laura Hoelter Austin High School European Beauty Standards and Native Cultures: The Lingering Effects of Assimilation on Self Esteem

Jose Veliz and Taylor Tiritilli San Antonio College "The inevitable has come:" African American soldiers and police violence in turn of the century San Antonio

Samantha Yanelli University of Texas at San Antonio El Movimiento Chicano de San Antonio through the words of Manuel Garza

Anthony Wood University of Michigan Our Memory of this Place: Race and the Construction of Collective Memory in the West

Rhylie Anderson Northeast Texas Community College Politics of Futility: African-American Leadership in LateNineteenth-Century Texas

W. Dale Weeks Texas A&M University

The War for Indian Sovereignty: How the Civil War and Failed Foreign Relations Altered U.S.-Indian Policy in the Late Nineteenth Century


SAN ANTONIO 2018

Friday, OCTOBER 19 2:15 – 3:45 P.M.

National Contexts, Local Problems: Racial Logics and State Power in 20th Century Texas

Critical Perspectives on Native Biography

Chair & Comment: C.J. Alvarez, University of Texas at Austin

Location: Directors

Chair: Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso William Bauer (Wailacki and Concow of the Round Valley Indian Tribes), University of Nevada, Las Vegas Angela Pulley Hudson, Texas A&M University Margo Tamez (Dene Nde’, Lipan Apache), University of British Columbia-Okanagan Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso Comment: Audience

Location: Nueces

ToniAnn Treviño, University of Michigan “Cada Uno de Nosotros Tenemos Profundamente un Deseo de Mejorarnos”: Solutions to Narcotics Policing in San Antonio’s Mexican American Communities, 1967- 1973 Jonathan Cortez, Brown University Refocusing FSA Migratory Labor Camps in South Texas on Ethnic Mexicans Jermaine Thibodeaux, University of Texas at Austin The Curse of Cane: Sugar and Its Unsweet Legacy in the Life and Labor of Black Texas Convicts, 1871-1927

Race and Ethnicity in Public History: A Workshop on Community Collaboration, Engagement, and Partnerships

Unpacking Borderlands: Origin, Legacy, and Construction of Race and Ethnicity

Location: Llano

Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

B. Erin Cole, Minnesota Historical Society

Chair: David Holtby, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Katrina Phillips (Red Cliff Ojibwe), Macalester College

William S. Kiser, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Contingencies of Empire: Civil War Diplomacy in Chihuahua and Sonora Lance Blyth, Command Historian, NORAD Borderlands of Race and Ethnicity Darren Raspa, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB Food Not Bombs: Native—Federal Encounters and Community Building in the North American Southwest, 1945-1970

Lindsey Passenger Wieck, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio Nicole Johnson, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio Rebecca Wingo, University of Cincinnati Liz Cook, History Colorado

Drawn by Law: A Critical Roundtable on Western Legal Histories

Comment: Catharine R. Franklin, Texas Tech University

Location: Frio

Chair: Katrina Jagodinsky, University of NebraskaLincoln Katrina Jagodinsky, University of Nebraska-Lincoln The Great Writ in Women’s Hands: Female Habeas Corpus Petitioners in 19th -c. Washington Pablo Mitchell, Oberlin College Extraordinary Legal Histories of Ordinary Westerners Julian Lim, Arizona State University Plenary Powers: Indians and Immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico Border, 1870- 1910 Maurice Crandall (Yavapai-Apache Nation), Dartmouth College “Creating” a Tribe: Removal, Reorganization, and Reconstitution of the Yavapai-Apache Nation Alicia Gutierrez-Romine, La Sierra University Breaking the Law: Abortion in Black and White

Race and Place in the Pacific Northwest Location: Pecan

Chair & Comment: Richard White, Stanford University Megan Asaka, University of California, Riverside “Chinaman’s Work, Indian’s Work”: The Making and Erasing of a Racialized Workforce in Puget Sound Agriculture Sean Fraga, Princeton University Water Lines: Maritime Mobility and Marine Borders in the Pacific Northwest Jacki Hedlund Tyler, Eastern Washington University “Settler Colonialism in the Pacific Northwest and Oregonians’ Construction of Race” Beth Lew-Williams, Princeton University Policing Race, Crime, and the Border in the Pacific Northwest


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Latina/o History: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Vicki Ruíz’s From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America

Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Race in the American West (CRAW), WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC), and Coalition for Western Women’s History Location: Live Oak

Co-Chairs: Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Jennifer Y. Macias, University of Utah Elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary Albert Camarillo, Stanford University Elizabeth Escobedo, University of Denver José Alamillo, California State University Channel Islands Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University Felipe Hinojosa, Texas A&M University

The “Fixi”-fication of American Indian & U.S. West History: Honoring Donald Fixico Location: Rio Grande – East

Chair: Monika Bilka, Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Arizona Blue Clark (Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma), Oklahoma City University School of Law Margaret Connell-Szasz, University of New Mexico Elliott West, University of Arkansas Brady DeSanti (Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe), University of Nebraska at Omaha Meaghan E. H. Seikman, American Ancestors, New England Historical Genealogical Society R. Dave Edmunds, University of Texas at Dallas Reetta Humalajoki, University of Turku, Finland Response: Donald L. Fixico (Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Mvskoke Creek, Seminole), Arizona State University

Response: Vicki L. Ruiz, University of California, Irvine

Rethinking Jonestown Forty Years Later Location: Bowie C (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Matthew A. Sutton, Washington State University Charles L. Hughes, Lynne and Henry Turley Memphis Center at Rhodes College ‘I Believe in Jim Jones’: Peoples Temple and the End of the Sixties Jared Eberle, Oklahoma State University The Peoples Temple and San Francisco’s Native American Community Curtis Foxley, University of Oklahoma Ann Elizabeth Moore, the New Left, and the Peoples Temple

Monuments, Memorials, and Plaques: Comparing Public Reckonings with the History of the West and the History of the South

Sponsored by the Center of the American West, University of Colorado Boulder Location: Chula Vista

Chair: Patty Limerick, Center of the American West, University of Colorado Boulder Albert S. Broussard, Texas A&M University Neil Foley, Southern Methodist University Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Ari Kelman, University of California, Davis Cynthia Prescott, University of North Dakota

Teaching the North American West: Session #2 The Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources – Western Region Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education and the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program – Western Region Location: Blanco

Discussant: Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame Scholar: Jeffrey A. Johnson, Providence College The 1916 Preparedness Day Bombing: Anarchy and Terrorism in Progressive Era America Teaching Demonstrations: Jonathan Shulman, La Jolla Country Day School, San Diego, California Cherry Whipple, Austin High School, Austin, Texas Melanie Kirchhof, Austin Independent School District, Austin, Texas Josh Dempsey, St. John the Baptist School, Santa Clara, California Kim Denning-Knapp, McNeil High School, Georgetown, Texas


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Diversity and the Managed West Location: Mesquite

Chair: Frank Van Nuys, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Diana L. Ahmad, Missouri University of Science and Technology All Eyes on the Islanders: The Selling of Hawaiian Tourism James R. Allison, III, Christopher Newport University Indians & Energy: Race, Law, and Culture Steven M. Fountain, Washington State University, Vancouver Endangered Resources and Tribal Sovereignty on the Lower Columbia River Frank Van Nuys, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology The Endangered Species Act, Predator Management, and Sovereignty: Recent History and Uncertain Future Michael D. Wise, University of North Texas Managing Food: Welfare, Sovereignty, and the Politics of Hunger in the Modern Native American West Comment: Audience

Memorializing Conquest: Race, Place, and Territory in the Commemoration of Spanish Colonization, 1890-1930 Location: Pecos

Chair & Comment: Edward D. Melillo, Amherst College Kerry Wynn, Washburn University “Facts for the People”: Nineteenth-Century Historians Claim Coronado to Craft White Racial Identity and Naturalize Settler Colonialism in Kansas Emmanuelle Perez Tisserant, University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès, France Out of the night: a “bold renegade” and American identity, race and place making in Hollywood and beyond Matthew Jennings, Middle Georgia State University “Guidance in the Past”?: Commemorating Spanish Colonization in 1920s Macon, Georgia


SAN ANTONIO 2018

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 8:30 – 10:00 A.M.

The Northern Paiute History Project: Engaging Undergraduates in Decolonizing Research with Tribal Community Members Location: Pecan

Film Session: Stolen Education: The Director’s Cut & Conversation with Enrique Alemán, Jr.

This session will feature excerpts from the film Stolen Education and include a discussion with the director. Location: Directors

Chair: Laura K. Muñoz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Enrique Alemán, Jr., University of Texas at San Antonio Discussion: Audience

Lightning Round: Condensed Doctoral Research Presentation

Kevin Hatfield, University of Oregon A Shared History Pedagogy: Undergraduate Researchers and Indigenous Communities Jennifer R. O’Neal, University of Oregon Reconciliation Through Research: Centering Indigenous Ways of Knowing into Historical Research Clara Gorman, University of Oregon Inter-Tribal Dynamics of the Warm Springs and Grand Ronde Reservations: A Historical Legacy of Discrimination, Prejudice, and Settler-Colonialism Myra Johnson Orange, Warm Springs Tribal Elder Tribal Elder As Instructor: Centering Humanity and Indigenous Ways of Knowing

Sponsored by WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC) Location: Rio Grande – East

This session serves as an opportunity for graduate students to learn effective ways to succinctly describe their research and gain feedback and insight on this process. Chair: Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University Presenters: Christina Lake, Texas A&M University Katherine Bynum, Texas Christian University Sasha Coles, University of California, Berkeley Eddie Bonilla, Michigan State University Gianna May Sanchez, University of Michigan Collin Rohrbaugh, Texas A&M University Jenni Tifft-Ochoa, University of Las Vegas, Nevada Comments: Amy Scott, Bradley University Matthew L. Basso, University of Utah Sean P. Cunningham, Texas Tech University Sergio González, Marquette University

The WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC) is open to any and all WHA Members who are also grad students. The WHA-GSC welcomes you to join! If you are interested in please contact the WHA Office. For more information about the WHA-GSC or to participate in future events and governance, contact Tiffany J. González at tiffany.j.gonzalez@tamu.edu

An Unruly Place: Land, Air, and Water in the Lone Star State Location: Bowie C (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Char Miller, Pomona College Kenna Archer, Angelo State University Ecological Diversity, Riparian Development and Public Policy in Texas Julie Courtwright, Iowa State University The Terror of West Texas: Dorothy Scarborough's The Wind, Gender, and Regional Identity Jason Pierce, Angelo State University How Texas Became Desirable

Indigenous Quest for Justice in American Western History Location: Llano

Chair & Comment: Jeffrey Ostler, University of Oregon James Riding In, Arizona State University Pawnee Land Claims: Colonialism and White American (In) Justice Baligh Ben Taleb, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Indigenous Land Sovereignty and Restorative Justice in the American West: The Western Shoshone Legal Battles Toward Dignity Ryan Driskell Tate, Rutgers University “Arabs of the Plains”: Energy, Race-Making, and Anti-Colonial Politics on the Northern Great Plains Melanie K. Yazzie (Bilagáana/Diné), University of New Mexico History as Justice: Protest, Memory, and AntiColonial Common Sense in Urban New Mexico


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Excavating the Silences: (Re)examining Colonialism, Gender, and Historical Narratives in the California Borderlands

Ethnic Mexicans and Chicanas/os in the West: Transnationalism, Ethno-Racial Identity, and Organizing in the Twentieth Century

Location: Mesquite

Location: Nueces

Chair & Comment: Clifford Trafzer, University of California, Riverside

Chair & Comment: Julian Lim, Arizona State University

Marne L. Campbell, Loyola Marymount University Race(ing) West: African American Women and the Promise of Freedom in California Michelle Lorimer, California State University, San Bernardino “Through Time’s White Mist”: Prejudice, Romanticism, and the California Mission Myth Yvette J. Saavedra, California State University, San Bernardino Before the Roses: Competing Colonialisms, Gender, and Land Use in the the Making of Pasadena, 1771-1890

Roundtable: Re-imagining the West during the Reconstruction Era Location: Chula Vista

Chair: Brian Q. Cannon, Brigham Young University

Diana Johnson, SUNY Purchase Third World Seattle: Labor Organizing, Coalition Building, and Anti-Globalization Politics during the 1970s Marco Antonio Rosales, University of California, Davis Ariztlan Sin Fronteras: Transnational Immigrant Rights Organizing in the Heart of Modern Conservatism Bryan Winston, Saint Louis University Ethnic Mexicans and the Multiethnic Midwest: Local, Regional, and Transnational Racial Formations during the Interwar Years

Promoting Diversity in History Education in Public Schools, Colleges and Universities

Please join the panelists prior to the session at 7:45 A.M. for complimentary coffee, tea, breakfast pastries, and prepanel conversation! Sponsored by the Department of History, University of Texas at Austin.

Rachel St. John, University of California, Davis

Location: Rio Grande – West

Anne Hyde, University of Oklahoma

Chair: Emilio Zamora, University of Texas at Austin

Clyde Milner, II, University of New Mexico

Walter Buenger, University of Texas at Austin Brett Derbes, Texas State Historical Association Patricia Nuñez, Austin Area Association of Bilingual Educators Amy Porter, Texas A&M University, San Antonio Maritza De La Trinidad, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Elliott West, University of Arkansas Richard White, Stanford University

New Mexico Peoples, Lands, and Chicanx Movements Location: Pecos

Chair & Comment: Kelly Lytle Hernández, University of California, Los Angeles Michael Alarid, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Ricos, Politicos, Hombres de Bien, or Something Else?: Reconsidering Landholding New Mexicans in the Mexican and American Territorial Periods, 1836-65 James Barrera, South Texas College Social, Cultural, and Political Movements of Mexican Americans in San Antonio from the Great Depression to 1960s Natalie Mendoza, University of Colorado Boulder The Model Good Neighbor: The Federal Obligation to New Mexico's Forgotten People during World War II Carlos Cantú, South Texas College A History of Chicana/o Colleges in Texas: Comparing Institutional Identities

Gender, Race, and the State between the U.S. and Mexico Location: Blanco

Chair & Comment: Geraldo L. Cadava, Northwestern University Kris Klein Hernández, University of Michigan Military Bases, Ethnic Anxieties, and the Rise of the Martial State, 1866-1877 Celeste Menchaca, Texas Christian University Patrolling for Sexual Immorality at the U.S.Mexico Border, 1906-1917 Laura Barraclough, Yale University Cowboy Sheriffs: Mexican Americans in the East L.A. Sheriffs Posse


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Envisioning an Alternative Future and Revising an Alternate Past: Race and Authority in Settler Colonialism and Historiography Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Khalil Anthony Johnson, Jr., Wesleyan University Keith Thor Carlson, University of Saskatchewan ‘The Last Potlatch’ James Douglas’ Vision of an Alternative Form of Settler Colonialism John Sutton Lutz, University of Victoria Competing Memories, James Douglas and the Recognition of Indigenous Title Hamar Foster, University of Victoria Past and Present: Facts and Symbols in British Columbia’s Legal History

Voces Desconocidas: Creating a Historical Narrative for Latino Mormons Sponsored by the Mormon History Association Location: Frio

Chair: Ignacio M. García, Brigham Young University Ignacio M. García, Brigham Young University Voice of the Prophets: Eduardo Balderas and the Translation of Scripture and Prophecy to the Lamanita Sujey Vega, Arizona State University Set Apart or Pushed Away: Latino LDS Saints speak to the complicated benefits and frustrations of their Faith in a 21st century climate Elisa Eastwood Pulido, Brigham Young University-Salt Lake Center The Life Thought of Margarito Bautista in Historical Context Fernando Gómez, Museum of Mormon Mexican History The Provo Mormon Museum: A Latino Mormon Narrative in Pictures & Documents

Borderlands of Southern Colorado: Public and Academic Historians Craft a Multi-Museum Exhibit Location: Live Oak

Chair: Patty Limerick, Center of the American West, University of Colorado Boulder Paul T. Conrad, University of Texas at Arlington Dawn DiPrince, History Colorado Derek R. Everett, Metropolitan State University of Denver Jason L. Hanson, History Colorado Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Fawn-Amber Montoya, Colorado State University-Pueblo

What will you do with that degree? Alternatives to the Tenure-Track Rat Race

Sponsored by the WHA Ad-Hoc Committee on Contingent and Adjunct Faculty Location: Rio Grande – Center

Chair: Carol L. Higham, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Carol L. Higham, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Lectureships and Editing Catharine R. Franklin, Texas Tech University Finding Federal Jobs Amy Haines, University of Colorado Colorado Springs Local History Greg Thompson, University of Utah Special Collections and Libraries Paivi Hoikkala, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Making Part-time Work

The WHA Ad-Hoc Committee on Contingent and Adjunct Faculty is open to any and all WHA Members who are interested in initiatives and programs that serve contingent and adjunct faculty in the historical profession. If you are interested in joining you may contact the WHA Office or Amy Essington at amycessington@gmail.com


SAN ANTONIO 2018

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Film Session: Bisbee '17 – A Film, a Community, and a Contentious Centennial This session will feature excerpts from the film Bisbee ‘17

State of the Field: Native Women’s History in the U.S. and Canada Location: Chula Vista

Chair: Brianna Theobald, University of Rochester Laurie Arnold (Sinixt Band Colville), Gonzaga University

Location: Directors

Brenda Child (Ojibwe), University of Minnesota

Chair: Katherine Benton-Cohen, Georgetown University

Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Panelists: Robert Greene, John B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism, Missouri School of Journalism

Mary Jane Logan McCallum (Munsee Delaware), University of Winnipeg

Katherine Benton-Cohen, Georgetown University

Sarah Nickel (Kamloops Secwepemc), University of Saskatchewan

Charles Bethea, The Bisbee Foundation

Susan Sleeper-Smith, Michigan State University

Rebecca Orozco, Cochise Community College

Allyson Stevenson (Métis), University of Regina

Latino Heritage Conservation: Locating Equity & Social Justice in Preservation

‘Natives,’ ‘Invaders,’ and Exoticized Flora: The Political Relationships Between Plants and People in the Borderlands

Location: Llano

Chair: Sarah Zenaida Gould, Latinos in Heritage Conservation Antonia Castañeda, Independent Scholar Laura Dominguez, University of Southern California Sarah Zenaida Gould, Latinos in Heritage Conservation Comment: Audience

Multiple use, Contested Identities, and Place-Making in the Evolving West Location: Bowie C (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair & Comment: Leisl Carr Childers, Colorado State University Robert M. Bednar, Southwestern University Colliding Authorities: The Cultural Politics of Roadside Memorialization in the Contemporary American Southwest Kathryn B. Carpenter, University of Missouri-Kansas City Access to Nature, Access to Health: The Government Free Bathhouse at Hot Springs National Park, 1877 to 1922 Anthony Graham, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Selling the Wasteland: Gold, Boosterism, Natural Disaster, and the Environment in Goldfield, Nevada, 1900-1920 Annie Reiva, University of Oregon Owning Tragedy: Memorializing Trauma and Violence at Washita and Sand Creek Jonathan Shafer, Auburn University Public Domain - Private Dominion: Nostalgia, Negotiation, and Power in Death Valley National Monument, 1920 to 1940

Location: Frio

Chair & Comment: Mark Fiege, Montana State University Ligia A. Arguilez, University of Texas at El Paso Native Invader: The Politics of Plants and the Shifting Identity of the Creosote Bush in 20th Century U.S.-Mexican Borderlands Katherine G. Morrissey, University of Arizona Telling Plant Tales in a Borderlands: The Boojum Tree Marsha Weisiger, University of Oregon, Zombies on the Rio Grande: Tamarisks, Toxins, Mexican-American Laborers, and Environmental Justice


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Cataloging Race & Ethnicity in the American West: Adapting, Challenging and Inventing Authority Location: Mesquite

Chair: Cheryl Miller, Autry Museum of the American West Cheryl Miller, Autry Museum of the American West Erin Elzi, Design & Discovery Librarian, University of Denver Kate Crowe, Special Collections & Archives, University of Denver

Maintaining Peace, Providing Security: The United States Army at the Edge This is Indian Land: Recognizing Native Resources in the Face of Settler Colonialism Location: Live Oak

Chair & Comment: Kent Blansett (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Shawnee, and Potawatomi), University of Nebraska at Omaha Christina Gish Hill, Iowa State University “These Fields Are Not So Good As Our Old Fields:” Land Theft, Reservation Farm Agents, and the Impact on Indigenous Agriculture Amber A. Annis (Cheyenne River Sioux), University of Minnesota The “Indian Gunnery Range”: Militarization, Settler Colonialism and the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Natale A. Zappia, Whittier College The Rio Puerco Spill: Energy Development and Indian Country in the Cold War West Nick Estes (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe), University of New Mexico The Will of the State: The Oceti Sakowin and the Enduring Legacy of the Pick-Sloan Dams

Contested Histories, Contested Memorials: Monumental Debates in the American West Location: Pecan

Chair: Laura Barraclough, Yale University Modupe Labode, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Jon Daehnke, University of California, Santa Cruz Gregory E. Smoak, University of Utah Laura Barraclough, Yale University Amy Lonetree (Ho-Chunk), University of California, Santa Cruz

Location: Nueces

Chair: Jeremy Maxwell, University of Southern Mississippi Carole Butcher, North Dakota State University “Lawton's Bloodhounds”: Indigenous Scouts from the Southwest to the Philippines Tony R. Mullis, Angelo State University “Luck of the Devil”: The Army and Quantrill’s Raid Betsy Rohaly Smoot, NSA Center for Cryptologic History Radio Wranglers: Army Signals Intelligence on the Mexican Border, 1917-1920 Comment: William A. Taylor, Angelo State University

Blurring The Edges: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in North America's Western Borderlands Location: Pecos

Chair: Sheila McManus, University of Lethbridge Eric V. Meeks, Northern Arizona University Refusing the Border: Indigenous Sovereignty in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands? Janne Lahti, University of Helsinki, Finland White Military Identities and the Nineteenth Century Southwest Borderlands Grace Peña Delgado, University of California, Santa Cruz The Parlance of “Forced” and “Free” in the Making of North America’s Sexual Borderlands Raúl A. Ramos, University of Houston Chicano/a Identity Disrupts the Borderlands Anthony Mora, University of Michigan Borderlands History and The Curse of Capistrano Sheila McManus, University of Lethbridge Two Shades of Beige? Race and Ethnicity in the Under-Analyzed Canada-US Borderlands Comment: Audience


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Traditions of the Southwest: Tamale Making and Storytelling

Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Race and the American West (CRAW) Location: Rio Grande – West

Space is limited and pre-registration ($15) is required for this session. It is scheduled to extend into the lunch-hour and end around 1:00 P.M. Maria E. Montoya, New York University Lori Flores, Stony Brook University Mary Ann Flores, Tejana (and Lori’s mom) Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Mary E. Mendoza, Grandma Lucia Villarreal, Grandma Rachel St. John, University of California, Davis

Teaching the North American West: Session #3 The Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources – Western Region Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education and the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program – Western Region Location: Rio Grande – Center

Discussant: Brian S Collier, University of Notre Dame Scholar: Cynthia Prescott, University of North Dakota Pioneer Myths in Western Monuments, 1890Present Teaching Demonstrations: Laura Martin, Deer Park Middle School, Round Rock, Texas Shannon Jones, Kealing Middle School, Austin, Texas Anna Busse, Bishop Garriga Middle School, Corpus Christi, Texas Lauren Proctor, Round Rock High School, Hutto, Texas

Shifting Ethnicities on the Edges of Empire Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair: Teresa Maya, University of the Incarnate Word Robert Wright, Oblate School of Theology Shifting Ethnic Relations and Hispanic Perceptions in the Native American Homeland of La Junta de los Rios Francis X. Galán, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Changing Borders, Changing Names: Pueblo de los Adaes, Mestizaje, and the Hidden Origins of the Early American Southwest in the TexasLouisiana Borderlands Carla Mendiola, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Indian, Immigrant, or Something Else?: Mestizaje and Identity in the South Texas and Lower Rio Grande Valley Borderlands

Washing the Dust off Indigenous Sovereignty: Marine Histories of Native America Location: Blanco

Chair & Comment: Joshua L. Reid (Snohomish), University of Washington Priscilla Martinez, University of California, Santa Cruz ‘This rather mythical locality’: Indigeneity, Sovereignty, and Power in the Rio Colorado Basin Bridget Groat (Inupiaq, Yup’ik, Alutiiq, and Dena’ina), Arizona State University The Changing Tides of Bristol Bay: Salmon, Sovereignty, and Alaska Natives John William Nelson, University of Notre Dame Muddy Waters: Indigenous Mobility and the Maritime Borderland of the Great Lakes


SAN ANTONIO 2018

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 1:30 P.M. – 3:00 P.M. Race and Radicalism: The Twin Bellwethers of Southwest Ultraconservatism Location: Frio

Chair: Sean P. Cunnigham, Texas Tech University Joel Zapata, Southern Methodist University Far-Right Activism in the Construction of the Plain’s Pioneer Folklore John S. Huntington, Independent Scholar Taxation as Tyranny: Willis E. Stone and the Liberty Amendment Frank DeLaO, Midland College Preserving Tradition: How Ultraconservatives Resisted Change in Texas, 1945-1965

Public Identities: Performing Indigeneity in and for the Early 20th Century West Location: Chula Vista

Chair: Katrine Barber, Portland State University Katrine Barber, Portland State University From Black Prophet to Chief Rising Sun: Alzamon Ira Lucas, Race Performance, and the Promise of Human Perfection Andrew Fisher, College of William and Mary “One of our best specimens of character in our race”: Nipo Strongheart and the Politics of Ethnic Performance in the New Era Laurie Arnold (Sinixt Band Colville), Gonzaga University ‘Performing’ Public Intellectualism and Moving Beyond Appearances: Christine Quintasket’s Work on the Columbia Plateau Comment: Audience

Space, Place and Community: Seeking a Regional History of the Bay Area Location: Seguin (Losoya Conference Center)

Co-Chairs: Jason Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha Lindsey Passenger Wieck, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio Panelists: Jeanette Estruth, New York University Glenna Matthews, Independent Scholar

Travels in the Greater West: The American West as a Transnational Proposition Location: Nueces

Chair: Sterling Evans, University of Oklahoma Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Going Transnational: The Promise and Peril of Comparing the American West with other Settler Colonial Contexts Tom Brooking, University of Otago, New Zealand How the New Western History Changed My Thinking about New Zealand History Thomas D. Isern, North Dakota State University Tall Crown’s War: A Western Historian’s Journey from Innocence to Confusion Comment: Margaret Connell-Szasz, University of New Mexico


SAN ANTONIO 2018 U.S. Expansion and Its Discontents Location: Blanco

Chair: Sam W. Haynes, University of Texas at Arlington Lori J. Daggar, Ursinus College Claiming Authority and Contesting Empire in the Early Nineteenth-Century Ohio Country Gerrit J. Dirkmaat, Brigham Young University Safely ‘Beyond the Limits of the United States’: The Mormon Expulsion and US Expansion Jimmy L. Bryan, Jr., Lamar University This Cool Diabolicism: Charles W. Webber’s Texas Gothic as Expansionist Intervention Comment: Monica Rico, Lawrence University

Race, Politics, Space, and the Spanish Past Location: Directors

Chair & Comment: Phylis Martinelli, St. Mary’s College of California Joel Kitchens, Texas A&M University San Antonio's Spanish Missions and the Complexities of Sacred Space Mark L. Howe, U.S. Section, International Boundary and Water Commission The Southern Texas Border and the Rio Grande: Race, Law, and Politics Meggan Woodbury-Bilotte, University of WisconsinMadison “These are the Thrifty Types of Hardworking Mexicans”: Labor, Domesticity, and Belonging, in the Great Western Sugar Company’s “Spanish Colonies,” 1920-1950

Power, Resistance, and Runaways: Federal Indian Policy in 20th-Century California Location: Pecos

Chair & Comment: Kevin Whalen, University of Minnesota, Morris Caitlin Keliiaa, University of California, Berkeley Unsettling Domesticity: Native Women Runaways and 20th-Century U.S. Indian Policy Matt Vileneuve, University of Michigan Dam Indians: Power, Sovereignty, and Dam Politics in Western Watersheds, 1912-2013 Kat Whiteley, University of Michigan California Dreamin’ in the Land of Lost Treaties


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Indigenous Communities in [Urban] Texas: A Conversation with Scholars and Community Leaders

Session is scheduled 1:30-4:30 with a break at 3:00 P.M. Location: Live Oak

Chair: Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso Jodi Voice Yellowfish (Mvskoke Creek/ Oglala Lakota/Cherokee), American Indian Heritage Day in Texas and Indian Citizens Against Racial Exploitation Yolonda BlueHorse (Sicangu Lakota/Rosebud Sioux), Society of Native Nations Frankie Orona, Society of Native Nations Kenneth M. Roemer, University of Texas at Arlington Dustin Tahmahkera (Comanche), University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Paul Conrad, University of Texas at Arlington Scott Langston, Texas Christian University Daniel Castro Romero, Jr. (Lipan Apache), University of Texas at El Paso Eloisa Tamez (Lipan Apache), University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Ed Countryman, Southern Methodist University Margo Tamez (Dene Nde’, Lipan Apache), University of British Columbia-Okanagan

Mexican American/Chicanxs during World War II: Confronting Issues of Gender, Culture, and Identity on the Home front & Abroad Location: Bowie C (Losoya Conference Center)

Chair: Maritza De La Trinidad, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Ana Zarazua, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Tejanas in World War II: Rositas aqui y alla! Paulina Garza, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Pachuca Culture in the 1940s Josue Puente University of Texas Rio Grande Valley El Americano, Defining the American norm and Defying Americanization Comment: Elizabeth Escobedo, University of Denver


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Geographies of Religion and Race Location: Mesquite

Chair & Comment: Kathryn Gin Lum, Stanford University Michel Sunhae Lee, University of Texas at Austin Sacred, Silent Sabbaths: Sound, Sabbatarianism, and Race and Ethnicity in Frontier California Joshua Paddison, Texas State University When Chan Pak Kwai and Jee Gam Both Played Chicago in 1879 Quincy D. Newell, Hamilton College “I Am White with the Exception of the Color of My Skin”: The Racialized Geography of Mormon Sacred Space

Nuestra Voz in San Antonio, Texas: Utilizing Oral History to Uncover the Complexities of Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender in a North American West Community Location: Llano

Chair & Commentator: Valerie A. Martínez, Our Lady of the Lake University Shayla San Miguel-Aston, Our Lady of the Lake University Adam Salem, Our Lady of the Lake University Rebecca Uribe, Our Lady of the Lake University

Floods, Droughts, Quakes, and Fires: How Communities Rebuild in the Aftermath of Manmade and Natural Disasters Location: Pecan

Chair & Comment: Ari Kelman, University of California, Davis Joanna L. Dyl, Independent Scholar Earthquakes, Infrastructure, and Rebuilding in California Julie Courtwright, Iowa State University Preparing and Responding to Prairie Fires Kyle Shelton, Kinder Institute, Rice University Infrastructure Choices, Community Entanglements, and Hurricane Harvey Erika Bsumek, University of Texas at Austin Drought, Dams, and attempts to Stave off Disaster on the Colorado Plateau


Dynamic Digital Methods for Integrating Local History into Public History Institutions and the K-16 Classroom Workshop at St. Mary’s University, Sunday October 21, 2018 Workshop cosponsored by: St. Mary’s University, San Antonio University of Notre Dame, Institute of Educational Initiatives WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education This workshop aims to bring together K-16 educators, public history professionals, and public history students to learn about strategies for integrating local and digital history into their professional practices. Participants reserve their space at the workshop and receive breakfast and lunch for a $15 registration fee. For more information, contact Lindsey Passenger Wieck at LWieck@stmarytx.edu or visit the WHA Website. 

8:00-8:30AM: Breakfast 8:30-9AM: Lindsey Passenger Wieck, St. Mary’s University: Introductions & Workshop Goals 9-9:50AM: Rebecca Wingo, University of Cincinnati: Collecting Local History through a History Harvest 9:50-10AM: Break 10-10:50AM: Shannon Murray, Calgary Stampede: Working with Local Communities to Develop Curriculum 11AM-11:50AM: Lunch & Presentation by Joel Zapata, Southern Methodist University: Exhibiting the Chicana/o                           Civil Rights Movement Without Walls: A Case for Joining Digital and Public History 11:50AM-12PM: Break 12-1PM: Jason Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha: Creating a Digital Archive to Share Local History 1-2:15PM: Small Groups will work together to make a product (for example: a public history project idea, a lesson                 plan that goes with it, and two digital history artifacts or infographics to take home with them). 2:15-2:45PM: Groups will share their products with the rest of the group. 2:45-3PM: Closing Remarks: Brian S Collier, University of Notre Dame: Institute for Educational Initiatives

Workshop Presenters Since 2015, Rebecca Wingo and her students have partnered with the Rondo community of Saint Paul, an historically African-American community bifurcated by highway construction the 1960s. She will present on the History Harvest, a student-driven, community-based digital archival project in which the participants bring items of significance, tell stories about their items while the students digitize the objects, and then take their heirlooms back home where they belong. Wingo will discuss the process of creating a History Harvest, and the importance of ensuring community leadership in the project. With her position at Calgary Stampede, Shannon Murray works closely with the organization’s education team who develop and deliver K-12 curriculum that connects students with local history. Murray will discuss her involvement in making edukits that tackle core areas of learning including First Nations History. While Wingo’s presentation discusses the collecting of local history artifacts, Murray’s presentation will speak to building and maintaining relationships with Indigenous peoples and offer examples of cross-cultural collaboration that serve to develop sensitive curriculum which honors multiple perspectives and bridges parallel ways of knowing. Like Murray, Jason Heppler will discuss an example of what we can do with local history materials collected. Heppler’s talk will discuss his work creating digital archives using Omeka, “a free, open source content management system for online digital collections.” Heppler’s use of Omeka plug-in Curatescape in his work on svhistorical.org, provided a platform for presenting local history narratives in a mobile-friendly format. Heppler’s presentation will demonstrate to participants the possibilities for creating digital archives with customized historical content to make local history accessible to the public. Joel Zapata of Southern Methodist University will discuss his digital history and mapping project, Chicana/o Activism in the Southern Plains Through Time and Space. This project, displayed at PlainsMovement.com, takes research and writing on the Chicana/o Civil Rights Movement to the wider public. Constructed through Omeka and Neatline, it centers on an interactive map and timeline along with an online collection of materials over the Southern Plains’ Chicana/o Movement. The digital project functions as an online museum, using webpages as exhibit panels. Each webpage, or panel, gradually and deliberately moves visitors into the heart of digital project while also giving visitors the option to freely explore through in-text hyperlinks and menu tabs that link to all the project’s pages. Overall, Chicana/o Activism in the Southern Plains Through Time and Space provides an accessible, digital museum experience that has not emerged within the walls of the Southern Plains’ museums and related institutions.


A

special

ProDigital

for

thanks

to

A.

capturing

Victor

our

time

Goodpasture in

San

Diego

and 2017.  


WHA 2018 BOOK EXHIBIT Adam Matthew Digital Arizona Historical Society Center for the Study of the American West Coalition for Western Women's History Montana Historical Society Mormon History Association New Mexico Historical Review North Dakota State University Press Oxford University Press South Dakota Historical Society Press St. Mary's University, San Antonio Texas A&M University Press Texas Tech University Press Trinity University Press University of Arizona Press University of California Press University Press of Colorado University Press of Kansas University of Nebraska Press University of Nevada Press University of New Mexico Press University of North Carolina Press University of Oklahoma Press University of Texas Press University of Washington Press Western History Association Western Writers of America Westerners International William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies Witte Museum  Yale University Press

The Western History Association's Book Exhibit is located in the Regency Ballroom across from the Registration Desk. Exhibit Hours: Thursday & Friday 8 AM - 5 PM Saturday 8 AM - 2 PM


FOLLOW US! #WHA2018 #WHAinSanAntonio2018! Conference Announcements, Job Postings, Scholarships, and Fellowship opportunities!

Follow us on social media for

WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION @WHAHISTORY WESTERNHISTORY


BOOK SIGNING

Join us at the WHA 2018 Conference for a book signing with

KENT BLANSETT A Journey to Freedom is a title in the Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity, published by Yale University Press

Friday, October 19 3:30-4:30 PM Exhibits Hall

This event is sponsored by Yale University Press and the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Nebraska at Omaha


INDEX OF ADS ABC-CLIO...................................................................................... 84 Adam Matthew.............................................................................. 57 Beineke Library............................................................................ 56 Center for Great Plains Studies................................................ Back Cover Coalition for Western Women's History.............................. 58 WHA Graduate Student Caucus ..............................................77 Lansing P. Bloom Family Award - NMHR............................ 84 Library of Congress Teach Primary Sources....................... 104 Montana Historical Society....................................................... 79 Mormon History Association................................................... 61 Museum of the Fur Trade......................................................... 83 New Mexico Historical Review......................................................72 Pennsylvania State University - History Department....... 60 Texas A&M University - San Antonio....................................83 Texas Tech University Press..................................................... 74 University of North Carolina Press......................................... 62 University of Arizona Press....................................................... 59 University of California Press...................................................63-64 University of Michigan Press.................................................... 78 University of Nebraska at Omaha........................................... 85 University of Nebraska Press.................................................... 65-66 University of Nebraska Press Journals................................... 74 University of New Mexico Press.............................................. 67 University of North Texas Press.............................................. 69 University of Oklahoma Libraries.......................................... 82 University of Oklahoma Press..................................................68 University of Texas Press........................................................... 71 University of Washington Press...............................................70 University Press of Colorado.................................................... 72 University Press of Kansas......................................................... 75-76 Western Historical Quarterly......................................................... 80 Westerners International .......................................................... 73 Yale University Press................................................................... 81


For nearly seventy years, the Yale Collection of Western Americana at the Beinecke Library has helped scholars from around the world better understand the history of the American West. The collection consists of some forty thousand printed works, four thousand catalogued manuscript collections, thousands of vintage photographs, and hundreds of prints, watercolors, and paintings that document the history and culture of Native American communities as well as the European and American exploration and settlement of the Trans-Mississippi West from Mexico to the Arctic Circle. Each year new purchases and gifts add depth and breadth to the collection, allowing it to respond flexibly to current trends in scholarship and to continue to serve not only Yale students and faculty but graduate students and senior scholars from America and abroad. The Beinecke Library offers generous fellowships to support research in its collections. To learn more about fellowships for visiting graduate students and for visiting postdoctoral scholars, please visit the library’s website at beinecke.library.yale.edu.


American Indian Newspapers A new digital primary source collection

Discover North American Indigenous journalism spanning two centuries American Indian Newspapers presents the publications of a range of communities, with an extensive list of periodicals produced in North America from 1828 to 2016. Research a range of subjects from an Indigenous perspective, including the civil rights era and American Indian Movement, environmentalism, land rights and cultural representation.

Visit our booth for more information

www.amdigital.co.uk

info@amdigital.co.uk


Celebrate Western Worn.en's History In 1983, the first

For 35 years, the

Coalition for Western Women's History has devoted itself to exploring the ''multicultural" history of western women and supporting the work of ''all people involved with western women's history." We've continued that work by mentoring graduate students and junior scholars, creating prizes recognizing the best western scholarship on the themes of women, gender, and sexuality, and sponsoring sessions at the annual conference of the Western History Association.

CWWH

“Women’s West Conference” occurred in Sun Valley, Idaho.* There, a group of women established the CWWH, to encourage the production of scholarship on women in western history. In 2018, the CWWH celebrates its 35th year. This year we embark on a fundraising campaign. $35,000 will expand our reach in supporting intersectional scholarship on sexuality, gender, and women. To help, please consider donating. Funds up to $25,000 will be matched by a generous donor.

TO DO ATE TO THE You can give online at: https:/ /westernwomenshistory.org/ *This grew out of conversations at the 1982 Institute of the American West conference, “Inventing the West.”

Or Mail Checks to: Lynne Getz, Treasurer Department of History Appalachian State University Boone, C 28608


NEW TITLES FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA PRESS

America’s Early Whalemen Indian Shore Whalers on Long Island, 1650–1750 John A. Strong Border Spaces Visualizing the U.S.-Mexico Frontera Edited by Katherine G. Morrissey and John-Michael H. Warner

Pasadena Before the Roses Race, Identity, and Land Use in Southern California, 1771–1890 Yvette J. Saavedra Style and Story Literary Methods for Writing Nonfiction Stephen J. Pyne

Ciudad Juárez Saga of a Legendary Border City Oscar J. Martínez

Upstream Trust Lands and Power on the Feather River Beth Rose Middleton Manning

The Making of a Mexican American Mayor Raymond L. Telles of El Paso and the Origins of Latino Political Power Mario T. García

Voices from Bears Ears Seeking Common Ground on Sacred Land Rebecca Robinson; Photographs by Stephen E. Strom; Foreword by Patricia Nelson Limerick

WWW.UAPRESS.ARIZONA.EDU | (800) 621-2736


CATHLEEN CAHILL

CHRISTINA SNYDER

AMY GREENBERG

The Penn State Department of History welcomes

D r . M ary M endoza

TATIANA SEIJAS

A.K. SANDOVAL-STRAUSZ

Photo by Ernie Chávez

Dr. Mendoza contributes to our department’s growing strengths in Western, Latinx, and Environmental History ELLEN STROUD

To learn more please visit our website at http://history.psu.edu

MARTHA FEW

COMING SOON

Masters of the Middle Waters: Indian Nations and European Empires Along the Mississippi

MATTHEW RESTALL

BRYAN L McDONALD

JACOB LEE

This publication is available in alternative media on request. Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status. U.Ed. LBS 18-492


MORMON HISTORY ASSOCIATION Call For Papers – 2019 Annual Conference Salt Lake City, Utah “Isolation and Integration” The 54th conference of the Mormon History Association will be held June 6–9, 2019, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The 2019 conference theme, “Isolation and Integration,” highlights a continuing tension in the Mormon experience and commemorates the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad and John Wesley Powell’s first Colorado River exploration. When Latter-day Saints arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in July 1847, they crossed an international boundary in search of religious liberty, something they hoped to find in the isolation of the desert expanses of northern Mexico. As MHA returns to Salt Lake City in 2019, we remember historical moments which reflect the Mormon desire for isolation as well as a corresponding pull toward integration represented by the laying of the Golden Spike in northern Utah on May 10, 1869, and two weeks later, the beginning of Powell’s charting of the mighty Colorado. In addition, the 1869 national discussion over granting Utah women suffrage led to their becoming the first to vote in the modern nation in early 1870, pulling them into the center of the national suffrage movement. Moreover, the Mormons’ imagined sense of isolation in the Great Basin did not account for the reality of their settlements being built on land already claimed by the region’s Native American inhabitants, thus perpetuating Native American dislocation and marginalization. Isolation and integration are metaphorically rich concepts in Mormon history. The 2019 conference theme invites scholars to contemplate the duality of the Mormon yearnings to be a peculiar people (isolation) and the contradictory impulse to be accepted and “mainstream” (integration). The theme opens doors to possible conversations between Mormon history and broader histories of missiology, colonization, globalization, and lived religion, as well as investigation of these instincts as manifested in other Restoration traditions. The Mormon History Association welcomes proposals from academic, professional, and amateur historians. Though the program committee will consider individual papers, it will give preference to proposals for complete sessions. Previously published papers are not eligible for presentation at MHA. Please send 1) a 300word abstract for each paper or presentation and 2) a 1–2 page CV for each presenter, including email contact information. Full session proposals should also include the session title and a brief abstract outlining the session’s theme, along with a confirmed or suggested chair and/or commentator, if applicable. MHA strongly encourages individuals to seek to organize panels that reflect diversity of panelists in terms of gender, institutional, social, ethnic, and religious background. The deadline for proposals is November 15, 2018. Send proposals to the program co-chairs at mhaslc2019@gmail.com. Acknowledgment of receipt will be sent immediately. Notification of acceptance or rejection will be made by January 15, 2019.


NEW FROM UNC PRESS | PLEASE VISIT OUR BOOTH!

Father Luis Olivares, a Biography Faith Politics and the Origins of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles MARIO T. GARCÍA 592 pages $34.95 cloth

The Lumbee Indians

An American Struggle MALINDA MAYNOR LOWERY 320 pages $30.00 cloth

Are We Not Foreigners Here?

Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands JEFFREY M. SCHULZE

THE DAVID J. WEBER SERIES IN THE NEW BORDERLANDS HISTORY Migrant Longing

Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands MIROSLAVA CHÁVEZ-GARCÍA 278 pages $27.95 paper

Women at War in the Borderlands of the Early American Northeast GINA M. MARTINO

240 pages $29.95 paper

Religious Freedom

The Contested History of an American Ideal TISA WENGER

368 pages $27.95 paper

336 pages $27.95 paper

Indian Women of the Ohio River Valley, 1690-1792 SUSAN SLEEPER-SMITH

The Politics of Hawaiian Performance STEPHANIE NOHELANI TEVES

Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850 ANDREW J. TORGET

The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century JOHN WEBER

Indigenous Prosperity and American Conquest

Defiant Indigeneity

Seeds of Empire

From South Texas to the Nation

232 pages $27.95 cloth

270 pages $32.95 paper

Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press 376 pages $45.00 cloth

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK Cattle Colonialism

Oberlin, Hotbed of Abolitionism

An Environmental History of the Conquest of California and Hawai’i JOHN RYAN FISCHER

College, Community, and the Fight for Freedom and Equality in Antebellum America J.BRENT MORRIS

280 pages $27.95 paper

352 pages $27.95 paper

The Latino Generation

The End of a Global Pox

Voices of the New America MARIO T. GARCÍA 288 pages $27.95 paper

America and the Eradication of Smallpox in the Cold War Era BOB H. REINHARDT 288 pages $27.95 paper

312 pages $34.95 cloth

Most UNC Press books are also available as E-Books.

UNC Press books are now available through Books @ JSTOR and Project Muse Muse – and North Carolina Scholarship Online (NCSO) on Oxford Scholarship Online.

at bookstores or 800-848-6224 • uncpress.org • uncpressblog.com


HISTORY JOURNALS FROM UC PRESS SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA QUARTERLY Editor: Merry Ovnick The Southern California Quarterly, the flagship publication of the Historical Society of Southern California, carries forward the tradition of fine regional history scholarship begun with the Society’s first annual publication in 1884. ISSN: 0038-3929 eISSN: 2162-8637 Published: February, May, August, November

CALIFORNIA HISTORY Editor: Josh Sides Under the stewardship of the California Historical Society for nearly one hundred years, California History is the premier journal of historical writing on California. Showcasing exceptional scholarship, engaging writing, and innovative research, California History is essential reading for students and scholars of the history of California and the West, as well as California residents curious to understand the imprint of the state’s rich past. ISSN: 0162-2897 eISSN: 2327-1485 Published: February, May, August, November

PACIFIC HISTORICAL REVIEW Editors: Marc Rodriguez and Brenda Frink For over eighty years, the Pacific Historical Review has accurately and adeptly covered the rich history of the Pacific Rim, including U.S. expansion to the Pacific and beyond, cross-cultural and comparative studies, race and ethnicity, history of empire and imperialism, environmental history, and historiography. ISSN: 0030-8684 eISSN: 1533-8584 Published: February, May, August, November

MEXICAN STUDIES/ESTUDIOS MEXICANOS Editor: Ruth Hellier-Tinoco Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos is a bilingual, international scholarly journal dedicated to providing a unique and essential forum for the dissemination of cutting-edge research relating to Mexico, broadly defined. eISSN: 1533-8320 Published: February, August, November

www.ucpress.edu/journals


NEW & FORTHCOMING

Shaped by the West, Volume 1: A History of North America to 1877 William Deverell and Anne F. Hyde

Shaped by the West, Volume 2: A History of North America from 1850 William Deverell and Anne F. Hyde

A Global History of Gold Rushes Edited by Benjamin Mountford and Stephen Tuffnell

Strategies of Segregation: Race, Residence, and the Struggle for Educational Equality David G. García

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States

Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo-Wop Singer

Rosina Lozano

Rubén Funkahuatl Guevara

Carleton Watkins: Making the West American

Security and Terror: American Culture and the Long History of Colonial Modernity

Tyler Green

Soldiering through Empire: Race and the Making of the Decolonizing Pacific Simeon Man

Flavors of Empire: Food and the Making of Thai America Mark Padoongpatt

Braided Waters: Environment and Society in Molokai, Hawaii Wade Graham

Eli Jelly-Schapiro

The Road to Resegregation: Northern California and the Failure of Politics Alex Schafran

The Worlds of Junipero Serra: Historical Contexts and Cultural Representations Edited by Steven W. Hackel

Inland Shift: Race, Space, and Capital in Southern California Juan De Lara

Beyond Hawai’i: Native Labor in the Pacific World Gregory Rosenthal

The Life of Paper: Letters and a Poetics of Living Beyond Captivity Sharon Luk

SAVE 40% ON BOOKS USING SOURCE CODE 18E4165 OR REQUEST AN EXAM COPY: ucpress.edu/go/exam

Stay connected: facebook.com/ucpress twitter @ucpress eNews at ucpress.edu/go/subscribe

www.ucpress.edu


new from the

UNIVERSITY

SEA OTTERS

A History Richard Ravalli $45.00 • HARDBACK

THE LIMITS OF LIBERTY

Mobility and the Making of the Eastern U.S.-Mexico Border James David Nichols $60.00 • HARDBACK

PHOEBE APPERSON HEARST A Life of Power and Politics Alexandra M. Nickliss $39.95 • HARDBACK

RELIGIOUS REVITALIZATION AMONG THE KIOWAS

The Ghost Dance, Peyote, and Christianity Benjamin R. Kracht $75.00 • HARDBACK

new in paperback THE MAYANS AMONG US

Migrant Women and Meatpacking on the Great Plains Ann L. Sittig and Martha Florinda González $17.95 • PAPERBACK

STANDING UP TO COLONIAL POWER

The Lives of Henry Roe and Elizabeth Bender Cloud Renya K. Ramirez $29.95 • HARDBACK

OGALLALA, THIRD EDITION

Water for a Dry Land John Opie, Char Miller, and Kenna Lang Archer $35.00 • PAPERBACK

THE FAULT LINES OF FARM POLICY A Legislative and Political History of the Farm Bill Jonathan Coppess $65.00 • HARDBACK

DOWNWIND

A People’s History of the Nuclear West Sarah Alisabeth Fox $19.95 • PAPERBACK

THE SPIRIT AND THE SKY Lakota Visions of the Cosmos Mark Hollabaugh $24.95 • PAPERBACK


OF NEBRASKA PRESS THE INTEGRATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE

HOW THE WEST WAS DRAWN

QUEERING KANSAS CITY JAZZ

ALL MY RELATIVES

Race and Baseball on the West Coast Amy Essington $19.95 • PAPERBACK

Gender, Performance, and the History of a Scene Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone $45.00 • HARDBACK

RUSSIAN COLONIZATION OF ALASKA

Preconditions, Discovery, and Initial Development, 1741-1799 Andrei Val’terovich Grinëv Translated by Richard L. Bland $70.00 • HARDBACK

SIGHT UNSEEN

How Frémont’s First Expedition Changed the American Landscape Andrew Menard $24.95 • PAPERBACK

Mapping, Indians, and the Construction of the TransMississippi West David Bernstein $65.00 • HARDBACK Exploring Lakota Ontology, Belief, and Ritual David C. Posthumus $55.00 • HARDBACK

INDIANS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA A Comparative History, Second Edition Roger L. Nichols $40.00 • PAPERBACK

Visit the UNP BOOTH for a 30% DISCOUNT

SONG OF DEWEY BEARD

Last Survivor of the Little Bighorn Philip Burnham $19.95 • PAPERBACK

nebraskapress.unl.edu


university of new mexico press Visit our booth and receive a 40% conference discount

Esteban: The African Slave Who Explored America Dennis Herrick $39.95 cloth 978-0-8263-5981-0 304 pp., 6 × 9, 11 halftones, 5 maps

Food Sovereignty the Navajo Way: Cooking with Tall Woman Charlotte J. Frisbie; with Recipes by Tall Woman & Assistance from Augusta Sandoval $34.95 paper 978-0-8263-5887-5 416 pp., 6 × 9, 45 halftones

Gold Mountain Turned to Dust: Essays on the Legal History of the Chinese in the Nineteenth-Century American West

Colonial New Mexican Families: Community, Church, and State, 1692–1800 Suzanne M. Stamatov $55.00 cloth 978-0-8263-5920-9 256 pp., 6 × 9, 5 drawings, 5 charts, 7 tables

Imagine a City That Remembers: The Albuquerque Rephotography Project Anthony Anella & Mark C. Childs; Foreword by V. B. Price $34.95 paper 978-0-8263-5977-3 192 pp., 10 × 8, 54 color illustrations

Into the Great White Sands

John R. Wunder; Foreword by Liping Zhu

Photographs by Craig Varjabedian; Essays by Jeanetta Calhoun Mish, Dennis Ditmanson, and Jim Eckles

$29.95 paper 978-0-8263-5938-4 200 pp., 6 × 9, 1 halftone, 1 chart, 3 graphs, 9 tables

$39.95 cloth 978-0-8263-5830-1 136 pp., 12 × 9.5, 91 color plates, 1 map

Untangling a Red, White, and Black Heritage: A Personal History of the Allotment Era

Sandia: Seasons of a Mountain

Darnella Davis $45.00 cloth 978-0-8263-5979-7 232 pp., 6 × 9, 21 figs.

Photographs by David Muench; Essay by Ruth Rudner $34.95 paper 978-0-8263-5924-7 104 pp., 12 × 10, 48 color photos

unmpress.com


COLOR CODED

NED CHRISTIE

THE CHISHOLM TRAIL

Party Politics in the American West, 1950–2016 By Walter Nugent

The Creation of an Outlaw and Cherokee Hero By Devon Abbott Mihesuah

Joseph McCoy’s Great Gamble By James E. Sherow

$34.95 CLOTH · 416 PAGES

$29.95 CLOTH · 272 PAGES

29.95 CLOTH · 368 PAGES

VALLEY OF THE GUNS

The Pleasant Valley War and the Trauma of Violence By Eduardo Obregón Pagán

LONE STAR MIND

Reimagining Texas History By Ty Cashion

MANY NATIONS UNDER MANY GODS

$34.95 CLOTH · 288 PAGES

$29.95 CLOTH · 304 PAGES

Public Land Management and American Indian Sacred Sites By Todd Allin Morman $39.95 CLOTH · 288 PAGES

COAST-TO-COAST EMPIRE

A BAD PEACE AND A GOOD WAR Spain and the Mescalero Apache Uprising of 1795–1799 By Mark Santiago

Rustlers, Rangers, and Regulars on the Lower Rio Grande, 1861–1877 By Michael L. Collins

$32.95 CLOTH · 288 PAGES

$32.95 CLOTH · 248 PAGES

$29.95 CLOTH · 360 PAGES

Manifest Destiny and the New Mexico Borderlands By William S. Kiser

THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION. WWW.OU.EDU/EOO

A CROOKED RIVER


University of North Texas Press From Santa Anna to Selena Notable Mexicanos and Tejanos in Texas History since 1821

The Ranger Ideal, Volume 2 Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1874-1930

Biographies of eleven notable Mexicanos and Tejanos, from the infamous Antonio López de Santa Anna to singer Selena Quintanilla Pérez.

Volume 2 of this three-part series presents capsule biographies of the twelve Hall of Fame inductees who served in the latter half of the 19th century.

Hardcover $29.95 | E-book $23.96

Hardcover $45.00 | E-book $36.00

Texas Rangers Lives, Legend, and Legacy

Eavesdropping on Texas History

This one-volume history tells the story of the Rangers and addresses the various wars, companies, and famous episodes that shaped the Ranger service.

Fifteen Texas history scholars explore one central question: “At what moment in Texas history would you have liked to have been a ‘fly on the wall,’ and why?”

Hardcover $34.95 | E-book $27.96

Hardcover $29.95 | E-book $23.36

Single Star of the West The Republic of Texas,1836-1845

Ordered West The Civil War Exploits of Charles A. Curtis

Harriett Denise Joseph

Bob Alexander & Donaly E. Brice

Kenneth W. Howell & Charles Swanlund, Eds.

Darren L. Ivey

Mary L. Scheer, Ed.

Alan D. Gaff & Donald H. Gaff, Eds.

A thorough look at the Republic years, examining Texas’s various militia and law enforcement services, social and cultural trends, and the emergence of a Texan identity.

In this extensive memoir, Curtis reminisces upon encounters with Indians, military figures, and other characters from the Old West— including frontiersman Kit Carson.

Hardcover $34.95 | E-book $27.96

Hardcover $34.95 | E-book $27.96

See our website for more books about the West:

Distributed by Texas Book Consortium Orders: 1-800-826-8911 • UNTPress.unt.edu


University

indigenous confluences

We Are Dancing for You Native Feminisms and the Revitalization of Women’s Coming-of-Age Ceremonies CUTCHA RISLING BALDY

of

 W a s h i n g t o n P r e SS

John Okada

Before Yellowstone

The Life and Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy

Native American Archaeology in the National Park

Edited by Frank Abe, Greg Robinson, and Floyd Cheung

Douglas H. MacDonald

Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies

208 pp., $30.00 pb

376 pp., 21 illus., $29.95 pb

Power in the Telling

Asian American Feminisms and Women of Color Politics

Grand Ronde, Warm Springs, and Intertribal Relations in the Casino Era BROOK COLLEY

FOREWORD BY DAVID G. LEWIS 224 pp., 1 illus., $30.00 pb

Chinook Resilience Heritage and Cultural Revitalization on the Lower Columbia River Jon Daehnke Foreword by Tony A. Johnson 256 pp., 15 illus., $30.00 pb

EDITED BY LYNN FUJIWARA AND SHIREEN ROSHANRAVAN Decolonizing Feminisms

december 2018 304 pp., $30.00 pb

Firebrand Feminism The Radical Lives of Ti-Grace Atkinson, Kathie Sarachild, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, and Dana Densmore Breanne Fahs

288 pp., 29 illus., $29.95 pb

In Defense of Wyam Native-White Alliances and the Struggle for Celilo Village Katrine Barber Emil and Kathleen Sick Series in Western History and Biography

312 pp., 23 illus., $24.95 pb

Proud Raven, Panting Wolf Carving Alaska’s New Deal Totem Parks EMILY L. MOORE

Concrete Mama Prison Profiles from Walla Walla ETHAN HOFFMAN AND JOHN A. MCCOY INTRODUCTION BY DAN BERGER 232 pp., 128 illus., $34.95 pb

Gold Rush Manliness Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope CHRISTOPHER HERBERT Emil and Kathleen Sick Series in Western History and Biography

280 pp., 7 illus., $30.00 pb

Art History Publication Initiative Books

296 pp., 85 illus., 19 color plates, $39.95 hb

The Seattle General Strike ROBERT L. FRIEDHEIM

INTRODUCTION, AFTERWORD, AND PHOTO ESSAY BY JAMES N. GREGORY 288 pp., 30 illus., $24.95 pb

240 pp., 125 color illus., $29.95 pb

Early Rock Art of the American West The Geometric Enigma Ekkehart Malotki and Ellen Dissanayake

312 pp., 200 color illus., $34.95 pb

A Family History of Illness Memory as Medicine Brett L. Walker

280 pp., 20 illus., $26.95 hc

we yerhaeuser environmental books fore words by paul S. sut ter

Seismic City An Environmental History of San Francisco’s 1906 Earthquake Joanna L. Dyl

352 pp., 41 illus., $34.95 hc

The Organic Profit Rodale and the Making of Marketplace Environmentalism Andrew N. Case

296 pp., 13 illus., $34.95 hc

Environmental Justice in Postwar America A Documentary Reader Edited by Christopher W. Wells

Weyerhaeuser Environmental Classics 328 pp., 33 illus., $24.00 pb

free shipping  |  30% discount with promo w902  |  washington.edu/uwpress


40%

wha conference discount

BANKING ON BEAUTY

Millard Sheets and Midcentury Commercial Architecture in California

ADAM ARENSON

Banking on Beauty

Nuevo South

Power Moves

Millard Sheets and Midcentury Commercial Architecture in California

Latinas/os, Asians, and the Remaking of Place

Transportation, Politics, and Development in Houston

B Y P E R L A M. G U E R R E R O $29.95 paperback $29.95 e-book

B Y KY L E S H E LT O N $29.95 paperback $29.95 e-book

BY ADAM ARENSON $45.00 hardcover

EDITED BY MARÍA EUGENIA COTERA

MAYLEI BLACKWELL

MARY P. RYAN

Taking the Land to Make the City A Bicoastal History of North America

NEW NARRATIVES of ACTIVISM and FEMINISM in the MOVEMENT ERA

New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era ED I T ED BY DIONNE E SPI N OZ A, M A R Í A E U G E N I A C O T E RA, A N D M AY L E I B L A C K W E L L $35.00 paperback $35.00 e-book

BY CRISTINA SALINAS $45.00 hardcover

2019

MOVIDAS Chicana Movidas

Growers, Farmworkers, and Border Enforcement in the Twentieth Century

FORTHCOMING IN

CHICANA DIONNE ESPINOZA

Managed Migrations

Speaker Jim Wright Power, Scandal, and the Birth of Modern Politics BY J. BROOKS FLIPPEN $35.00 hardcover

They Came to Toil

JEFF ROCHE

Newspaper Representations of Mexicans and Immigrants in the Great Depression

The Conservative Frontier

B Y M E L I TA M . G A R Z A $29.95 paperback $29.95 e-book

The New Right and the American West

university of texas press


Wanted History fans who live by their own rules and enjoy their history with a touch of humor. No stuffed shirts allowed.

Join the 5000 worldwide members in 70 unique corrals and posses to find out how fun Western history can be.

Westerners International

Stop by our booth or learn more at Westerners-International.org


Visit Our Booth in the Exhibit Hall

No Place Like Home

California at War

Lessons in Activism from LGBT Kansas

The State and the People during World War I

C.J. Janovy

Diane M. T. North

308 pages, 14 photographs, Cloth $29.95

496 pages, 70 photographs, 2 maps, Cloth $29.95

Crusader for Democracy

Hopi Runners

The Political Life of William Allen White Charles Delgadillo

Crossing the Terrain between Indian and American

328 pages, 27 photographs, Cloth $34.95

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Magic Bean The Rise of Soy in America Matthew Roth 368 pages, 16 photographs, Cloth $45.00, Paper $24.95

The Diaries of Reuben Smith, Kansas Settler and Civil War Soldier Edited by Lana Wirt Myers 264 pages, 22 photographs, 4 maps, Cloth $45.00, Paper $24.95

A River in the City of Fountains An Environmental History of Kansas City and the Missouri River

272 pages, 19 photographs, 1 map, Cloth $27.95

Beyond the Borders of the Law Critical Legal Histories of the North American West Edited by Katrina Jagodinsky and Pablo Mitchell 368 pages, 10 photographs, 4 maps, Cloth $50.00, Paper $29.95

Dodge City and the Birth of the Wild West Robert R. Dykstra and Jo Ann Manfra 240 pages, 28 photographs, Cloth $45.00, Paper $22.95

Yellowstone and the Smithsonian Centers of Wildlife Conservation

Amahia K. Mallea

Diane Smith

352 pages, 29 photographs, 5 maps, Cloth $50.00, Paper $29.95

208 pages, 27 photographs, Cloth $39.95, Paper $19.95


Special Conference Discount Offer

The Earth Memory Compass

Osage Women and Empire

Diné Landscapes and Education in the Twentieth Century

Gender and Power

Farina King

224 pages, 10 photographs, 4 maps, Cloth $45.00, Paper $24.95

264 pages, 17 photographs, 5 maps, Cloth $45.00, Paper $24.95

The Hunter Elite Manly Sport, Hunting Narratives, and American Conservation, 1880–1925 Tara Kathleen Kelly

Tai Edwards

Wide-Open Town Kansas City in the Pendergast Era Edited by Diane Mutti Burke, Jason Roe, and John Herron

348 pages, 15 photographs, Cloth $50.00, Paper $27.95

384 pages, 54 photographs, 1 map, Cloth $50.00, Paper $29.95

Where There’s Smoke

The American Elsewhere

The Environmental Science, Public Policy, and Politics of Marijuana

Adventure and Manliness in the Age of Expansion

Char Miller

Jimmy L. Bryan Jr.

256 pages, 16 photographs, Cloth $29.95

368 pages, 30 photographs, Cloth $39.95

Elevations

Populism and Imperialism

A Personal Exploration of the Arkansas River

Politics, Culture, and Foreign Policy in the American West, 1890–1900

Max McCoy

Nathan Jessen

320 pages, 22 photographs, 1 map, Cloth $27.95

376 pages, 15 photographs, Cloth $39.95

Ebook editions available from your favorite ebook retailer.

University Press of Kansas Phone (785) 864-4155 • Fax (785) 864-4586 • www.kansaspress.ku.edu


Western History Association Graduate Student Caucus Graduate Student Caucus Sessions: Session 1. Navigating the Historical Profession: Different Career Options for Historians (Thursday at 12:30 PM) Session 2. Lightning Talks: Condensed Doctoral Research Presentations (Saturday at 8:30 AM) Graduate Student Caucus Sponsored Session: Latina/o History: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Vicki Ruíz’s From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America (Friday at 2:15 PM) The Western History Association Graduate Student Caucus is devoted to serving the needs of students of Western History by providing skills and opportunities necessary to excel in our field. The only requirement to joining the WHA Graduate Student Caucus is to be a paid student member of the WHA. Send us an email at WHAGSC@gmail.com to be added to the Caucus. We also encourage you to get involved, as a volunteer, or a member of the GSC Council. Follow us on social media Facebook: www.facebook.com/WHAGSC Twitter: www.twitter.com/whagrads WHA 2018 hashtags: #WHAGrad2018 #WHA 2018


Celebrate more than 65 years of

There are two ways to receive the magazine:

1. ADD Montana The Magazine of

2. JOIN the Montana Historical

Western History to your Western History Society. Subscriptions are only $35 Association membership for only per year. Memberships with additional $19.00. http://westernhistory.org benefits begin at $55 per year. http://mhs.mt.gov/Membership/Join

Insta

Ask us how to receive a 15% WHA member discount on advertising rates in Montana.

225 N. Roberts, P.O. Box 201201, Helena, MT 59620 (406) 444-2694  montanahistoricalsociety.org


Submit your work to an award-winning journal

THE OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION The Western Historical Quarterly presents original articles on the North American West, including western Canada, northern Mexico, Alaska, and Hawaii. Topics incude expansion and colonization, indigenous histories, regional studies and transnational, comparative, and borderland histories.

PRIZE-WINNING RESEARCH 2017: Golden Spur Award. Western Writers of America. ‘Master of Ceremonies’: The World of Peter Biggs in Civil War-Era Los Angeles” by Kendra Field and Daniel Lynch 2017: Oscar O. Winther Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “Chinese Braceros? Chinese Mexican Workers in the United States during World War II” by Fredy González 2017: Bert M. Fireman and Janet Fireman Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “‘What is it to Withdraw?’: Klamath and Navajo Tribal Councils’ Tactics in Negotiating Termination Policy, 1949-1964” by Reetta Humalajoki

Host Institution: The University of Oklahoma Department of History

2016: Arrington-Prucha Prize. Western Historical Association. “Wage Work in the Sacred Circle: The Ghost Dance as Modern Religion” by Louis Warren

The Western Historical Quarterly Staff

Alison Fields, Associate Editor

2016: Theodore C. Blegen Award. The Forest History Society. “When Loggers Were Green: Lumber, Labor, and Conservation, 1937 1948” by Erik Loomis

Louisa Brandt, Editorial Fellow

2016: Judith Ridge Prize. Western Association of Woman Historians. “A’ Ghàidhealtachd and the North American West” by Margaret Connell-Szasz

Anne Hyde, WHQ Editor and Professor of History Abigail Gibson, Editorial Fellow

The Western Historical Quarterly awards two article prizes each year: The Oscar O. Winther Award gives $500 to the for best The Western Historical Quarterly article and the Bert M. Fireman and Janet Fireman Award gives $500 to the best student article in The Western Historical Quarterly.

2016: Bolton-Cutter Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “Migrant Longing, Courtship, and Gendered Identity in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands” by Miroslava Chávez-García 2016: Jensen-Miller Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “A Tale of Two Sisters: Family Histories from the Strait Salish Borderlands” by Katrina Jagodinsky 2016: Michael P. Malone Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “Western Spirit of ’76: The American Bicentennial and the Making of Conservative Multiculturalism in the Mountain West” by Laura Barraclough

Learn more and submit your work: academic.oup.com/whq


Visit our booth

Unlikely General

The Lamar Series in Western History

Mary Stockwell

Growing Up with the Country

“Mad” Anthony Wayne and the Battle for America

Family, Race, and Nation after the Civil War

First Americans

U.S. Patriotism in Indian Country after World War I Thomas Grillot

Dust Bowls of Empire Imperialism, Environmental Politics, and the Injustice of “Green” Capitalism Hannah Holleman

The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity

Indigenous Visions

Rediscovering the World of Franz Boas

Edited by Ned Blackhawk and Isaiah Lorado Wilner Paperback original

A Journey to Freedom Richard Oakes, Alcatraz, and the Red Power Movement Kent Blansett

The Makings and Unmakings of Americans

Kendra Taira Field

First Impressions

A Reader’s Journey to Iconic Places of the American Southwest

The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873 Benjamin Madley Now in paperback

Frontiers in the Gilded Age

Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa White Fox and Icy Seas and the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917 in the Western Arctic David J. Weber and William deBuys

The Fur Trade, Transportation, and Change in the Early Twentieth Century

John R. Bockstoce Foreword by William Barr

Grounds for Dreaming Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the California Farmworker Movement

Andrew Offenburger Forthcoming in 2019

The Destruction and Survival of American Indian Nations, 1750s–1900, Volume 1 Jeffrey Ostler

Forthcoming in 2019

The American West

Lori A. Flores

A New Interpretive History Reader

Uncertain Destinies

Paperback original Forthcoming in 2019

Now in paperback

The Lakota Nation and the Long Conquest of the American Interior

Indians and Immigrants in American Literature and Culture, 1879-1929

An American Genocide

Pekka Hämäläinen Forthcoming in 2019

John Mack Faragher and Daniel Lanpher

Wanted

The Outlaw Lives of Billy the Kid and Ned Kelly Robert M. Utley Now in paperback

Cristina Stanciu

Forthcoming in 2019

Yale university press YUP WHA 2018#2.indd 1

www.YaleBooks.com 6/1/18 7:42 AM


Study the North American West!

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA

HISTORY M.A. PROGRAM offers courses, internships, and programs that concentrate in the North American West, Native American Studies, Immigration Law & Policy, Great Plains, Environment, Women and Gender, Comparative Indigenous & Genocide, and Digital Engagement

The UNO HISTORY DEPARTMENT provides graduate students with unique opportunities for research and professional development, including: ▪ Funded Teaching Assistantships (tuition + stipend) ▪ ▪ Thesis Writing Fellowships (tuition + stipend) ▪ ▪ Martin Fund for Western History (travel & research) ▪ ▪ Graduate Research Grants (GRACA) ▪ ▪ University Committee Grants for Research (UCRCA) ▪ ▪ Western History Association ▪ ▪ History Intern Program ▪ ▪ Missouri Valley History Conference ▪

The UNO History Department is also the home for the WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION, which opens doors for graduate student networking, funding, and exposure to the historical profession. Please inquire with Dr. Elaine Nelson, WHA Executive Director (emnelson@unomah.edu) WWW.CAS.UNOMAHA.EDU/HISTORY


WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION

EXECUTIVE OFFICE Elaine Nelson, PhD, Executive Director

Leah Cargin, M.S., Executive Assistant

On behalf of the WHA Executive Office, I welcome you to the 58th Annual WHA Conference! We are pleased that the organization is returning to Texas for the first time in 15 years. Many of our members and sponsors are located in Texas, and we are eager to reconnect with the state’s rich and complex history. This year, the WHA hired numerous graduate students from across the country to assist the conference staff. Please drop by the registration desk to thank them for their contributions to the association! After one full year at the WHA’s new host institution, University of Nebraska at Omaha, we remain grateful to the support of Dr. David Boocker, Dean of UNO’s College of Arts and Sciences, and the faculty in the UNO Department of History. The WHA benefits from the University’s generosity, along with the support of the History Dual Enrollment Program, Office of Graduate Studies, Criss Library, Missouri Valley History Conference, and the Charles W. and Mary Caldwell Martin Western History Fund. Graduate students in UNO’s History M.A. Program are actively engaged in the field of western history and take advantage of the opportunities that the WHA’s presence on campus provides to them. My position as the Executive Director allows me to work with many people and organizations throughout the historical profession who are devoted to the study of the North American West. I am grateful to the past, current, and future Presidents, Officers, Council members, and the Chairs and members of the Standing and Ad-Hoc Committees. Thank you for your time and efforts; your service to the WHA is invaluable.

Libby Rea, Graduate Assistant

The WHA benefits from the efficiency, energy, and exceptional performance of the WHA Executive Assistant, Leah Cargin. She and I highly value the work of the WHA Graduate Assistants Elizabeth Rea and Kaitlin Sundberg who propel enthusiasm into their positions. I am very lucky to collaborate with this group of dedicated women. Thank you for your work to the Western History Association! WHA CONTACT INFORMATION: Western History Association UNO Department of History 6001 Dodge Street Omaha, NE 68182 Phone: 402-554-5999 Email: WesternHistoryAssociation@gmail.com

Kaitlin Sundberg, Graduate Assistant & NU Presidential Graduate Fellow


WHA COMMITTEES GRADUATE STUDENT CAUCUS The WHA Graduate Student Caucus meets at each WHA gathering to discuss ways in which the organization can be more inclusive of graduate students. Please contact WHAGSC President Tiffany J. González at tiffany.j.gonzalez@tamu.edu for more information. COMMITTEE ON TEACHING AND PUBLIC EDUCATION The Committee on Teaching and Public Education works year-round on projects which increase the awareness of the West, and promote K-16 education. The CTPE encourages collaboration between teachers and scholars. Please contact Committee Chair Mark Johnson (mark.johnson@nd.edu) for more information.  TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE The Technology Committee researches technical innovations for the WHA. They advise the Council and Executive Office on how to move forward with technology such as digital submission platforms and social media use. Please contact Committee Chair Jason Heppler at jheppler@unomaha.edu for more information. 

WHA COMMITTEE ON ASSAULT RESPONSE AND EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES Committee on Assault Response & Educational Strategies (CARES) was formed in 2018. They work to provide educational resources for WHA members. It is their goal to raise awareness of assault in the academy. If you are interested in becoming involved with this committee please attend the 2018 Spark Session. You may also contact the Chair, S. Deborah Kang at sdkang@csusm.edu.


COMMITTEE ON RACE AND THE AMERICAN WEST (CRAW) The Committee on Race and the American West is dedicated to diversifying the scholars and members of the WHA as well as ensuring there is more scholarship produced by historians of color. Please contact Committee Chair Mary E. Mendoa at marye.mendoza@psu.edu for more information.  MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE The Membership Committee uses their energy to implement new recruitment and retention strategies for the WHA. They also spark energy in emerging scholars through the WHA Graduate Student Prize. Please contact Committee Chair Laurie Arnold at arnoldl@gonzaga.edu for more information. 

PUBLIC HISTORY COMMITTEE The Public History Committee works to ensure that public history and historians are promoted and welcomed within the WHA. Their duties include advising the Council on matters of public history, fundraising, and hosting the Public History Reception. Please contact Committee Chair Rebecca Hunt at rebecca.hunt@ucdenver.edu for more information. AD-HOC COMMITTEE ON CONTINGENT AND ADJUNCT FACULTY The Ad-Hoc Committee on Contingent and Adjunct Faculty uses their platform to create initiatives and programs for contingent university faculty in academic organizations. Please contact Committee Member Amy Essington at amycessington@gmail.com for more information. 


The Western History Association membership elects the primary governing body of the organization, which consists of the President, President-Elect, Executive Director, and seven regularly elected members to serve on the Council. Together, and with the assistance of the Nominating Committee and other committees, these elected officials oversee the broad interests of the association by managing business and creating policies that promote a congenial home for all those interested in the study of the North American West.

Executive Committee Donald L. Fixico, President

Martha A. Sandweiss, President-Elect

Elaine M. Nelson, Executive Director

Arizona State University

Princeton University

University of Nebraska at Omaha

Cathleen Cahill (2018)

Tiffany Jasmin González (2020)

Gregory E. Smoak (2018)

Pennsylvania State University

Texas A&Am University

University of Utah

Council

Susan Johnson (2019)

José Alamillo (2019)

Renée Laegreid (2019)

University of Wisconsin-Madison

California State University Channel Islands

University of Wyoming

Stephen Aron (2019)

Anne M. Hyde (ex-officio)

John W. Heaton (2019)

University of California, Los Angeles

Western Historical Quarterly

University of Alaska Fairbanks

John Mack Faragher (2018)

Shelia McManus (2020)

Jeffrey Ostler (2020)

Yale University

University of Lethbridge

University of Oregon

Nominating Committee Connie Chiang (2019)

Amy Lonetree (2019)

Lori Lahlum (2018)

Bowdoin College

University of California, Santa Cruz

Minnesota State University, Mankato

Leisl Carr Childers (2018)

George T. Díaz (2018)

Colorado State University

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Committee on Assault Response & Educational Strategies (CARES) S. Deborah Kang, Chair

Erika Pérez

Jennifer McPherson

José Alamillo

California State University, San Marcos

University of Arizona

Purdue University

California State University Channel Islands

Membership Committee Laurie Arnold, Chair

Patricia Loughlin

Melody Miyamoto Walters

Renée Laegreid

Gonzaga University

University of Central Oklahoma

Collin College

University of Wyoming

Boyd Cothran

Jerry Frank

Julia Stetler

York University

University of Missouri

University of Wyoming

Technology Committee Jason Heppler, Chair

J. Wendel Cox

Rebecca Wingo

Lindsey Passenger Wieck

University of Nebraska at Omaha

Dartmouth College Library

University of Cincinnati

St. Mary’s University, San Antonio

Jana Remy

Leisl Carr Childers

Douglas Seefeldt

Durwood Ball

Chapman University

Colorado State University

Ball State University

University of New Mexico


Financial Advisory Committee David A. Johnson, Chair

James F. Brooks

Janet Fireman

Portland State University

University of California, Santa Barbara

Independent Scholar

Committee on Race in the American West (CRAW) Mary E. Mendoza, Chair

Karen Leong

Katherine Benton-Cohen

Pennsylvania State University

Arizona State University

Georgetown University

CRAW Advisors Kevin Leonard

Ernesto Chávez

Erika Pérez

Maria E. Montoya

Western Washington University

University of Texas, El Paso

University of Arizona

New York University

Traci Brynne Voyles

Jennifer Y. Macias

Pablo Mitchell

Lina-Maria Murillo

Loyola Marymount University

University of Utah

Oberlin College

University of Texas, El Paso

Kelly Lytle Hernández

Danielle Olden

Cathleen Cahill

Kent Blansett

University of California, Los Angeles

University of Utah

Pennsylvania State University

University of Nebraska at Omaha

Public History Committee Rebecca A. Hunt, Chair

Tamsen Hert

Bill Bryans

Jeremy Johnston

University of Colorado Denver

University of Wyoming

Oklahoma State University

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Kathryn McKee

Jennifer Stevens

B. Erin Cole

Eric Nystrom

University of Wyoming

Stevens Historical Research Associates

Minnesota Historical Society

Arizona State University

Committee on Teaching & Public Education Mark Johnson, Chair

Brian S Collier

Peter Blodgett

Steven M. Fountain

University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame

The Huntington Library

Washington State University Vancouver

Patricia Loughlin

Alicia Dewey

Andrea Radke-Moss

Lindsey Passenger Wieck

University of Central Oklahoma

Biola University

Brigham Young University-Idaho

St. Mary’s University, San Antonio

William DeStefano

Linda Sargent Wood

Andrea Mott

Lindsay Marshall

Tucson, Arizona

Northern Arizona University

Western Wyoming Community College

University of Oklahoma

Sheila McManus University of Lethbridge

WHA Parliamentarian Thomas Alexander Brigham Young University

Western History Association Diversity Statement “The North American West has been both home to many different groups with divergent belief systems and cultural practices, and a place in which people often experience shifting identities. The Western History Association strives to reflect the richness of our regions. We seek to be an association of historians of diverse backgrounds who thrive in the spirit of mutual respect and engaged curiosity.”


THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS, PATRONS, SUSTAINING MEMBERS, AND SPONSORING INSTITUTIONS!

Donors Stephen Aron

Tom Isern Suzzanne Kelley

John Heaton

Carol O’Connor Clyde Milner II

David Wrobel

Patron Brian S Collier Jeremy Johnston Gregory C. Thompson

Karl Geier Katherine Morrissey Louis Warren Albert L. Hurtado

Anne Hyde Barry Ruderman John Wunder

Sustaining Peter Blodgett John Findlay Todd Kerstetter Don McCues Gregory Smoak Carol Williams Polly McLean

Larry Burgess Winifred Gallagher Andy Kirk Elaine Marie Nelson Harold Sorensen Kerry Wyatt Jeff Pappas

Jolane Culhane Nathan Gonzales Lori Lahlum Akim Reinhardt Joseph Taylor Ned Blackhawk Kent Blansett

Bruce J. Dinges David G. Gutierrez Patricia Loughlin Caroline Schimmel Jerry Thompson Sarah Carter Michael E. Rosser

David Edmunds Susan L. Johnson Don MacKendrick Fred Shaw Richard White Andy Kirk Jerry Thompson

Sponsoring Institutions AK Smiley Public Library

Archives Library Info Center

Amon Carter Museum of American Art Research Library

Autry Museum of the American West

Denver Public Library, Western History Department

Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art

History Colorado

Oklahoma State University, History Department

Joslyn Art Museum

American Heritage Center

Montana Historical Society

Mormon History Association

National Archives and Records Administration

Nebraska State Historical Society

North Dakota State University

Pioneers Museum, Colorado Springs

Polly Rosenbaum Archives & History Building

Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library

Tesoro Cultural Center/The Fort

Texas Heritage Museum – Hill College

The Bancroft Library

The University of Utah Press

University of Wyoming Libraries

Westerners International

Buffallo Bill Center of the West

Washington State Historical Society

American Indian Resource Center Library Coalition for Western Women’s History

University of Oklahoma Libraries

To upgrade your membership level please contact the WHA Office at westernhistoryassociation@gmail.com by phone at 402-554-5999 or visit the Registration Desk!


PAST PRESIDENTS Ray Allen Billington

Richard Etulain

O.O. Winther

Patricia Nelson Limerick

Robert Athearn

James P. Ronda

John F. Bannon

Elliott West

W. Eugene Hollon

Brian Dippie

Robert M. Utley

Iris H. W. Engstrand

Leonard Arrington

Peter Iverson

Clark Spence

Walter Nugent

T.A. Larson

R. David Edmonds

Howard Lamar

Virginia Scharff

John Caughey

Sherry L. Smith

John Porter Bloom

John Wunder

Donald Worcester

Quintard Taylor

Donald C. Cutter

Albert Hurtado

W. Turrentine Jackson

Don Worster

Rodman W. Paul

Margaret Connell-Szasz

Joe B. Frantz

Elizabeth Jameson

William T. Hagan

John Mack Faragher

Vernon Carstensen

Stephon Aron

Mary Lee Spence

Donald L. Fixico

Walter Rundell, Jr. Francis Paul Prucha C. L. Sonnichsen Gene M. Gressley Gilbert Fite Martin Ridge Sandra Myres

W. David Baird Gerald D. Nash Richard Maxwell Brown Earl Pomeroy Alvin M. Josephy, Jr. Norris Hundley, Jr. Richard White Glenda Riley Janet Fireman

PAST DIRECTORS/ SECRETARIES John Porter Bloom 1961-1967 Arrell M. Gibson 1968-1970 Everett L. Cooley 1971-1973 William D. Rowley 1973-1990 Paul Andrew Hutton 1990-2006 Kevin Jon Fernlund 2006-2012 John W. Heaton 2012-2017 Elaine M. Nelson 2017-Present


WHA Award Committees Arrell M. Gibson Award ($500) – for the best essay of the year on Native American history. Elizabeth Fenn (Chair), University of Colorado Boulder Allyson Stevenson, University of Saskatchewan Tamrala Swafford, University of Maryland

Arrington-Prucha Prize ($500) – for the best article on the history of religion in the West. Kristine Ashton Gunnell (Chair), Univ. of California, Los Angeles Louis Warren, University of California, Davis Mark Harvey, North Dakota State University Bert M. Fireman & Janet Fireman Award ($500) – for the best student essay published in the Western Historical Quarterly. The WHQ Board of Editors selects the award recipient Bolton-Cutter Award ($500) – for the best journal article on Spanish Borderlands history. Jay Gitlin (Chair), Yale University Alice Baumgartner, University of Southern California Julian Lim, Arizona State University

Vicki L. Ruiz Award ($500) – best article on race in the North American West. Inaugural award is in 2018. Kelly Lytle Hernández (Chair), Univ. of California, Los Angeles Traci Brynne Voyles, Loyola Marymount University Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Huntington-WHA Martin Ridge Fellowship ($2000) – a one-month research fellowship at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Hal Barron (Chair), Harvey Mudd College Megan Kate Nelson, Freelance Writer and Columnist Erika Pérez, University of Arizona

Autry Public History Prize ($1,000) – for work that contributes to a broader public reflection and appreciation of the past or serves as a model of professional public history practice. Rebecca A. Hunt (Chair), University of Colorado Denver Josh Garrett-Davis, Autry Museum of the American West Roger Nichols, University of Arizona

Caughey WHA Prize ($2,500) – for the best book of the year Dr. Miroslava ChávezGarcía received the 2017 Bolton-Cutter Award for her article "Migrant Longing, Courtship, & Gendered Identity in the U.S.Mexico Borderlands," published in the Western Historical Quarterly

Jensen-Miller Award ($500) – for the best article in the field

in Western History. Andrew Needham (Chair), New York University Edward Melillo, Amherst College Margaret Connell-Szasz, University of New Mexico

David J. Weber-Clements Prize ($2,500) – for the best nonfiction book on Southwestern America. Rachel St. John (Chair), University of California, Davis Brian DeLay, University of California, Berkeley Gary Clayton Anderson, University of Oklahoma

Donald L. Fixico Award ($1,000) – for the best book

of women and gender in the North American West. Jennifer Thigpen (Chair), Washington State University Katherine Ellinghaus, University of Melbourne Chelsea Mead, Minnesota State University, Mankato

centering Indigenous epistemologies and perspectives. Inaugural award is in 2018. Laurie Arnold (Chair), Gonzaga University Cathleen Cahill, Penn State University William Bauer, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Michael P. Malone Award ($500) – for the best article on state, provincial, or territorial history in North America. Jeff Pappas (Chair), N.M. Historic Preservation Division Jon Lauck, University of South Dakota John Monnett, Metropolitan State University of Denver

WHA Graduate Student Prizes – The WHA Graduate Student Prizes are administered by the Membership Committee. Prize recipients receive a one-year WHA membership and complimentary conference items such as registration and lodging.

Oscar O. Winther Award ($500) – for the best article

published in the Western Historical Quarterly. The WHQ Board of Editors selects the award recipient

Ray Allen Billington Award ($500) – for the best journal

article in Western history, not published in the Western Historical Quarterly. Thomas G. Andrews (Chair), Univ. of Colorado Boulder James Drake, Metropolitan State University of Denver Meg Frisbee, Metropolitan State University of Denver

2017 WHA Graduate Student Prize Recipients receive recognition at the 2017 Awards Banquet in San Diego, California.


WHA Award Committees Dwight L. Smith (ABC-CLIO) Award ($500) – for best significant bibliography or research tool on any aspect of the American West. Tamsen Hert (Chair), University of Wyoming Adam Arenson, Manhattan College Brenden Rensink, Brigham Young University Hal K. Rothman Award ($500) – for the best book on Western Environmental History. Jared Farmer (Chair), Stony Brook University Jared Orsi, Colorado State University William Swagerty, University of the Pacific Joan Paterson Kerr Award ($500) – for the best illustrated book on the American West. Carolyn Brucken (Chair), Autry Museum of the American West Cynthia Prescott, University of North Dakota Steven Danver, Walden University

John C. Ewers Award ($500) – for best book on the topic of North American Indian Ethnohistory. Rebekah Mergenthal (Chair), Pacific Lutheran University John Bowes, Eastern Kentucky University Paul Kelton, Stony Brook University

Robert G. Athearn Award ($1,000) – for the best book on the twentieth century West. Brian Frehner (Chair), Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City Rosalyn LaPier, University of Montana Ross Frank, University of California, San Diego

Honorary Lifetime Membership – awarded annually by the WHA President. The 2018 Honorary Lifetime Memberships will be selected and by 2018 President Donald Fixico (Distinguished Foundation Professor of History, Arizona State University). WHA President Stephen Aron awarded former Executive Director Dr. John Heaton (2012-2017) with an Honorary Lifetime Membership at the 2017 WHA Awards Banquet in San Diego.

Charles Redd Center Teaching Award ($500) – to support K-12 teacher conference attendance. Steven Fountain (Chair), Washington State University, Vancouver Andrea (Mott) Glessner, Western Wyoming Community College William De Stefano, Tucson, Arizona Peter Blodgett, The Huntington Library

Indian Student Conference Scholarship ($500) – to support Indian student conference attendance. Rosalyn LaPier (Chair), University of Montana Heather Daly, University of California, Los Angeles Julie L. Reed, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Louise Pubols Public History Prize ($500) – to support

military history of the frontier and western North America. Andrew Graybill (Chair), Southern Methodist University Lance Blyth, NORAD and US Northern Command William Kiser, Texas A&M University-San Antonio

attendance of a public historian to the WHA conference. Inaugural award is in 2018. Tamsen Hert (Chair), University of Wyoming B. Erin Cole, Minnesota Historical Society David Chang, University of Minnesota

Kenneth N. & Sally Owens Award ($500) – for the best

Sara Jackson Award ($500) – for graduate student research.

Robert M. Utley Award ($500) – for the best book on

book on the history of the Pacific West. David Igler (Chair), University of California, Irvine Joshua L. Reid, University of Washington Clifford Trafzer, University of California, Riverside

Melissa Stuckey (Chair), The Coltrane Group Marne L. Campbell, Loyola Marymount University Sandra Enríquez, University of Missouri, Kansas City

Trennert-Iverson Conference Scholarship ($500) – to

published book on the American West. Bethel Saler (Chair), Haverford College Daniel Herman, Central Washington University Matthew Garrett, Bakersfield College

support graduate student conference attendance. Ashley Riley Sousa (Chair), Middle Tennessee State University Alicia Dewey, Biola University Monika Bilka, Chandler-Gilbert Community College

Gordon M. Bakken Award of Merit – for outstanding

Walter Rundell Graduate Student Award ($1,500) – to

W. Turrentine-Jackson Award ($1,500) – for the best first

service to the field of Western History and the WHA. George Miles (Chair), Beinecke Library David Rich Lewis, Utah State University Jay H. Buckley, Brigham Young University

support dissertation research. Karen Marrero (Chair), Wayne State University Flannery Burke, Saint Louis University Gregory Smithers, Virginia Commonwealth University


WHA Conference History 1961 Santa Fe

1991 Austin

1962 Denver

1992 New Haven

1963 Salt Lake City

1993 Tulsa

1964 Oklahoma City

1994 Albuquerque

1965 Helena

1995 Denver

1966 El Paso

1996 Lincoln

1967 San Francisco

1997 St. Paul

1968 Tucson

1998 Sacramento

1969 Omaha

1999 Portland

1970 Reno

2000 San Antonio

1971 Santa Fe

2001 San Diego

1972 New Haven

2002 Colorado Springs

1973 Fort Worth

2003 Fort Worth

1974 Rapid City

2004 Las Vegas

1975 Tulsa

2005 Scottsdale

1976 Denver

2006 St. Louis

1977 Portland

2007 Oklahoma City

1978 Hot Springs

2008 Salt Lake City

1979 San Diego

2009 Denver

1980 Kansas City

2010 Lake Tahoe

1981 San Antonio

2011 Oakland

1982 Phoenix

2012 Denver

1983 Salt Lake City

2013 Tucson

We are pleased to announce

1984 St. Paul

2014 Newport Beach

Albuquerque, New Mexico as

1985 Sacramento

2015 Portland

1986 Billings

2016 St. Paul

1987 Los Angeles

2017 San Diego

1988 Wichita

2018 San Antonio

Conference. Mark your calendars

1989 Tacoma

2019 Las Vegas

for October 14-17, 2020!

1990 Reno

2020 Albuquerque

the location of the 60th Annual Western History Association


"What happens in the West doesn't stay in the West" 59TH OCTOBER

ANNUAL

16-19,

WHA

2019

-

CONFERENCE

WESTGATE

LAS

VEGAS

2019 WHA President: Martha A. Sandweiss, Princeton University   Program Committee Co-Chairs:

Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chairs:

Rachel St. John, University of California, Davis

William Bauer, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Joshua L. Reid, University of Washington

Michael Green, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Andy Kirk, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Call for Papers

Deadline: December 1, 2018

What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas… or so boosters tell us in their efforts to draw the nation and the world to the North America West. For its 2019 meeting, the Western History Association explores a more accurate twist on this slogan, seeking to highlight the connections between western history and the histories and historiographies of other parts of the nation, continent, and world. We welcome paper and panel proposals from western historians who are interested in making connections between the West and other places, exploring how regional histories can inform larger historical narratives. We also welcome submissions from scholars who may not think of themselves as western historians but who wish to explore how their work -- on migration, expansion, capitalism, climate change, Pacific Worlds, or any number of other topics -- might inform and shape western history. We likewise seek submissions from historians in all fields who have been influenced by the scholarship of western historians working with Indigenous peoples or in fields such as borderlands, the environment, or race and ethnicity. Finally, we encourage submissions that explore the cultural history of the American West and query the very idea of regional culture – and regional history -- in a global age. In addition to traditional paper sessions, we welcome submissions that integrate creative formats and seek to expand conference participation by including public historians, writers, teachers, students, and the public. The 2019 Program Committee, Co-Chaired by Rachel St. John (University of California, Davis) and Joshua Reid (University of Washington), requests full session submissions, but will consider individual papers. Guidelines for putting together sessions, panels, and roundtables are available at www.westernhistory.org/2019. The WHA's new online submission software will be available through the WHA website. The paper and panel submission process will open on September 1, 2018. All submissions are due December 1, 2018. 2019 WHA Program Committee Members

Co-Chairs: Joshua Reid and Rachel St. John

Jacob Lee, Penn State University

Juliana Barr, Duke University

Patty Limerick, Center of the American West, U. of Colorado Boulder

Geraldo L. Cadava, Northwestern University

Malinda Maynor Lowery, University of North Carolina

Josh Garrett-Davis, Autry Museum of the American West

John Sutton Lutz, University of Victoria, British Columbia

Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University

Christian W. McMillen, University of Virginia

Trinidad O. Gonzalez, South Texas College

Rebecca Scofield, University of Idaho

Maria John, University of Massachusetts Boston

Tyina Steptoe, University of Arizona

Khalil Anthony Johnson, Jr., Wesleyan University

Tamara Venit-Shelton, Claremont McKenna College

Travel scholarships and prizes for students and public historians are awarded annually by the WHA. Please visit the WHA website (www.westernhistory.org) for more information on membership, awards, sponsors, and future events. The WHA is hosted on the campus of the University of Nebraska at Omaha and benefits from the generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences and Department of History.


SAN ANTONIO 2018

A Christina Abreu 33 Guadalupe Lupito Acuña 19 Moisés Acuña-Gurrla 36 Kevin Adams 33 Tabitha Adkins 27 Dennis Aguirre 36 Diana L. Ahmad 41 José Alamillo 33, 40, 89 Michael Alarid 43 Enrique Alemán, Jr. 42 Thomas Alexander 90 James R. Allison, III 41 C.J. Alvarez 39 Gary Clayton Anderson 93 Rhylie Anderson 38 Rani-Henrik Andersson 36 Jennifer Andrella 27 Benny J. Andrés, Jr. 37 Thomas G. Andrews 28, 93 Amber A. Annis 46 Laura J. Arata 28, 32 Celeste Archer 23 Kenna Archer 42 Seth Archer 27 Adam Arenson 94 Ligia A. Arguilez 45 Laurie Arnold 30, 45, 48, 88, 89, 93 Stephen Aron 89 Megan Asaka 39

B Durwood Ball 89 Katrine Barber 48 Lisa Barnett 29 Juliana Barr 24, 33, 96 Laura Barraclough 43, 46 Alexander Barrera 38 James Barrera 43 Hal Barron 93 Bridget Barry 29 Michael J. Barthelemy, Jr. 24 Matthew L. Basso 37, 42 William Bauer 39, 93 Robert Bauman 32 Alice Baumgartner 26, 93 Natasha R. Beck 38 Robert M. Bednar 45 Katherine Benton-Cohen 33, 45, 90 Erik Bernardino 37 Shana Bernstein 34 Charles Bethea 45

Monika Bilka 33, 40, 94 Bob Blackburn 30, 31 Kent Blansett 7, 46, 90 Peter J. Blodgett 17, 30, 90, 94 Yolonda BlueHorse 50 Lance Blyth 39, 94 Peter Boag 37 Carly Boerringter 38 Eddie Bonilla 42 Alida Boorn 27 Ryan W. Booth 34 Tanya Bowers 32 John Bowes 17, 94 Tim Bowman 33 Elise Boxer 23 Robert Brave Heart 36 Phil Brick 32 Tom Brooking 48 James F. Brooks 34, 90 Albert S. Broussard 30, 31, 40 Jen Brown 25 Carolyn Brucken 94 Jimmy L. Bryan, Jr. 49 Bill Bryans 90 Erika Bsumek 8, 51 Jay H. Buckley 94 Walter Buenger 43 Flannery Burke 28, 94 Anna Busse 47 Carole Butcher 46 Katherine Bynum 42

C Geraldo L. Cadava 43, 96 Cathleen Cahill 25, 34, 89, 90, 93 Roberto R. Calderón 36 Albert Camarillo 40 Marne L. Campbell 28, 43, 94 Brian Q. Cannon 43 Carlos Cantú 43 Leah Cargin 86 Keith Thor Carlson 8, 44 Kathryn B. Carpenter 45 John Carranza 28 Dominic Carrasco 38 Antonia Castañeda 45 Josh Cerretti 32 David Chang 94 Derek Chang 35 Ernesto Chávez 36, 90 Connie Chiang 34, 89 Brenda Child 45 Leisl Carr Childers 45, 89

Michael Childers 25 Blue Clark 40 Kerri Clement 27 Caitlyn Clinton 24 Quin’Nita Cobbins 8 Alston Cobourn 27 B. Erin Cole 8, 39, 90, 94 Annie Gilbert Coleman 25 Ronald G. Coleman 28 Sasha Coles 24, 42 Brian S Collier 11, 17, 23, 24, 47, 52, 90 Margaret Connell-Szasz 40, 48, 93 Paul T. Conrad 44, 50 Liz Cook 39 Maddie Corcoran 24 Jonathan Cortez 39 Boyd Cothran 89 Ed Countryman 50 Julie Courtwright 42, 51 J. Wendel Cox 89 Maurice Crandall 39 Dorothea Crosbie-Taylor 29 Kate Crowe 46 Sean P. Cunningham 42, 48

D Jon Daehnke 46 Lori J. Daggar 49 Heather Daly 94 Sara Dant 25 Steven Danver 94 Ryan Dearinger 28 Matthew R. Deepe 24 Frank DeLaO 48 Jesús F. de la Teja 37 Maritza De La Trinidad 35, 43, 50 Brian DeLay 26, 37, 93 Grace Peña Delgado 46 Midge Dellinger 38 Philip J. Deloria 30, 31 Josh Dempsey 40 Brandi Denison 25 Kim Denning-Knapp 40 Brett Derbes 43 Brady DeSanti 40 S. Matthew Despain 25 William De Stefano 17, 90, 94 Sarah Deutsch 37 William Deverell 33 Alicia Dewey 17, 90, 94 George T. Díaz 17, 25, 89 Dawn DiPrince 44 Gerrit J. Dirkmaat 49


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Diana Di Stefano 34 Angelica Docog 11 Neil Dodge 27 Laura Dominguez 45 James Drake 93 Michael Duchemin 11 Lisa Duncan 30 Jennifer Dunn 38 James Dupey 35 John J. Dwyer 35 Joanna L. Dyl 51

E Jared Eberle 40 R. Dave Edmunds 40 Katherine Ellinghaus 93 Clyde Ellis 28 Maggie J. Elmore 24 Erin Elzi 46 Linda English 17 Sandra Enríquez 8, 36, 94 Elizabeth Escobedo 34, 40, 50 Nick Estes 46 Jeanette Estruth 48 Sterling Evans 48 Derek R. Everett 44

F Allison Faber 29 John Mack Faragher 89 Jared Farmer 94 Elizabeth Fenn 93 Mark Fiege 45 Kailea Fink 38 Janet Fireman 90 Andrew Fisher 48 Donald L. Fixico 4, 20, 40, 89, 94 Francis Flavin 36 Lori Flores 34, 47 Mary Ann Flores 47 Neil Foley 40 Jeffrey Fortney 28 Hamar Foster 44 Steven M. Fountain 17, 23, 41, 90, 94 Curtis Foxley 40 Sean Fraga 39 Jerry Frank 89 Ross Frank 94 Julia C. Frankenbach 26 Catharine R. Franklin 34, 39, 44 Robert Franklin 32 Brian Frehner 94

Meg Frisbee 93 Kathleen Whalen Fry 28

G Kayla Gabehart 23 Francis X. Galán 11, 47 Robert W. Galler 28 Dee Garceau 34 Ignacio M. García 30, 31, 33, 44 Mario T. García 24, 36 Matthew Garrett 94 Josh Garrett-Davis 93, 96 Alejandra Garza 29 Paulina Garza 50 Joseph Genetin-Pilawa 37 Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert 24 Jay Gitlin 93 Philis M. Barragán Goetz 17 Fernando Gómez 44 Gabriela González 25 Jerry González 26 Rebecca González 29 Sergio M. González 24, 42 Shelby Gonzalez 27 Tiffany Jasmin González 34, 40, 42, 87, 89, 96 Trinidad O. Gonzalez 96 Clara Gorman 42 Sarah Zenaida Gould 45 Jennifer Graber 25 Anthony Graham 45 Daniel Grant 26 Andrew Graybill 94 Michael Green 96 Robert Greene 45 Bridget Groat 47 Julia Grummitt 27 Kristine Ashton Gunnell 93 Frank Guridy 33 Alicia Gutierrez-Romine 39

H Evan Habkirk 34 Amy Haines 44 Tiffany Hale 36 Kara Hall 32 Jason L. Hanson 44 Stephen Harrigan 37 Mark Harvey 93 Kevin Hatfield 42 Stephen Hausmann 24 Sam W. Haynes 49

John W. Heaton 37, 89 Brett Hendrickson 25 Amanda Hendrix-Komoto 24 Robin C. Henry 27 Jacob Henson 38 Jason Heppler 8, 30, 48, 52, 87, 89 Daniel Herman 94 John Hernandez 38 Kelly Lytle Hernández 43, 90, 93 Kris Klein Hernández 43 Laura Hernández-Ehrisman 28, 37 Tamsen Hert 30, 90, 94 Madison Heslop 33 Carol L. Higham 34, 44 Christina Gish Hill 46 Brandi Hilton-Hagemann 28 Felipe Hinojosa 24, 40 Gilberto Hinojosa 11 Laura Hoelter 38 Paivi Hoikkala 44 David Holtby 39 Matthew Hooley 33 Mark L. Howe 49 Madeline Y. Hsu 30, 31 Margaret Huettl 24, 33 Angela Pulley Hudson 39 Lynn M. Hudson 28 Charles L. Hughes 40 Reetta Humalajoki 40 Rebecca A. Hunt 29, 88, 90, 93 John S. Huntington 48 Paul Hutton 37, Anne Hyde 23, 25, 43, 89

I David Igler 94 Brian M. Ingrassia 33 Matthew Irwin 27 Thomas D. Isern 48

J Brenda Jackson-Abernathy 28 Margaret Jacobs 40, 45, 48 Danae Jacobson 35 Katrina Jagodinsky 29, 34, 39 Elizabeth Jameson 28, 34, 37, 40 Alison Rose Jefferson 37 Robert F. Jefferson 8, 37 Matthew Jennings 41 Melinda Marie Jetté 23 Sam Jezak 36 Michael Jin 35


SAN ANTONIO 2018 Maria John 35, 96 David A. Johnson 90 Diana Johnson 43 Jack Johnson 38 Jeffrey A. Johnson 40 Khalil Anthony Johnson, Jr. 44, 96 Mark Johnson 17, 23, 36, 40, 87, 90 Nicole Johnson 38, 39 Susan L. Johnson 37, 89 Jeremy Johnston 29, 90 Shannon Jones 47 Miguel Juárez 27

K S. Deborah Kang 29, 87, 89 Holly Karibo 29 Katherine Kasckow 37 Saara Kekki 30 Caitlin Keliiaa 49 Ari Kelman 26, 37, 40, 51 Paul Kelton 94 Jennifer Kendrick 36 Todd Kerstetter 11, 35 Lora Key 34 Denise Khor 35 Doug Kiel 25 Ginny Kilander 30 Kurt Kinbacher 36 Farina King 7, 33 Melanie Kirchhof 40 Andy Kirk 96 William S. Kiser 11, 17, 39, 94 Joel Kitchens 49 Kerwin Klein 33 Byron Komah 20

L Modupe Labode 46 Katrina Lacher 33 Reneé M. Laegreid 34, 89 Lori Ann Lahlum 24, 89 Janne Lahti 46 Christina Lake 29, 37, 42 John P. Langellier 34 Scott Langston 50 Rosalyn LaPier 94 Juliet Larkin-Gilmore 28 Corey Larson 32 Chrissy Yee Lau 35 Jon Lauck 93 Jacob Lee 96 Michel Sunhae Lee 51

Susanna Lee 37 Brian Leech 33 Priscilla Leiva 33 Kevin Leonard 90 Karen Leong 90 David Rich Lewis 94 Beth Lew-Williams 39 Gustavo Licón 26 Caroline Lieffers 28 Julian Lim 39, 43, 93 Patty Limerick 27, 40, 44, 96 Joseph Locke 29 Amy Lonetree 46, 89 Erik Loomis 28 Michelle Lorimer 43 Patricia Loughlin 17, 23, 89, 90 Karina Marie Lovas 27 Malinda Maynor Lowery 96 Rosina Lozano 37 Kathryn Gin Lum 51 John Sutton Lutz 44, 96 Daniel Lynch 26 Bonnie Lynn-Sherow 27

M Jennifer Y. Macias 40, 90 Dwayne A. Mack 37 Marcus Macktima 27 Jeffrey Mahas 35 Amahia Mallea 35 Kevan Q. Malone 35 Abigail Markwyn 28 Karen Marrero 94 Lindsay Marshall 17, 24, 90 Mary Katherine Marshall 23 Laura Martin 47 Michelle M. Martin 37 Phylis Martinelli 49 Priscilla Martinez 47 Valerie A. Martínez 51 Katherine Massoth 29 Glenna Matthews 48 Jeremy Maxwell 46 Teresa Maya 47 Preston McBride 28 Mary Jane Logan McCallum 45 Nicolas McKay 38 Kathryn McKee 90 Ryan McKinley 36 Sheila McManus 17, 34, 46, 89, 90 Christian W. McMillen 28, 94, 96 Jennifer McPherson 29, 89 Chelsea Mead 33, 93 Eric V. Meeks 46

Edward D. Melillo 41, 93 Robynne Mellow 33 Celeste Menchaca 34, 43 Carla Mendiola 47 Mary E. Mendoza 25, 29, 37, 40, 44, 47, 88, 90, 93 Mary E. Mendoza (Grandmother) 47 Natalie Mendoza 43 Rebekah Mergenthal 94 Richard Meyers 36 George Miles 30, 94 Char Miller 35, 42 Cheryl Miller 46 Douglas K. Miller 25 Edward H. Miller 25 Kyler Miller 30 Leslie Miller 30 Rebecca Miller 38 Clyde Milner II 43 Pablo Mitchell 39, 90 Jacqueline Molina 38 John Monnett 93 Carolina Monsivais 35 Paul G. Monson 28 Fawn-Amber Montoya 44 Maria E. Montoya 47, 90 Anthony Mora 46 Daniel Morales 26 Gene Morales 28 Katherine G. Morrissey 23, 45 Andrea Mott 17, 90, 94 Tony R. Mullis 46 Laura K. Muñoz 8, 27, 42 Raúl Muñoz 36 Shannon Murray 37, 52 Lina-Maria Murillo 90

N Margit Nagy 29 Anthony Nauni 20 Andrew Needham 25, 93 Elaine M. Nelson 29, 86, 89 Jessica Nelson 35 John William Nelson 47 Megan Kate Nelson 37, 93 Quincy D. Newell 25, 51 James David Nichols 25 Jeff Nichols 32 Roger Nichols 27, 93 Sarah Nickel 35, 45 Jessica Nowlin 30 Patricia Nuñez 43 Eric Nystrom 33, 90


SAN ANTONIO 2018

O Jean O’Brien 27 Leah LaGrone Ochoa 25 Madeline Ochoa 38 Meredith Oda 35 Andrew Offenburger 30 Danielle Olden 90 Brent Olson 32 Jennifer R. O’Neal 42 Azusa Ono 33 Myra Johnson Orange 42 Frankie Orona 50 Rebecca Orozco 45 Jared Orsi 94 Jeffrey Ostler 42, 89

P Joshua Paddison 26, 51 Jeff Pappas 93 Matthew Pearce 28 Monica Perales 24, 27 Erika Pérez 23, 89, 90, 93 Frank J. Perez 36, 38 Natalia Mehlman Petrzela 25 Katrina Phillips 39 Jason Pierce 42 Amy Porter 11, 17, 43 Cynthia Prescott 23, 40, 47, 94 Lauren Proctor 47 Bernadette Pruitt 17 Josue Puente 50 Elisa Eastwood Pulido 44

R Andrea G. Radke-Moss 17, 24, 90 Raúl A. Ramos 46 Darren Raspa 39 Libby Rea 86 Julie L. Reed 94 Jacquelyn Reese 30 W. Paul Reeve 25 Joshua L. Reid 8, 25, 47, 94, 96 Skyler Reidy 26 Akim Reinhardt Annie Reiva 45 Jana Remy 89 Paul M. Renfro 25 Brenden Rensink 30, 94 Christopher Repka 38 Ramon Resendiz 30 Rosalva Resendiz 30 Thomas Richards, Jr. 24

Molly Richey 38 Patricia Richey 38 Monica Rico 49 James Riding In 42 Cassandra Rincones 35 David Robles 36 Jeff Roche 33 Paul Joseph Rodriguez 36 Kenneth M. Roemer 50 Brent M. Rogers 8, 24, 27 Jedediah Rogers 25 Collin Rohrbaugh 25, 42 Alicia Romero 36 Daniel Castro Romero, Jr. 30, 50 Todd Romero 27 Caroline Rooney 24 Marco Antonio Rosales 43 Taylor Elliott Rose 28 Nicolas Rosenthal 33 Pam Rosser 37 Karen R. Roybal 36 Herbert G. Ruffin II 37 Vicki L. Ruiz 40

S Yvette J. Saavedra 43 Bethel Saler 94 Sarah H. Salter 27, 30 Linda Salvucci 29 Gianna May Sanchez 30, 42 Victoria L. Sanchez 38 Martha A. Sandweiss 89, 96 Guadalupe San Miguel 36 Shayla San Miguel-Aston 51 Theresa Salazar 30 Adam Salem 51 Virginia Scharff 29, 33 Khal Schneider 37 Hailey Schultz 24 Rebecca Scofield 96 Amy Scott 24, 42 Laurie Scrivener 30 Douglas Seefeldt 27, 89 Meaghan E. H. Seikman 40 Kim Selinske 38 Jennifer Seltz 28 Jonathan Shafer 45 Naomi Shapiro 32 Kyle Shelton 51 Jeffrey P. Shepherd 30, 39, 50 Jonathan Shulman 40 Mario Sifuentez 28 Donna Sinclair 29 Avni Singh 38

Susan Sleeper-Smith 45 Jennifer Smith 38 Gregory Smithers 34, 94 Gregory E. Smoak 8, 46, 89 Betsy Rohaly Smoot 46 Alexis Soto 38 Ashley Riley Sousa 25, 94 Rowan Steineker 28 Michael L. Stephen 38 Tyina Steptoe 96 Margaret Sternbergh 30 Julie Stetler 89 Jennifer Stevens 90 Allyson Stevenson 35, 45, 93 Austin Stewart 24 Rachel St. John 43, 47, 93, 96 Steven A. Stofferahn 28 Melissa Stuckey 94 Camille Suárez 26 Kaitlin Sundberg 86 Matthew A. Sutton 40 Tamrala Swafford 93 William Swagerty 94 Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy 24

T Dustin Tahmahkera 50 Baligh Ben Taleb 42 Eloisa Tamez 30, 50 Margo Tamez 30, 39, 50 Ryan Driskell Tate 42 Jay Taylor 33 Quintard Taylor 32 William A. Taylor 46 Charlotte Hansen Terry 35 Brianna Theobald 8, 25, 45 Jermaine Thibodeaux 39 Jennifer Thigpen 93 Gregory C. Thompson 44 Claire Thomson 35 Coll Thrush 32 Jenni Tifft-Ochoa 42 Taylor Tiritilli 38 Emmanuelle Perez Tisserant 41 Andrew J. Torget 27, 30 Clifford Trafzer 43, 94 ToniAnn Treviño 39 Cheryl Troupe 35 Samuel Truett 29 Clayton Trutor 25 Cecilia Tsu 34 Lauren Turek 30 Jacki Hedlund Tyler 39


SAN ANTONIO 2018

U Laura M. Uribarri 35 Rebecca Uribe 51

V Micaela Valadez 26 Omar S. Valerio-JimĂŠnez 11, 29, 36 Teresa Van Hoy 11 Frank Van Nuys 41 Sujey Vega 44 Jose Veliz 38 Tamara Venit-Shelton 96 James Vice 33 Matt Vileneuve 49 Eric Villalpando 38 Nicholas Villanueva 17 Lucia Villarreal 47 Chuck Vollan 27 Traci Brynne Voyles 29, 90, 93

W Melody Miyamoto Walters 89 Theresa Warburton 32 Emily Wardrop 28 Louis Warren 36, 93 Rose Soza War Soldier 24 Timothy Watts 27 W. Dale Weeks 38 Marsha Weisiger 33, 45 Elliott West 40, 43 Edward Westermann 11 Kevin Whalen 49 Cherry Whipple 40 Richard White 39, 43 Kat Whiteley 49 Lindsey Passenger Wieck 8, 17, 39, 48, 52, 89, 90 Rachel Williams 38 Samantha M. Williams 27 Bruce Winders 11, 37 Rebecca Wingo 39, 52, 89 Bryan Winston 43 Michael D. Wise 41

Anthony Wood 38 Linda Sargent Wood 17, 90 Meggan Woodbury-Bilotte 49 Robert Wright 47 Kerry Wynn 41

Y Samantha Yanelli 38 Melanie K. Yazzie 42 Jim Yellowfish 20 Jodi Voice Yellowfish 50 Tim Yellowfish 20 Tennyson Yellowfish 20

Z Emilio Zamora 35, 43 Joel Zapata 48, 52 Natale A. Zappia 46 Ana Zarazua 50


A

special

ProDigital

for

thanks

to

A.

capturing

Victor

our

time

Goodpasture in

San

Diego

and 2017.  


The Garden Terrace is located on the First Floor of the Guest Room Levels.

The Losoya Conference Center is located across the street from the Hyatt Regency. Conference rooms Bowie C and Seguin are located here.


www.loc.gov/teachers

Free Teaching Resources and Professional Development The Teaching with Primary Sources Western Region is proud to sponsor the 58th Annual Conference of the Western History Association The goal of the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program is to: • Build awareness of the Library’s educational initiatives • Provide content that promotes the effective educational use of the Library’s resources • Offer access to and promote sustained use of the Library’s educational resources

Learn about the WHA’s innovative Teachers as Scholars program by attending the following sessions: •

Panel 1: Friday, October 19, 10:30-12:00 PM

Panel 2: Friday, October 19, 2:15-3:45 PM

Panel 3: Saturday, October 20, 10:30-12:00 PM * Locations and additional information in program

Teaching with Primary Sources Western Region

303.615.0550 tpswesternregion@msudenver.edu http://www.loc.gov/teachers/tps/regional

Discover Millions of Free UNIQUE Primary Sources


STEADING P ME R O

U

N

IV

A

ECT OJ

THE H

Behind on the new homesteading scholarship?

ER

SIT Y

B OF NE

S RA

K

Catch up in Great Plains Quarterly “The New Learning About Homesteading” Winter, 2018

“Land was one of the greatest gifts”: Women’s Landownership in Dakota Indian, Immigrant Scandinavian, and African American Communities”

Summer, 2018

“Staking Their Claim: Dewitty and Black Homesteaders in Nebraska”

“To Commute or Not Commute: The Homesteader’s Dilemma”

Summer, 2018

Spring, 2018

Homesteading the Plains By Richard Edwards, Jacob K. Friefeld, & Rebecca S. Wingo Homesteading the Plains offers a bold new look at the history of homesteading, overturning what for decades has been the orthodox scholarly view. The authors begin by noting the striking disparity between the public’s perception of homesteading as a cherished part of our national narrative and most scholars’ negative and dismissive treatment.

University of Nebraska

go.unl.edu/homesteading

Profile for Western History Association

2018 WHA Conference Program  

The program for the 58th annual Western History Association Conference.

2018 WHA Conference Program  

The program for the 58th annual Western History Association Conference.

Advertisement