Page 1

59th Annual Conference

What Happens in the West doesn't stay in the West Western History Association

Las Vegas, Nevada October 16-19, 2019


2019 SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE Wednesday, October 16

Tour: Nevada Test Site

WHA Fall Council Meeting Teaching in the West Doesn’t Stay i… CWWH Roundtable: …Era of #MeToo WHA Welcoming Reception

Thursday, October 17

ASEH Breakfast Ad Hoc SPC Breakfast (Closed)

Awakenings: Seeking Solutions to H… Exception or Rule? Locating Indian… The American West, Borderlands, an… Latina/os and Religious Diversity in… Las Vegas Memory and Identity in t… Water in the West Science, Public Lands, and the West… Narratives of Belonging: Constitution… The People’s Archives: Communities… What’s Arizona Got to Do with It?… Native Women and Historical Repre… Covering Up: Shifting Sexuality, Ra… Panic and Sexual Practices in the 20th… What Happens on Western Land Is… Historical Truth in Film: Native Part… Votes for Women on the Northern G… The Birth of a State: Slavery, Confin… New Directions in Mexican America… Bridging the West through Region &… Book Session: David G. Garcia’s Str… Neon Pacific: Asian American and P… New Works in the Histories of Health… Fiestas, Performance, and Resistance… Roundtable: Fringe Politics in the W… Stories of Change since We Last Met… African American History in Los An… Drawing the Line: Exclusion and Inc… Faith and Finance: Approaching the… “The Most Harmoniously Segregated… Transnational Borders and Nature in… Beyond Standing Rock and #NoDAPL… Roundtable: What Happens in the W… Networks, Land, and People: From a… Integrating Boarding School Narrative… Indigeneity and Nuclear Contexts Sound and Fury Under Western Skies… 2019 WHA Spark Session Teacher/Author Lunch (Closed) WHQ Editorial Board Lunch Montana Editorial Board Lunch WHA 2020 Program Committee WHA-Graduate Student Caucus Tour: Tale of Two Cities Tour: Hoover Dam/Boulder City Tour: East/West Ethnic Las Vegas WHA Technology Committee WHA CARES - Committee Assault… WHA Teaching & Public Ed. Committee WHA Committee on Contingent Faculty WHA Membership Committee WHA CRAW – Committee on Race… WHA Public History Committee

Improving the Research Experience… Six Shooters: A Digital Frontiers Lig… Coalition (CWWH) Business Meeting QuIT Caucus Meeting WHA Strategic Plan. Meeting Presidential Plenary Public History Reception Graduate Student Reception Tour: LGBTQ Vegas Tour

Friday, October 18

Coalition (CWWH) Breakfast

Sharing Regional Stories of Bucking… Getting Here: Travel, Capitalism, an… The American West in World War II Material Histories of Spanish Califor… Industrial Food, Industrial Poison… Go West, Young Scholar, and Help… Global Wests: Transnational Flows… Responding to Decline and Extinction… Where Does the Midwest End and… Tips for the Academic Career Part 1 Soundscapes of the West: Music and… Standing with Standing Rock: Voices… CWWH Branded Session: Illicit Labor… Indigenous Power: A New History of… Local, National, Foreign: The Pacific… Owning the Means of Cultural Produ… Beyond Binaries, Beyond Regions… More Than One Way to Victory… Writing Your Second Book: A Roun… Late 19th-Century American and Can…

8:00AM

5:00 PM

East Tower Entrance

8:00 PM

Nat’l Atomic Testing Museum

8:00 AM 8:00 AM

Ballroom B Boardroom

8:30 AM 2:00 PM 3:45 PM

4:00 PM 3:30 PM 5:15 PM

7:00 AM 7:00 AM

6:00 PM

8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 12:15 PM

10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM

2:00 PM 2:30 PM

4:30 PM 4:00 PM

12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 12:15 PM 1:00 PM 12:30 PM 1:00 PM 1:15 PM 1:15 PM 1:15 PM 1:15 PM 1:15 PM 1:15 PM 1:15 PM 2:15 PM 3:15 PM 4:00 PM 5:00 PM 6:30 PM 6:45 PM 7:00 PM

7:00 AM

8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM

Conf. Rooms 8-10 Conf. Rooms 1-3 Conf. Rooms 4-6

Conf. Room 1 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 2 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 7 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 10 Ballroom D Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 11 Ballroom G Conf. Room 12 Ballroom F Conf. Room 14 Ballroom E Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 2 Conf. Room 1 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 6 Ballroom E Conf. Room 7 Ballroom G Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 12 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 10 Ballroom F Conf. Room 14 Ballroom D Conf. Room 3

1:30 PM 1:30 PM 1:30 PM 4:15 PM 1:30 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM 4:30 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM

Ballroom F Ballroom E Ballroom G Ballroom B Ballroom D East Tower Entrance East Tower Entrance East Tower Entrance Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 10 Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 12 Conf. Room 14

3:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:45 PM 6:30 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM 10:00 PM

Conf. Room 7 Conf. Room 3 Ballroom D Ballrooms E, F, G Ballroom D/Foyer Garden Patio South East Tower Entrance x

8:00 AM

10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM

Conf. Rooms 4-5 Conf. Room 1

Ballroom B

Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 2 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 14 Conf. Room 1 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 9 Ballroom F Conf. Room 4 Ballroom E Ballroom G Conf. Room 10 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 7 Ballroom D Conf. Room 12 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 6

Re-Envisioning the Table: New App… Water, Work, Farms, and Fitness… To the Moon and Mars: Western Land… An Unholy Union: Southern History… Examining & Reclaiming the Africa… Beyond the West: Regions, Network… Fighting for the Survival of Latinx N… Hiding in Plain Sight? Finding Voice… Teaching the West: Chinese Experien… Otherwise Invisible to the Eye… Neon Metropolis: Hal Rothman’s La… Tips for the Academic Career Part 2 History Is Now: How Should Public… Two Spirit, Queer, Indigenous: An… Landscapes of Violence and Sacred… Immigrant Advocacy as a Matter of…

10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM

12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM

Conf. Room 1 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 7 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 2 Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 10 Conf. Room 13 Ballroom G Ballroom F Conf. Room 12 Ballroom D Conf. Room 14 Ballroom E

Practice, Research, and Reflection at… Traditions of Activism in the Americ… Glitter in the Dust: The Transformati… Violence, Race, and the (Neo)Libera… Diplomacy & Development in the C… Settler Colonialism in Transit: Settle… Mapping Race: Racial Geographies… Making the Crooked Places Straight… Twenty Thousand Roads: A Celebrat… Western Waterfronts: The Pacific Co… Critical Perspectives on American In… Wrestling Over Rivers: The Impact… Roundtable: Making the Case for Lat… “I Pity the Country”: Settler Surveill… Imagining Place: John Wesley Powel… Managing the Business of Leisure: C… Navigating the Historical Profession… Reconceptualizing Northern Great Pl…

2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2: 00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM

3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM

Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 2 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 1 Conf. Room 8 Ballroom F Conf. Room 7 Ballroom D Conf. Room 12 Ballroom E Conf. Room 14 Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 10 Ballroom G Conf. Room 9

Presidential Lunch and Address

WHA Business Meeting CRAW/CWWH Reception Awards Ceremony and Reception

Saturday, October 19

Borderlands Breakfast

12:15 PM

3:30 PM 4:00 PM 5:30 PM*

7:00 AM

1:45 PM

4:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:30 PM

8:00 AM

Ballroom B

Ballroom D Ballroom B Ballrooms E, F, G *Doors open at 5:00PM Ballroom B

Railroads in Native America: Reflect… Native American Women and Comm… Rephotographing the American West Lightning Talks: Condensed Doctora… Courage and Change in the Fight… “The Boiler Room for the Nation” … Hidden in the Fields: Untold Histories… Global Perspectives from the Unseen… The Farthest West: Gender, Indigene… Roundtable: It’s a Gamble: Luck, Ch… Westworlds: Western History in Vid… Placemaking and Wayfinding: Signal… Beyond the Southwest Borderlands… Russian Colonialism in California… Public Histories of the Borderlands… An Unholy Union of West and South… A Western Church in a Global Settin… Transpacific Archaeology and Histor… Challenging Settler Fantasies: New… Histories of Education Across Weste… Indigenizing Relocation: Challenging… Institutional Interventions: Americ… Women’s Rights in the Progressive… Teaching the West: Japanese Intern… Rethinking Buffalo Bill’s Wild West… Hidden in Plain Sight: Uniting Histo… Regulating the Recent West: Energy… Keeping the Songs Alive: A Roundt… Prepping for the Interview

8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM

10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM

Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 7 Ballroom F Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 12 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 10 Conf. Room 8 Ballroom D Conf. Room 14 Ballroom G Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 3 Ballroom E Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 7 Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 14 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 12 Conf. Room 10 Ballroom G Conf. Room 11

All That Glitters: Indigenous Property… Behind the Scenes: Historical Arch… Borders of Legality in the North Am… Fish, Fowl, and Roping Bears: Huma… Gender, Power, and Urban Practice… Natural Soldiers: The United States… Environmental History Perspectives… Native Resistance and the Politics of… Following the Manito Trail: Migration… The Cultural Influence of Route 66… Imperial Connections across the Paci… Sites of Survivance: Indian Allotment… Latinx California XIX: Beyond Cano… Gender and Hidden Pasts: Spanish… “Like Fire in the Dry Grass”: From… After the Middle Ground: The Anish… The Cowboy Life: From the Ranch t… Creation, Circulation, and Destruction… Vigilantism, War, and Terror: Vio… Black/Brown Sounds: Exploring Co… Religion and the Making and Reme… Geographies of Resistance: Fugitives… Empire, Faith, and Family in the Pac…

1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 1:45 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM

3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 3:15 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:00 PM

Conf. Room 13 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 7 Conf. Room 10 Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 14 Conf. Room 12 Conf. Room 8 Conf. Room 10 Conf. Room 3 Conf. Room 7 Conf. Room 9 Conf. Room 5 Conf. Room 4 Conf. Room 11 Conf. Room 14 Conf. Room 6 Conf. Room 13

Indian Scholars Lunch Teaching Western History Lunch

12:15 PM 12:15 PM

1:30 PM 1:30 PM

Ballroom F Ballroom D


Cover image is an

TABLE OF

old view of the Las Vegas strip. The city of Las Vegas and the

CONTENTS

mountainous landscape of the Great Basin are in the background.

WELCOME TO LAS VEGAS! Conference Sponsors

4

President's Message

9

Program Committee

10

Local Arrangements Committee

12

CONFERENCE INFORMATION Registration and Hotel Information

6

Conference Tours Schedule at a Glance Meeting Floor Map

14 Inside Front Inside Back

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE WEST DOESN'T STAY IN THE WEST Business and Committee Meetings

20

Meals and Receptions

21

2019 Schedule of Sessions

23-57

EXHIBITS AND ADS WHA Exhibitors List

59

Index of Advertisements

60

WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION WHA Policies and Practices

2

WHA Executive Office

92

Past Presidents, Directors, Sites

93

Governance & Standing Committees

94

Awards and Committees

98

Membership

100

2020 Call for Papers

101

Program Index

102


WHA POLICIES AND PRACTICES Statement on Diversity The North American West has been both home to many different groups with divergent belief systems and cultural practices, and a place in which people often experienced shifting identities. The Western History Association strives to reflect the richness of our regions. We seek to be an association of historians of diverse backgrounds who thrive in the spirit of mutual respect and engaged curiosity. (Adopted in 2011 and revised in 2017)

Code of Conduct The Western History Association (WHA) works to maintain an environment that allows persons in the historical profession to flourish by encouraging respectful, inclusive, and equitable treatment of all who participate in WHA activities. As a statement of principle, the WHA rejects harassment, discrimination, and retaliation by any means based on sex, gender identity, gender expression, or sexual orientation. Sexual harassment

creates

a

hostile

environment

that

impedes

the

advancement

of

historical

knowledge

by

marginalizing individuals and communities. It also damages productivity and career growth and prevents the healthy exchange of ideas. We affirm that discrimination and harassment are unacceptable in any research or learning environment. The WHA is committed to providing a safe, productive, and welcoming environment for all. (In 2018 the WHA pledged to develop a Code of Conduct and plan for implementation. The above statement is an abbreviated version. The full version will be approved in fall 2019.)

Diversity of Session Participants WHA Call for Papers guide for Program Committees: 1) The Program Committee will actively promote the full and equitable inclusion of racial and ethnic minorities, religious minorities, people with disabilities, women, and LGBTQ people on the Annual Meeting program. 2) Although not all sessions can reflect the entire diversity of the profession, the Program Committee will encourage proposers of sessions to include diverse

sets

of

participants,

addressing

gender

diversity,

racial

and

ethnic

diversity,

sexual

diversity,

religious diversity, disability-based diversity, and/or LGBTQ diversity. 3) The Program Committee will encourage session proposers to consider the benefits of including on their panels historians in various career paths and of various ranks (i.e., senior scholars, public historians, graduate students, independent historians, etc.) within their organizations/institutions. (In 2018 the WHA Council adopted the above to guide each Program Committee. Abbreviated versions of this will appear on the WHA Call for Papers each year.)

Support for and Recognition of Contingent and Adjunct Faculty In 2018 the Standing Committee for Contingent and Ad Hoc Faculty requested the WHA Council to support the OAH’s Statement on “Standards for Part-Time, Adjunct, and Contingent Faculty” as it was adopted and revised in 2011 and 2014, respectively. With the caveat that the WHA also considers “Teaching Post-Doc Positions” as contingent employment, the Council approved this request. Read the full OAH Statement here: https://www.oah.org/about/reports/reports-statements/standards-for-part-time-adjunct-and-contingent-faculty/

#WHA2019

2

#Western2019


Fawn Douglas, PA- Water is Life, Mixed Media, 2019

About the Artist: Fawn Douglas Fawn Douglas is a member of the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe with roots in the Moapa Paiute, Southern Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Mvskogee Creek Nations. She is an Artivist currently in the Master of Fine Arts Program at UNLV.

Indigenous Lands As attendees of the WHA Conference in Las Vegas, we are guests on the ancestral homeland of the Southern Paiute People. The Southern Paiute were created here, tended the delicate desert ecosystem, and remain a vibrant part of Las Vegas’ economy with businesses ranging from a golf course to a cannabis dispensary. This region of southern Nevada also experienced the aftermath of an Indigenous past shaped by struggles to overcome competing colonial forces of genocide, slavery, and dispossession. Today, Nevada is home to Northern Paiute, Southern Paiute, Western Shoshone, Mohave, Goshute, and Washoe Nations.

WHA Policy on Tribal Affiliations In the fall of 2016, the WHA Council voted, based on a recommendation brought forth by the WHA Membership Committee, to include Tribal affiliations or descendancy next to the names of participants on the conference program. Each person on the program who has a Tribal affiliation next to their name provided

us

with

their

preference

for

the

spelling,

formatting,

and

appearance

of

the

Tribe(s)

and/or

Nation(s). If, for any reason, your affiliation was not included, please contact the WHA office and we will add it to the 2019 Conference Program Errata.

#WHA2019

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#Western2019


Thank you to the 2019 WHA Conference Sponsors!

Alverson Taylor & Sanders Black Mountain Institute Department of History, Boise State University Charles Schwab Bank Colorado College’s Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies Public Lands History Center, Colorado State University Center of the American West, University of Colorado Boulder Public History Program, University of Colorado Denver Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West The Huntington Library Jeffrey Ostler College of Arts and Sciences, University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska Press Nevada Humanities Nevada Mining Association Nevada State College College of Liberal Arts, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Department of History, University of Nevada, Las Vegas


Thank you to the 2019 WHA Conference Sponsors!

Harry Reid Endowed Chair for the History of the Intermountain West, UNLV Office of the Provost, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Department of English, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Department of Interdisciplinary, Gender, and Ethnic Studies, UNLV University of Nevada Press Center for the Southwest, University of New Mexico Merrick Chair of Western American History, University of Oklahoma Public History Program, Oklahoma State University Department of History, Penn State University George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center, Penn State University Preserve Nevada Dean of the Faculty, Princeton University American West Center, University of Utah Women Also Know History Women's Research Institute of Nevada William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies Beinecke Library, Yale University


2019 WHA CONFERENCE INFORMATION Conference

Registration:

WHA

conference

registration

opens

July

1,

2019.

The

conference

pre-

reigstration deadline is September 19, 2019. Registration and full payment must be processed by September 19, 2019 to receive the pre-registration rates. All persons attending, including program participants, are required to register for the conference. WHA members receive discounted registration rates. To join the WHA inquire on-site at the conference registration desk or visit www.westernhistory.org/join. Refund policy: Refunds will be issued for cancellations received by September 19, 2019. All refunds after that date will be honored less a $25 handing fee.

Pre-Registration Rates:

On-Site Registration Rates:

WHA Member:

$115

WHA Member:

$140

Non-Member:

$165

Non-Member:

$190

Student:

$40

Student:

$60

K-12 Teachers:

$80

K-12 Teachers:

$80

Contingent Professionals:

$65*

Contingent Professionals:

$85*

Guest (Non-Member):

$50**

Guest (Non-Member):

$75**

Under/Unemployed:

Contact WHA Office

Under/Unemployed:

Contact WHA Office

*Contingent faculty includes those whose primary employment, whether full-time or part-time, is not on the tenure track.

**The WHA defines a guest as a family member or someone who would not attend the conference except to accompany a conference attendee. The WHA no longer offers registration rates for Joint members, as the "Joint" membership category has phased out of existence. Each WHA conference attendee, regardless of membership category, must individually register.

WHA Registration Desk Hours: The conference registration desk is located in the Westgate Conference Center Foyer near the main Ballroom. Hours of operation October 16-19 are: Wednesday: 11:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M., Thursday and Friday: 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M., and Saturday, 8:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M.

Teachers: Continuing Education Units (CEU) are available at the conference through the University of Notre Dame. CEU registration materials will be available on-site at the WHA Registration Desk. CEUs are $25 per conference day. Scholarships are available for those teaching at under-resources schools. For more information please contact Brian Collier at Brian.Collier@nd.edu or (574) 631-1637

#WHA2019

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2019 WHA CONFERENCE INFORMATION WHA Program--Now Online! The 2019 WHA Conference Program is now available online in a platform that is supported on mobile devices. To view conference sessions, abstracts, meetings and events, and to build your own schedule bookmark this page: https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/wha/wha19/

Book Exhibit Hours: Coffee, tea, and water will be available during the book exhibit hours. Breakfast pastries will also be available from 8:00-9:30 A.M. on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Exhibit hours are Thursday and Friday: 8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. and Saturday: 8:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.

Hotel Information: Attendees of the 2019 WHA Conference are invited to reserve their rooms under the WHA room block at the Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino. The WHA hotel room block will open for reservations on July 1, 2019.

Westgate Reservations: To make a reservation on or after July 1 please call 1-800-635-7711 or 702-7325111

and

refer

to

the

"Western

History

Association"

room

black.

To

book

your

room

online

visit

www.westernhistory.org/2019/travel where you will find the Westgate reservation link for the WHA.

Room Rates and Fees: Room Reservation Rates (Singles/Doubles): $139 per night* Additional Person: $35 per night. All room rates are subject to any local, state, and federal tax that may apply at the time of occupancy. The WHA room block rates are only valid until September 19, 2019 or until the room block is filled. *Please note there is a $25.00 Resort Fee (plus 13.88% tax) per room, per day, which will be added to the room rate.

Hotel Contact Information: Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino 3000 Paradise Road Las Vegas, NV 89109, US 702-732-5111 Transportation: The conference hotel is approximately five miles from the McCarran International Airport. The below prices are approximate costs of one-way travel between the airport and Westgate. Uber/Lyft: $15 - $20; SuperShuttle: $15; Taxi: $22

Las Vegas Monorail: The Las Vegas Monorail does not have service that extends to McCarran so you will need to find alternative transportation between the airport and hotel. However, the Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino has a very convenient monorail stop directly on its property ("Westgate Station") which you can use to visit other sites along the Las Vegas Strip. For more information and ticket pricing visit: https://www.lvmonorail.com/

#WHA2019

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WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION

DONATE TO THE WHA! Visit us online at westernhistory.org/donate to donate to the Western History Association.

DONATIONS TO THE WHA SUPPORT SCHOLARSHIP, TRAVEL, TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND PUBLIC HISTORY! The WHA is hosted by the Department of History at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and benefits from the generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences.


A Message from the 2019

WHA President MARTHA A. SANDWEISS Professor of History, Princeton University

Welcome to Las Vegas! In 2003, an ad agency working for the city came up with the slogan “what happens here, stays here.” That morphed

into

the

catchier

“what

happens

in

Vegas,

stays

in

Vegas,” a phrase that entices visitors with the promise of discrete adventure. I hope everyone will have fun at the 59th annual conference of the Western History Association, but I also hope we’ll take what we learn here back home to our classrooms, jobs, and thinking about western history. 

Our conference theme plays with the city’s slogan and turns it on its head: What happens in western history doesn’t stay in western history. Instead of focusing on what sets western history apart, we will focus on how recent scholarship in western history intersects with scholarship in other fields, and how western historians can work with other scholars, public historians, artists, and policy makers to understand how history impacts our contemporary world.

The Presidential Plenary addresses this theme by asking whether the idea of regional history in general (and western history, in particular) is still useful in a moment when so many historians are asking questions that transcend older definitions of geographical space. It brings together scholars who work on diverse regions and who follow different communities across time and space to ask: is regionalism still a useful concept for American historians?

Conference co-chairs Josh Reid and Rachel St. John, along with their hard-working committee, have assembled an extraordinary program, nearly 25% bigger than last year’s, that highlights the vibrancy and diversity of our organization. You’ll find a wide range of sessions, including: sessions that explore the connections between western history and work being done on other parts of the world; sessions on Native history that highlight the work of Native scholars and incorporate the insights and perspectives of members and leaders from Native communities; sessions focused on practical professionalization skills; sessions that speak to the varied priorities of public historians, archivists, students and teachers; sessions that focus on Las Vegas and the region; and sessions that bring together historians with writers, practitioners, and others who work to make sense of the past.

The Local Arrangements Committee, co-chaired by Willy Bauer, Michael Green, Susan Johnson, and Andy Kirk, has organized some wonderful tours that introduce us to Las Vegas and the surrounding region, from the glitter of the Strip and reborn downtown, to the nuclear testing grounds of the Nevada National Security Site and the natural wonders of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation area. Additional tours will explore Las Vegas’s LGBTQ past and present, the city’s historically segregated neighborhoods, and the region’s emerging reputation as a destination for foodies.

This year we break with longstanding tradition, by redesigning the awards banquet as a ceremony and receptionstyle event that will make our annual recognition of outstanding achievements in western history an event open to all. We hope this new Friday night gathering will bring us all together to celebrate the winners of our many awards and fellowships, and the growing vibrancy and diversity of our organization.

#WHA2019

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2019 PROGRAM COMMITTEE

JOSHUA REID

RACHEL ST. JOHN

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

2019 PROGRAM COMMITTEE CO-CHAIR

2019 PROGRAM COMMITTEE CO-CHAIR

Welcome to Las Vegas! In the 15 years since the Western History Association last held its annual conference in Las Vegas, a lot has changed. Thanks to the efforts of both long-standing and more recent members, the organization has grown and become more inclusive of a wide range of subfields, approaches, chronologies, and geographies, as well as the diverse historians who study the western past. Some of these changes, such as a growing engagement with questions around race and gender in the North American West, were already under way when we last met in Las Vegas in 2004. Like the broadening and dynamic field of western history, the association was influenced by the expansion of African American, Chicana/o, Asian American, and American Indian and Indigenous histories; the emergence of borderlands and environmental histories; and the development of new studies on sexuality and gender. As new graduate students, faculty members, practitioners, and community members from traditionally under-represented groups grew among the ranks of the WHA, they contributed not only to the transformation of the association, but also to our understanding of the history of the North American West.

In returning to Las Vegas, we wanted to take this opportunity to acknowledge and highlight the positive changes in the field and the WHA. In choosing the theme for this year’s conference—“What happens in the West doesn’t stay in the West”—we staked out a big tent approach to the history of the North American West. Not only does the theme play on a famed Las Vegas marketing campaign, but it also illuminates the connections between western history and the histories and historiographies of other parts of the nation, continent, and world. This theme has resonated with stalwart WHA members who are excited to underscore the far-ranging relevance of their work, and with the many people now on the program who have told us “I’m not a western historian, but….” It is a credit to everyone who put together proposals, as well as the hard work of the program committee and WHA staff, that the program embodies the broad reach of western history and provides a space for new conversations across regional and national boundaries.

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2019 PROGRAM COMMITTEE This year’s program reflects the strength, diversity, and dynamism of the history of the North American West. With 148 sessions ranging from traditional panels to roundtables, workshops, and more experimental sessions, the program provides a snapshot of the changing ways we approach the West. We are excited to report that this conference is expected to be the largest—in terms of the number of sessions and presenters—in the history of the WHA. More importantly, the range of topics addressed highlights the staggering breadth and continued importance of the history of the North American West. Quickly scanning through the titles of the sessions and papers reveals a few notable patterns. First, the WHA has become one of the most productive spaces for historians of Native and Indigenous histories. This has been evident over the last several annual meetings and reflects the growing number of Indigenous scholars working in our field. Second, the West has firmly expanded temporally into the twentieth century and geographically into the Pacific, while also incorporating a growing number of studies that reach back to the eighteenth century or explore “western” patterns north of the 49th parallel, south of the Rio Grande, and east of the Mississippi River. Third, western historians share a regional focus, but represent many fields. This program has something to offer historians of education, law, and governance; indigeneity, immigration, and race and ethnicity; women, gender, and sexuality; capitalism and labor; music, art, and performance; science and religion; diplomacy and war; food, medicine, and bodies; the environment and the economy; tourism and transportation; and many other topics. Fourth, the WHA has increased its support of professionalization in our discipline—this is evident in the growing number of sessions addressing social dynamics and inequities in the academy, preparing graduate students for diverse professions, and exploring both traditional and new ways of making our scholarship accessible to wider audiences. Fifth, the history of the North American West is relevant! This year’s conference features a number of panels that put historians in conversation with writers, lawyers, and other scholars and professionals to consider how history matters in our present moment. From law to video games and from Malheur to Standing Rock, panelists are making the case that the western past can provide insight into current events and debates.

Whether you are a graduate student presenting a paper for the first time, a long-time sustaining member, a K-12 teacher in Las Vegas schools taking advantage of having the conference in town to learn about new scholarship, a community member partnering with scholars, or a newcomer whose primary academic home is in another professional association, we welcome you to the Western History Association! We hope you will find what you came here for, and also that you will discover some unexpected surprises along the way.

Rachel and Josh 2019 WHA Program Co-Chairs

2019 Program Committee Members Juliana Barr, Duke University  

Malinda Maynor Lowery, University of North Carolina

Geraldo L. Cadava, Northwestern University

John Lutz, University of Victoria, British Columbia

Josh Garrett-Davis, Autry Museum of the American West  

Christian McMillen, University of Virginia  

Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University

Rebecca Scofield, University of Idaho

Trinidad O. Gonzales, South Texas College

Tynia Steptoe, University of Arizona

Maria John, University of Massachusetts Boston

Tamara Venit-Shelton, Claremont McKenna College

Khalil Anthony Johnson, Jr., Wesleyan University

Patricia N. Limerick, Center of the American West, University of Colorado Boulder

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WELCOME TO LAS VEGAS! “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” says Las Vegas’s popular advertising campaign. Local Andre Agassi said, “Image is everything,”and Las Vegas has long promoted images of itself, but its past and present are exciting without embellishment. In addition to 43 million annual visitors, about 2.3 million live in the metropolitan area, including the city; North Las Vegas; and, to the south, Henderson. While downtown Las Vegas, about three miles north of the conference hotel, increasingly caters to gamblers and a local, younger

population

enjoying

its

historical

attractions,

clubs,

and

restaurants, the Strip consists mainly of large, corporate-owned resorts that replaced older, smaller properties. Once deemed a “city of sin” for its

gambling,

industry,

Las

called

Vegas

the

is

the

epicenter

“quintessential

of

a

American

worldwide

city”

for

tourism

its

service

economy and round-the-clock activity. A vibrant community known as “the

entertainment

diverse

capital

population

and

of

the

culture,

world,”

known

Las

for

its

Vegas

also

ethnic

and

boasts

a

culinary

variety. It has evolved from a place to stop to a place to go—and live.

Long

settled

by

Southern

Paiutes,

Las

Vegas

was

part

of

the

Old

Spanish Trail, reflecting its history as a spot for travelers and its ties to southern

California,

which

have

included

transportation,

tourism,

architecture, and suburbanization, as well as early casino operators. John Frémont’s mapmaking party of 1844 reported on the warm springs that created “las vegas,” Spanish for the meadows, for weary travelers, beginning another trend: federal influence, from Frémont’s report to highway-building, public works, and defense plants.

Euro-American settler colonialism began haltingly in 1855 when thirty Mormon missionaries arrived from Salt Lake. They soon left because of conflicts over whether to concentrate on farming and proselytizing or mining. Their mission became a ranch and rest stop. In 1902, owners Helen Stewart and her family sold their ranch property to Senator William Clark for a division point on his railroad between Los Angeles and Salt Lake. A downtown land auction on May 15, 1905, started significant non-Indigenous settlement, and Las Vegas’s dependence on the railroad.

In 1931, the economic focus changed. Hoover Dam construction began, attracting tourists

thousands

marveling

contributed

to

of at

workers “the

southern

during

eighth

California’s

the

wonder growth

Depression of

the

with

as

well

world,”

cheap

as

which

water

and

power. A flood of federal projects followed, including Las Vegas’s first U.S.

government

building,

wartime

production

plants

and

military

bases, and the Nevada Test Site, where mushroom clouds endangered nearby residents and became a tourist attraction. Meanwhile, hoping to attract

visitors

reducing

the

who

would

residency

stay

and

requirement

invest, for

legislators

divorce

to

passed

six

weeks

bills and

legalizing most forms of gambling.

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WELCOME TO LAS VEGAS! By 1941, gambling branched out beyond downtown, with the El Rancho

Vegas

reputedly

opening

named

for

on

its

Highway

bright

91,

lights

beginning

reminiscent

the of

Strip—

Local Arrangements Committee

southern

California’s Sunset Strip. After the Flamingo (the first Strip hotel

William Bauer

built with mob money) in 1946, organized crime interests from

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Co-Chair

around the country erected luxury hotels like the Desert Inn, Sands, Riviera,

Tropicana,

and

Stardust.

Amid

this

growth,

the

local

population used up its underground water. In 1965, the Southern

Michael Green University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Co-Chair  

Nevada Water Project began the process of pumping from Lake Mead, the nation’s largest man-made lake, and now Las Vegas’s water source. By

then,

Las

Billionaire

Susan Lee Johnson University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Co-Chair

Vegas

was

Howard

trying

to

Hughes’s

rid

itself

buying

of

mob

spree

influence.

reduced

mob

Andy Kirk University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Co-Chair

ownership, but federal prosecutions and tougher state regulation finally drove organized crime out by the early 1980s. Las Vegas changed little until, in 1989, The Mirage opened with a volcano in front, white tigers inside, and Siegfried & Roy in the showroom. Its success

triggered

a

building

boom—literally,

as

Steve

Wynn,

Sheldon Adelson, and other resort operators imploded older hotelcasinos and constructed new resorts. Today’s

Strip

is

interconnected.

mostly

MGM

corporate-owned

Resorts

and

and

internationally

Caesars

Entertainment

properties predominate along with Wynn Resorts and Las Vegas Sands, all active in other states or around the world—a reflection of U.S.

economic

development,

globalization,

and

DeAnna Beachley College of Southern Nevada

Richard Bryan Former U.S. Senator and chairman, Preserve Nevada

María Raquél Casas University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Shae Cox Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas/Preserve Nevada

gambling’s

metamorphosis from vice to recreation. Las Vegas still attracts

Su Kim Chung

gamblers, but since Caesars invited Wolfgang Puck to open Spago

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

and built The Forum Shoppes, the city has become a food and shopping

destination.

traditional

headliner

Entertainment

or

“showgirl”

has

lineups

changed to

from

concerts

in

the large

Kendra Gage University of Nevada, Las Vegas

venues, residencies for stars like Cher and Lady Gaga, and Cirque du

Soleil

shows

that

boast

modern,

technologically

advanced

production values. The

“Mirage

construction

Boom” and

Michael Hall National Atomic Testing Museum

triggered

housing

rapid

boom

population

that

went

bust

growth in

the

and

a

Great

Pete La Chapelle Nevada State College

Recession. The growth included a large influx of Latinx and Asian peoples, who joined an already vibrant and historically significant African

American

community

and

became

the

heart

of

the

Mark Padoongpatt University of Nevada, Las Vegas

nationally recognized Culinary Union, making the Clark County School District majority/minority and UNLV the most diverse U.S. university. Outside investors have continued to come into Nevada, with connections to the past: NVEnergy’s owner, Warren Buffett, is from Omaha—home of the Union Pacific, once so dominant in Las Vegas; on the downtown land that once housed UP repair shops

are

the

Smith

Center

for

the

Performing

Arts

and

the

Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, reflecting the

Harry Reid former U.S. Senator

Geoff Schumacher The Mob Museum

Robert Stoldal, Nevada State Board of Museums and History

area’s growing cultural and medical communities. They show that in Las Vegas, a lot is happening—and staying here.

Claytee White University of Nevada, Las Vegas

-Willy, Mike, Susan, and Andy

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TOURS: WEDNESDAY/THURSDAY All tours will meet at the East Tower Entrance of the Westgate for bus transportation to tour site.

“We had long ago written off that terrain as wasteland and today it’s blooming with atoms,” said Governor Charles Russell of Nevada in 1952. He was referring to the atomic testing that began with above ground blasts at the Nevada Test Site in 1951 on land where the Western Shoshone and other Indigenous people once lived. There would be 100 such tests before underground testing began in 1963 and continued until 1992. Today, renamed the "Nevada National Security Site," the Nevada Test Site is a major research facility with a history of about 1,000 nuclear tests, scientific

Nevada Test Site

experiments, rumors of alien craft, and numerous protests.

Ticket Price: $50

On this tour you will go behind-the-scenes with a day trip to

Wednesday, October 16, 8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.

the site. The tour includes travel from Las Vegas through the Mojave Desert landscape to the Test Site gates and the closed testing town of Mercury. After a tour of Mercury, where scientists, engineers, and thousands of workers lived during atmospheric testing in the 1950s, the group will make stops at significant historic sites of Frenchman Flat, the Sedan Crater, the Ice Cap, and Doom Town. Tour guides are Leisl

Carr

Childers,

Ph.D.

(Colorado

State

University),

author of The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin, Christian Harrison, Ph.D. (Clark County

School District) scholar on Nevada water use and environmental history, and Anthony Graham (Ph.D. Candidate, UNLV), environmental historian and intern for the Nevada Site Specific Research Board. Because this is an operational U.S. Department of Energy national security site, attendees must pass a background check to take this tour when they reserve a tour ticket. Contact the WHA Office for a form. Lunch is provided. Please note: cameras and cell phones are not permitted. (Photos courtesy of Anthony Graham)

The Red  Rock  National Conservation Area divides the west

side

of

the

city

of

Las

Vegas.

The

cliffs

of Red  Rock  draw more than two million climbers and tourists

from

recently

around

featured

the

in

world

the

each

year

Academy

and

were

Award-winning

documentary, Free Solo . The cliffs resulted from the movement of the Keystone Trust Fault line linking the towering grey limestone Spring Mountains with the tail end of the sandstone of the Colorado Plateau. In 1990, special

legislation

supported

by

the

Nevada

congressional delegation, changed the status of the Red Rock

Recreation

Area,

the

seventh

Lands to

to

be

a

National

designated

Conservation

nationally.

This

legislation provides the funding to protect and improve the area. This tour, led by Andy Kirk (Professor and Chair

of

explore

the

the

UNLV

National

Department Scenic

of

History)

By-Way

and

will

14-mile

scenic loop offering opportunities to stop by features like

Red Rock Hike and Tour

Thursday, October 17, 1:00 P.M.-4:30 P.M.

#WHA2019

Box

Canyon,

petroglyph

sites,

and

take

a

moderate hike toward Calico Tanks. Take a break from the

Ticket Price: $25

Ice

Strip

and

enjoy

spectacular red  road

one

of

landscapes

of

the the

southwest. (Photo courtesy of Andy Kirk)

14

most

American

#Western2019


TOURS: THURSDAY All tours will meet at the East Tower Entrance of the Westgate for bus transportation to tour site.

Before there was a downtown Las Vegas, there was

East Side, West Side:

a townsite west of the railroad tracks. This district

Ethnic Las Vegas

eventually became the segregated area called "West

Ticket Price: $35

Las Vegas" or the "Historic Westside". The Civil

Thursday, October 17, 1:00 P.M.-4:30 P.M.

Rights Movement changed West Las Vegas to some degree,

but

Nevada

as

industry

other

factors

well.

The

and

large-scale

would

expansion

international

migrations

change of

southern

the

developments

from

Asia

and

gaming inspired

especially

Latin America, creating ethnic neighborhoods both just west of the Strip and in the eastern part of the valley. This tour delves into the ethnic and racial diversity of Las Vegas and will be led by Michael Green,

associate

professor

of

history

at

the

University of Nevada, Las Vegas. As the co-author of Las Vegas: A Centennial History and author of Nevada:

A

(nearly)

a

experience

History lifelong these

of

the

Silver

resident

diverse

State,

who

districts

Green

grew

that

up

make

is to

Las

Vegas so unique. (Photo courtesy of Leisl Carr Childers.)

Please join the QuIT Caucus for its inaugural event in Fabulous Las Vegas! QuIT is an ad hoc organizing group

for

Western

a

proposed

Women's

caucus

History

of

the

(CWWH)

Coalition

for

committed

to

making two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI+) people and pasts a visible and vital force in the field of North American western history. This unique LGBTQ bus tour will make stops across the

city,

shining

multiracial, lesbian,

a

rainbow

multiethnic,

gay,

bisexual,

and

spotlight

Indigenous

transgender,

on

the

history

two-spirit,

of

and

queer Nevadans. We’ll end our time together at an historic bar, but you may want your night to begin there!

Bring

your

favorite

LGBTQ

people

and

treasured allies along for this “Nitty Gritty History of the

Fabulous Las Vegas LGBTQ History Bus Tour Ticket Price: $30 Thursday, October 17, 7:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M.

the WHA Office before registering.

lead

by

Brian

Paco

Alvarez’s

Fabulous

Vegas native and graduate student at UNLV, will give attendees

an

insider’s

excursion

through

queer

Las

Vegas. This tour is not to be missed. Be there or be square! (Photo courtesy of Brian Paco Alvarez.)

Scholarships are available for this tour for those who wish to attend but cannot afford it. For details, please contact

City”

Story Tours. As your guide, Alvarez, who is a Las

15


TOURS: THURSDAY All tours will meet at the East Tower Entrance of the Westgate for bus transportation to tour site.

The bright lights of Las Vegas can be seen from outer space. On this tour you will go behind those lights to

A Tale of Two Cities:

examine the history of the Las Vegas Strip, then actually

The Las Vegas Strip and Downtown

go to Las Vegas (your guides can explain that one). You

Ticket Price: $35

will visit downtown, begun as a railroad stop in 1905, and

delve

into

the

history

of

Las

Vegas

and

Thursday, October 17, 1:00 P.M.-4:30 P.M.

its

surrounding areas. You’ll hear about who those histories have influenced one another, the West, the nation, and the world, and how outside forces shaped them, shifting from

the

federal

government,

to

organized

crime,

to

international events. The tour ranges from a U.S. senator from

Tennessee

to

an

eccentric

billionaire,

from

a

murderous mobster to bankers from Utah. Your guides are intimately familiar with Las Vegas and its environs. Former

Governor

(1983-89)

and

U.S.

Senator

(1989-

2001) Richard Bryan’s family was from Las Vegas, and he moved there in 1942; he serves as chairman of the board of Preserve Nevada, the state’s oldest statewide historic preservation organization. Geoff Schumacher is a longtime resident, a former journalist, senior content director

for

the

AAM-accredited

Mob

Museum,

and

author of Sun, Sin, & Suburbia: The History of Modern Las Vegas.

Construction on “the eighth wonder of the world” began in 1931, and Hoover Dam’s completion in 1936 made possible a significant amount of the growth of Southern California and the American Southwest with cheap and plentiful water and hydroelectric power. It continues to generate water and power for California, Nevada, and Arizona, but it also became a major tourist attraction, thanks

to

its

America’s right

first

behind

sheer

magnitude

national the

government

also

Reservation

to

and

recreation

the

area,

726.4-foot-high

built

house

creation Lake

Mead,

structure.

the

Boulder

Canyon

those

building

the

dam,

of

The

Federal and

it

became Boulder City, now not only a federal town but also a historic community and Las Vegas suburb known for its limited growth, lack of gambling (one of only two Nevada

The Best Little Town by a Dam Site, and the Dam Site: Boulder City and Hoover Dam Ticket Price: $40 Thursday, October 17, 1:00 P.M.-4:30 P.M.

towns

where

it’s

illegal),

and

small-town

atmosphere. Michelle Follette Turk, Ph.D., author of A History of Occupational Health and Safety: 1905 to the present, and historic preservationist in Nevada, leads a tour

that

takes

Hoover Dam.

16

you

through

Boulder

City

and

then


2019 PRESIDENTIAL PLENARY

DOES THE WEST MATTER? The Future of Regionalism in American History A Roundtable Discussion

Thursday

October 17, 2019

5:00 P.M. - 6:30 P.M. Location:

Ballrooms E, F, G

Chair William Cronon, University of Wisconsin–Madison Panelists Edward L. Ayers, University of Richmond Lisa Brooks (Abenaki), Amherst College Susan Lee Johnson, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Tiya Miles, Harvard University George Sánchez, University of Southern California

59th Annual WHA | Las Vegas, Nevada


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 12:15 P.M.

TEACHER-AUTHOR LUNCHEON BALLROOM F Authors with recent works on Western History are paired with middle and high school teachers to discuss the books. This year the committee is pleased to feature:

2018 Winners of the Charles Redd Center Teaching Award

John L. Smith, Freelance writer, journalist, and author Westside Slugger: Joe Neal's Lifelong Fight for Social Justice (University of Nevada Press, 2019) Joanne Goodwin, Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vega Changing the Game: Women at Work in Las Vegas, 1940-1990 (University of Nevada Press, 2014) Iker Saitua, Post Doc, University of California, Riverside Basque Immigrants and Nevada's Sheep Industry:  Geopolitics and the Making of an Agricultural Workforce, 1880-1954 (University of Nevada Press, 2019) This is a private event sponsored by the CTPE. To find out more about the Committee on Teaching and Public Education, or how to get involved in the Committee, contact the Chair, Mark Johnson, at Mark.Johnson@nd.edu

WHA STANDING COMMITTEE ON TEACHING AND PUBLIC EDUCATION

TAKE A HISTORIAN TO SCHOOL PROGRAM The Committee on Teaching and Public Education partners historians with schools to build bridges between K-12 teachers and university educators. This year, the CTPE is pleased to feature the following partnerships:

Michael Green, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Caryll Batt Dziedziak, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Joanne Goodwin, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Committee on Teaching and Public Education Members: Mark Johnson (Chair), Patricia Loughlin, William DeStefano, Brian S Collier, Peter Blodgett, Steven Fountain, Alicia Dewey, Andrea G. Radke-Moss, Lindsey Wieck, Linda Sargent Wood, Lindsay Marshall, Sheila McManus, Michelle Lorimer. 


2019 PRESIDENTIAL LUNCH AND ADDRESS

SEEING HISTORY: THINKING ABOUT AND WITH PHOTOGRAPHS

2019 PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS BY MARTHA A. SANDWEISS

Friday, October 18, 2019 12:15-1:45 P.M. Ballroom B Ticket Price: $40


MEETINGS LAS

VEGAS

2019

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 WHA Fall Council Meeting 8:30 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.

Conference Rooms 8, 9, 10

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 Ad Hoc Strategic Planning Committee Meeting (Closed) 7:00 A.M. - 8:00 A.M.

Boardroom

WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHAGSC) Meeting 12:15 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.

Ballroom D

2020 Program Committee Meeting 12:15 P.M. - 4:15 P.M.Â

Ballroom B

Technology Committee Meeting 1:15 P.M. - 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 9

Committee on Contingent and Adjunct Faculty Meeting 1:15 P.M. - 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 13

Committee on Race and the American West (CRAW) Meeting 1:15 P.M. - 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 12

Public History Committee Meeting 1:15 P.M. - 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 14

Committee on Assault Response and Educational Strategies (CARES) Meeting 1:15 P.M.- 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 8

Membership Committee Meeting 1:15 P.M. - 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 11

Committee on Teaching and Public Education Meeting 1:15 P.M. - 2:15 P.M.

Conference Room 10

Coalition for Western Women's History (CWWH) Business Meeting 2:15 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.

Conference Room 7

QuIT Caucus Meeting 3:15 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.

Conference Room 3

WHA Strategic Planning: An Open Forum on the Future of the WHA Open to all conference attendees and members! 4:00 P.M. - 4:45 P.M.

Ballroom D

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 WHA Business Meeting 3:30 P.M. - 4:30 P.M.

#WHA2019

Ballroom D

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#Western2019


MEALS AND RECEPTIONS LAS

VEGAS

2019

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 WHA Welcoming Reception 6:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M.

National Atomic Testing Museum

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 American Society for Environmental History (ASEH) Breakfast 7:00 A.M. - 8:00 A.M.

Ballroom B

Montana the Magazine of Western History Editorial Board Lunch 12:15 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.

Ballroom G

Western Historical Quarterly Editorial Board Lunch 12:15 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.

Ballroom E

Teacher/Author Lunch (Closed) 12:15 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.

Ballroom F

Public History Reception 6:30 P.M. - 7:30 P.M.

Ballroom D/Foyer

Graduate Student Reception 6:45 P.M. - 8:15 P.M.

Garden Patio South

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 Coalition for Western Women's (CWWH) Breakfast 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

Ballroom B

Presidential Lunch and Address 12:15 P.M. - 1:45 P.M.

Ballroom B

CRAW/Coalition Reception (Committee on Race and the American West and Coalition for Western Women's History)

4:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.

Ballroom B

Awards Ceremony and Reception 5:30 P.M. - 6:30 P.M. (Doors open at 5:00)

Ballrooms E, F, G

In lieu of a sit-down banquet, the 2019 Awards Ceremony will take place in an open, reception-style setting and is free for all to attend! Doors open to all at 5:00 P.M. with cash bars and the ceremony concludes at 6:30 with a ticketed reception ($10) that includes heavy appetizers.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 Borderlands Breakfast 7:00 A.M. - 8:00 A.M.

Ballroom B

Indian Scholars Lunch 12:15 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.

Ballroom F

Teaching Western History Lunch (and Award Presentations) 12:15 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.

#WHA2019

Ballroom D

21

#Western2019


A special thanks to Sarah Cargin and Sula Photography for capturing our time in San Antonio 2018.  

#WHA2019

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#Western2019


WHA 2019 SCHEDULE OF SESSIONS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 2:00 P.M. – 3:30 P.M. Teaching in the West Doesn't Stay in the West: Practical, Innovative Teaching Strategies for the College Classroom Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Teaching and Public Education Location: Conference Rooms 1-3

Chair: Patricia Loughlin, University of Central Oklahoma Lindsey Wieck, St. Mary’s University Using Interactive Syllabi: Framing Engagement and Equity in the Classroom Lindsay Erin Marshall, University of Oklahoma The Myth of the Lazy Undergraduate: Teaching Soft Skills to Boost Engagement and Teach Historical Thinking Jeff Johnson, Providence College Talkin’ about the West … Lecture on the Lecture Frontier Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame Practical Ways to Incorporate Active Learning into Your Teaching

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 3:45 P.M. – 5:15 P.M. CWWH Roundtable: Western Women's and Gender History in the Era of #MeToo Sponsored by Coalition for Western Women’s History Location: Conference Rooms 4-6

Chair: Laurie Mercier, Washington State University Vancouver Samantha Edgerton, Washington State University Kiera J. Anderson, Simon Fraser University Lorena Oropeza, University of California, Davis

#WHA2019

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The American West, Borderlands, and Beyond: A Roundtable on Turning Your Dissertation into a Book

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 8:30 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.

Location: Conference Room 2

Chair: Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso

Awakenings: Seeking Solutions to Have Diverse Ableism Grow in Academic and History Professions

Kristen Buckles, University of Arizona Press

Location: Conference Room 1

Charles Grench, University of North Carolina Press

Chair: Alida Boorn, Historian

Kim Hogeland, Oregon State University Press

Alida Boorn, Historian Pragmatic Ableism: Approaching an Independent Scholarly Career thru Visual Impairment Robin C. Henry, Wichita State University Universal Design in a Personalized Educational Universe: Accessibility and Faculty Control in the University Classroom Miguel Juárez, University of Texas at El Paso/El Paso Community College How can we address issues of ageism and ableism at the WHA? Daniel Romero, Jr. (Lipan Apache Band of Texas), University of Texas at El Paso Change of Non-Indigenous and Indigenous Communities through Social, Religious, and Linguistic Values

Coll Thrush, University of British Columbia Adam C. Kane, University of Oklahoma Matthew Bokovoy, University of Nebraska Press

Latina/os and Religious Diversity in the American West Location: Conference Room 3

Chair: Mark A. Goldberg, University of Houston Felipe Hinojosa, Texas A&M University “¡Cristo Si, McIntyre No!”: Católicos Por La Raza and the Reformation of American Catholicism Mark A. Goldberg, University of Houston “Marranos y Conversos”: Jewish Latina/os in the 20th-Century U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Cuba Borderlands Sujey Vega, Arizona State University "Finding Our History": Searching for LDS Latinas in Home Archives and Ethnographic Engagements

Comment: Patricia N. Limerick, University of Colorado Boulder

Exception or the Rule? Locating Indian Territory within U.S. History (1803-present) Location: Conference Room 5

Comment: Gerald E. Poyo, St. Mary's University

Chair & Comment: David A. Chang, University of Minnesota

Las Vegas Memory and Identity in the Past and Present

Cori L. Simon, University of Wisconsin-Madison Making an “Indian Territory”: Federal Policy and Indigenous Power After Removal Alaina Roberts (Chickasaw, Choctaw), University of Pittsburgh Democracy through Domestic Imperialism: Land, Citizenship, and Reconstruction in Indian Territory Joseph Schiller, University of Oklahoma Extraction, Environment, and Settler Visions in Oklahoma John Truden, University of Oklahoma A Communication Explosion: Indigenous Identities, Political Activism, and the Institute of the Southern Plains

#WHA2019

Location: Conference Room 7

Chair & Comment: David M. Wrobel, University of Oklahoma Nicole R. Batten, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Fallen Neon: Monuments and Memory in Las Vegas Kenneth J. Bindas, Kent State University Helldorado: Las Vegas and the Search for a Western Identity, 1934-1945 Michael Green, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Las Vegas and the Contested Past and Present: The Mob Museum

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Water in the West Location: Conference Room 4

Chair & Comment: Erika M. Bsumek, University of Texas at Austin Jan E. Hansen, Humboldt University of Berlin Water Infrastructure and How-to Knowledge in the Everyday Life of Los Angeles, ca. 1900 Robert L. Jones, University of Nevada, Las Vegas A Paradise in the Desert? Elizabeth Hameeteman, Boston University Water Out West: The Water Discourse in U.S. Foreign Aid Assistance

Science, Public Lands, and the West’s Pacific Connections Location: Conference Room 6

Chair & Comment: Lissa Wadewitz, Linfield College Robert Diaz, University of Texas at El Paso Scientific Islanders: Pacific Peoples, American Scientists, and the Desire to Understand the World Graeme Mack, University of California, San Diego “Our Territory on the Pacific”: The Oregon Question, San Francisco Bay, and Political Compromise in the United States, 1822-1848 Mark Fiege, Montana State University The Philippines in California: Col. John Roberts White and Sequoia National Park

Narratives of Belonging: Constitution of Identity in the West Location: Conference Room 8

Chair & Comment: Ashley Riley Sousa, Middle Tennessee State University Mariel Aquino, University of California, Santa Barbara A Question of Skulls: Basque-Americans, Science, and Identity Carla Mendiola, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Contesting Identity Narratives of Belonging and Difference in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Constructing Mexican American Identity through Historical Narratives Katrine Barber, Portland State University “My Family Considers Ourselves a Race Apart”: Alzamon Ira Lucas, New Thought Philosophies, and Racial Representation Anne Petersen, Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation Creating Organizational Change in a Contested Space: Lessons from El Presidio de Santa Bárbara

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The People’s Archives: Communities on the Margins Preserving Their Own Histories

Covering Up: Shifting Sexuality, Race, and Class to Get By

Location: Conference Room 9

Location: Conference Room 13

Chair: Liza Posas, Autry Museum of the American West

Chair & Comment: Karl Jacoby, Columbia University

Amanda K. Wixon (Chickasaw), Sherman Indian Museum/University of California, Riverside

Ernesto Chávez, University of Texas at El Paso “I just Had A Fight With My Girlfriend”: SilentEra Screen Star Ramón Novarro’s Performance of the Closet David J. Cameron, Lone Star College-University Park “A Mexican American, I Guess”: The Reverend James L. Novarro and the Politics of Faith, Race, and Ethnicity Emiliano Aguilar, Northwestern University “El Gran Comediante”: The Political Death of Marco Antonio Diaz Infante and the Crusade of the G.I. Forum

Roger Bergmann, International Gay Rodeo Association (IGRA) Jenny Emery Davidson, The Community Library, Ketchum, Idaho Thuy Vo Dang, University of California, Irvine Yusef Omowale, Southern California Library

What's Arizona Got to Do with It? Arizona History in Western, U.S., and Transnational Contexts

Panic and Sexual Practices in the 20th-Century West

Location: Conference Room 10

Location: Conference Room 11

Co-Chairs: David Turpie, Arizona Historical Society Katherine G. Morrissey, University of Arizona

Chair & Comment: Matthew Basso, University of Utah

Katherine Benton-Cohen, Georgetown University

Katie M. Hemphill, University of Arizona Sexually Progressive: Masculinity, Moral Reform, and Queer Scandal at the Baltimore Y.M.C.A. Brian Stack, Washington State University “In Certain Western Areas of the United States”: Alfred Kinsey, Bestiality, and American Culture in the 20th-Century Anthony Easton, Independent Scholar Our Public Idaho: The 1950s Boise Sex Scandal and the Pyschogeography of the Queer West

Flannery Burke, Saint Louis University Maurice Crandall (Yavapai-Apache Nation), Dartmouth College Daniel Herman, Central Washington University Eric V. Meeks, Northern Arizona University Andrew Needham, New York University

Native Women and Historical Representation

What Happens on Western Land Is Never Just Western: American Opportunity, Federal Policy, and Agrarian Whiteness

Location: Ballroom D

Chair & Comment: Lisa Brooks (Abenaki), Amherst College

Location: Ballroom G

Loren Michael Mortimer, University of California, Davis Kateri’s Bones: Indigenous Women and Spiritual Revitalization in the Shadow of New France, 16701720 Jayne Elizabeth Kinney, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities They Walked with the Buffalo: A Response to Anglo-American Perceptions of Mandan Women Rose Stremlau, Davidson College Some Documents Are a Punch to the Gut: Indian Removal, Gendered Violence, and the California Genocide

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Chair: Clyde A. Milner II, University of New Mexico Sara M. Gregg, University of Kansas “Make Way for Civilization”: Revisiting Native Dispossession in Histories of U.S. Homesteading Kathryn Morse, Middlebury College Race, Class, and Land Tenancy in the New Deal West Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Turnerian, Si, Americano No: Uncovering the Boundaries of Whiteness in the American West Comment: Neil Foley, Southern Methodist University

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Historical Truth in Film: Native Participation and Representation in Hollywood

The Birth of a State: Slavery, Confinement, Incarceration, and the Origins of Ethnic Cleansing in California

Location: Conference Room 12

Location: Conference Room 14

Chair: Steven Sexton (Pawnee and Choctaw), University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Chair: Jean Pfaelzer, University of Delaware

Liza Black (Oklahoma Cherokee), Indiana University Historical Truths in Hollywood: Technical Advisors and Authenticity in American Indian Film Andrew Fisher, College of William and Mary The Indian in the Studio: Nipo Strongheart and the Hidden History of Native Creativity in Hollywood Brianna Tafolla Rivière, University of California, Davis Reel Red Power: The Red Power Movement and Revisionist Westerns from 1960-1975

Lynette C. Mullen, Historian/Project Manager Native American Slavery on the Northern California Coast Jean Pfaelzer, University of Delaware “Except as Punishment for a Crime”: Involuntary Servitude and the Birth of Carceral California Jessica Ordaz, University of Colorado Boulder The Repurposed Detention Camp: Comparative German and Mexican Labor and Detention Practices Samantha Q. de Vera, University of California, San Diego Visualizing Geographies of Unfreedom

Comment: Kent Blansett (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Shawnee, and Potawatomi), University of Nebraska at Omaha

Votes for Women on the Northern Great Plains: Western Woman Suffrage and the National Narrative

Comment and Discussion: Audience

New Directions in Mexican American History: Citizenship, Civil Rights, and Activism during World War II

Location: Ballroom F

Chair: Renée M. Laegreid, University of Wyoming Jennifer Helton, Ohlone College So Great an Innovation: Woman Suffrage in Wyoming Dee Garceau, University of Montana “A Right to Help Make the Laws”: The Pragmatic Politics of Blackfeet Suffragists Kristin Mapel Bloomberg, Hamline University Western Woman Suffrage Begins on the Northern Plains: Cora E. Smith Eaton and North Dakota Woman Suffrage, 1888-1897 Ruth Page Jones, Independent Historian The Forgotten Story of Partial Suffrage Lori Ann Lahlum, Minnesota State University, Mankato Ethnic Voters and Woman Suffrage in the Northern Great Plains States Molly P. Rozum, University of South Dakota Woman Suffrage on the Northern Great Plains: Observations and Directions

Location: Ballroom E

Chair & Comment: Miroslava Chávez-García, University of California, Santa Barbara Natalie Mendoza, SMU Clements Center for Southwest Studies and University of Colorado Boulder The Good Neighbor in the American Historical Imagination: Mexican American Intellectual Thought in the Fight for Civil Rights Chantel Rodríguez, University of Maryland, College Park Forging Health Citizenship: Sacrifice and Obligation in the Railroad Bracero Program of World War II Valerie A. Martinez, Our Lady of the Lake University “I got out of my mother’s and father’s wings when I signed up”: WWII Latina Servicewomen Asserting Cultural Citizenship

Comment and Discussion: Audience

QuIT QuIT is an ad hoc organizing group for a proposed caucus in the Coalition for Western Women's History (CWWH) committed to making two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI+) people and pasts a visible and vital force within the field of North American western history. QuIT isn’t strictly an acronym, though you’re right to detect in it bits of the familiar LGBTQI+ rubric. Many of us who locate ours elves within that rubric embrace the label “queer”—hence the “Qu” in our name. But the particularities of two-spirit and transgender and intersex lives and the exclusions practiced by lesbian and gay communities make us mindful that not all LGBTQI+ people stand equally at ease under the “queer” banner. So we’re not just “Qu” but also, proudly and d efiantly, both “I” and “T.” We are QuIT—as in, QuIT acting like we’re invisible. You see us, and we see you looking. We are QuIT—as in, you wish you knew how to QuIT us. You can’t. We’re here. We’re queer. We’re intersex. We’re two -spirit. We’re transgender. Get used to it. You can support QuIT by attending their WHA-sponsored panels and the "Fabulous Las Vegas LGBTQ Tour." You can also support QuIT by donating to assist those who otherwise could not afford the QuIT tour.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Bridging the West through Region & Migration Location: Conference Room 5

Chair & Comment: Kristen T. Oertel, University of Tulsa Jaynie Elizabeth Adams, Arizona Historical Society Southwest by South: Cultural and Political Connections between Arizona and the South Robert Hunt Ferguson, Western Carolina University ‘Tarheel Country’ in the Pacific Northwest: The Cultural Impacts of Labor-based Migration from Western North Carolina to Western Washington Thomas Richards, Springside Chestnut Hill Academy The Great U.S. Diaspora: Reconsidering Manifest Destiny as Global Migration, 1819-1865

Book Session: David G. García’s Strategies of Segregation: Race, Residence, and the Struggle for Educational Equality Location: Conference Room 4

Chair: Bryant Partida, University of California, Los Angeles José M. Alamillo, California State University Channel Islands Cynthia E. Orozco, Eastern New Mexico UniversityRuidoso Angelina Teresa Martínez, University of Texas at El Paso Comment: David G. García, University of California, Los Angeles

Neon Pacific: Asian American and Pacific Islander Las Vegas Location: Conference Room 2

Chair: Mark Padoongpatt, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Armina Kayla Guelas, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Jacob B. Cabanero, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Brittany Carino Biggs, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Rosalina Trinidad, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

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New Works in the Histories of Health and Disease in the West and the World Location: Conference Room 1

Chair & Comment: Christian McMillen, University of Virginia Seth Archer, Utah State University Smallpox and the Medicine Line Adria L. Imada, University of California, Irvine An Archive of Skin, an Archive of Kin: Disability and Life-Making during Medical Incarceration Tamara Venit-Shelton, Claremont McKenna College Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Medicine in the United States Matthew Klingle, Bowdoin College Salubrious Sovereignty: Reframing Diabetes and Native Agency through Art and Education

Fiestas, Performance, and Resistance in Mexican American Communities Location: Conference Room 3

Chair & Comment: Jessica M. Kim, California State University, Northridge Alejandra Christiana Garza, University of Texas at Austin Viva El Vaquero: Mexican American Cowboys, Fiestas, and Historical Memory in the 20thCentury Rita Marie Velasco, Northwestern University Fiestas Patrias and Community Building: The Making of the Mexican Middle Class in Fresno, California Brian Luna Lucero, Columbia University “Amado por todas las generaciones de la gran familia Mexicana”: Early 20th-Century Performances of Los Pastores as Cultural Identification and Resistance

African American History in Los Angeles Location: Conference Room 7

Chair: Dana Elizabeth Weiner, Wilfrid Laurier University Monica E. Jovanovich, Golden West College Keepers of the Flame: The League of Allied Arts’ Support of African American Artists in Los Angeles James K. Steele, University of Nevada, Las Vegas The Fire Over There: The (Mis)-Representation of the King Uprising Marne L. Campbell, Loyola Marymount University Reality and Myth: Black Criminality in Early Los Angeles Comment: Brenda E. Stevenson, University of California, Los Angeles

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Roundtable: Fringe Politics in the West

Faith and Finance: Approaching the Financial History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Its Members

Location: Conference Room 6

Chair: Kathryn Olmsted, University of California, Davis

Location: Conference Room 8

Kathleen Belew, University of Chicago

Chair: Matthew C. Godfrey, Church History Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Joseph Lowndes, University of Oregon

Brooke Kathleen Brassard, Historian Canadian Latter-day Saints and Cooperation Elizabeth Ann Kuehn, Church History Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Joseph Smith's Debts and Repayment Efforts D. Michael Quinn, Independent Historian The Remarkable History of General Authority Income and Wealth Sherilyn Farnes, Texas Christian University The Financial Status of Women in Utah Territory Matthew C. Godfrey, Church History Department, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints By Divine Revelation: Apostolic Fundraising Efforts for the Utah Sugar Company

James Pogue, Writer

Stories of Change since We Last Met in Vegas: Retrospectives on the WHA Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Race and the American West (CRAW), WHA Public History Committee, & Coalition for Western Women’s History Location: Ballroom E

Chair: Gregory E. Smoak, American West Center University of Utah Elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary Maria Montoya, New York University and New York University Shanghai

Comment and Discussion: Audience

"The Most Harmoniously Segregated Community in America": Mexican Colonias, Housing Discrimination, Black Cultural Labor, and School Segregation in Bakersfield

David Rich Lewis, Utah State University Kent Blansett (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Shawnee, and Potawatomi), University of Nebraska at Omaha

Location: Conference Room 13

Drawing the Line: Exclusion and Inclusion in Immigration Policy

Chair: Peter La Chapelle, Nevada State College

Madeline Hsu, University of Texas at Austin World Citizen: Yuan Ren Chao and Border Transcendence during the Asian Exclusion Era Beth Lew-Williams, Princeton University Chinese Prostitution in California and the Rise of Federal Immigration Policy Adam Goodman, University of Illinois at Chicago Decentering the 1924 Act: Mexican Migration and the Making of "Illegal Aliens" in the Early 20th Century

F. Javier Llamas, Bakersfield College Mexican Pioneers and the Origins of the Mexican Colonia in Bakersfield Donato Luis Cruz, California State University, Bakersfield America’s Newest City: Bakersfield 1950s and the Making of the Modern Sub-Urban Segregated Landscape Daniel Rios, University of California, San Diego Black Yields: Race, Space, Labor, and WorkingClass Resistance in Bakersfield, California, 19601974 Navjyot Gill, University of California, Irvine The Construction of Racial Boundaries and Redistricting in Kern County

Comment: Julian Lim, Arizona State University

Comment: Oliver Arthur Rosales, Bakersfield College

Sponsored by Immigration and Ethnic History Society Location: Ballroom G

Chair: Adam Goodman, University of Illinois at Chicago

GRADUATE STUDENT RECEPTION Cash bar, non-alcoholic beverages, and light appetizers will be available

Thursday, October 17, 6:30 P.M. - 8:30 P.M. Garden Patio South – Tickets: $5 Thank you to the sponsors for their generous support of this event!

Center of the American West (CU Boulder) Jeffrey Ostler University of Oklahoma History Department

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Transnational Borders and Nature in the West

Networks, Land, and People: From an Interdisciplinary and International Perspective of the Spanish Frontier

Location: Conference Room 12

Chair & Comment: Sara Dant, Weber State University

Location: Conference Room 10

Glenn Iceton, University of Saskatchewan Beavers and Borders: Wildlife Conservation across the Yukon-British Columbian Border Donna Crail-Rugotzke, College of Southern Nevada The Spirit of the West?: Velma "Wild Horse Annie" Johnston and Efforts to Protect Wild Horses and Burros Will Wright, Montana State University Wolves, Settler-Colonial States, and the Origins of the Yellowstone-to-Yukon Conservation Initiative

Chair: Yvette J. Saavedra, University of Oregon Kimberly Sumano Ortega, University of Texas at El Paso Indigenous Voices and Silences: Exploring Resistance on the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro David Arturo Muñiz García, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez Reacomodo de Población en Torno al Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, Durango y Chihuahua Maria Guadalupe Vallejo, University of Texas at El Paso Entre Tierra y Honor: Analyzing Land, Gender, and State Policies in the Villas del Norte Alejandro González-Milea, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez Schemers, Boosters, and Surveyors of the West in the North of Mexico during the 19th Century

Beyond Standing Rock and #NoDAPL: Responding to Nick Estes' Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance Location: Conference Room 9

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Chair: Maria John, University of Massachusetts Boston

Integrating Boarding School Narratives into Transnational, Public, and National Histories

Kristen Simmons (Moapa Band of Southern Paiutes), University of Chicago Futures Otherwise Kevin Bruyneel, Babson College Commentary on Nick Estes’ Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance Andrew Curley (Navajo), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Reflecting on Our History Is the Future and the Future of Tribal Sovereignty

Location: Ballroom F

Chair: David Wallace Adams, Cleveland State University Preston McBride (Comanche by descent), University of California, Los Angeles “Let all that is Indian within you die!”: A Transnational Legal Case for Cultural Genocide in American Indian Boarding Schools, 1879-2015 Bobbi J. Rahder, Stewart Indian School Cultural Center & Museum Chris Ann Gibbons, Stewart Indian School Cultural Center & Museum Public History and the Native American Boarding School System: Educating Visitors about the Complicated History of the Stewart Indian School Matt S. Villeneuve (Turtle Mountain Chippewa), University of Michigan The Campaigns for Off-Reservation Boarding School Closures, 1900-1934 Samantha Williams, University of California, Santa Cruz “Guilty of Very Outrageous Conduct”: Uncovering Federal Investigations of Boarding School Abuses, 1898-1906

Comment: Nick Estes (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe), University of New Mexico

Roundtable: What Happens in the West Shouldn't Stay in the West: Teaching the History of the American West Online Location: Conference Room 11

Chair: Sandra Mathews, Nebraska Wesleyan University and Dancing Loon Historical Consulting, LLC Jennifer Andrella, Michigan State University Cassie Clark, University of Utah Jennifer Thigpen, Washington State University

#WHA2019

Comment and Discussion: Audience

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Indigeneity and Nuclear Contexts

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 2:00 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.

Location: Conference Room 14

Chair: Andy Kirk, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Improving the Research Experience: A Workshop for Graduate Students in Western American History

Dmitri Brown (Santa Clara Pueblo), University of California, Davis Bridges from the Center of the World: Tewa Pueblos, the Manhattan Project, and the Birth of the Atomic Age George Gregory Rozsa, University of Iowa The Nevada Movement: A Model of Transnational Indigenous Solidarity Rebecca Hogue, University of California, Davis Environmental Mitigation and Maternity in AntiNuclear Narratives of Oceania

Sponsored by Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University

For participation details visit westernhistory.org/2019 Location: Conference Rooms 4-5

Chair: Peter J. Blodgett, Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens Laurie Arnold (Sinixt Band, Colville Confederated Tribes), Gonzaga University

Comment: Ian Zabarte (Western Bands of the Shoshone Nation of Indians), Native Community Action Council

Lisa Escobedo Duncan, University of Arizona Libraries Sam Herley, South Dakota Oral History Center Tamsen Hert, University of Wyoming

Sound and Fury Under Western Skies: Punk Rock Communities and the Making of the Modern West

Ginny Kilander, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

Location: Ballroom D

George A. Miles, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

Chair & Comment: Matthew Bokovoy, University of Nebraska Press

Jacquelyn Reese, University of Oklahoma Libraries

Ryan Edgington, Independent Scholar “Blood and Sand”: How New Mexico Punk Rock Shattered the Western Music Tradition, 1988Present Alexandria Waltz, University of Utah “Hello World, I’m Your Wild Girl”: Punk Women’s Alternative Gender Constructions within the Los Angeles Rock and Roll Industry Matthew Daniel Mason, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University Punks by the Bay: Punk Rock Fliers and New Wave Music Subcultures in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1979-1986

Theresa Salazar, The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley Laurie Scrivener, University of Oklahoma Libraries

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 2:30 P.M. – 4:00 P.M. Six Shooters: A Digital Frontiers Lightning Round Sponsored by the WHA Technology Committee Location: Conference Room 1

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 12:15 P.M. – 1:30 P.M.

Chair: Jason A. Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha Cynthia Prescott, University of North Dakota

2019 WHA Spark Session: Abortion and Reproductive Justice in the West

Shine Trabucco, St. Mary’s University Brian Luna Lucero, Columbia University

Location: Conference Room 3

Glory Taylor, University of Wyoming

The WHA continues its annual “Spark Session” in 2019—a session featuring a contemporary issue that sparks immediate discussion. Roundtable participants will be announced prior to the conference.

#WHA2019

Joel Zapata, Southern Methodist University B. Hinesley, Oklahoma State University

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 4:00 P.M. – 4:45 P.M. Special Session An Open Forum on Strategic Planning for the Future of the WHA Location: Ballroom D In 2018 the WHA Council approved the process to begin a “Strategic Planning” initiative for the WHA. The Ad Hoc Strategic Planning Committee members discussed several “next steps” for WHA financial goals, programming, membership, & professional contributions. They, in partnership with the WHA Executive Office, are committed to making this process open and transparent. This session is open to all conference attendees and will serve as a platform for holding an open conversation about the WHA as it looks ahead.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 5:00 P.M. – 6:30 P.M. (Doors Open at 4:30 P.M.) Location: Ballrooms E, F, G

Presidential Plenary Does the West Matter?: The Future of Regionalism in American History, A Roundtable Conversation Chair: William Cronon University of Wisconsin-Madison Panelists: Edward L. Ayers University of Richmond Lisa Brooks (Abenaki) Amherst College Susan Lee Johnson University of Nevada, Las Vegas Tiya Miles Harvard University George J. Sánchez University of Southern California

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 8:30 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.

The American West in World War II: Confinement, Internment, and Injustice

Sharing Regional Stories of Bucking Conservatism: Place, Politics, and Historical Narratives of Activism

Chair & Comment: Megan Asaka, University of California, Riverside

Location: Conference Room 2

Jeffrey Leavitt, California State University, Fullerton No Interned in My Backyard: The Racial Community Relations of Japanese Internment in Manzanar and Poston Whitney J. Peterson, University of Denver Snapshots of Confinement: Mediating Historical Relationships through Japanese Americans' World War II-era Photo Albums Desirée A. Valadares, University of California, Berkeley Unlikely Antiquities: Redressing Military Injustice and Refashioning the Vestiges of War in Hawai‘i

Location: Conference Room 8

Chair: Karissa Robyn Patton, University of Saskatchewan Erin Gallagher-Cohoon, Queen’s University Organizing in Canada’s “Bible Belt”: The Early History of Gay Alliance Toward Equality Edmonton Tarisa Little, University of Saskatchewan Setting a Precedent: The Power of Public Protest at Blue Quills Residential School, 1970 Karissa Robyn Patton, University of Saskatchewan Contraception, Community, and Controversy: The Lethbridge Birth Control and Information Centre, 1972-1978 Mack Penner, McMaster University Rethinking Liberalism, Rethinking Leftism: The Woodsworth-Irvine Socialist Fellowship and the Meanings of Alberta’s Left History

Material Histories of Spanish California and Beyond Location: Conference Room 3

Chair: Robert M. Senkewicz, Santa Clara University Kristin Dutcher Mann, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Bells and Empire in Spanish California Anna Toledano, Stanford University A Collector in Mexico, an Explorer in Monterey: José Longinos and Natural History in 18th-century New Spain Skyler Reidy, University of Southern California The Windmill's Godfather: Social Bonds between Objects and People in the California Missions

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Getting Here: Travel, Capitalism, and Leisure in the Evolving West Location: Conference Room 11

Chair & Comment: Terence Young, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Comment: Steven W. Hackel, University of California, Riverside

David Michael Burel, Arizona State University Omar Suttles and the Origins of the Western Trailer Industry: Enthusiast-Engineers, Trailer Manufacturers, and Western Tourism Dominique Brégent-Heald, Memorial University of Newfoundland Motoring through the Rockies: Promoting Western Canadian Auto Tourism through Film, 1920s1930s Jonathan Shafer, Auburn University The Trail that Leads Everywhere: Capitalism, Consumerism, and Tourism's Utilitarian Frame in the Evolving West Anthony Daniel Graham, University of Nevada, Las Vegas "Where shall you find the Desert?": Tourism and Boosterism in the Mojave

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Industrial Food, Industrial Poison: Science, Agriculture, and Knowledge from the West to the Nation… and Back Location: Conference Room 14

Chair & Comment: Leisl Carr Childers, Colorado State University Lyn Ellen Bennett, Utah Valley University Colorado to New York and Places in Between: The Accidental Travels of Paris Green. David D. Vail, University of Nebraska at Kearney Defending Plenty: The Great Plains Agricultural Council’s Efforts to Study Climate Change, Protect Crops, and Solve the 1950s Drought Michael Weeks, Utah Valley University Importing and Exporting the Colorado Feedlot

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Responding to Decline and Extinction: Connections in Western Wildlife History

Go West, Young Scholar, and Help the History Profession Grow Up: Borrowing from BeyoncĂŠ to Turn a Nation of Amnesiacs into Fans of History

Location: Conference Room 13

Chair: Andrew Isenberg, University of Kansas

Sponsored by the Center of the American West Location: Conference Room 1

Jason M. Colby, University of Victoria After the Slaughter: Gray Whale Recovery and the Environmental Culture of the Coastal West Adam R. Hodge, Lourdes University Wisdom from the Big Hole?: A Comparative History of Arctic Grayling in Montana and Michigan Monika Bilka, Chandler-Gilbert Community College The Fight for Not-So-Pretty Fish: Tribal-StateFederal Efforts to Protect Endangered Suckers Travis Brandon Roy, Temple University From Disbelief to Providence: Tracking Anglophone Attitudes toward Animal Extinction in the Long 19th-Century

Moderator: Patricia N. Limerick, University of Colorado Boulder Does sharing your historical expertise with audiences far beyond the boundaries of higher education figure in your aspirations--or in your current practices? With the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the University of Colorado's Center of the American West has launched a major program in Applied History, "repurposing" the skills of historians who have been trained in more conventionally academic forms of communication. To navigate the not-always-harmonic convergence of the currents of old and new media, the Center welcomes--and, actually, needs--your company and active participation at this session.

Comment: Jon T. Coleman, University of Notre Dame

Where Does the Midwest End and the West Begin?

Global Wests: Transnational Flows of Western Imaginaries

Sponsored by the Midwestern History Association

Location: Conference Room 5

Location: Conference Room 9

Chair & Comment: Josh Garrett-Davis, Autry Museum of the American West

Chair: Jon Lauck, University of South Dakota

Gregory Hinton, Out West The Wild West in London: On the Town with Buffalo Bill, Henry Irving & Oscar Wilde Sarah Sarzynski, Claremont McKenna College The Cold War Nordestern (or Brazilian Western): Masculinity, Barbarism and Honor Rachel Leket-Mor, Arizona State University IsraPulp: Hebrew-Language Pulp Industry and the American Western Rebecca Scofield, University of Idaho Wild West Dreams: 1980s Cowboy Politics and Fashion

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Catherine McNicol Stock, Connecticut College Sara Egge, Centre College Derek R. Everett, Metropolitan State University of Denver and Colorado State University Walter Nugent, University of Notre Dame (emeritus) Virgil W. Dean, Kansas Historical Society (retired) Harry F. Thompson, Center for Western Studies, Augustana University

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Uahikea Maile (Kanaka Maoli), University of Toronto Beyond Fictive Kinship Nick Estes (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe), University of New Mexico Editing Standing with Standing Rock Anne Spice (Kwanlin Dün First Nation), City University of New York Interview with Freda Huson, Wet’suwet’en Territory

Tips for the Academic Career, Part One: Service, Institutional Isolation, and the Importance of Networks Sponsored by the WHA Membership Committee Location: Ballroom F

Chair: Laurie Arnold (Sinixt Band, Colville Confederated Tribes), Gonzaga University Heather Ponchetti Daly (Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel), University of California, San Diego

CWWH Branded Session: Illicit Labor: The Politics of Race, Sexuality, Gender, Labor in Vice Activities

William Bauer (Round Valley Indian Tribes), University of Nevada Las Vegas Susan E. Gray, Arizona State University

Sponsored by Coalition for Western Women’s History

Brenden Rensink, Brigham Young University and Charles Redd Center for Western Studies

Location: Ballroom G

Chair & Comment: Katherine Sarah Massoth, University of Louisville

Rosalyn LaPier (Blackfeet/Métis), University of Montana

Joanne L. Goodwin, University of Nevada, Las Vegas The Working Women of Las Vegas, 1940-1990 Erika Pérez, University of Arizona “I am a woman of the town”: Regulating Sex Workers and Vice in 19th-Century Southern California Holly Marie Karibo, Oklahoma State University Reading the Archives of the Illicit: Sex Work, Space, and Memory in Women's Autobiography Carolina Monsivais, University of Texas at El Paso Prohibiting Women: Policing Gender during U.S. Prohibition

Soundscapes of the West: Music and Performance from the Variety Hall to the Movie House Location: Conference Room 4

Chair: Catharine Rohini Franklin, Texas Tech University Beth E. Levy, University of California, Davis Enacting California History at Bohemian Grove Allison Robbins, University of Central Missouri Buffalo Bill’s Cowboy Band and the Creation of a Western Musical Identity Jonathan Verbeten, Texas Tech University “Trashy Music” in the Halls: A CulturalGeographical History of Music Making in San Francisco during the Gold Rush Years, 1849-1869 Mariana Whitmer, West Virginia University Musical Representations of Western Settlement for The Covered Wagon

Indigenous Power: A New History of Small Nations Location: Conference Room 10

Chair & Comment: Philip J. Deloria (Dakota descent), Harvard University Elizabeth Ellis (Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma), New York University Un-Settling French Colonial Place-Making: How the Indigenous Petites Nations Shaped French Settlement in the Lower Mississippi Valley Mandy Izadi, Harvard University Seminoles and Their Many Worlds in Florida and the Greater Caribbean Matthew Kruer, University of Chicago Susquehannock Social Memory and Turning Points in American History Julia Lewandoski, University of Southern California Land, Law, and Indigenous Survival in the Los Angeles Basin, 1834-1891

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Standing with Standing Rock: Voices from the #NoDAPL Movement: A Roundtable Discussion with the Authors Location: Ballroom E

Chair: Sandy Grande (Quechua), Connecticut College Jaskiran Dhillon, The New School Indigenous Youth Rise Up, Speak Out Teresa Montoya (Diné), New York University Settler Toxicities: From Standing Rock to the Indigenous Southwest

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Local, National, Foreign: The Pacific Worlds of the 19th-Century American West

Beyond Binaries, Beyond Regions: Indigenous and Black Intersections

Location: Conference Room 6

Location: Ballroom D

Chair: Alfred Peredo Flores (Chamoru), Harvey Mudd College

Chair: Tiya Miles, Harvard University Tiffany Hale (Afro-Cherokee Descent), Barnard College, Columbia University From Crisis to Empire: Black Reconstruction, Indian Warfare, and American National Futures Holly Miowak Guise (Iñupiaq), University of California, Irvine Aleut Internment and Gendered Indigenous Segregation: Intersections and Dissonance between the Archives and Elder Oral Histories Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lumbee Indians vs. the Ku Klux Klan

Ashley Riley Sousa, Middle Tennessee State University Kanaka Native Hawaiian Indians: Coalescence and Confusion in Central California, 1851-1917 Charlotte Hansen Terry, University of California, Davis To Make Saints: Concerns about Mormon Migrations from the Pacific in the 1890s Sasha Coles, University of California, Santa Barbara “The Whole World for a Market”: Great Basin Entrepreneurs and the European Silkworm Crisis of the 1860s Comment: Kariann Akemi Yokota, University of Colorado Denver

Comment: Christina Snyder, Penn State University

Owning the Means of Cultural Production: Democratizing and Disseminating the Culture of the Racial Freedom Struggle in the West

More Than One Way to Victory: The Different Routes of Latina/o Politics during the Civil Rights Movement

Location: Conference Room 7

Location: Conference Room 12

Chair & Comment: Louis Warren, University of California, Davis

Chair & Comment: Geraldo Cadava, Northwestern University

Alison Rose Jefferson, Independent Scholar and Heritage Conservation Consultant, Los Angeles, California African Americans, Leisure, and Performance of the California Dream in the Jim Crow Era Kerry Lauren Goldmann, University of Texas at Dallas Keepers of the Culture: How Black Theatres in the West Embodied and Shaped the National Black Power Movement Miguel Castañeda, University of California, San Diego Class Politics, Multiracialism, and Cultural Production in the Los Angeles Committee for Protection of the Foreign Born

Francisco Beltrán, University of California, Santa Barbara “The Wheel That Squeaks Gets the Grease”: Phil Saenz, the Mexican-American/Amigo Magazine, and Mexican-American Republican Civil Rights Activism in San Diego, California Josue Estrada, University of Washington Citizens with Foreign Tongues: A History of Latinx Voter Suppression in Washington State Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University Remembering Their Place in American Politics: Latinas, the Democratic Party, and the Civil Rights Movement in Texas

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Writing Your Second Book: A Roundtable Location: Conference Room 4

Chair: Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Sarah Eppler Janda, Cameron University Mark Fiege, Montana State University Jeannette Eileen Jones, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Bridget Barry, University of Nebraska Press Larin McLaughlin, University of Washington Press Comment and Discussion: Audience

Late 19th-Century American and Canadian Treaties with Indigenous People Location: Conference Room 6

Chair: William A. Dobak, U.S. Army Center of Military History (retired) Catharine Rohini Franklin, Texas Tech University Uncovering the Truth of the 1875 Allison Commission: Thítȟuŋwaŋ Testimony and the Theft of Ȟe Sápa Theodore (Ted) Binnema, University of Northern British Columbia Indian Treaties in Transnational and Comparative Perspective: The Blackfeet Treaties in the United States and Canada, 1855-1877 Robert Irwin, MacEwan University Dawes Severalty Act (1887) and Treaty No. 8 (1899) in Canada: What’s the Connection? Comment: Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso

Re-Envisioning the Table: New Approaches to Food Studies in the U.S. West Location: Conference Room 1

Chair & Comment: Tyina Steptoe, University of Arizona Jerome Kern Dotson, University of Arizona “You Call It Soul Food; I Call It Survival Food”: Diet, Hypertension, and Food Politics in Los Angeles Roy Vu, North Lake College Farm-to-Freedom: Vietnamese Americans and Their Home Gardens Meredith Abarca, University of Texas at El Paso El Paso’s Food Voices

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Water, Work, Farms, and Fitness: The Lower Colorado River Valley in the Early 20th Century Location: Conference Room 5

Chair & Comment: Clifford E. Trafzer, University of California, Riverside Traci Brynne Voyles, Loyola Marymount University A Sickly Sea: The Salton Sea and Disease Ecologies in the Colorado Desert Juliet Larkin-Gilmore, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Cows on the Colorado: Dairy, Cattle, and the Colorado River Reservation Kevin Whalen, University of Minnesota, Morris Agents of Change? The Politics of Sovereignty and Native American Labor Agents in the BIA, 19251933

To the Moon and Mars: Western Landscapes and the History of Space Exploration Location: Conference Room 7

Chair & Comment: William Katerberg, Calvin College Daniel Zizzamia, Harvard University The Martian Frontier and the American West Benjamin Thomas Carver, Northern Arizona University The Lunar West: Astronaut Training Sites and the Apollo Science Mission Kevin Schindler, Lowell Observatory One Giant Leap: Apollo Astronaut Training in the Grand Canyon Lois Rosson, University of California, Berkeley Seeing Is Believing: Chesley Bonestell and the Pre-Apollo Lunar Landscape

An Unholy Union: Southern History and Western History Location: Conference Room 3

Chair: James F. Brooks, University of California, Santa Barbara Megan Kate Nelson, Writer Wastelands: Desert, Swamps, and Military Landscapes Lance R. Blyth, NORAD and U.S. NORTHCOM “Which War?” Angela Pulley Hudson, Texas A&M University Indian Soldiers and the Freedmen’s Bureau? Stephen Kantrowitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison Indians and the 1866 Civil Rights Act Comment: Stacey Smith, Oregon State University

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Examining & Reclaiming the African American Experience during Westward Expansion

Hiding in Plain Sight? Finding Voices of Indigenous Children and Families in the Past, Advancing New Histories in the Present

Location: Conference Room 2

Chair: Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom (Nimiipuu lineage), University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Location: Conference Room 11

Kenneth M. Hamilton, Southern Methodist University Nicodemus, Kansas: The Origins and Development George Junne, University of Northern Colorado Dearfield, Colorado and the Black Farming Experience Timothy E. Nelson, University of New Mexico, Independent Historian Borders and Blackdom, New Mexico Ashley Adams, Mills College Nicodemus, Kansas and Representation in the National Parks Service Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom (Nimiipuu lineage), University of Nebraska-Lincoln Staking their Claim: Black Homesteaders in Nebraska

Amy Lonetree (Ho-Chunk), University of California, Santa Cruz Native American Child Removal, Indigenous Activism, and the Creation of an Archive Sherry Farrell-Racette (Métis), University of Regina “Dear Miss Davis”: Networks of Care in Rupert’s Land, 1856-1874 Allyson Donna Stevenson (Métis), University of Regina The Letters of Karen B. and Indigenous Girlhood on the Prairies: Indigenous Children’s Voices Disrupting Colonial Images in Adoption Advertising

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Teaching the North American West: The Chinese Experience in the West

Beyond the West: Regions, Networks, and New Histories of Early America

Location: Conference Room 10

Chair: Erin Millions, University of Winnipeg

Comment: Dian Million (Tanana), University of Washington

Chair: Sheila McManus, University of Lethbridge

Location: Conference Room 8

Danielle Gaudet, Cantwell-Sacred Heart of Mary High School

Chair: Alejandra Dubcovsky, University of California, Riverside

Taylor Still, St. Therese Catholic School, Denver, CO

Elizabeth Fenn, University of Colorado Boulder Robert Englebert, University of Saskatchewan

Joshua Dempsey, St. John the Baptist Catholic School, Milpitas, CA

Maria Esther Hammack, University of Texas, Austin

Beth Lew-Williams, Princeton University

David Igler, University of California, Irvine

Otherwise Invisible to the Eye: Putting the Native American West on the Map

Fighting for the Survival of Latinx Neighborhoods in the West and Midwest

Location: Conference Room 13

Location: Conference Room 9

Chair: Juliana Barr, Duke University

Chair: A.K. Sandoval-Strausz, Penn State University Gene Morales, University of Texas at El Paso Foundations of Inequality: Cemented Racial Borders in the Alamo City Felipe Hinojosa, Texas A&M University The Young Lords, McCormick Seminary, and the Fight against Urban Renewal in Chicago Sandra I. Enríquez, University of Missouri-Kansas City Fighting for Our Barrio’s Existence: CommunityControlled “Regeneration” in El Paso, Texas Lindsey Wieck, St. Mary’s University “Our Mission: No Eviction”: Latinx Culture and Gentrification in San Francisco

Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez, Texas State University Mapping Comanche Captivity Keith Thor Carlson, University of Saskatchewan Mapping Legends to Historicize Space: Settler Colonialism and the Re-Gendering of Indigenous Territoriality Stephen O’Neil, UltraSystems Environmental California's Great Transformation and the Early California Cultural Atlas Project John Lutz, University of Victoria “A city of the white race occupies its place”: The Vanishing Indian Quarter in Victoria, B.C., 18431911

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Comment and Discussion: Audience

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Neon Metropolis: Hal Rothman’s Las Vegas in the 21st Century

History Is Now: How Should Public Historians Respond to Current Events?

Location: Ballroom G

Sponsored by the WHA Public History Committee Location: Conference Room 12

Chair: Brian Frehner, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Chair: B. Erin Cole, Minnesota Historical Society Melanie Adams, Minnesota Historical Society

Michael W. Childers, Colorado State University

Cynthia Sanford, Clark County Museum

Michelle Follette Turk, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Wendy Barker, Ojai Valley Museum Jenny Hankinson, Littleton Museum

Jonathan Foster, Great Basin College

Two Spirit, Queer, Indigenous: An Urgent Interdisciplinary Conversation

Leisl Carr Childers, Colorado State University Eric Nystrom, Arizona State University

Sponsored by QuIT Caucus, Coalition for Western Women’s History

Christian Harrison, Clark County School District

Location: Ballroom D

Chair: Doug Kiel (Oneida Nation of Wisconsin), Northwestern University

Tips for the Academic Career, Part Two: Negotiating, Transitions, and Balance

Chris Finley (Colville Confederated Tribes), University of Southern California Two Spirt and Queer Indigenous Peoples Are Not Disposable: Practicing Self-Recognition and Decolonial Love in Our Communities Andrew Jolivette (Opelousa/Ishak Nation), University of California, San Diego Queer Indigenous Citizenship: Two-Spirit Belonging from the Classroom to the Community Daniel Winunwe Rivers (Choctaw), The Ohio State University Indigenous Women within Amazon Nation: Native American Lesbian Feminists, 1970-1980 Lisa M. Tatonetti, Kansas State University Indigenous Knowledges and Felt Theory: Trans* Narratives in Indigenous Literature

Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Race and the American West (CRAW) Location: Ballroom F

Chair: Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Honor Sachs, University of Colorado Boulder Ari Kelman, University of California, Davis Sarah Pearsall, Cambridge University Kelly Lytle Hernández, University of California, Los Angeles Philip J. Deloria (Dakota descent), Harvard University

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Landscapes of Violence and Sacredness: Native Reclaiming and Reinterpretation of Historic and Hallowed Spaces

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 2:00 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.

Sponsored by Westerner’s International

Practice, Research, and Reflection at the Smithsonian: Latino Museum Studies Program Alumni Roundtable

Location: Conference Room 14

Chair: Matthew Despain, Rose State College

Location: Conference Room 11

William Winslow Carroll, Austin Peay State University Shadows of Sand Creek: The Massacre as a Pivotal Moment in the American West Darren Parry (Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation), Tribal Chairman, Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation Voices from the Dust: A Shoshone Perspective of the Bear River Massacre Daryl Max Bear (Cheyenne and Arapaho), Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma Reclaiming and Decolonizing the Land: Modern Plains Tribe Consortiums and Bear Butte

Chair: Diana H. Rivera, Librarian Mayela Caro, University of California Riverside ¡Presente!: Latinx Presence at the Smithsonian Lorena Chambers, Chambers Lopez Strategies LLC Visual Imagery/Political Advertising: Electing U.S. Senators Catherine Cortez-Masto and Jacky Rosen José Centeno-Meléndez, University of Texas at Austin Documenting Histories of Washington, DC’s Barrio through the Latino DC History Project Priscila Hernandez, University of Texas at Austin We Were Always Here: Recategorizing Latinx Voices at the Archives of American Art Verónica Méndez Flores, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Haciendo Mucho con Poquito: Documenting Latina History Mark Anthony Ocegueda, California State University Sacramento Engaging Barrio Histories with Universities and the National Museum of American History Denise Michelle Sandoval, California State University, Northridge Bajito y Suavecito: Cruising through LP and Academia

Comment: Donald Fixico (Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Muscogee Creek and Seminole), Arizona State University

Immigrant Advocacy as a Matter of Law and History Location: Ballroom E

Chair & Comment: Julian Lim, Arizona State University Laura McClure St. John, The Florence Immigrant & Refugee Rights Project The Role of History in Contemporary Immigration Enforcement Michael Kagan, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Refining the Resistance Toolbox through Critical History Angela M. Banks, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University The Purpose of Membership Madeline Hsu, University of Texas at Austin Legislating Inequality: The Inherent Discriminations of Immigration Restriction Adam Goodman, University of Illinois at Chicago Using Legal Sources as a Lens into Recent Immigration History S. Deborah Kang, California State University San Marcos Thinking in Time: Immigration History and Public Policy in the Trump Era

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Comment: Gianna M. May Sanchez, University of Michigan & Diana Bossa Bastidas, Smithsonian Latino Center

Traditions of Activism in the American West Location: Conference Room 3

Chair & Comment: Lauren Araiza, Denison University Albert Broussard, Texas A&M University Are LGBT Rights Civil Rights?: African American LGBT Activism in Northern California Casey D. Nichols, California State University, East Bay The Road to a National Movement against Poverty: California Protest Traditions and the Poor People’s Campaign Maggie Elmore, University of Notre Dame Claiming Civil Rights: Mexican Immigrants and the Post-Brown US Supreme Court

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Glitter in the Dust: The Transformation of Nevada

Settler Colonialism in Transit: Settler and Indigenous Narratives of the Overland Trails

Sponsored by the Nevada Mining Association

Location: Conference Room 6

Location: Conference Room 2

Chair & Comment: Sarah Keyes, University of Nevada, Reno

Chair: Su Kim Chung, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Courtney Buchkoski, University of Oklahoma Settler Colonial Middle Figures on the Overland Trails Andrew Shaler, University of California, Riverside The Cherokee and Wyandot Companies on the Overland Trials, 1849-1850: Histories of Indigenous Migration and the Settler Gaze Christopher Clayton Smith, University of Oregon “Big tales of Indians ahead”: Overland Travel Narratives as Settler Colonial Discourse

Christopher M. MacMahon, University of California, Santa Barbara “All the Good Land”: Environmental Impacts of Early Nevada Settlement, 1842-1860 Phil Brigandi, Local Historian Startling the Uninitiated: Monetizing the Western Myth during the Southern Nevada Mining Boom Joseph Hall-Patton, University of New Mexico “Renegade Indians”: A Strain of Violence in Southern Nevada and its Parallels Mark P. Hall-Patton, Clark County Museum System The Bottle House: From Nevada Necessity to International Environmental Statement

Mapping Race: Racial Geographies and Spatial Power in California, 1830-1940

Comment: Abraham Hoffman, Los Angeles Valley College

Location: Conference Room 1

Violence, Race, and the (Neo)Liberal State

Brian Wright, Princeton University "Deliver Me from His Map and Maw": Cartography, Land Law, and the Search for Geometric Order in California, 1841-1869 Tahireh Hicks, University of Southern California Rural Refuge: The Persistence of Californio Identity in Southern California, 1850-1890 Miguel Giron, University of Texas at El Paso Rethinking the San Diego-Tijuana Border: Race in the Making of Urban Borderlands Spaces in the 20th Century Laura Gomez, University of California, Merced Beet-Sugar Plantations: Race, Gender, and the Ideal Family in California's Central Valley

Chair & Comment: David Torres-Rouff, University of California, Merced

Location: Conference Room 4

Chair & Comment: Jimmy Patiño, University of Minnesota Alina Ramirez Méndez, University of Washington The Dangerous Life of the Bracero: Violence in California’s Imperial Valley, 1942-1964 Jeannette Estruth, Bard College Health Care and Slow Violence in the Age of the Western Tax Revolt Jorge N. Leal, University of Southern California The 1992 Los Angeles Riots and the Emergence of the Deportation Regime

Diplomacy & Development in the Cold War West

Making the Crooked Places Straight: Intimate Discipline in Canadian and U.S. Wests

Location: Conference Room 5

Location: Conference Room 8

Chair & Comment: John M. Findlay, University of Washington

Chair: Susan Lee Johnson, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Iker Saitua, University of California, Riverside Bargaining Chip: The Recruitment of Basque Immigrant Labor in the Western Sheep Industry and the Franco Regime’s Quest for American Economic Aid in the Early Cold War Brian Froese, Canadian Mennonite University “Muscular Energy”: North American Evangelicals, Albertan Oil, and the Cold War Ernesto Sagás, Colorado State University NAFTA’s Legacy in the High Country: Mexican Migration to Colorado’s Western Slope

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Spencer Thomas Mann, University of California, Davis Bureaucracy as Kinship: The Allotmentality of Settler Colonial Marriage Policy Andrea Ens, University of Saskatchewan “Considering Such Factors as Sexual Adjustment”: The Intersection of Medical and Social Discourses on Homosexuality at Hollywood Hospital, 1955-1973 Comment: Regina Kunzel, Princeton University

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Twenty Thousand Roads: A Celebration of Virginia Scharff Location: Ballroom F

Chair: Erik Loomis, University of Rhode Island Karen S. Anderson, University of Arizona Richard White, Stanford University Stephen Aron, University of California, Los Angeles Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University Cathleen D. Cahill, Penn State University Erik Loomis, University of Rhode Island Jennifer McPherson, Purdue University Response: Virginia Scharff, University of New Mexico

Western Waterfronts: The Pacific Coast & the North American West Location: Conference Room 7

Chair & Comment: Edward Melillo, Amherst College Sean Fraga, Princeton University The Pacific Railroads and the Pacific World: American Expansion, Asian Trade, and Terraqueous Mobility Madison Heslop, University of Washington Rise and Fall: A Vertical History of Urban Waterfronts in the Pacific Northwest Jordan Keagle, University of Southern California Cold Cargo: The Natural Ice Trade in the Pacific West Kariann Akemi Yokota, University of Colorado Denver The Quest for “Soft Gold” and the “California Banknote”: The Politics of Commodities in the Transpacific World

Critical Perspectives on American Indian History and United States History Location: Ballroom D

Chair: Neil Foley, Southern Methodist University Melanie Yazzie (Navajo), University of New Mexico Capitalism and the Question of Violence: Rethinking Marxism and Feminism in Indigenous History K. Tsianina Lomawaima (Muscogee Creek, unenrolled), Arizona State University A View of History from Indigenous Studies Pekka J. Hämäläinen, Oxford University Legacies of the New Indian History Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, California State University, East Bay These Truths & Other Lies U.S. Historians Peddle

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Wrestling Over Rivers: The Impact of Droughts, Floods, War, Financial Crises, and Urban Growth on Water Allocation in the 20th-Century Borderlands Location: Conference Room 12

Chair & Comment: Douglas Sackman, University of Puget Sound Benny J. Andrés, Jr., University of North Carolina at Charlotte Watering the Borderlands: La Compañía de Terrenos y Aguas de la Baja California—Shaping the Lower Colorado River Region, 1895-1962 Todd Kerstetter, Texas Christian University What Happens in Fort Worth… Flows Downhill to Dallas: Water and Urban Development in Early 20th-Century North Texas Alicia M. Dewey, Biola University Drought and Falcon Dam: Transnational Conflict and Cooperation over Water in the 1950s Lower Rio Grande Valley

Roundtable: Making the Case for Latino Political History Location: Ballroom E

Chair: Jaime Sánchez, Jr., Princeton University Rosina Lozano, Princeton University Geraldo Cadava, Northwestern University Max Krochmal, Texas Christian University Benjamin Francis-Fallon, Western Carolina University Jaime Sánchez, Jr., Princeton University

“I Pity the Country”: Settler Surveillance and Indigenous Survivance in 20th-Century U.S. and Canadian Cities and Reservations Location: Conference Room 14

Chair & Comment: Jean O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), University of Minnesota Rebecca S. Wingo, University of Cincinnati Controlling the Crows: Adult Education and Resistance in a Surveillance State David W. Hugill, Carleton University Indigenous Urbanization Programs as Continental Strategy: "Knowledge-Sharing" Networks and Relocation Efforts in Postwar North America Douglas Miller, Oklahoma State University “Jails They All Know Me”: Settler Surveillance and Incarceration in Urban Indian Country

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Imagining Place: John Wesley Powell and the Colorado River Basin—Reflections upon the 1869 Colorado River Exploring Expedition’s Sesquicentennial

Navigating the Historical Profession: Different Career Options for Historians Sponsored by the WHA Public History Committee and the WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC)

Location: Conference Room 13

Location: Ballroom G

Chair: Jason Anthony Robison, University of Wyoming College of Law

Chair: Bryan Winston, Dartmouth College

Paul Hirt, Arizona State University Thinking Like a RePublic: Public Lands in the Colorado River Basin Patricia N. Limerick, University of Colorado Boulder Common Water Commonwealth: The Paradox of a Shared Resource Daniel Craig McCool, University of Utah “We Must Either Protect Him or Destroy Him” Rachel St. John, University of California, Davis Louis Warren, University of California, Davis Strange Resurrection: The Fall & Rise of John Wesley Powell

Robert Weaver, Southwest Collection, Texas Tech University Leah Cargin, Western History Association Claire White, The Mob Museum Jay L. Brigham, Morgan, Angel & Associates Rebecca A. Hunt, University of Colorado Denver Dawn Durante, University of Illinois Press

Reconceptualizing Northern Great Plains Histories with Indigenous Space and Place

Managing the Business of Leisure: Creating Infrastructures for Tourism and Recreation in the American West, 1890-1990

Location: Conference Room 9

Chair & Comment: Benjamin Hoy, University of Saskatchewan

Location: Conference Room 10

Chair & Comment: Peter J. Blodgett, Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Tyla Betke, Carleton University “Across the border in long knife country”: Solidifying Cree Territory in the United States in the Late 19th and Early 20th-Centuries Corey Wayne Yellow Boy (Oglala Sioux Tribe), Oglala Lakota College Leháŋl Lakȟóta oyáte kiŋ tókhel čhaŋgléška kiŋ ablézapi: How the 19th-Century and Contemporary Lakota Comprehend the Significance of the Circle in Relation to History and Culture Claire Thomson, University of Alberta Making Wood Mountain Part of Lakȟóta Tȟamákȟočhe: Expanding Lakota Country between Canada and the U.S., 1876 to 1930

Elizabeth Ann Watry, Historian “Relics from the Rockies”: From Native Tradition to Curio Trade Tamsen Hert, University of Wyoming What Happens in the National Parks Doesn't Stay in the National Parks Anne Gilbert Coleman, University of Notre Dame Outdoor Guides and Wilderness Politics Terence Young, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona “To Keep in Touch with the Real America”: The Wally Byam Foundation’s Trailer-Camping Program of National Discovery and Re-Discovery

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 8:30 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.

Lightning Talks: Condensed Doctoral Research Presentations

Railroads in Native America: Reflections on the 150th Anniversary of Transcontinental Construction

Location: Conference Room 7

Sponsored by the WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC) Chair: Jenni Tifft-Ochoa, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Location: Conference Room 11

Student Presenters:

Chair: Reed Robinson (Rosebud Sioux Tribe), National Park Service Manager

Alejandra Christiana Garza, University of Texas at Austin

Alessandra Link, Indiana University-Southeast

Doris Morgan Rueda, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Desrie Valdez (Navajo), Union Pacific Railroad

Jen Andrella, Michigan State University

Jennifer Valadez, Council of Native American Heritage, Union Pacific Railroad

Amanda Katz, Carnegie Mellon University John Legg, Virginia Tech

Reed Robinson (Rosebud Sioux Tribe), National Park Service Manager

Nicole Batten, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Paige Figanbaum, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Laura Crossley, George Mason University

Native American Women and Community Organizing in the 20th Century

Comment:

Location: Conference Room 5

Sandra I. Enríquez, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Chair & Comment: Cathleen D. Cahill, Penn State University

María Raquél Casas, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Tamara Venit-Shelton, Claremont McKenna College

Amanda J. Johnson, Oklahoma State University "The Women's Dance": Native Sovereignty and the Female Body in the Red Power Era Sasha Maria Suarez (White Earth Ojibwe descendancy), University of Minnesota Indigenous Incarceration, Indigenous Women, and Prison Programming in 20th-Century Minnesota Brooke Linsenbardt, Texas A&M University “For Cheyenne River, By Cheyenne River”: History, Leadership, and Community Organizing of the Cheyenne River Youth Project

David D. Vail, University of Nebraska at Kearney Sarah Keyes, University of Nevada, Reno

Courage and Change in the Fight against Sexual Harassment in the Academy Sponsored by the WHA Committee on Assault Response and Educational Strategies (CARES) Location: Ballroom F

Chair: Erika Pérez, University of Arizona

Matthew Fockler, Augustana College Two-Mississippi: Repeat Photography as Public History William Wyckoff, Montana State University Rephotographing Arizona: Riding Shotgun with Norman Wallace Michael Amundson, Northern Arizona University On the Trail in Western National Parks: Rephotographing Clyde A. McCoy’s 1940 Color Stereo Images in Digital 3D

Karen J. Leong, Arizona State University What Happened in Vegas, and What Happens Now José M. Alamillo, California State University Channel Islands Dismantling Toxic Masculinity among Men of Color at a Hispanic Serving Institution Elizabeth Hutchison, University of New Mexico Building Institutional Courage in Our Universities: Fighting Sexual Harassment Alesha Durfee, Arizona State University Sexual Violence in Academia: Fostering Structural Analyses and Solutions Matthew Basso, University of Utah Student Perspectives on Masculinity and Sexual Violence

Comment: Mark Klett, Arizona State University

Comment: Brianna Theobald, University of Rochester

Rephotographing the American West Location: Conference Room 6

Chair: Tamera Lenz Muente, Taft Museum of Art

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“The Boiler Room for the Nation”: When Western Coal Doesn’t Stay in the West

The Farthest West: Gender, Indigeneity and Settler Colonial Logics in Transpacific U.S.- Philippines History

Location: Conference Room 13

Location: Conference Room 10

Chair & Comment: Andrew Needham, New York University

Chair & Comment: Rebecca Tinio McKenna, University of Notre Dame

Daniel Cumming, New York University Greening the Rust: Western Coal Frontiers and the Remaking of Baltimore’s Post-Industrial Hinterlands Trish Kahle, University of Chicago Wheeling Power: Rethinking the 1977-78 “National” Coal Strike Ryan Driskell Tate, Rutgers University Coal-Fired Federalism: The Western Coalfields and the Rise of the New Right

Adrian De Leon, University of Southern California From Sea to Strawberry Hill: Wartime Labor and Filipino-Coast Salish Intimacies in a Puget Sound Community Tessa Marie Winkelmann University of Nevada, Las Vegas “A Chance to Work out Their Own Salvations:” Interracial Relations and Settler Colonialism in the Philippines Christine Noelle Peralta, Indiana University Tropical Womanhood: Preserving Whiteness and Youthful Bodies in American Summer Camps of the Philippines

Hidden in the Fields: Untold Histories of Agricultural Labor in the West and Beyond Location: Conference Room 12

Roundtable: It's a Gamble: Luck, Chance, and Failure as a Historian

Chair & Comment: Lori Flores, Stony Brook University Julia Ornelas-Higdon, California State University Channel Islands Colonial Grapes, Sacramental Wines: Indian Labor in the California Missions Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez, Columbia University Migrants in the Making: Agricultural Child Labor Migration in the West and the Limits of Citizenship, 1938-1965 Christian Paiz, University of California, Berkeley “Santo Campesino”: On the United Farm Worker Movements' National Grape Boycott and the Fantasy of White Allies

Location: Conference Room 8

Chair & Comment: Michael J. Lansing, Augsburg University Ryan Hall, Colgate University It’s Not Your Fault!: Confronting the Job Market’s “Experience” Paradox for New Ph.D.’s Jason A. Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha Failure as a Method of Success Anne F. Hyde, University of Oklahoma An Exercise in Surviving Failure: Writing, Reviewing, Revising, and Editing Journal Articles Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln A CV of Failures Shannon Murray, Calgary Stampede The Big F: Redefining Failure in the Academy Rebecca S. Wingo, University of Cincinnati I’m a Failure, Too

Global Perspectives from the Unseen West: Indigenous Lenses in Higher Education Location: Conference Room 9

Chair: Dawn Pichon Barron (Choctaw/Chowanoke), The Evergreen State College Corey Larson, The Evergreen State College Carmen Hoover, The Evergreen State College

Westworlds: Western History in Video Games and Popular Media

Toby Melissa Sawyer (Chickasaw), The Evergreen State College

Chair: Khalil Anthony Johnson, Wesleyan University

Location: Ballroom D

Kendra Aguilar (Luiseno), The Evergreen State College

Josh Reid (Snohomish), University of Washington

Gary W. Arthur, The Evergreen State College

Nora Khan, Rhode Island School of Design

Comment: Margaret Connell-Szasz, University of New Mexico

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Khalil Anthony Johnson, Wesleyan University Jamin Warren, Twofivesix

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Placemaking and Wayfinding: Signaling the Past through Public History

Russian Colonialism in California: Pasts and Presents

Location: Conference Room 14

Location: Conference Room 4

Chair: Rebekah Crowe, Wayland Baptist University

Chair: Jeffrey Glover, Loyola University Chicago

Laura Dominguez, University of Southern California Courtyard Sisters: Sustaining Los Angeles’ Progressive Landscape Nicole Johnson, St. Mary’s University A Year of Remembrance Recalled Christina Lake, Texas A&M University If You [Re]Build It, They Will Come: Preserving the Fred Harvey Legacy in Las Vegas, New Mexico Gianna M. May Sanchez, University of Michigan Cultural Interpretation, Medical Practice, and Memorialization of Curandera Maclovia Sanchez de Zamora Sara Ramirez & Shine Trabucco, St. Mary’s University Returning to Roots: The History of Adobe in San Antonio

Lauren Peters (Adaagux Tribe of King Cove, Alaska), Independent Historian Russian Colonization: An Unangax^ perspective Jean Pfaelzer, University of Delaware A Slave Triangle in the Pacific Michael Buse, University of British Columbia Remembering Fort Ross: Fiction, Preservation, and the Construction of Settler Belonging at Metini/Fort Ross Nina Bogdan, University of Arizona Fort Ross as a Site of Memory

Comment: B. Erin Cole, Minnesota Historical Society

Location: Conference Room 3

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Public Histories of the Borderlands: A Showcase of Recent Projects Chair: Peter A. Kopp, University of Colorado Denver

Beyond the Southwest Borderlands: Mexican and Latinx Migrants Outside the West during the 20th Century

Robert Diaz, University of Texas at El Paso Gershom’s Music in the Borderland: The Jewish Immigrant Community and Musical Performance in El Paso, Texas Josue Estrada, University of Washington Mapping the Chicanx Movement: A Digital Geographic History Project Norma Chairez, Las Cruces Museum System The Murals of Las Cruces Project: Preservation and Community Erica Marin, University of Texas at El Paso La Frontera: A Century of Division and Resistance Melanie Reimann, Washington State University Survival of Native Communities Across the 49th Parallel: Cross-Border Movements of Members of the Confederated Colville Tribes and the Syilx/Okanagan Nation Cynthia Renteria, University of Texas at El Paso Public History as Cultural Activism: Fighting Demolition and Displacement Jesus Vidrio, Independent Scholar Lucha Libre and Intergenerational Exchange in El Paso/Juarez Carolyn Williams, New Mexico State University Preserving Duranguito and the Chinese Laundromat

Location: Ballroom G

Chair: Yuridia Ramírez, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Miami University Dustin Cohan, University of Wisconsin-Madison Deconstructing Migration: Chicanx Advocacy, Bilingual Education, and Work in Central Wisconsin, 1971-1974 Juan Ignacio Mora, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Bracero Justice: Midwest Braceros, Mexican Consuls in Texas, and La Prensa Carolina Ortega, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Navigating the Watery Borderlands: Steamships, Oil Tankers, and Mexican Migrants in New York City, 1925-1932 Bryan Winston, Dartmouth College A Racial Borderlands?: Mexican Migrants Navigating Mestizaje and White Supremacy in the Lower Midwest, 1910 to 1950 Comment and Discussion: Audience

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Transpacific Archaeology and History: Chinese Immigrant and Chinese American Communities in the North American West

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M.

Location: Conference Room 8

An Unholy Union of West and South: A Pre-Circulated Papers Workshop

Chair: Tamara Venit-Shelton, Claremont McKenna College

Location: Ballroom E

Chelsea Rose, Southern Oregon University The Oregon Chinese Diaspora Project Chris Merritt, Utah Division of State History Chinese Railroad Worker Archaeology in Montana and Utah Sarah Heffner, PAR Environmental Services, Inc. Chinese American Medicine on the Western Frontier: A Material Culture Perspective Renae Campbell, University of Idaho, Moscow When Old Boston was in the Basin: Ongoing Historical and Archaeological Research on Chinese Mining Sites in Southern Idaho’s Boise Basin

Session Time: 10:30 A.M. – 1:00 P.M. The Western Historical Quarterly and the Journal of the Civil War Era are planning two special joint issues to highlight the scholarly energy and innovation in comparing Western History and Southern history. We will have drafts of 8-10 essays that we will workshop at the WHA. This will be open to any conference attendee willing to read the papers, available by request from the editors.

Comment: Judith Giesberg, Villanova University Stacey Smith, Oregon State University James F. Brooks, University of California, Santa Barbara Anne F. Hyde, University of Oklahoma

Comment: K. Ian Shin, University of Michigan

A Western Church in a Global Setting: Decentering and Re-Centering Mormonism

Challenging Settler Fantasies: New Directions in California Indian Studies

Sponsored by the Mormon History Association

Location: Conference Room 5

Location: Conference Room 3

Chair & Comment: Lisbeth Haas, University of California, Santa Cruz

Chair: Charlotte Hansen Terry, University of California, Davis

Martin Rizzo, University of California, Riverside Fausta & Sarafina: Indigenous Women in Positions of Power within the California Missions Stephanie Lumsden (Hoopa Valley Tribe), University of California, Los Angeles Dying or Dangerous: The California Indian in the Settler Imaginary Caitlin Keliiaa (Yerington Paiute and Washoe), University of California, Berkeley Outing Families and Indian Children: The Reality of Live-in Labor Amanda K. Wixon (Chickasaw), Sherman Indian Museum, University of California, Riverside “Fixing Them Up”: Civilizing Native Youth at Sherman Institute

Ignacio M. Garcia, Brigham Young University Crossing Boundaries & Forming New Ones: Eduardo Balderas and the Transnational Nature of his Translations & Blessings Brian Q. Cannon, Brigham Young University President David O. McKay and the Global Church Po Nien (Felipe) Chou, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Translating the Mongolian Book of Mormon: From Salt Lake City to Ulaanbaatar Petra N. Chou, Alpine School District Early Missionary Efforts in Hong Kong by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: 18521955

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Histories of Education Across Western Borders

Women’s Rights in the Progressive Era West

Location: Conference Room 4

Location: Conference Room 14

Chair & Comment: Khalil Anthony Johnson, Wesleyan University

Chair & Comment: Cynthia Prescott, University of North Dakota

Shawn W. Brackett, University of Calgary Paths to Normal: Uncovering Different Kinds of Borders and Boundaries in the History of Education Brendan Shanahan, Yale University Contesting Citizenship Rights in the West: Immigrant Teachers and the Right to Work, 19141945 Shannon Kelly McConnell, University of Saskatchewan “The Children No One Else Wanted”: The Woodlands School, 1950-1974

Wyatt James Bouma, University of Wyoming Access to Religion in Progressive Era Western Prisons: The Story of the First Female Prison Chaplain in the United States Jennifer Bridges, Grayson College Prostitution, Progressives, and Peril: How the Amalgamation of Prostitution and Promiscuity during the Progressive Era Led to Nullification of Women’s Rights in Texas Emily B. Kaliel, University of Guelph “To Discover,” “To Educate,” “To Correct”: The Alberta District-Nursing Program’s Adaptation of the National Discourse of Scientific Motherhood, 1919-1945

Indigenizing Relocation: Challenging Totality of Native Dispossession in the Trans-Mississippi West

Teaching the North American West: Japanese Internment

Location: Conference Room 7

Chair: Christina Snyder, Penn State University;

Location: Conference Room 6

Chantal Walker, University of California, Davis Piyahu Nadu—Land of Flowing Waters: The Water Transfer from Owens Valley to Los Angeles Alika Bourgette (Native Hawaiian (Kānaka Maoli)), University of Washington Reclaiming Piʻinaio: The Ala Wai Canal and Community Resilience in Kālia, Waikīkī, 19061924 Anthony Soliman, University of Connecticut, Storrs Making a Native Place in Indian Territory: Securing Cherokee Land Ownership in Eastern Oklahoma

Chair: Brian S Collier, University of Notre Dame Adriana Marrero, Notre Dame San Jose High School, San Jose, CA Laura Fenerty, Holy Trinity School, Los Angeles, CA Sam Joseph Jezak, Pinewood School Melody M. Miyamoto Walters, Collin College

Rethinking Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in Europe, 1887–1890

Comment: Andrew Fisher, College of William and Mary

Location: Conference Room 9

Co-Chairs: Emily C. Burns, Auburn University Stefanie Schäfer, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg

Institutional Interventions: American Indian Education, Medicine, and Labor

Sharon E. Cogdill. St. Cloud State University London’s Social World at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in London, 1887 Emily L. Voelker, Vassar College Conjuring/Troubling Imagined Geographies: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in Performance & Photography, Paris 1889 Emily C. Burns, Auburn University Gender Bending and the American West: Rosa Bonheur and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Stefanie Schäfer, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Between “Flintenweib” and “Fräuleinwunder”: Annie Oakley and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in Germany and Austria

Location: Conference Room 13

Chair & Comment: Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert (Hopi), University of Arizona K. Tsianina Lomawaima (Muscogee Creek, unenrolled), Arizona State University The Night of the Japanese Lanterns: Trixing Story as Theory at Chilocco Indian School Susan Burch, Middlebury College Disorderly Histories: American Indian Families and Institutionalization, 1900-2015 Sarah Ashley Whitt (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma), University of California, Berkeley Hoe Handle Medicine: Indianness as Illness and Labor as Panacea at Carlisle

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Comment and Discussion: Audience

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Hidden in Plain Sight: Uniting History and Archaeology to Trace the Comanche Empire through Rock, Record, Tradition, and Landscape

Prepping for the Interview

Location: Conference Room 12

Enjoy “coffee and conversation” while discussing job interview tips and advice from senior mentors!

Sponsored by the WHA Graduate Student Caucus (WHA-GSC) Location: Conference Room 11

Chair: Elizabeth Ellis (Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma), New York University

Chair: Christina Lake, Texas A&M University

Juliana Barr, Duke University Severin Fowles, Barnard College

Mentors: Natalie Mendoza, SMU Clements Center for Southwest Studies and University of Colorado Boulder

Pekka J. Hämäläinen, Oxford University

Chantal Rodríguez, University of Maryland

Jimmy Arterberry (Comanche), Comanche Nation

Jeffrey P. Shepherd, University of Texas at El Paso

Regulating the Recent West: Energy, Environment, and Federal Regulation in the Late 20th-Century American West

Amy Scott, Bradley University Matthew Basso, University of Utah

Location: Conference Room 10

Elizabeth Jameson, University of Calgary

Chair: Amanda Hendrix-Komoto, Montana State University

Elise Boxer (Dakota), University of South Dakota Brian Luna Lucero, Columbia University

Jennifer Dunn, Montana State University Superfund: An Unwelcome Necessity in Libby, Montana Keith Woodhouse, Northwestern University Divining a Desert’s Future: The California Desert Conservation Area Brian Leech, Augustana College No Country for Slow Men: Energy, Safety, and the American West’s Fight against the National Maximum Speed Limit in the 1970s and 1980s

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 1:45 P.M. – 3:15 P.M. All That Glitters: Indigenous Property, Knowledge Production, and the Politics of Colonial Extraction in the 20th Century Southwest Location: Conference Room 13

Comment: Karen Merrill, Williams College

Chair: Beth Rose Middleton Manning, University of California, Davis

Keeping the Songs Alive: A Roundtable for Preserving Southern Paiute Salt Songs

Adam Fulton Johnson, University of Michigan Clandestine Relationships: Secrets and Values at the Heart of the Ethnographic Data Accumulation Julia Sizek, University of California, Berkeley Checkerboarded: In/Visibilities of Railroading and Native American Histories in Southeastern California Taylor Rose, Yale University “A Real Community of Spirit”: Nuclear Colonialism, Treaty Land Claims, and Planetary Alliances at the Nevada Test Site Paul Berne Burow, Yale University Indigenous Sovereignty, Knowledge Politics, and the Rise of Cultural Resource Management in the Western Great Basin

Location: Ballroom G

Chair: Clifford E. Trafzer, Professor, University of California, Riverside Participants: Southern Paiute Men and Women Singers, including Chemehuevi Tribal elder Matthew Hanks Leivas (Southern Paiute) and his siblings. Salt Songs are a shared song complex of all Southern Paiute Bands, including the Las Vegas Paiute and those of the Great Basin region surrounding Las Vegas. This session will bring together 8-10 Southern Paiute men and women singers to share a discussion with the audience about the vitality, past and present, of Salt Songs. They will also discuss the decade-old intertribal preservation effort, the “Salt Song Project.”

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Comment and Discussion: Audience

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Behind the Scenes: Historical Archaeology of the Service Industry in the American West

Gender, Power, and Urban Practice in and Beyond Western History

Location: Conference Room 5

Location: Conference Room 10

Chair: Amanda Bielmann, Basque Museum and Cultural Center

Chair & Comment: Traci Brynne Voyles, Loyola Marymount University

Katrina C.L. Eichner, University of Idaho Laundry, Labor, and Liminality: Black Women as Cultural Brokers in the Late 19th-Century Western Frontier Jenn Ogborne, Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest Commensality and Managerial Capitalism: Company Boardinghouses in Coloma, Montana Molly Elizabeth Swords, University of Idaho Creating Space and Place: The Pend d’Oreille Hotel in Sandpoint, Idaho

Isaiah Ellis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill The Spirit of Modernism in a West of Cities: Religion, Gender, and Architecture Beyond the Skyscraper, 1886-1924 Emma Z. Rothberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill “Denver Awaits Her Guests”: Civic Power and the 1895 Festival of Mountain and Plain Elizabeth Grennan Browning, Indiana University Bloomington Below 2 Feet: Public Housing and Lead Contamination in East Chicago, Indiana Sarah Alisabeth Fox, University of British Columbia “Having with Our Own Eyes Seen Tragedy Strike”: Gender, Power, and Place in Great Basin Downwind Testimonies, 1955-1992

Comment and Discussion: Audience

Natural Soldiers: The United States Army, Race, and Indigeneity from the Indian Wars to World War I Location: Conference Room 8

Chair: Sherry L. Smith, Southern Methodist University

Borders of Legality in the North American West

Stefan Aune, University of Michigan Authoring Empire: Charting Imperial Continuities through the Writing of General Charles King Amy Kohout, Colorado College Field Books and Army Ledgers: Natural History and Imperial Control during the Apache Campaigns David Krueger, United States Military Academy “Calling heavily upon the colored race”: The United States Army and Colonial Ethnic Forces, 1891-1913

Location: Conference Room 4

Chair & Comment: Alexandra (Sasha) Harmon, University of Washington Emilie Connolly, Dartmouth Society of Fellows The Great Robbery: Corruption in the 19thCentury Indian Affairs Department Benjamin Hoy, University of Saskatchewan Outsourced Violence and Extra-Legal Control along the 49th Parallel Allison Powers Useche, SMU Clements Center for Southwest Studies and Texas Tech University “The Famous Gringo Justice”: International Law and State Violence in the American West

Comment: Boyd Cothran, York University

Fish, Fowl, and Roping Bears: Human-Animal Relations in Commerce and Recreation Location: Conference Room 7

Environmental History Perspectives on California Greenin'

Chair: James W. Martin, Montana State University

Location: Conference Room 6

Jeffrey Nichols, Westminster College Making and Protecting Ducks Susan Nance, University of Guelph Wild Animals at the Rodeo: Experimental Cowboy Tournament Events in the West James W. Martin, Montana State University "A Trade and Not a Pastime": North Idaho's Commercial Fishery, 1900-1980

Chair: Brinda Sarathy, Pitzer College Shelley Alden Brooks, University of California, Davis Char Miller, Pomona College Teresa Sabol Spezio, Pitzer College Comment: David Vogel, University of California, Berkeley

Comment: Jason M. Colby, University of Victoria

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WHA 2019 – LAS VEGAS

Native Resistance and the Politics of Removal

Imperial Connections across the Pacific West

Location: Conference Room 9

Location: Conference Room 14

Chair & Comment: Julie L. Reed (Cherokee Nation), Penn State University

Chair & Comment: Abigail Margaret Markwyn, Carroll University

Austin Stewart, Lehigh University “The United States became anxious to push us further west”: Western Cherokees, Indian Territory, and the Formation of U.S. National Space in Arkansas, 1810-1830 Libby Rose Tronnes, Bradley University Protectors of the Corn Moon: How the Rock River Ho-Chunks Hid 1,200 Fugitive Indians & Mired U.S. Troops during the 1832 Black Hawk War John R. Legg, Virginia Tech Another Trail of Tears: A New Refugeedom, Dakota Diaspora, and the Aftermath of the U.S.Dakota War of 1862 James Kopaczewski, Temple University “The System is Rotten, the System is False”: The Castillo de San Marcos and the End of Grant's Peace Policy

Andrea Geiger, Simon Fraser University The Modern and the 'Savage': Positioning Imperial Japan and Ainu Moshir at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904 Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame “The Mountains are High and the Emperor is Far Away”: Montana’s Chinese & the Anti-American Boycott of 1905 Roneva Keel, University of Washington Contesting Mobility: The Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ Association and U.S. Imperialism in the Philippines, 1906-1916

Following the Manito Trail: Migration and Place Making/Marking beyond the Nuevomexicano Homeland Location: Conference Room 3

Chair & Comment: Vanessa Fonseca Chávez, Arizona State University Levi Romero, University of New Mexico Mi Querido Ranchito: Memory and Place Making Trisha Venisa-Alicia Martinez, University of New Mexico Land-Based Consciousness as Querencia Troy Lovata, University of New Mexico Arborglyphs as Place Marking

The Cultural Influence of Route 66 Outside the American West Location: Conference Room 11

Chair & Comment: Susan Croce Kelly, Author & Editor Peter J. Blodgett, Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens Imagining the Mother Road: Creating the Cultural Identity of Route 66 T. Lindsay Baker, Independent Scholar Eating Up Route 66: The Reach of Mother Road Fare outside the American West Frank Norris, National Park Service (retired) International Perspectives on Route 66

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WHA 2019 – LAS VEGAS

Gender and Hidden Pasts: Spanish-Mexican and Mexican Women’s Strategic Use of Space, Land, Networks, and Identity in the Greater Southwest

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 3:30 P.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sites of Survivance: Indian Allotments, Attempted Colonialism, and Resistance

Location: Conference Room 10

Location: Conference Room 12

Chair: Margie Brown-Coronel, California State University, Fullerton

Chair & Comment: William Bauer (Round Valley Indian Tribes), University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Karen R. Roybal, Colorado College Before the West Was “Won”: Gender, Genocide, and Dispossession in Northern California Yvette J. Saavedra, University of Oregon Living La Mala Vida: Transgressive Femininities, Morality, and Nationalism in Los Angeles, 18101850 Katherine Sarah Massoth, University of Louisville In Her Own Name: Spanish-Mexican Women and Married Women’s Property Rights in Territorial Arizona and New Mexico Vanessa Fonseca Chávez, Arizona State University We Were Always Chicanas: Feminist Activism and Archives in Rural Wyoming

Beth Rose Middleton Manning, University of California, Davis Melany Johnson (Mountain Maidu, Pit River), Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Susanville Indian Rancheria Reclaiming Maidu Land Deserea R. Langley (Paiute and Shoshone, Susanville Indian Rancheria), University of California, Davis Shared Regions and Shared Identities: Susanville Indians Land Reclamation and Cultural Revitalization Kristin Ruppel, Montana State University Jill Falcon Mackin (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe), Montana State University Micaela Young, Montana State University Loren BirdRattler (Blackfeet/Piikani), Blackfeet Nation Christopher J. Carter, Montana State University & Nunataq, Inc. Kim Paul (Blackfeet/Piikani), Piikani Lodge Health Institute Fractionation, Consolidation, and Indigenous Planning Responses in Piikani (Blackfeet) Country

Comment: María Raquél Casas, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

“Like Fire in the Dry Grass”: From the Salmon River Mission Failure of the 1850s to the Northwestern Shoshone Conversions of the 1870s Sponsored by the Mormon History Association Location: Conference Room 3

Latinx California XIX: Beyond Canonical Names

Chair: Andrea Radke-Moss, Brigham Young University–Idaho

Location: Conference Room 8

Chair: Covadonga Lamar Prieto, University of California, Riverside

Scott R. Christensen, LDS Church History Department Devan Jensen, Brigham Young University George Washington Hill’s and Dimick Huntington’s Missions to Native Americans Andrea Radke-Moss, Brigham Young University-Idaho “The Squaw Not Wishing to Be Baptized at That Time”: George Washington Hill and Shoshone Female Agency in Mormon Missionizing, 1855– 1875 Darren Parry (Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation), Tribal Chairman, Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation What Chief Sagwitch’s Conversion Means to My People

Covadonga Lamar Prieto, University of California, Riverside Mocking Mofras: Francisco Sánchez and His Satire against French Imperialism Damian Bacich, San José State University Unconquered: A Californiana in Three Californias Catherine Fountain, Appalachian State University Zelia Nuttall, between California and Mexico, between Home and the World Miriam Villazón Valbuena, University of California, Riverside Daughters and Granddaughters of Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo Comment and Discussion: Audience

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Comment and Discussion: Audience

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WHA 2019 – LAS VEGAS

After the Middle Ground: The Anishinaabeg in the 19th Century

Creation, Circulation, and Destruction of Knowledge in the Spanish Borderlands

Location: Conference Room 7

Location: Conference Room 5

Chair & Comment: C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa, George Mason University

Chair: Steven W. Hackel, University of California, Riverside

Katie Lantz, University of Virginia Secrecy and Sovereignty Justin M. Carroll, Indiana University East Tshusick’s Journey to Washington D.C.: Relative Mobility and the Great Lakes Fur Trade Willa Hammitt Brown, Harvard University Itinerancy and the Seasonal Round

Jay T. Harrison, Hood College Later Franciscan Missions and Natural History: Describing and Classifying Mission Territories in Northern New Spain, 1683-1798 Rodrigo Moreno, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (Chile) Missions in Strategic Frontiers: Jesuits and Franciscans in Chiloé and Patagonia in the 18th Century Kyle Jackson, University of California, Berkeley Circuitous Accounts: The Informational Ecosystem of New Orleans during the Spanish-American Independence Wars David Rex, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez (Chile) An Enlightened Scientist: Jerónimo Boscana, Franciscan Missions, and California Ethnography

The Cowboy Life: From the Ranch to Global Icon Location: Conference Room 9

Chair: Patricia Loughlin, University of Central Oklahoma Diane McKenzie, University of Lethbridge Nostalgia, Romantic Ideals, Legacy, and Generational Transfer of the Family Farm Kerri Keller Clement, University of Colorado Boulder Counting Cows and Hawking Horses: Digital History and Transnational Cattle Ranching Networks in Montana, 1860-1915 Frank Whitehead, University of Arizona Exporting Cowboy Contests: American Rodeo in 20th-Century Europe Tracey Hanshew, Washington State University Superstar Cowgirl 1882-2012: Entertainment Industry’s Distortion of the Cowgirl Image Robbin Denise Davis, Oklahoma Historical Society Exploring the International and Domestic Adoption of Western Wear: Cultural Appropriation vs. Appreciation

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Comment and Discussion: Audience

Vigilantism, War, and Terror: Violence in the Antebellum American West Location: Conference Room 4

Chair & Comment: Amy S. Greenberg, Penn State University Brady G. Winslow, Independent Historian Vigilantism & Community Hysteria: The Murder of the Mormon Prophet Joseph Smith & Its Aftermath Kay Wright Lewis, Howard University Through the Glass More Deeply: African American Ideas about Race War in California Pearl T. Ponce, Ithaca College Terror and the Territories of the 1850s

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WHA 2019 – LAS VEGAS

Black/Brown Sounds: Exploring Connections in Chicanx and African American Music

Geographies of Resistance: Fugitives, Slaves, and American Indians in the 19th-Century West and Pacific

Location: Conference Room 11

Location: Conference Room 6

Chair & Comment: Jason Dean Mellard, Texas State University

Chair & Comment: Samuel Truett, University of New Mexico

Deb R. Vargas, Rutgers University Freddy Fender’s Brown Soul Tyina Steptoe, University of Arizona “Brown Eyed Handsome Man”: Race, Sex, and Early Rock ’n’ Roll Alex La Rotta, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University ¿Qué Onda, México?: Transnational Perspectives on Soul and Rock & Roll Marco Antonio Cervantes, University of Texas at San Antonio Sonic Convergences on the Third Coast: The Black and Brown Sounds of The Suffers, Brownout, and Third Root

Jeremy Zallen, Lafayette College Saltwater Marronage: Making the Pacific into a Fugitive Geography Alice Lucile Baumgartner, University of Southern California Minerva: A Fugitive Slave in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands Joshua Specht, Monash University The Politics of Cattle Theft: Property and Power in the Late 19th-Century American Southwest

Empire, Faith, and Family in the Pacific World, 1860 - 1960 Location: Conference Room 13

Religion and the Making and Remembering of Western Spaces

Chair: Jennifer Dunn, Montana State University

Location: Conference Room 14

Steven S. Maughan, College of Idaho Co-opting Patriarchy: Women, High Church Missions, Hawai‘i, and the Launch of the Ladies’ Association of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 1860-1870 Amanda Hendrix-Komoto, Montana State University Sacraments and Ordinances: Disciplining Shoshone and Native Hawaiian Families in the 19th and 20th Centuries Joy Schulz, Metropolitan Community College Fragile Friendships: Native Scholars and American Teachers in the Republic of Hawai‘i

Chair & Comment: Brett Hendrickson, Lafayette College Brennan Keegan, Randolph College Claiming Places of Sovereignty on the Wind River Indian Reservation Danae Jacobson, Colby College How Nuns Made Place: Story-telling, Commemoration, and Erasures Sarah Koenig, Ramapo College of New Jersey Whitman’s Bones: Martyrs, Monuments, and Contested Spaces in the Pacific Northwest

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Comment: Hokulani Aikau, University of Utah

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A special thanks to Sarah Cargin and Sula Photography for capturing our time in San Antonio 2018.  

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WHA BOOK EXHIBITS Adam Matthew Digital Arizona Historical Society Athabasca University Press Center for the Study of the American West The Church Historian's Press Coalition for Western Women's History (CWWH) Montana Historical Society Mormon History Association New Mexico Historical Review North Dakota State University Press Oregon State University Press South Dakota Historical Society Press Southern Nevada Conservancy Texas A&M University Press Texas Tech University Press University of Arizona Press University of California Press University of Massachusetts Press University of Nebraska Press University of Nevada Press University of New Mexico Press University of North Carolina Press University of Oklahoma Press University of Texas Press University of Washington Press University Press of Colorado University Press of Kansas Waveland Press Western History Association  Westerners International William G. Pomeroy Foundation William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies Yale University Press

The WHA Book Exhibit is located in Ballroom A

Exhibit Hours: Thursday & Friday: 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. Saturday: 8:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M. #WHA2019

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WHA INDEX OF ADS ABC-CLIO...................................................................................... 83 Beinecke Library.......................................................................... 69 Center of the American West................................................... 64 Center for Great Plains Studies................................................ Back The Church Historian's Press................................................... 85 Coalition for Western Women's History.............................. 68 The Helmerich Center for American Research.................. 66 WHA Graduate Student Caucus ............................................. 65 Immigration and Ethnic History Society.............................. 70 Montana Historical Society....................................................... 80 Mormon History Association................................................... 90 Museum of the Fur Trade......................................................... 83 New Mexico Historical Review...................................................... 62 Oregon Historical Society.......................................................... 70 Pennsylvania State University - History Department....... 77 South Dakota Historical Society Press................................... 84 Southern Nevada Conservancy................................................ 78 TesOro Cultural Center.............................................................. 88 Texas Tech University Press...................................................... 89 University of Arizona Press....................................................... 71 University of California Press................................................... 86-87 University of Massachusetts Press........................................... 84 University of Nebraska at Omaha........................................... 107 University of Nebraska Press.................................................... 74-75 University of Nebraska Press Journals................................... 81 University of Nevada Press........................................................ 81 University of Nevada, Las Vegas - History Department... 109 61 University of Nevada, Reno - Department of History....... 79 University of North Carolina Press......................................... 72 University of Oklahoma Press.................................................. 91 University of Texas Press........................................................... 82 University of Washington Press............................................... 88 University Press of Colorado.................................................... 76 University Press of Kansas......................................................... 67 Westerners International........................................................... 63 Western Historical Quarterly......................................................... 73 Yale University Press...................................................................

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The Department of History at the University of Nevada, Reno is pleased to announce the inaugural

Senator Harry Reid Graduate Fellowship In Western American or Environmental History To be awarded for 2020-21

5-Year Ph.D. Fellowship includes a research assistantship in the Harry Reid Papers, research stipend, and summer funding.

unr.edu/history

Photo credit: Pyramid Lake near Reno, Nevada, 1968, Special Collections and University Archives Collections, University of Nevada, Reno.


Follow the WHA on social media to learn about: Job Postings Scholarships Fellowship opportunities Conference Announcements #WHA2019 #Western2019

WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION @WHAHISTORY WESTERNHISTORY


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The Western Historical Quarterly

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THE OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION

V O L U M E 50 NU M BER 1

The Western Historical Quarterly presents original articles on the North American West, including western Canada, northern Mexico, Alaska, and Hawaii. Topics include expansion and colonization, indigenous histories, regional studies and transnational, comparative, and borderland histories.

Spring 2019 VO L U M E 50 N U M B E R 1

TheWestern Historical Quarterly

PRIZE-WINNING RESEARCH

2018: Arrell M. Gibson Award. Western Historical Association. “Klamath Tribal Persistence, State Resistance: Treaty Rights Activism, the Threat of Tribal Sovereignty and Collaborative Natural Resource Management in the Pacific Northwest” by Monika Bilka

S PRI NG 2019

2018: Bert M. Fireman and Janet Fireman Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “Unsettled Rights in Territorial Alaska: Native Land, Sovereignty, and Citizenship from the Indian Reorganization Act to Termination” by Jessica Leslie Arnett

10-01-2019 14:51:50

Host Institution: The University of Oklahoma Department of History

2018: Oscar O. Winther Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “Chinese Braceros? Chinese Mexican Workers in the United States during World War II” by Fredy González 2017: Golden Spur Award.. Western Writers of America. “‘Master of Ceremonies’: The World of Peter Biggs in Civil War-Era Los Angeles” by Kendra Field and Daniel Lynch

The Western Historical Quarterly Staff Dr. Anne Hyde, WHQ Editor and Professor of History Dr. Alison Fields, Associate Editor

Abigail Gibson, Editorial Fellow Louisa Brandt, Editorial Fellow

The Western Historical Quarterly awards two article prizes each year: The Oscar O. Winther Award gives $500 to the best The Western Historical Quarterly article and the Bert M. Fireman and Janet Fireman Award gives $500 to the best student article in The Western Historical Quarterly.

2017: Oscar O. Winther Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “Chinese Braceros? Chinese Mexican Workers in the United States during World War II” by Fredy González 2017: Bert M. Fireman and Janet Fireman Award. Western Historical Quarterly. “‘What is it to Withdraw?’: Klamath and Navajo Tribal Councils’ Tactics in Negotiating Termination Policy, 1949-1964” by Reetta Humalajoki 2016: Arrington-Prucha Prize. Western Historical Association. “Wage Work in the Sacred Circle: The Ghost Dance as Modern Religion” by Louis Warren 2016: Theodore C. Blegen Awar. The Forest History Society. “When Loggers Were Green: Lumber, Labor, and Conservation, 1937 - 1948” by Erik Loomis 2016: Judith Ridge Prize. Western Association of Woman Historians. “A’ Ghàidhealtachd and the North American West” by Margaret Connell-Szasz

Learn more and submit your work: academic.oup.com/whq


DISCOVER THE HELMERICH CENTER FOR AMERICAN RESEARCH The Helmerich Center for American Research houses the Gilcrease Library and Archive. The collection dates back to the fifteenth century and details the Spanish arrival in the Americas, the New England colonies, the founding of democracy in the United States, and cultural contact and conflict in the American West. The center also holds a large Native American collection of manuscripts, photographs, maps, and rare books. RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES Short-term research fellowships are available to support research projects that require substantial on-site use of the collections. Travel-to-collections grants are available to support research projects that require on-site use of the collections.

The collection of approximately 100,000 items is made up of manuscripts, books, maps photographs, imprints, and broadsides. Please visit gilcrease.org/ helmerich-center/ for a detailed list of collections. Contact: Renee Harvey Chief Librarian renee-harvey@utulsa.edu 918-631-6441 gilcrease.org/helmerich-center 2501 West Newton Street Tulsa, OK 74127


Wanted History fans who live by their own rules and enjoy their history with a touch of humor. No stuffed shirts allowed.

Join the 5000 worldwide members in 70 unique corrals and posses to find out how fun Western history can be.

Westerners International

Stop by our booth or learn more at Westerners-International.org


Celebrate Western Women’s History In 1983, the Coalition

In 2018, the Coalition

devoted itself to exploring the “multicultural” history of western women and sup-porting the work of "all people involved with western women's history.” We’ve continued that work by mentoring graduate students and junior scholars, creating prizes recognizing the best western scholarship on the themes of women, gender, and sexuality, and sponsoring sessions at the annual conference of the Western History Association.

for Western Women's History celebrated its 35th year. In 1982, a group of women’s historians met during a conference sponsored by the Institute of the American West titled “Inventing the West.” A year later, the CWWH was born. This year we continue our fundraising campaign. $35,000 will expand our reach and continue supporting intersectional scholarship on sexuality, gender, and women. Funds up to $25,000 will be matched by a generous donor.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DONATE Mail Checks to: Lynne Getz, Treasurer Department of History Appalachian State University Boone, NC 28608

Or you can give online at: https://westernwomenshistory.org/ 68


For nearly seventy years, the Yale Collection of Western Americana at the Beinecke Library has helped scholars from around the world better understand the history of the American West. The collection consists of some forty thousand printed works, four thousand catalogued manuscript collections, thousands of vintage photographs, and hundreds of prints, watercolors, and paintings that document the history and culture of Native American communities as well as the European and American exploration and settlement of the Trans-Mississippi West from Mexico to the Arctic Circle. Each year new purchases and gifts add depth and breadth to the collection, allowing it to respond flexibly to current trends in scholarship and to continue to serve not only Yale students and faculty but graduate students and senior scholars from America and abroad. The Beinecke Library offers generous fellowships to support research in its collections. To learn more about fellowships for visiting graduate students and for visiting postdoctoral scholars, please visit the library’s website at beinecke.library.yale.edu.

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New from The University of Arizona Press

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Indigenous Visions

Rediscovering the World of Franz Boas Edited by Ned Blackhawk and Isaiah Lorado Wilner

Strangers on Familiar Soil

Rediscovering the ChileCalifornia Connection Edward Dallam Melillo

Now in paperback

A Journey to Freedom

Yale Agrarian Studies Series Now in paperback

Richard Oakes, Alcatraz, and the Red Power Movement

Eye on the West

The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity

George Miles

Kent Blansett

Our Beloved Kin

Photography and the Contemporary West

Polygamy

An Early American History

A New History of King Philip’s War

Sarah M. S. Pearsall

Lisa Brooks

Surviving Genocide

Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas Jeffrey Ostler

Art of Native America The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection Gaylord Torrence

Contributions by Ned Blackhawk and Sylvia Yount Published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Distributed by Yale University Press

The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity Now in paperback

The Lamar Series in Western History

The American West

A Reader’s Journey to Iconic Places of the American Southwest

A New Interpretive History Reader

First Impressions

David J. Weber and William deBuys

John Mack Faragher and Daniel Lanpher Forthcoming in Fall 2020

Grounds for Dreaming Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the California Farmworker Movement

First Americans

U.S. Patriotism in Indian Country after World War I Thomas Grillot

Dust Bowls of Empire

Imperialism, Environmental Politics, and the Injustice of “Green” Capitalism

Kendra Taira Field Now in paperback

Lakota America

Robert V. Hine, John Mack Faragher, and Jon T. Coleman

Pekka Hämäläinen

A New Interpretive History, Second Edition

Frontiers in the Gilded Age

Now in paperback

Family, Race, and Nation after the Civil War

The American West

Paperback original

Lori A. Flores

Growing Up with the Country

Adventure, Capitalism, and Dispossession from Southern Africa to the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880-1917

A New History of Indigenous Power

White Fox and Icy Seas in the Western Arctic The Fur Trade, Transportation, and Change in the Early Twentieth Century John R. Bockstoce

Foreword by William Barr

Andrew Offenburger

Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University

Hannah Holleman

Yale Agrarian Studies Series

Yale university press YUPWHA2019.indd 1

www.YaleBooks.com 4/30/19 6:47 PM


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LEGACIES OF DUST Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains Douglas Sheflin $55.00 now $33.00

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WALKS ON THE GROUND A Tribal History of the Ponca Nation Louis V. Headman Foreword by Sean O’Neill $90.00 now $54.00

new in paperback HOMESTEADING THE PLAINS Toward a New History Richard Edwards, Jacob K. Friefeld, and Rebecca S. Wingo $19.95 now $12.00

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The Penn State Department of History Welcomes

Dr. Julie Reed

Associate Professor of History

Photo by Alan Cressler

The PSU History Department is thrilled to welcome Dr. Julie Reed, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and a Native American history scholar, as an associate professor of history. Reed is a member of several professional and academic societies, including the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association and the Digadatsele’i, a Cherokee Scholars Think Tank. She is a prolific scholar and has garnered multiple awards for her research. She is the author of Serving the Nation: Cherokee Sovereignty and Social Welfare, 1800-1907 (University of Oklahoma Press 2016). Her second book, which is under advance contract with UNC Press, The Means of Education Shall Forever Be Encouraged in this Nation: A Cherokee and American Educational History, is a comprehensive history of Cherokee education beginning in the archaeological record and going through the 1970s. At Reed’s urging, Penn State applied for and was accepted as a member of the prestigious Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies (NCAIS), part of the Newberry, an independent research library in Chicago. Launched in 2009, NCAIS draws on the Newberry’s collections in American Indian and Indigenous studies to host conferences, institutes and workshops and provide fellowships to graduate students and faculty at member institutions. For more about NCAIS: https://www.newberry.org/newberry-consortium-american-indian-studies

This publication is available in alternative media on request. Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status. U.Ed. LBS 19-


Creating Opportunities to Discover, Understand, And Enjoy Your Public Lands. Red Rock Canyon

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NEW FROM UNC PRESS Lorena oropeza

RAILROADING RELIGION Mormons, Tourists, and the Corporate Spirit of the West

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Jacket illustration: Reies López Tijerina at UCLA symposium, February 1968. Photo by Devra Anne Weber.

Reies López Tijerina

DAVID WALKER

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Reproduction on the Reservation

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CHamoru Women, White Womanhood, and Indigeneity under U.S. Colonialism in Guam Christine Taitano DeLisle 224 pages $24.95 paper

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Colonialism in the Long Twentieth Century Brianna Theobald

Railroading Religion

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Race, Resistance, and the Rise of the LAPD Max Felker-Kantor 392 pages $34.95 cloth

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How Activists Responded to Sexual Violence, 1950–1980 Catherine O. Jacquet

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Religion, Race, and Politics in a Civil War Borderland Bridget Ford 424 pages $27.95 paper

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392 PP., 14 ILLUS., $35.00 PB

Gold Rush Manliness

Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope CHRISTOPHER HERBERT 280 PP., 7 ILLUS., $30.00 PB

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Native-White Alliances and the Struggle for Celilo Village KATRINE BARBER

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INDIGENOUS CONFLUENCES

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An Environmental History of San Francisco’s 1906 Earchquake JOANNA L. DYL

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WESTERN HISTORY FROM UC PRESS

Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity Laura R. Barraclough

Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad Manu Karuka

Collisions at the Crossroads: How Place and Mobility Make Race Genevieve Carpio

Beyond Hawai’i: Native Labor in the Pacific World Gregory Rosenthal

Louder and Faster: Pain, Joy, and the Body Politic in Asian American Taiko Deborah Wong

American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford Roland De Wolk

Dreamers and Schemers: How an Improbable Bid for the 1932 Olympics Transformed Los Angeles from Dusty Outpost to Global Metropolis

The Road to Resegregation: Northern California and the Failure of Politics Alex Schafran

Braided Waters: Environment and Society in Molokai, Hawaii

Barry Siegel

Wade Graham

Unsettled Waters: Rights, Law, and Identity in the American West

Warhol and the West heather ahtone, Faith Brower, and Seth Hopkins

Eric P. Perramond

The Peyote Effect: From the Inquisition to the War on Drugs Alexander S. Dawson

William Deverell and Anne F. Hyde

America’s Social Arsonist: Fred Ross and Grassroots Organizing in the Twentieth Century Gabriel Thompson NEW IN PAPERBACK

American Prophet: The Life and Work of Carey McWilliams, with a Foreword Mike Davis

Shaped the West, Volume 1: A History of North America to 1877 Shaped the West, Volume 2: A History of North America from 1850 William Deverell and Anne F. Hyde

Carleton Watkins: Making the West American Tyler Green

Peter Richardson NEW IN PAPERBACK

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WESTERN HISTORY JOURNALS FROM UC PRESS

published in association with the california historical society

1

INTO THE ARCHIVES

2

CECILIA M. TSU LINDSEY PASSENGER WIECK JOHN PUTNAM

JOSH SIDES

152

Becoming Refugee American: The Politics of Rescue in Little Saigon by Phuong Tran Nguyen

154

San Francisco: Instant City, Promised Land by Michael Johns

156

The Bonanza King: John Mackay and the Battle over the Greatest Riches in the American West by Gregory Crouch

vol 96 no 1

JOSH SIDES

NATALIE PELLOLIO

S OU T H E RN C A L I F O R NReports I A from Q Around UART E R LY the State BOOK REVIEWS

spring 2019

CECILIA M. TSU

LINDSEY PASSENGER WIECK

HSS C

PACIFIC HISTORICAL REVIEW

FROM THE EDITOR

c a l i f o r n i a h i s to r y

S O U T H E R N C A L I F O R N I A Q U A RT E R LY

CA LIFORNIA HISTORY

JOHN PUTMAN

SPOTLIGHT

157

Photographing Disaster NATALIE PELLOLIO

vol 96 no 1

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH, AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

Southern California Quarterly

California History

WINTER 2019�VOL. 88 NO. 1

spring 2019

S P R I N G 2 0 1 9 VO L . 1 0 1 N O . 1

S pri n g 2 0 1 9 , Vo l u me 1 0 1 , No. 1

special issue The Carceral West WINTER 2019 VOLUME 88 NUMBER 1

Pacific Historical Review

VOLUME 41 NUMBER 1 FEBRUARY 2019

VOLUME 41 NUMBER 1 FEBRUARY 2019

Mexican Studies/ Estudios Mexicanos

THE JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL ON PUBLIC HISTORY

The Public Historian

Boom California

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NEW FROM TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY PRESS A Sacred People AB Indigenous Governance, Traditional Leadership, and the Warriors of the Cheyenne Nation

A AB Sovereign People

Indigenous Nationhood, Traditional Law, and the Covenants of the Cheyenne Nation

A Sacred People

Indigenous Governance, Traditional Leadership, and the Warriors of the Cheyenne Nation

A Sovereign People

Indigenous Nationhood, Traditional Law, and the Covenants of the Cheyenne Nation

In two volumes, Leo Killsback, a citizen of the Northern Cheyenne Nation, reconstructs and rekindles an ancient Cheyenne world, using teachings from the indigenous past to chart a path towards rebuilding and healing today Leo K. Killsback

A Sacred People $45.00 paper 978-1-68283-035-2 A Sovereign People $45.00 paper 978-1-68283-037-6 Leo K. Killsback

Leo Killsback

Latinos and Latinas in American Sport Stories Beyond Peloteros

Essays on sport, recreation and the creation of identity for Spanish-speaking people throughout what is now the United States Edited by Jorge Iber

$39.95 paper 978-1-68283-040-6 S P O RT I N T H E A M E R I C A N W E ST S E R I E S

P L A I N S H I STO R I E S S E R I E S

“Help Indians Help Themselves”

The Later Writings of Gertrude Simmons Bonnin (Zitkala-Ša)

A critical collection of political and activist writings—including newsletters, speeches, congressional testimony, publications, and correspondence—where Bonnin advocates tirelessly for “the Indian Cause” Edited by P. Jane Hafen

$39.95 paper 978-1-68283-045-1 P L A I N S H I STO R I E S S E R I E S

RECENT RELEASES Flood on the Tracks

Living, Dying, and the Nature of Disaster in the Elkhorn River Basin

A chronicle of the natural and human history of the Elkhorn River in northeastern Nebraska Todd M. Kerstetter

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A Promise Fulfilled

The Kitty Anderson Diary and Civil War Texas, 1861

An annotated transcription of San Antonio Unionist Kitty Anderson’s 1861 diary, which chronicles her family’s tumultuous experience fleeing Confederate Texas during the early years of the Civil War Edited by Nancy Draves

$24.95 cloth 978-1-68283-003-1 LO U H A LS E L L R O D E N B E R G E R PRIZE TTU Press is now accepting submissions for the Lou Halsell Rodenberger Book Prize in History, Culture, and Literature. For more information: www.ttupress.org


WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION

EXECUTIVE OFFICE As I enter my third year as the WHA Executive Director I am energized by a new conference season! The 2019 program is full of exciting panels, new research, and unique professional gatherings. This is due to the 2019 leadership and co-chairs, as well as the WHA’s top-notch Standing Committees and Graduate Student Caucus. Elaine Nelson, PhD, Executive Director

Leah Cargin, M.S., Executive Assistant

Justin Pratt, Graduate Assistant

Although conference season is hectic, it is often fun to have a bird’s eye view of the event-planning process. This is only enjoyable because of the outstanding WHA staff members who facilitate the details and logistics each year. Please find time to personally thank WHA Executive Assistant Leah Cargin, 2019-2020 Graduate Assistant Justin Pratt, and Project Assistant Kaitlin Sundberg for their months of hard work for the organization. Over the summer we bade farewell and good luck to Libby Rea (2018-2019 GA) who will pursue her strong passion for wildlife conservation through a graduate program in Conservation Biology. We also congratulate Kaitlin on the completion of her history graduate degree! We are grateful she has agreed to provide our office with a few hours of extra staff support this fall. Thank you for your patience as the WHA embarked on new technological terrain with an online abstract submission system. With the urging of the Technology Committee and 2017 Program Committee Co-Chairs, we are very excited to provide our attendees with a program platform that is accessible on multiple devices! The WHA is also actively undergoing a process of strategic planning. We look forward to learning how the organization can evolve with new ideas, incentives, and initiatives. I joined the WHA as a graduate student and experienced my first conference at Fort Worth in 2003. The following year I attended my second conference in Las Vegas. At that time, I was both a first-year PhD. student and a Graduate Assistant for the WHA. During my work for the organization over the next few years I gained much insight about the history profession, established several intellectual connections, and developed strong friendships that shaped my personal life and career. As we settle into the conference this year, I challenge attendees to find time to step outside their peer groups and interact with new faces: drop by the Graduate Student Reception and shake hands with the future scholars of our field, share conversations over reception appetizers with early career professionals, and provide supportive feedback for presenters and panelists. No matter how much the WHA changes in the future, I hope the exchanges that profoundly defined my development in this career remain at the core of what makes our association so unique, accepting, and welcoming.

WHA CONTACT INFORMATION:

Western History Association UNO Department of History 6001 Dodge Street Omaha, NE 68182 Phone: 402-554-5999 Email: WesternHistoryAssociation@gmail.com

Kaitlin Sundberg, M.A.,  Project Assistant  

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Cover image is of an old view of the Las Vegas strip with the city and mountains in the background.

WHA

WHA

MEMBERSHIP

HISTORY

Membership in the Western History Association is open to any person interested in the North American West.

WHA MEMBERSHIP IS BASED ON ANNUAL INCOME:

$150,000 or above:            $210

PAST PRESIDENTS, 1962Ray Allen Billington, 1962-63

Glenda Riley, 1996-97

O.O. Winther, 1963-64

Janet Fireman, 1997-98

Robert Athearn, 1964-65

Richard Etulain, 1998-99

John F. Bannon, 1965-66

Patricia N. Limerick, 99-00

W. Eugene Hollon, 1966-67

James P. Ronda, 2000-01

Robert M. Utley, 1967-68

Elliott West, 2001-02

Leonard Arrington, 1968-69

Brian Dippie, 2002-03

Clark Spence, 1969-1970

Iris H.W. Engstrand, 2003-04

T.A. Larson, 1970-71

Peter Iverson, 2004-05

Howard Lamar, 1971-72

Walter Nugent, 2005-06

John Caughey, 1972-73

R. David Edmunds, 2006-07

John Porter Bloom, 1973-74

Virginia Scharff, 2007-08

$100,000-149,999:            $170 $70,000-99,999:                 $120 $45,000-69,999:                   $95

Donald Worcester, 1974-75

$30,000-44,999:                   $70

Donald C. Cutter, 1975-76

Under $30,000:                   $45

W. Turrentine Jackson, 76-77

Student                              $30

Rodman W. Paul, 1977-78

Retired                                $60 Donor                                $600 Patron                               $450

Joe B. Frantz, 1978-79 William T. Hagan, 1979-80

Sustaining                          $300

Vernon Carstensen, 1980-81

Sponsoring Institution          $200

Mary Lee Spence, 1981-82 Walter Rundell, Jr., 1982 Francis Paul Prucha, 1982-83 C. L. Sonnichsen, 1983-84

Join, update, or upgrade your membership today by logging into "MyWHA" at www.westernhistory.org

Gene M. Gressley, 1984-85 Gilbert Fite, 1985-86

Sherry L. Smith, 2008-09 John Wunder, 2009-2010 Quintard Taylor, 2010-11 Albert Hurtado, 2011-12 Donald Worster, 2012-13 Margaret Connell-Szasz, 13-14 Elizabeth Jameson, 2014-15 John Mack Faragher, 2015-16 Stephen Aron, 2016-17 Donald L. Fixico, 2017-18 Martha A. Sandweiss, 2018-19

PAST DIRECTORS/

Martin Ridge, 1986-87

SECRETARIES Sandra Myres, 1987-88

John Porter Bloom, 1961-1967 W. David Baird, 1988-89

Arrell M. Gibson, 1968-1970 Gerald D. Nash, 1989-90

Everett L. Cooley, 1971-1973 David J. Weber, 1990-91

William D. Rowley, 1973-1990 Richard Maxwell Brown, 91-92

Please contact the WHA Office with questions: 402-554-5999 westernhistoryassociation@gmail.com

Paul Andrew Hutton, 1990-2006 Earl Pomeroy, 1992-93 Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., 1993-94 Norris Hundley, Jr., 1994-95 Richard White, 1995-96

Kevin Jon Fernlund, 2006-2012 John W. Heaton, 2012-2017 Elaine M. Nelson, 2017-Present


Western History Association membership elects primary governing body The The Western History Association membership elects the the primary governing body of

of the the

organization, which consists of the President-Elect, Executive Director, andand seven organization, which consists of President, the President, President-Elect, Executive Director, seven regularly elected members to serve on the Together, and and withwith the the assistance of the regularly elected members to serve on Council. the Council. Together, assistance of the Nominating Committee and and other committees, these elected officials oversee the the broad Nominating Committee other committees, these elected officials oversee broad interests of the association by managing business and creating policies that promote a interests of the association by managing business and creating policies that promote

a

congenial home for all those interested in the study of the North American West. congenial home for all those interested in the study of the North American West.

WHA GOVERNANCE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

COUNCIL

Martha A. Sandweiss, Princeton University

José Alamillo, Calif. State Univ. Channel Islands (2019)

WHA President

Susan Lee Johnson, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas (2019) Renée Laegreid, University of Wyoming, (2019)

David Wrobel, University of Oklahoma

Sheila McManus, University of Lethbridge (2020)

WHA President- Elect

Jeffrey Ostler, University of Oregon (2020)

Elaine Marie Nelson, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Laurie Arnold, Gonzaga University (2021)

WHA Executive Director

Erika M. Pérez, University of Arizona (2021) Stephen Aron, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (2019)

NOMINATING COMMITTEE

Donald L. Fixico, Arizona State University (2020)

Connie Chiang, Bowdoin College (2019)

Martha A. Sandweiss, Princeton University (2021)

Amy Lonetree, University of California, Santa Cruz 2019)

David Wrobel, University of Oklahoma (2022)

Brian DeLay, University of California, Berkeley (2020)

Tiffany Jasmin González, Texas A&M University (2020)

Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University (2020)

Anne M. Hyde, Western Historical Quarterly (ex-officio)

Carolyn Brucken, Autry Museum of the American West (2020)

Elaine Marie Nelson, Western History Association

WHA STANDING COMMITTEES FOR OPERATIONS TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE

COMMITTEE ON RACE AND THE

Jason Heppler, University of Nebraska at Omaha (Chair)

AMERICAN WEST (CRAW)

Douglas Seefeldt, Ball State University

Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University (Chair)

Rebecca Wingo, University of Cincinnati

Karen Leong, Arizona State University

Lindsey Wieck, St. Mary's University, San Antonio

Katherine Benton-Cohen, Georgetown University

Jana Remy, Chapman University

Advisors to CRAW:

J. Wendel Cox, Dartmouth College Library

Kevin Leonard, Middle Tennessee University

Durwood Ball, University of New Mexico

Ernesto Chávez, University of Texas, El Paso

Leisl Carr Childers, Colorado State University

Erika Pérez, University of Arizona Maria E. Montoya, New York University & NYU Shanghai

COMMITTEE ON CONTINGENT AND

Traci Brynne Voyles, Loyola Marymount University

ADJUNCT FACULTY

Kelly Lytle Hernández, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Amy Essington, California State University, Fullerton (Co-Chair) Carol L. Higham, Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte (Co-Chair) Greg Thompson, J. Willard Marriott Library

Jennifer Y. Macias, University of Utah Pablo Mitchell, Oberlin College Lina-Maria Murillo, University of Texas, El Paso

Heather Ponchetti Daly, University of California, Los Angeles Andrew Thomas Dietzel, Central Michigan University

Danielle Olden, University of Utah Cathleen Cahill, Penn State University

Steve Fountain, Washington State University Vancouver

Kent Blansett, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Catharine Rohini Franklin, Texas Tech University John R. Gram, Missouri State University

COMMITTEE ON TEACHING AND

Amy Haines, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

PUBLIC EDUCATION

Paivi Hoikkala, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Jon Lauck, Midwestern History Association

Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame (Chair) Lindsey Marshall, University of Oklahoma

James Leiker, Johnson County Community College

Brian S Collier, University of Notre Dame

Matthew Luckett, California State University, Dominguez Hills Donna Schuele, California State University, Los Angeles

Peter Blodgett, The Huntington Library Steven M. Fountain, Washington State Univ. Vancouver Patricia Loughlin, University of Central Oklahoma

COMMITTEE ON ASSAULT RESPONSE

Alicia Dewey, Biola University

AND EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES (CARES)

Andrea Radke-Moss, Brigham Young University-Idaho

S. Deborah Kang, California State University San Marcos (Chair)

Lindsey Wieck, St. Mary's University, San Antonio

Erika M. Pérez, University of Arizona

William DeStefano, Tucson, Arizona

Jennifer McPherson, Purdue University

Linda Sargent Wood, Northern Arizona University

José Alamillo, California State Univ. Channel Islands

94

Andrea Mott, Western Wyoming Community College


The

Western

History

Association

membership

elects

the

primary

governing

body

of

the

organization, which consists of the President, President-Elect, Executive Director, and seven The Western History Association strives to be a congenial home for the study and regularly elected members to serve on the Council. Together, and with the assistance of the teaching of all aspects of North American Wests, frontiers, homelands and borderlands. Nominating Committee and other committees, these elected officials oversee the broad Our mission is to cultivate the broadest appreciation of this diverse history. interests

of

the

association

by

managing

business

and

creating

policies

that

promote

congenial home for all those interested in the study of the North American West.

WHA STANDING COMMITTEES FOR OPERATIONS (Continued) PUBLIC HISTORY COMMITTEE

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE

Rebecca A. Hunt, University of Colorado Denver (Chair)

Laurie Arnold, Gonzaga University (Chair)

Tamsen Hert, University of Wyoming

Patricia Loughlin, University of Central Oklahoma

Bill Bryans, Oklahoma State University

Melody Miyamoto Walters, Collin College

Jeremy Johnston, Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Brenden Rensink, Brigham Young University

Kathryn McKee, Yellowstone Historic Center

Renée Laegreid, University of Wyoming

Jennifer Stevens, Stevens Historical Research Associates

Kat Whitely, University of Michigan

B. Erin Cole, Minnesota Historical Society

Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame

Eric Nystrom, Arizona State University

Sandra Enríquez, University of Missouri-Kansas City

WHA STANDING COMMITTEES FOR PLANNING AND FINANCE FINANCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE

PROGRAM COMMITTEES

James Brooks, University of California Santa Barbara (Chair)

Rachel St. John, Univ. of California, Davis, 2019 Co-Chair

Janet Fireman, Independent Scholar

Joshua Reid, University of Washington, 2019 Co-Chair

Lynn Roper, Mari Sandoz Heritage Society

Leisl Carr Childers, Colorado State Univ., 2020 Co-Chair Lori Flores, Stony Brook University, 2020 Co-Chair Amy Lonetree, Univ. of Cal., Santa Cruz, 2020 Co-Chair

AD HOC STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE

LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS COMMITTEES

Martha Sandweiss, Princeton University (Chair)

William Bauer, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, 2019 Co-Chair

David Wrobel, University of Oklahoma

Michael Green, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, 2019 Co-Chair

Laurie Arnold, Gonzaga University

Susan Johnson, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, 2019 Co-Chair

Stephen Aron, University of California, Los Angeles

Andy Kirk, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, 2019 Co-Chair

Connie Chiang, Bowdoin College

Virginia Scharff, University of New Mexico, 2020 Chair

Cathleen Cahill, Penn State University Maria Montoya, New York University and NYU Shanghai Mark Johnson, University of Notre Dame

THANKS TO OUR DONOR, PATRON, AND SUSTAINING MEMBER CATEGORIES! DONOR

PATRON

Stephen Aron

Brian S Collier

Laurie Arnold

SUSTAINING Andy Kirk

John Heaton

Karl Geier

José Alamillo

Patricia Loughlin

Henry Casady

Albert L. Hurtado

Kent Blansett

Don MacKendrick

Tom Isern

Anne Hyde

Peter Blodgett

Polly McLean

Suzzanne Kelley

Jeremy Johnston

Larry Burgess

Beth Rose Middleton Manning

David Rich Lewis

Lori Lahlum

Clyde A. Milner II

Katherine Morrissey

Carol O’Connor

Elaine M. Nelson

Martha Sandweiss

Barry Ruderman

David Wrobel

Caroline Schimmel

Jolane Culhane

Lorena Oropeza

Katherine Ellinghaus

Akim Reinhardt

John Findlay Winifred Gallagher

Gregory C. Thompson

Nathan Gonzales

Louis Warren

David Gutiérrez

John Wunder

Tiya Miles

Bruce J. Dinges

Susan Lee Johnson Todd Kerstetter Holly Arnold Kinney

Fred Shaw Gregory Smoak Harold Sorenson Joseph E. Taylor, III Jerry Thomspon Richard White Kerry Wyatt

To upgrade your membership level please contact the WHA Office at westernhistoryassociation@gmail.com by phone at 402-554-5999 or visit the Registration Desk!

95

a


GET INVOLVED IN THE WHA! GRADUATE STUDENT CAUCUS The WHA Graduate Student Caucus meets at each WHA gathering to discuss ways in which the organization can be more inclusive of graduate students. Please contact WHAGSC President Tiffany J. González at tiffany.j.gonzalez@tamu.edu for more information on how to be involved.

COMMITTEE ON TEACHING AND PUBLIC EDUCATION The Committee on Teaching and Public Education works year-round on projects which increase the awareness of the West, and promote K-16 education. The CTPE encourages collaboration between teachers and scholars. Please contact Committee Chair Mark Johnson (mark.johnson@nd.edu) for more information or to join the group.

TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE The Technology Committee researches technical innovations for the WHA. They advise the Council and Executive Office on how to move forward with technology such as digital submission platforms and social media use. Please contact Committee Chair Jason Heppler at jheppler@unomaha.edu for more information and how to be active.

WHA COMMITTEE ON ASSAULT RESPONSE AND EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES Committee on Assault Response & Educational Strategies (CARES) was formed in 2018. They work to provide educational resources for WHA members. It is their goal to raise awareness of assault in the academy. If you are interested in becoming involved with this committee or want details please contact Chair S. Deborah Kang: sdkang@csusm.edu. 96


COMMITTEE ON RACE AND THE AMERICAN WEST (CRAW) The Committee on Race and the American West is dedicated to diversifying the scholars and members of the WHA as well as ensuring there is more scholarship produced by historians of color. Please contact Committee Chair Mary E. Mendoa at marye.mendoza@psu.edu for more information or to become a CRAW adviser.

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE The Membership Committee uses their energy to implement new recruitment and retention strategies for the WHA. They also spark energy in emerging scholars through the WHA Graduate Student Prize and other professional activities. Please contact Chair Laurie Arnold at arnoldl@gonzaga.edu for more information or to become involved.

PUBLIC HISTORY COMMITTEE The Public History Committee works to ensure that public history and public historians are promoted and welcomed within the WHA. Their duties include advising the Council on matters of public history, fundraising, and hosting the Public History Reception. For more information, please contact Chair Rebecca Hunt at rebecca.hunt@ucdenver.edu.

COMMITTEE ON CONTINGENT AND ADJUNCT FACULTY The Committee on Contingent and Adjunct Faculty uses their platform to create initiatives and programs for contingent university faculty in academic organizations. Please contact Committee Co-Chair Amy Essington at amycessington@gmail.com or Carol L. Higham at ahigham@uncc.edu for more information and how you can become involved. 97


2019 WHA Award Committees Arrell M. Gibson Award ($500) - Best essay of the year on

Vicki L. Ruiz Award ($500) - Best article on race in the

Arrington-Prucha Prize ($500) - Best article on the history

Huntington-WHA Martin Ridge Fellowship ($3,500) – Best proposal for a one-month research fellowship at the

North American West Traci Brynne Voyles, Chair, Loyola Marymount Univ. Mary E. Mendoza, Penn State University Neil Foley, Southern Methodist University

Native American history Allyson Stevenson (Chair), University of Saskatchewan Tamrala Swafford, University of Maryland Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Huntington Library in San Marino, California Megan Kate Nelson (Chair), Freelance Writer and Columnist Erika Pérez, University of Arizona Tamara Venit-Shelton, Claremont McKenna College

of religion in the West Louis Warren (Chair), University of California, Davis Mark Harvey, North Dakota State University Brian Q. Cannon, Brigham Young University

Bert M. Fireman & Janet Fireman Award ($1,000) -

Autry Public History Prize ($1,000) – Best contribution to

Best student essay published in the Western Historical Quarterly The WHQ Board of Editors selects the award recipient S. Deborah Kang, author of The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954, received the 2018 W. Turrentine Jackson Award for the best first book on the American West. It was published by Oxford University Press.

a broader public reflection and appreciation of the past or serves as a model of professional public history practice Josh Garrett-Davis (Chair), Autry Museum of the American West Roger Nichols, University of Arizona Ben Johnson, Loyola University

Caughey WHA Prize ($2,500) – Best book of the year in

Western History Edward Melillo (Chair), Amherst College Margaret Connell-Szasz, University of New Mexico Andrés Reséndez University of California, Davis

David J. Weber-Clements Prize ($2,500) – Best

Bolton-Cutter Award ($500) - Best journal article on

nonfiction book on Southwestern America Rachel St. John (Chair), Univ. of California, Davis Gary Clayton Anderson, University of Oklahoma Emily Lutenski, St. Louis University

Spanish Borderlands history Alice Baumgartner (Chair), Univ. of Southern California Julian Lim, Arizona State University Rosina Lozano, Princeton University

Donald L. Fixico Award ($1,000) – Best book centering

Jensen-Miller Award ($500) - Best article on women and

Indigenous epistemologies and perspectives Cathleen Cahill (Chair), Penn State University William Bauer, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Beth Piatote, University of California, Berkeley

gender in the North American West Katherine Ellinghaus (Chair), University of Melbourne Chelsea Mead, Minnesota State University, Mankato Katrina Jagodinsky, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

WHA Graduate Student Prizes –Prize recipients receive a one-year WHA membership and complimentary conference items such as registration and lodging. The WHA Membership Committee selects the Graduate Student Prize recipients.

Michael P. Malone Award ($500) - Best article on state,

provincial, or territorial history in North America John Lauck (Chair), University of South Dakota John Monnett, Metropolitan State Univ. of Denver Carol O’Connor, Albuquerque, New Mexico

2018 WHA Graduate Student Prize recipients receive recognition at the 2018 Awards Banquet in San Antonio, Texas.

Oscar O. Winther Award ($500) – Best article published in the Western Historical Quarterly The WHQ Board of Editors selects the award recipient

Ray Allen Billington Award ($500) –Best journal article in Western history, not published in the Western Historical Quarterly James Drake, Chair, Metropolitan State Univ. of Denver Meg Frisbee, Metropolitan State University of Denver Beth Lew-Williams, Princeton University

98


2019 WHA Award Committees Dwight L. Smith (ABC-CLIO) Award ($500) – Best

Honorary Lifetime Membership – Awarded annually

significant bibliography or research tool on any aspect of the American West Adam Arenson (Chair), Manhattan College Brenden Rensink, Brigham Young University Erika Bsumek, University of Texas, Austin

by the WHA President. The 2019 Honorary Lifetime Memberships will be selected by 2019 President Martha A. Sandweiss.

WHA President Donald Fixico presenting R. David Edmunds with an Honorary Lifetime Membership at the 2018 WHA Awards Banquet in San Antonio.

Hal K. Rothman Award ($500) –Best book on Western Environmental History Jared Orsi (Chair), Colorado State University William Swagerty, University of the Pacific Sarah Dant, Weber State University

Joan Paterson Kerr Award ($500) –Best illustrated book

Charles Redd Center Teaching Award ($500) –

on the American West Cynthia Prescott (Chair), University of North Dakota Steven Danver, Walden University Carol Clark, Amherst College

Awards recognizing K-12 teachers instructing the American West Steven Fountain (Chair), Washington State Univ. Vancouver Andrea Mott, Western Wyoming Community College William De Stefano, Tucson, Arizona Peter Blodgett, The Huntington Library

John C. Ewers Award ($500) – for best book on the topic of North American Indian Ethnohistory. John Bowes (Chair), Eastern Kentucky University Paul Kelton, Stony Brook University David R.M. Beck, University of Montana

Indian Student Conference Scholarship ($500) –

Awards to support Indian student conference attendance Heather Daly (Chair), Univ. of Calif., Los Angeles Julie L. Reed, Pennsylvania State University Alexandra Harmon, University of Washington

Robert G. Athearn Award ($1,000) – Best book on the 20th -century West Rosalyn LaPier (Chair), University of Montana Ross Frank, University of California, San Diego Douglas Sackman, University of Puget Sound

Louise Pubols Public History Prize ($500) – Award to support attendance of a public historian to

Robert M. Utley Award ($500) – Best book on military

the WHA conference B. Erin Cole (Chair), Minnesota Historical Society David Chang, University of Minnesota Theresa Salazar, The Bancroft Library at Univ. of California, Berkeley

history of the frontier and western North America Lance Blyth (Chair), NORAD and U.S. Northern Command William Kiser, Texas A&M University-San Antonio Ari Kelman, University of California, Davis

Sara Jackson Award ($500) – Awards to support

Kenneth N. & Sally Owens Award ($500) –Best book on

graduate student research Marne L. Campbell, Chair, Loyola Marymount Univ. Sandra Enríquez, Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City Omar Valerio Jiménez, Univ. of Texas at San Antonio

the history of the Pacific West Joshua L. Reid (Chair), University of Washington Clifford Trafzer, University of California, Riverside Joy Schulz, Metropolitan Comm. College, Nebraska

W. Turrentine-Jackson Award ($1,500) – Best first

Trennert-Iverson Conference Scholarship ($500) – Award to support graduate student conference attendance

published book on the American West Daniel Herman (Chair), Central Washington Univ. Matthew Garrett, Bakersfield College Katherine Benton-Cohen, Georgetown University

Alicia Dewey (Chair), Biola University Monika Bilka, Chandler-Gilbert Comm. College Monica Rico, Lawrence University

Gordon M. Bakken Award of Merit –Outstanding service

Walter Rundell Graduate Student Award ($1,500) – Award to support dissertation research

to the field of Western History and the WHA David Rich Lewis (Chair), Utah State University Jay H. Buckley, Brigham Young University Virginia Scharff, University of New Mexico

Flannery Burke (Chair), St. Louis University Gregory Smithers, Virginia Commonwealth Univ. Fay Yarbrough, Rice University

99


WHA Conference History

We are pleased to announce that Portland, Oregon is the location of the 61st Annual WHA Conference. The 2021 Call for Papers will be released soon. In the meantime, mark your calendars for October 26-31, 2021!

1961 Santa Fe

1992 New Haven

1962 Denver

1993 Tulsa

1963 Salt Lake City

1994 Albuquerque

1964 Oklahoma City

1995 Denver

1965 Helena

1996 Lincoln

1966 El Paso

1997 St. Paul

1967 San Francisco

1998 Sacramento

1968 Tucson

1999 Portland

1969 Omaha

2000 San Antonio

1970 Reno

2001 San Diego

1971 Santa Fe

2002 Colorado Springs

1972 New Haven

2003 Fort Worth

1973 Fort Worth

2004 Las Vegas

1974 Rapid City

2005 Scottsdale

1975 Tulsa

2006 St. Louis

1976 Denver

2007 Oklahoma City

1977 Portland

2008 Salt Lake City

1978 Hot Springs

2009 Denver

1979 San Diego

2010 Lake Tahoe

1980 Kansas City

2011 Oakland

1981 San Antonio

2012 Denver

1982 Phoenix

2013 Tucson

1983 Salt Lake City

2014 Newport Beach

1984 St. Paul

2015 Portland

1985 Sacramento

2016 St. Paul

1986 Billings

2017 San Diego

1987 Los Angeles

2018 San Antonio

1988 Wichita

2019 Las Vegas

1989 Tacoma

2020 Albuquerque

1990 Reno

2021 Portland

1991 Austin

100


60th Annual WHA Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico "Migrations, Meeting Grounds, and Memory" OCTOBER 14-17, 2020 Hyatt Regency Albuquerque and Albuquerque Convention Center 2020 Program Committee Co-Chairs

2020 WHA President

Leisl Carr-Childers, Colorado State University

David Wrobel, University of Oklahoma

Lori Flores, Stony Brook University

2020 Local Arrangements Committee Chair

Amy Lonetree, University of California, Santa Cruz

Virginia Scharff, University of New Mexico

The WHA will gather in Albuquerque for its 60th Annual Conference and we encourage scholars and teachers of the North American West in all fields—history, American Studies, Ethnic Studies, Native American, Chicana/o, Asian, and African American Studies, literature, film, music, art and art history—members and non-members, tenure stream, renewable, and contingent faculty and professionals at all colleges, universities,

and

K-12

schools,

independent

scholars,

graduate

students,

public

practitioners

in

museums,

art

galleries,

historic

sites,

government agencies, and others who care about the West to join us. We have a collective responsibility as conveyors and guardians of the West’s diverse cultural heritage to convey the full richness of the region’s histories of migrations, meeting grounds, and memories to a larger national and global public. To that end, we invite submissions on all topics relating to migrations, both human and non-human, into and out of the West throughout human history, from individual and family stories, to the voluntary migrations of religious and other cultural groups, the involuntary migrations of Native peoples, the displacement and accompanying refugee migrations resulting from wars in Mexico, Central and South America, and Asia, migratory labor streams, both officially sanctioned and sin papeles, and changing immigration law and enforcement policies, as well as the migrations of animal and plant species.   We seek sessions on all cultural interactions in the region in all periods—from war, conquest, massacre, enslavement, confinement, mass incarceration, and elimination to resistance, cultural unions and exchanges, self-determination, and survivance. We welcome investigations at every historical scale, from the local to the global, from micro-histories to trans-national movements and world systems that impact the western region, as well as interactions with its lands and landscapes. We encourage proposals that connect to broader public conversations on contested memory of western events, through the written record, literary accounts, artistic renderings, museum exhibits, historic sites and reenactments, monuments, memorials, and markers.   We encourage workshops, for example, on teaching, digital humanities, public history, oral history, art and museum representation, and dissertation chapter workshops, along with readings centered seminars, and other innovative and non-traditional formats are welcome. Paper sessions (with two, three, or four papers) are also encouraged, along with roundtable formats, lightening rounds, poster sessions, film screenings, and performances. We strongly encourage full session submissions, although we will consider single papers.   To submit a full session (preferred) or individual paper, please visit the WHA 2020 Conference website and follow the directions and guide for electronic submissions, which opens September 5, 2019: www.westernhistory.org/2020. The deadline for submissions is December 5, 2019. Please contact the 2020 Program Co-Chairs with questions: Leisl Carr-Childers (Colorado State University), Lori Flores (Stony Brook University), and Amy Lonetree (University of California, Santa Barbara).   WHA Diversity of Session Participants Policy: The Program Committee will actively promote the full and equitable inclusion of racial and ethnic minorities, religious minorities, people with disabilities, women, LGBTQ people, and people with various ranks and career paths on this conference program. The Program Committee will encourage sessions to include diverse sets of participants, addressing gender diversity, racial and ethnic diversity, sexual diversity, religious diversity, disability-based diversity, and/or LGBTQ diversity.

Albuquerque Skyline 1 - Photo Credit: www.kipmalone.com - Photo Courtesy Visit Albuquerque

2020 Program Committee Leisl Carr-Childers, Colorado State University (Co-Chair)

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, University of California, Irvine

Lori Flores, Stony Brook University (Co-Chair)

John Findlay, University of Washington

Amy Lonetree, University of California, Santa Cruz

Elise Boxer, University of South Dakota

Amy Haines, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs Jane Hong Lee - Occidental College Omar Valerio Jiménez - University of Texas, San Antonio Jonathan Foster, Great Basin College Jeffrey Shepherd, University of Texas, El Paso

101

Herbert Ruffin, Syracuse University Casey D. Nichols, California State University, East Bay Allyson Stevenson, University of Regina Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Sarah Sadlier, Harvard University


WHA 2019 – PROGRAM INDEX LAS VEGAS 2019

A

Abarca, Meredith 38 Adams, Ashley 40 Adams, David Wallace 31 Adams, Jaynie Elizabeth 28 Adams, Melanie 41 Aguilar, Emiliano 26 Aguilar, Kendra 48 Aikau, Hokulani 57 Alamillo, José M. 28, 47, 94, 95 Alvarez, Brian Paco 15 Amundson, Michael 47 Anderson, Gary Clayton 98 Anderson, Karen S. 44 Anderson, Kiera J. 23 Andrella, Jennifer 31, 47 Andrés, Benny J., Jr. 45 Aquino, Mariel 25 Araiza, Lauren 42 Arenson, Adam 99 Archer, Seth 29 Arnold, Laurie 32, 36, 94, 95, 97 Aron, Stephen 44, 94, 95 Arterberry, Jimmy 52 Arthur, Gary W. 48 Asaka, Megan 34 Aune, Stefan 53 Ayers, Edward L. 17, 33

B

Bacich, Damian 55 Baker, T. Lindsay 54 Ball, Durwood 94 Banks, Angela M. 42 Barber, Katrine 25 Barker, Wendy 41 Barr, Juliana 11, 40, 52 Barron, Dawn Pichon 48 Barry, Bridget 38 Basso, Matthew 26, 47, 52 Bastidas, Dianna Bossa 42 Batten, Nicole R. 24, 47 Bauer, William 9, 13, 36, 55, 95, 98 Baumgartner, Alice Lucile 57, 98 Beachley, DeAnna 13 Bear, Daryl Max 42 Beck, David R.M. 99 Belew, Kathleen 29 Beltrán, Francisco 37 Bennett, Lyn Ellen 34 Benton-Cohen, Katherine 26, 94, 99 Bergmann, Roger 26 Betke, Tyla 46 Bielmann, Amanda 53 Biggs, Brittany Carino 28 Bilka, Monika 35, 99 Bindas, Kenneth J. 24 Binnema, Theodore (Ted), 38

BirdRattler, Loren 55 Black, Liza 27 Blansett, Kent 27, 30, 94, 95 Blodgett, Peter J. 18, 32, 46, 54, 94, 95, 99 Blyth, Lance R. 39, 99 Bogdan, Nina 49 Bokovoy, Matthew 24, 32 Boorn, Alida 24 Bouma, Wyatt James 51 Bourgette, Alika 51 Bowes, John 99 Boxer, Elise 52, 101 Brackett, Shawn W. 51 Brassard, Brooke Kathleen 30 Brégent-Heald, Dominique 34 Bridges, Jennifer 51 Brigandi, Phil 43 Brigham, Jay L. 46 Brooks, James F. 39, 50, 95 Brooks, Lisa 17, 26, 33 Brooks, Shelley Alden 53 Broussard, Albert 42 Brown, Dmitri 32 Brown, Willa Hammitt 56 Brown-Coronel, Margie 55 Browning, Elizabeth Grennan 53 Brucken, Carolyn 94 Bruyneel, Kevin 31 Bryan, Richard, 13, 16 Bryans, Bill 95 Bsumek, Erica M. 25, 99 Buchkoski, Courtney 43 Buckles, Kristen 24 Buckley, Jay 99 Burch, Susan 51 Burel, David Michael 34 Burgess, Larry 95 Burke, Flannery 26, 99 Burns, Emily C. 51 Burow, Paul Berne 52 Buse, Michael 49

C

Cabanero, Jacob B. 28 Cadava, Geraldo L. 11, 37, 45 Cahill, Cathleen 44, 47, 94, 95, 98 Cameron, David J. 26 Campbell, Marne L. 30, 99 Campbell, Renae 50 Cannon, Brian Q. 50, 98 Cargin, Leah 46, 92 Cargin, Sarah 22 Carlson, Keith Thor 40 Caro, Mayela 42 Carr Childers, Leisl 14, 15, 34, 41, 94, 95, 101 Carroll, Justin M. 56 102

Carroll, William Winslow 42 Carter, Christopher J. 55 Carver, Benjamin Thomas 39 Casady, Henry 95 Casas, María Raquél 13, 47, 55 Castañeda, Miguel 37 Centeno-Meléndez, José 42 Cervantes, Marco Antonio 57 Chairez, Norma 49 Chambers, Lorena 42 Chang, David A. 24, 99 Chávez, Ernesto 26, 94 Chávez-García, Miroslava 27 Chiang, Connie 94, 95 Childers, Michael W. 41 Chou, Petra N. 50 Chou, Po Nien (Felipe) 50 Christensen, Scott R. 55 Chung, Su Kim 13, 43 Clark, Carol 99 Clark, Cassie 31 Clement, Kerri Keller 56 Cogdill, Sharon E. 51 Cohan, Dustin 49 Colby, Jason M. 35, 53 Cole, B. Erin 41, 49, 95, 99 Coleman, Anne Gilbert 46 Coleman, Jon T. 35 Coles, Sasha 37 Collier, Brian S 6, 18, 51, 94, 95 Connell-Szasz, Margaret 48, 98 Connolly, Emilie 53 Cothran, Boyd 53 Cox, J. Wendel 94 Cox, Shae 13 Crail-Rugotzke, Donna 31 Crandall, Maurice 26 Cronon, William J. 17, 33 Crossley, Laura 47 Crowe, Rebekah 49 Cruz, Donato Luis 30 Culhane, Jolane 95 Cumming, Daniel 47 Curley, Andrew 31

D

Dant, Sara 31, 99 Danver, Steven 99 Davis, Robbin Denise 56 Dean, Virgil W. 35 De Leon, Adrian 48 DeLay, Brian 94 Deloria, Philip J. 36, 41 Dempsey, Joshua 40 Despain, Matthew 42 DeStefano, William 18, 94, 99 Dewey, Alicia 18, 45, 99 de Vera, Samantha Q. 27


WHA 2019 – PROGRAM INDEX Dewey, Alicia M. 18, 45, 94 Dhillon, Jaskiran 36 Diaz, Robert 25, 49 Dietzel, Andrew Thomas 94 Dinges, Bruce J. Dobak, William A. 38 Dominguez, Laura 49 Dotson, Jerome Kern 38 Douglas, Fawn 3 Drake, James 98 Dubcovsky, Alejandra 40 Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne 44 Duncan, Lisa Escobedo 32 Dunn, Jennifer 52, 57 Durante, Dawn 46 Durfee, Alesha 47 Dziedziak, Caryll Batt 18

E

Easton, Anthony 26 Eckstrom, Mikal Brotnov 40 Edgerton, Samantha 23 Edgington, Ryan 32 Edmunds, Dave 99 Egge, Sara 35 Eichner, Katrina C.L. 53 Ellinghaus, Katherine 95, 98 Ellis, Elizabeth 36, 52 Ellis, Isaiah 53 Elmore, Maggie 42 Emery Davidson, Jenny 26 Englebert, Robert 40 Enríquez, Sandra I. 40, 47, 95, 99 Ens, Andrea 43 Essington, Amy 94, 97 Estes, Nick 31, 36 Estrada, Josue 37, 49 Estruth, Jeannette 43 Everett, Derek R. 35

F

Farnes, Sherilyn 30 Farrell-Racette, Sherry 40 Fenerty, Laura 51 Fenn, Elizabeth 40 Ferguson, Robert Hunt 27 Fiege, Mark 25, 38 Figanbaum, Paige 47 Findlay, John M. 43, 95, 101 Finley, Chris 41 Fireman, Janet 95 Fisher, Andrew 27, 51 Fixico, Donald 42, 94, 99 Flores, Alfred Peredo 37 Flores, Lori 48, 95, 101 Fockler, Matthew 47 Foley, Neil 26, 44, 98 Fonseca Chávez, Vanessa 54, 55 Foster, Jonathan 41, 101

LAS VEGAS 2019

Fountain, Catherine 55 Fountain, Steven M. 18, 94, 99 Fowles, Severin 52 Fox, Sarah Alisabeth 53 Fraga, Sean 44 Francis-Fallon, Benjamin 45 Frank, Ross 99 Franklin, Catharine Rohini 36, 38, 94 Frehner, Brian 41 Frisbee, Meg 98 Froese, Brian 43

G

Gage, Kendra 13 Gallagher, Winifred 95 Gallagher-Cohoon, Erin 34 Garceau, Dee 27 García, David G. 28 Garcia, Ignacio M. 50 Garrett, Matthew 99 Garrett-Davis, Josh 11, 35, 98 Garza, Alejandra Christiana 29, 47 Gaudet, Danielle 40 Geier, Karl 95 Geiger, Andrea 54 Genetin-Pilawa, C. Joseph 56 Gibbons, Chris Ann 31 Giesberg, Judith 50 Gilbert, Matthew Sakiestewa 51 Gill, Navjyot 30 Giron, Miguel 43 Glover, Jeffrey 49 Godfrey, Matthew C. 30 Goldberg, Mark A. 24 Goldmann, Kerry Lauren 37 Gomez, Laura 43 Gonzales, Nathan 95 González, Tiffany Jasmin 11, 37, 94, 96 Gonzalez, Trinidad O. 11 González-Milea, Alejandro 31 Goodman, Adam 30, 42 Goodwin, Joanne L. 18, 36 Gordon-Reed, Annette 44 Graham, Anthony Daniel 14, 34 Gram, John R. 94 Grande, Sandy 36 Gray, Susan E. 36 Green, Michael 9, 13, 15, 18, 24, 95 Greenberg, Amy S. 56 Gregg, Sara M. 26 Grench, Charles 24 Guelas, Armina Kayla 28 Guise, Holly Miowak 37 Gutiérrez, David 95

H

Haas, Lisbeth 50

103

Hackel, Steven W. 34, 56 Haines, Amy 94, 101 Hale, Tiffany 37 Hall, Michael 13 Hall, Ryan 48 Hall-Patton, Joseph 43 Hall-Patton, Mark P. 43 Hämäläinen, Pekka J. 44, 52 Hameeteman, Elizabeth 25 Hamilton, Kenneth M. 40 Hammack, Maria Esther 40 Hankinson, Jenny 41 Hansen, Jan E. 25 Hanshew, Tracey 56 Harmon, Alexandra (Sasha) 53, 99 Harrison, Christian 14, 41 Harrison, Jay T. 56 Harvey, Mark 98 Heaton, John 95 Heffner, Sarah 50 Helton, Jennifer 27 Hemphill, Katie M. 26 Hendrickson, Brett 57 Hendrix-Komoto, Amanda 52, 57 Henry, Robin C. 24 Heppler, Jason A. 32, 48, 94, 96 Herley, Sam 32 Herman, Daniel 26, 99 Hernandez, Priscila 42 Hert, Tamsen 32, 46, 95 Heslop, Madison 44 Hicks, Tahireh 43 Higham, Carol 94, 97 Hinesley, B. 32 Hinojosa, Felipe 24, 40 Hinton, Gregory 35 Hirt, Paul 46 Hodge, Adam R. 35 Hoffman, Abraham 43 Hogeland, Kim 24 Hogue, Rebecca 32 Hoikkala, Paivi 94 Hoover, Carmen 48 Hoy, Benjamin 46, 53 Hsu, Madeline 30, 42 Hudson, Angela Pulley 39 Hugill, David W. 45 Hunt, Rebecca A. 46, 95, 97 Hurtado, Albert L. 95 Hutchison, Elizabeth 47 Hyde, Anne F. 48, 50, 94, 95

I

Iceton, Glenn 31 Igler, David 40 Imada, Adria L. 29 Irwin, Robert 38 Isenberg, Andrew 35 Isern, Tom 95 Izadi, Mandy 36


WHA 2019 – PROGRAM INDEX J

Jackson, Kyle 56 Jacobs, Margaret 38, 48, 98, 101 Jacobson, Danae 57 Jacoby, Karl 26 Jagodinsky, Katrina 98 Jameson, Elizabeth 30 Janda, Sarah Eppler 38 Jefferson, Alison Rose 37 Jensen, Devan 55 Jezak, Sam Joseph 51 John, Maria 11, 31 Johnson, Adam Fulton 52 Johnson, Amanda J. 47 Johnson, Ben 98 Johnson, Jeff 23 Johnson, Khalil Anthony 11, 48, 51 Johnson, Mark 18, 23, 54, 94-96 Johnson, Melany 55 Johnson, Nicole 49 Johnson, Susan Lee 9, 13, 17, 33, 43, 94, 95 Johnston, Jeremy 95 Jolivette, Andrew 41 Jones, Jeannette Eileen 38 Jones, Robert L. 25 Jones, Ruth Page 27 Jovanovich, Monica E. 30 Juárez, Miguel 24 Junne, George 40

K

Kagan, Michael 42 Kahle, Trish 47 Kaliel, Emily B. 51 Kane, Adam C. 24 Kang, S. Deborah 42, 94, 95, 98 Kantrowitz, Stephen 39 Karibo, Holly Marie 36 Katerberg, William 39 Katz, Amanda 47 Keagle, Jordan 44 Keegan, Brennan 57 Keel, Roneva 54 Keliiaa, Caitlin 50 Kelly, Susan Croce 54 Kelley, Suzzanne Kelman, Ari 41, 99 Kelton, Paul 99 Kerstetter, Todd 45, 95 Keyes, Sarah 43, 47 Khan, Nora 48 Kiel, Doug 41 Kilander, Ginny 32 Kim, Jessica M. 29 Kinney, Holly Arnold 95 Kinney, Jayne Elizabeth 26 Kirk, Andy 9, 13, 32, 95 Kiser, William 99

LAS VEGAS 2019

Klett, Mark 47 Klingle, Matthew 29 Koenig, Sarah 57 Kohout, Amy 53 Kopaczewski, James 54 Kopp, Peter A. 49 Krochmal, Max 45 Krueger, David 53 Kruer, Matthew 36 Kuehn, Elizabeth Ann 30 Kunzel, Regina 43

L

La Chapelle, Peter 13, 30 La Rotta, Alex 57 Laegreid, Renée M. 27, 94, 95 Lahlum, Lori Ann 27, 95 Lake, Christina 49, 52 Lamar Prieto, Covadonga 55 Langley, Deserea R. 55 Lansing, Michael J. 48 Lantz, Katie 56 LaPier, Rosalyn 36, 99 Larkin-Gilmore, Juliet 39 Larson, Corey 48 Lauck, Jon 35, 94, 98 Leal, Jorge N. 43 Leavitt, Jeffrey 34 Lee, Jane Hong 101 Leech, Brian 52 Legg, John R. 47, 54 Leiker, James 94 Leivas, Matthew Hanks 52 Leket-Mor, Rachel 35 Leonard, Kevin 94 Leong, Karen J. 47, 94 Levy, Beth E. 36 Lewandoski, Julia 36 Lewis, David Rich 30, 95, 99 Lewis, Kay Wright 56 Lew-Williams, Beth 30, 40, 98 Lim, Julian 30, 42, 98 Limerick, Patricia N. 11, 24, 35, 46 Link, Alessandra 47 Linsenbardt, Brooke 47 Little, Tarisa 34 Llamas, F. Javier 30 Lomawaima, K. Tsianina 44, 51 Lonetree, Amy 40, 94, 95, 101 Loomis, Erik 44 Lorimer, Michelle 18 Loughlin, Patricia 18, 23, 56, 94, 95 Lovata, Troy 54 Lowery, Malinda Maynor 11, 37 Lowndes, Joseph 29 Lozano, Rosina 45, 98 Luckett, Matthew 94 Lumsden, Stephanie 50 Luna Lucero, Brian 29, 32, 52

104

Lutenski, Emily 98 Lutz, John 11, 40 Lytle Hernández, Kelly 41, 94

M

Mack, Graeme 25 Macias, Jennifer Y. 94 MacKendrick, Don 95 Mackin, Jill Falcon 55 MacMahon, Christopher M. 43 Maile, Uahikea 36 Mann, Kristin Dutcher 34 Mann, Spencer Thomas 43 Mapel Bloomberg, Kristin 27 Markwyn, Abigail Margaret 54 Marrero, Adriana 51 Marshall, Lindsay Erin 18, 23, 94 Marin, Erica 49 Martin, James W. 53 Martínez, Angelina Teresa 28 Martinez, Trisha Venisa-Alicia 54 Martinez, Valerie A. 27 Mason, Matthew Daniel 32 Massoth, Katherine Sarah 36, 55 Mathews, Sandra 31 Maughan, Steven S. 57 May Sanchez, Gianna M. 42, 49 McBride, Preston 31 McConnell, Shannon Kelly 51 McCool, Daniel Craig 46 McKee, Kathryn 95 McKenna, Rebecca Tinio 48 McKenzie, Diane 56 McLaughlin, Larin 38 McLeen, Polly 95 McManus, Sheila 18, 40, 94 McMillen, Christian 11, 29 McPherson, Jennifer 44, 94 Mead, Chelsea 98 Meeks, Eric V. 26 Melillo, Edward 44, 98 Mellard, Jason Dean 57 Méndez, Alina Ramirez 43 Méndez Flores, Verónica 42 Mendiola, Carla 25 Mendoza, Mary E. 26, 41, 94, 97, 98 Mendoza, Natalie 27, 52 Mercier, Laurie 23 Merrill, Karen 52 Merritt, Chris 50 Middleton Manning, Beth Rose 52, 55, 95 Miles, George A. 32 Miles, Tiya 17, 33, 36, 95 Miller, Char 53 Miller, Douglas 45 Million, Dian 40 Millions, Erin 40 Milner, Clyde A., II 26, 95


WHA 2019 – PROGRAM INDEX LAS VEGAS 2019

Mitchell, Pablo 94 Monnett, John 98 Monsivais, Carolina 36 Montoya, Maria 30, 94, 95 Montoya, Teresa 36 Mora, Juan Ignacio 49 Morales, Gene 40 Moreno, Rodrigo 56 Morgan Rueda, Doris 47 Morrissey, Katherine G. 26, 95 Morse, Kathryn 26 Mortimer, Loren Michael 26 Mott, Andrea 94, 99 Muente, Tamera Lenz 47 Mullen, Lynette C. 27 Muñiz García, David Arturo 31 Murillo, Lina-Maria 94 Murray, Shannon 48

Pearsall, Sarah 41 Penner, Mack 34 Peralta, Christine Noelle 48 Pérez, Erika 36, 47, 94, 98 Peters, Lauren 49 Petersen, Anne 25 Peterson, Whitney J. 34 Pfaelzer, Jean 27, 49 Piatote, Beth 98 Pogue, James 29 Ponce, Pearl T. 56 Ponchetti Daly, Heather 36, 94, 99 Posas, Liza 26 Powers Useche, Allison 53 Poyo, Gerald E. 24 Pratt, Justin 92 Prescott, Cynthia 32, 51, 99

N

Quinn, D. Michael 30

Nance, Susan 53 Needham, Andrew 26, 48 Nelson, Elaine Marie 92, 94, 95 Nelson, Megan Kate 39, 98 Nelson, Timothy E. 40 Nichols, Casey D. 42, 101 Nichols, Jeffrey 53 Norris, Frank 54 Nichols, Roger 98 Nugent, Walter 35 Nystrom, Eric 41, 95

O

O’Brien, Jean 45 O’Connor, Carol 95, 98 O’Neil, Stephen 40 Ocegueda, Mark Anthony 42 Oertel, Kristen T. 28 Ogborne, Jenn 53 Olden, Danielle 94 Olmsted, Kathryn 29 Omowale, Yusef 26 Ordaz, Jessica 27 Ornelas-Higdon, Julia 48 Oropeza, Lorena 23, 95 Orozco, Cynthia E. 28 Orsi, Jaren 99 Ortega, Carolina 49 Ostler, Jeffrey 4, 94

P

Padilla-Rodríguez, Ivón 48 Padoongpatt, Mark 13, 28 Paiz, Christian 48 Parry, Darren 42, 55 Partida, Bryant 28 Patiño, Jimmy 43 Patton, Karissa Robyn 34 Paul, Kim 55

Q R

Radke-Moss, Andrea 18, 55, 94 Rahder, Bobbi J. 31 Ramirez, Sara 49 Ramírez, Yuridia 49 Reed, Julie L. 54, 99 Reese, Jacquelyn 32 Reid, Harry 13 Reid, Josh 9, 10, 48, 95, 98 Reidy, Skyler 34 Reimann, Melanie 49 Reinhardt, Akim 95 Remy, Jana 94 Rensink, Brenden 36, 95 Renteria, Cynthia 49 Reséndez, Andrés Rex, David 56 Richards, Thomas 28 Rico, Monica 99 Riley Sousa, Ashley 37 Rios, Daniel 30 Rivaya-Martínez, Joaquín 40 Rivera, Diana H. 42 Rivers, Daniel Winunwe 41 Rizzo, Martin 50 Robbins, Allison 36 Roberts, Alaina 24 Robinson, Reed 47 Robison, Jason Anthony 46 Rodríguez, Chantel 27, 52 Romero, Daniel, Jr. 24 Romero, Levi 54 Roper, Lynn 95 Rosales, Oliver Arthur 30 Rose, Chelsea 50 Rose, Taylor 52 Rosson, Lois 39 Rothberg, Emma Z. 53

105

Roy, Travis Brandon 35 Roybal, Karen R. 55 Rozsa, George Gregory 31 Rozum, Molly P. 27 Ruderman, Barry 95 Ruffin, Herbert 101 Ruppel, Kristin 55

S

Saavedra, Yvette J. 31, 55 Sachs, Honor 41 Sackman, Douglas 45, 99 Sadlier, Sarah 101 Sagás, Ernesto 43 Saitua, Iker 18, 43 Salazar, Theresa 32, 99 Sánchez, George J. 17, 33 Sánchez, Jaime, Jr. 45 Sandoval, Denise Michelle 42 Sandoval-Strausz, A.K. 40 Sanford, Cynthia 41 Sandweiss, Martha 9, 19, 94, 95, 99 Sarathy, Brinda 53 Sarzynski, Sarah 35 Sawyer, Toby Melissa 48 Schäfer, Stefanie 51 Scharff, Virginia 44, 95, 99, 101 Schiller, Joseph 24 Schimmel, Caroline 95 Schindler, Kevin 39 Schuele, Donna 94 Schulz, Joy 57, 99 Schumacher, Geoff 13, 16 Scofield, Rebecca 11, 35 Scott, Amy 52 Scrivener, Laurie 32 Seefeldt, Douglas 94 Senkewicz, Robert M. 34 Sexton, Steven 27 Shafer, Jonathan 34 Shaler, Andrew 43 Shanahan, Brendan 51 Shaw, Fred 95 Shepherd, Jeffrey P. 24, 38, 52, 101 Shin, K. Ian 50 Simmons, Kristen 31 Simon, Cori L. 24 Sizek, Julia 52 Smith, Christopher Clayton 43 Smith, John L. 18 Smith, Sherry L. Smith, Stacey 39, 50, 53 Smithers, Gregory 99 Smoak, Gregory E. 30, 95 Snyder, Christina 37, 51 Soliman, Anthony 51 Sorenson, Harold 95 Specht, Joshua 57 Spezio, Teresa Sabol 53


WHA 2019 – PROGRAM INDEX Spice, Anne 36 St. John, Laura McClure 42 St. John, Rachel 9, 10, 46, 95, 98 Stack, Brian 26 Steele, James K. 30 Steptoe, Tyina 11, 38, 57 Stevens, Jennifer 95 Stevenson, Allyson Donna 40, 98, 101 Stevenson, Brenda E. 30 Stewart, Austin 54 Still, Taylor 40 Stock, Catherine McNicol 35 Stoldal, Robert 13 Stremlau, Rose 26 Suarez, Sasha Maria 47 Sumano Ortega, Kimberly 31 Sundberg, Kaitlin 92 Swafford, Tamrala 98 Swords, Molly Elizabeth 53

T

Tafolla Rivière, Brianna 27 Tate, Ryan Driskell 48 Tatonetti, Lisa M. 41 Taylor, Glory 32 Taylor, Joseph E. III 95 Terry, Charlotte Hansen 37, 50 Theobald, Brianna 47 Thigpen, Jennifer 31 Thompson, Harry F. 35 Thomson, Claire 46 Thompson, Greg 94, 95 Thompson, Jerry 95 Thrush, Coll 24 Tifft-Ochoa, Jenni 47 Toledano, Anna 34 Torres-Rouff, David 43 Trabucco, Shine 32, 49 Trafzer, Clifford E. 39, 52, 99 Trinidad, Rosalina 28 Tronnes, Libby Rose 54 Truden, John 24 Truett, Samuel 57 Turk, Michelle Follette 16, 41 Turpie, David 26

U V

Vail, David D. 34, 47 Valadares, Desirée A. 34 Valadez, Jennifer 47 Valdez, Desrie 47 Valerio Jiménez, Omar 99, 101 Vallejo, Maria Guadalupe 31 Vargas, Deb R. 57 Vega, Sujey 24 Velasco, Rita Marie 29

LAS VEGAS 2019

Venit-Shelton, Tamara 11, 29, 47, 50, 98 Verbeten, Jonathan 36 Vidrio, Jesus 49 Villazón Valbuena, Miriam 55 Villeneuve, Matt S. 31 Vo Dang, Thuy 26 Voelker, Emily L. 51 Vogel, David 53 Voyles, Traci Brynne 39, 53, 94, 98 Vu, Roy 38

W

Wadewitz, Lissa 25 Walker, Chantal 51 Walters, Melody M. Miyamoto 51, 95 Waltz, Alexandria 32 Warren, Jamin 48 Warren, Louis 37, 46, 95, 98 Watry, Elizabeth Ann 46 Weaver, Robert 46 Weeks, Michael 34 Weiner, Dana Elizabeth 30 Whalen, Kevin 39 White, Claire 46 White, Claytee 13 White, Richard 44, 95 Whitehead, Frank 56 Whitely, Kat 95 Whitmer, Mariana 36 Whitt, Sarah Ashley 51 Wieck, Lindsey 18, 23, 40, 94 Williams, Carolyn 49 Williams, Samantha 31 Wingo, Rebecca S. 45, 48, 94 Winkelmann, Tessa Marie 48 Winslow, Brady G. 56 Winston, Bryan 46, 49 Wixon, Amanda K. 26, 50 Wood, Linda Sargent 18, 94 Woodhouse, Keith 52 Wright, Brian 43 Wright, Will 31 Wrobel, David M. 24, 94, 95, 101 Wu, Judy Tzu-Chun 101 Wunder, John 95 Wyatt, Kerry 95 Wyckoff, William 47 X Y Yarbrough, Fay 99 Yazzie, Melanie 44 Yellow Boy, Corey Wayne 46 Yokota, Kariann Akemi 37, 44 Young, Micaela 55 Young, Terence 34, 46

106

Z

Zabarte, Ian 32 Zallen, Jeremy 57 Zapata, Joel 32 Zizzamia, Daniel 39


Study the North American West!

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA

HISTORY M.A. PROGRAM offers courses, internships, and programs that concentrate in the North American West, Native American Studies, Immigration Law & Policy, Great Plains, Environment, Women and Gender, Comparative Indigenous & Genocide, and Digital Engagement

The UNO HISTORY DEPARTMENT provides graduate students with unique opportunities for research and professional development, including: ▪ Funded Teaching Assistantships (tuition + stipend) ▪ ▪ Thesis Writing Fellowships (tuition + stipend) ▪ ▪ Martin Fund for Western History (travel & research) ▪ ▪ Graduate Research Grants (GRACA) ▪ ▪ University Committee Grants for Research (UCRCA) ▪ ▪ Western History Association ▪ ▪ History Intern Program ▪ ▪ Missouri Valley History Conference ▪

The UNO History Department is also the home for the WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION, which opens doors for graduate student networking, funding, and exposure to the historical profession. Please inquire with Dr. Elaine Nelson, WHA Executive Director (emnelson@unomah.edu) WWW.CAS.UNOMAHA.EDU/HISTORY 107


WESTGATE FLOOR MAP

Conference Rooms 7-14 are up one level

All WHA Conference events will take place in the Conference Center of the Westgate Resort (highlighted in green) After you enter the main lobby (pink) of the hotel turn right and follow the signs accordingly Conference Rooms 1-6 are on the main level; Conference Rooms 7-14 are up one level Bus pick-up for off-site reception and tours will meet at the East Entrance of the Westgate (highlighted in yellow)


Professor Jol1nson joins western l1istorians Micl1ael Alarid, William Bat1er, RaquĂŠl Casas, Micl1ael Green, and Andy Kirk, v,rl10 togetl1er embody an intellectual con1n1t1nity con1n1itted to place-based l1istories of gender, race, etl1nicity, and indigeneity, and of both urban and 1ural, both built and natt1ral environments. Our M.A. and Ph.D. programs, in addition to traditional assistantships, offer a range of graduate student opportunities of special interest to western and public historians, all housed in the History Department. These include 12-month renewable assistantships with the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association; Graduate Student Associate Directorships of Preserve Nevada, our statewide historic preservation association; and assistantships with the Southwest Oral History Association. Students also have the opportunity to work with the UNLV Public History/Public Lands Institute on a wide range of projects at the intersection of western, environmental, cultural, and public history, including the amazing Walking Box Ranch. To learn more please visit www.unlv.edu/history and www.unlvpublichistory.com

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Department of History


Homesteading the Plains

NOW IN PAPERBACK

By Richard Edwards, Jacob K. Friefeld, & Rebecca S. Wingo Homesteading the Plains offers a bold new look at the history of homesteading, overturning what for decades has been the orthodox scholarly view. The authors begin by noting the striking disparity between the public’s perception of homesteading as a cherished part of our national narrative and most scholars’ negative and dismissive treatment.

New Scholarship on Black Homesteaders

in Great Plains Quarterly

“Staking Their Claim: Dewitty and Black Homesteaders in Nebraska” Summer, 2018

“African American Homesteader ‘Colonies’ in the Settling of the Great Plains” STEADING P ME R O

IV

ER

SIT Y

B OF NE

RA

“African Americans and the Southern Homestead Act” Spring, 2019

“Canaan on the Prairie: New Evidence on the Number of African American Homesteaders in the Great Plains”

A

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Photo: Great Plains Black History Museum

ECT OJ

THE H

Winter, 2019

SK

Summer 2019

go.unl.edu/homesteading

Profile for Western History Association

WHA 2019 Conference Program  

Conference Program for the 59th Annual WHA Conference

WHA 2019 Conference Program  

Conference Program for the 59th Annual WHA Conference

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