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OC TOBER 2012 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Realignment: How Cities Can Recover Costs to Fight Crime p.8 Regs for Lobbying Local Agencies p.6 New High-Tech Tools Enhance Public Safety Efforts p.12

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CONTENTS 2 3

Calendar of League Events

8

President’s Message

Focusing on Economic Development By Bill Bogaard

Cities can draw on their own police powers and state laws to abate problems from drugs and prostitution to graffiti and gangs.

City Forum

Mark Your Calendar Now For November Legislative Briefings

12

The Legislative Briefings cover information of critical importance to cities and are offered in two formats, online and in person, to make them readily accessible for all member cities.

6

Realignment: How Cities Can Maximize Existing Powers and Recover Costs to Fight Crime By Matthew R. Silver

In an era of tight economic resources, how can we best promote the economies of our cities and California as a whole?

5

Legal Notes

Everyday Ethics for Local Officials

Regulating Lobbying Activities, Part II of II

By Eva Spiegel High-tech tools are making it possible for cities to issue alerts in real time to their communities, respond more quickly to emergencies and maximize scarce resources.

13

California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

San Mateo Helps Residents “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!”

By Daniel D. Purnell This column presents options for securing compliance with local lobbying laws and questions to ask about what kind of laws make sense for a particular community.

New High-Tech Tools Keep Residents Safe, Informed And Engaged

15

Job Opportunities

23

Professional Services Directory Cover Photo: Kinetic Imagery/ Shutterstock

What is your city’s top public safety challenge? Keeping fire and police adequately staffed and the needed resources in place while dealing with less revenue and maintaining morale.

This Month

Bill Hodge Council Member Calexico

To read more answers to this question from elected officials, visit www.westerncity.com and click on “Web Exclusive.”


President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Second Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

Immediate Past President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

November

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

15 – 16

Board of Directors Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

28 – 29

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

Municipal Finance Institute, San Jose This conference provides essential information in a new two-day format for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

Contributors Dan Carrigg Dorothy Holzem Koreen Kelleher JoAnne Speers Jennifer Whiting Patrick Whitnell

28 – 30 City Clerks New Law & Elections Seminar, San Jose This seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as many aspects of the city clerk’s responsibilities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

JANUARY 2013

16 – 18

Design Pat Davis Design Group, Inc.

New Mayors and Council Members Academy, Sacramento This vitally important training prepares newly elected officials for the demands of office and introduces them to the legal constraints on city councils.

For photo credits, see page 16.

17 – 18 Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2012 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXVIII, No. 10.

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FSC is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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League of California Cities

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

18 Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

30 – February 1 City Managers Department Meeting, San Francisco Geared to the unique needs of city managers, this conference covers issues affecting cities throughout California.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


President’s Message by Bill Bogaard

Focusing on Economic Development

This column marks the beginning of my year as League president, and one issue in particular continues to dominate discussions: In an era of tight economic resources, how can we best promote the economies of our cities and California as a whole? Now that the Legislature has eliminated local redevelopment agencies, what can we do to ensure that the economy is built for the benefit of all? Although the Legislature and the State of California are working on tools for economic development, these efforts are nowhere near to providing the scope and flexibility offered by redevelopment. Given the highly volatile political environment of the Legislature, it’s unrealistic to think the state is going to provide local governments with an economic development tool that will effectively replace our defunct redevelopment agencies. Furthermore, as League Executive Director Chris McKenzie pointed out in his September Western City column “Taking the Long View,” the tensions between cities, the Legislature and the governor go all the way back to 1849 and are in no way a new challenge for us. (You can find his article online at www.westerncity.com.) But the cities of California historically have been self-starters. We’ve taken pride in our ability to develop solutions and protect local control by working together to solve problems without looking to the Legislature or the governor to fix things for us. If the state presents us with a solution that works for a given chal-

www.westerncity.com

lenge, we appreciate it and work with state leaders to fine-tune it — but we don’t count on this happening. Cities’ entrepreneurial spirit, flexibility and ability to adapt to a changing political environment are our major sources of strength and creativity, and these are the assets we are drawing on now. Efforts Currently Under Way

The League Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools began work early this year to identify a variety of options for cities and provide some helpful tools. While no single tool will work for every city in all respects, the work of the task force is focusing on two fronts. First, the League is working with legislators to help address the points of law that have prevented infrastructure financing districts from functioning as effective economic development continued

Western City, October 2012

3


Focusing on Economic Development, continued

tools for cities. Our legislative team is also engaged in stopping any efforts at the state level that would restrict cities’ flexibility. As Western City went to press, we were pleased the Legislature had enacted SB 214 (Wolk) to significantly improve the usefulness and flexibility of the Infrastructure Financing Districts law. That bill is awaiting action by the governor, along with a few

other bills designed to make tax increment financing available to cities for economic development and infrastructure. Second, the task force is examining successful economic development efforts of cities and local agencies that can be replicated without direction or help from the state. For example, community development corporations offer a number

It’s up to us to continue learning from each other and thinking creatively about economic development. of advantages, which are described in the article “The Next Generation of Economic Development Tools: Community Development Corporations” that appeared last month in Western City (online at www.westerncity.com). In my city, Pasadena, we have established a task force that includes many representatives of strong businesses from our private sector. The task force is taking a fresh look at our city’s strengths and offering suggestions on how we can build on those strengths to help move our local economy forward. Essentially, Pasadena is using the same collaborative approach that works so well for the League — building on the ingenuity and creativity of many people to find better ways to achieve our common goals. Looking Ahead

“Pervious concrete has the advantage of meeting multiple design requirements for storm water runoff management in Santa Barbara County.” — Cathleen Garnand, Civil Engineering Associate, County of Santa Barbara Water Resources Division

“We needed a material for the ADA compliant areas of the parking lot that would facilitate wheelchair access, accept code required striping and still allow the storm water to percolate.” — Brian Dougherty, FAIA, Dougherty + Dougherty Architects LLP

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League of California Cities

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It’s up to us, in cities throughout California, to continue learning from each other and thinking creatively about economic development. We have to work with the business community as well as other agencies in our regions — with a flexible approach and open minds. This entrepreneurial spirit is the source of our strength. I urge you to share information about your city’s successful economic development efforts with the League Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools. Send your information to Dan Carrigg, legislative director, League of California Cities, at dcarrigg@ cacities.org. Let’s move forward together to build a stronger California economy. n www.cacities.org


Mark Your Calendar Now for November Legislative Briefings F

or the third year in a row, the League is offering its end-of-the-year Legislative Briefings in two formats to make them readily accessible for all member cities. The Legislative Briefing webinar will be conducted Tuesday, Nov. 13 from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m., with an in-person briefing scheduled the next day, Nov. 14, at the Riverside City Hall from 9:00 a.m. to noon. Each participant will receive the League’s 2012 Legislative Briefing Report, which details each bill. The Legislative Briefings cover information of critical importance to cities. The League’s lobbyists provide details and context on the legislation that Gov. Jerry Brown signed in 2012. They will also discuss the new legislation’s impact on cities in the coming year.

increased workloads. The online format makes it possible for city officials and staff to participate and access valuable information while saving travel costs and time. The webinar also allows more people from each city to attend the Legislative Briefings. It’s no longer necessary for the mayor, council members or city manager to take copious notes to share with various individuals back at city hall. Now staff from every department can participate in the webinar and hear firsthand important information related to the services their department provides. The cost to participate in the Legislative Briefings is $25 for League members and League Partners. Register today for the 2012 Legislative Briefings at www. cacities.org/events. n

The Legislative Briefings will focus on key developments from the 2011–12 legislative session as well as the statewide November 2012 election. League lobbyists will offer perspectives on the election and its effects on cities and the Legislature, including the new “top two” primary election, changes in term limits and ballot initiative outcomes. “Specializing in providing advice and representation to public entities and California’s law enforcement agencies.”

Topics will include: • Pension reform; • Economic development in the postredevelopment era;

A Trusted Legal Team… Experts in Public Sector and Law Enforcement Issues – Over 30 years of experience • Municipal Law

• Training in Personnel & Labor Issues

• City Attorney

• Redevelopment

• Cap-and-trade revenues;

• Code Enforcement/City Prosecutor

• Water Law

• Government Tort Defense

• ADA

• Environmental legislation; and

• Internal Affairs Investigations

• Review & Revision of Policy Manuals

• Management & Operational Audits

• Health & Safety Receiverships

• Workers’ compensation;

• Public safety. Online Format Increases Convenience, Decreases Costs

The League introduced the webinar format in 2009 to help city officials cope with the issues of limited funds for travel and www.westerncity.com

Representing over 75 California Cities and Public Agencies, including:

Contact us today!

3777 N Harbor Blvd., Fullerton, CA 92835 www.jones-mayer.com

Jones & Mayer Attorneys at Law

(714) 446-1400 Western City, October 2012

5


Regulating Lobbying Activities, Part II of II by Daniel D. Purnell

Question

After a series of unfortunate

experiences, we are considering whether to adopt regulations related to lobbying our agency. What should we understand about regulating lobbyists?

Answer

The August “Everyday Ethics”

column (Part I, online at www.westerncity.com) examined common elements contained in local lobbying laws. This column presents options for securing compliance with these laws and questions to ask in determining what kind of laws make sense for a particular community.

The Challenges of Effective Enforcement Establishing a culture of effective administration and compliance presents one of the greatest challenges to a successful lobbyist registration program. It is not enough simply to prescribe penalties in the text of an ordinance. An effective lobbying program depends largely on active administration and workable compliance measures.

This column is a service of the Institute for Local Government (ILG), whose mission is to promote good government at the local level. For more information and to access ILG’s resources on public service ethics, visit www.ca-ilg.org/trust. Daniel D. Purnell is both a former local elected official and former executive director of the Oakland Public Ethics Commission. Purnell practices campaign and election law in California and serves as a volunteer for ILG. He can be reached at dandp626@gmail.com.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Everyday Ethics for Local Officials

Getting Complete and Accurate Reports Lobbying laws essentially operate on the honor system. Lobbyists are expected to register in a timely manner and truthfully report their activities. So how does a local agency ensure that these registration and reporting requirements are being met? One of the ways to help ensure accurate reporting is by requiring lobbyists to verify under penalty of perjury that the information contained in the reports is both complete and accurate. Professional lobbyists are not likely to risk damaging their credibility by failing to make full and honest disclosures. However, a strict verification requirement can help remind lobbyists that their disclosures are important and the local agency takes them seriously. Another way to ensure full disclosure is by developing a process for diligently reviewing information contained in lobbyist reports and cross-checking it against other sources. Given the large number of lobbyists, clients and decisions they seek to influence, even in moderately sized jurisdictions, chances are good that some reportable information may go unreported unless the lobbyist reports are reviewed carefully for errors and possible omissions.

Penalties for Noncompliance Many lobbying laws provide for criminal misdemeanor penalties in the event of an intentional violation. But because of the high burden of proof in criminal prosecutions, not all claimed violations may receive the attention they arguably deserve. Consequently some jurisdictions also provide for civil penalties, such as monetary fines and suspension from practice, in addition to criminal sanctions. Before any civil penalties can be imposed, however, alleged violations must first be investigated and, if necessary, submitted to a neutral fact-finder authorized to impose penalties. Investigating alleged violations of lobbying laws, often in the form of written complaints filed by members of the public, can be a complex, time-consuming activity. The process frequently involves inter-

www.westerncity.com

viewing parties and witnesses, obtaining records and ultimately analyzing whether enough facts exist to proceed with a formal hearing. If an investigation finds a reasonable basis for believing a violation has occurred, the local agency may conduct a formal hearing before a neutral hearing officer. While rare, such formal hearings can also be very time intensive and must conform to exacting procedural due-process requirements. These include adequate notice and a fair hearing.

Assigning Responsibility for Enforcing and Administering the Law Some jurisdictions have addressed the compliance issue, along with administrative issues, by creating a local body with limited powers of oversight and enforcement. For example, the cities of San Diego, Los Angeles, Oakland and San Francisco have delegated civil enforcement authority over their respective lobbying laws to local ethics commissions. These commissions also have jurisdiction over other local ethics laws, such as campaign finance and government conduct ordinances. Staff to these appointed boards investigate alleged violations in addition to administering the law, including such activities as developing forms, creating educational material and managing filed documents. The ethics commissions are authorized to sit as hearing panels to determine alleged violations of law and impose appropriate civil penalties. Not every local jurisdiction has the resources or desire to create an ethics commission to take responsibility for ensuring lobbyist compliance. Before adopting any lobbying law, serious thought should be given to the resources that the local agency is prepared to commit for necessary administration and enforcement. Without credible enforcement, compliance can suffer. The initial and annual registration fees many jurisdictions charge to cover or defray the cost of administering and enforcing the ordinance cannot always anticipate the sometimes extensive costs for a complex investigation or a protracted enforcement proceeding. continued on page 17

Western City, October 2012

7


Realignment: How Cities Can Maximize Existing Powers and Recover Costs to Fight Crime by Matthew R. Silver

About Legal Notes

Matthew R. Silver is an associate with the legal firm of Best Best & Krieger LLP and can be reached at Matthew.Silver@bbklaw.com.

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League of California Cities

This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local agency attorneys.


California’s Public Safety Realignment law, which went into effect a year ago, mandates that the state reduce the number of inmates in its prisons to 137.5 percent of the intended capacity by June 27, 2013. The legislation stemmed from a federal order issued by a three-judge panel, which was affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court. The law essentially shifted responsibility for the supervision of low-level offenders — whose last offense was nonserious, nonviolent and nonsexrelated — from the state to the local jurisdiction where they were originally sentenced.

A

t its core, realignment was intended to relieve California’s overcrowded prisons by:

• Incarcerating low-level offenders in local jails rather than transferring them to state custody; and • Giving local agencies responsibility for monitoring prisoners freed on probation. Realignment implementation is under way throughout the state. During this process if cities experience an increase in crime, they can draw on their own police powers and certain state laws to abate problems at essentially no cost other than (in some instances) staff time. A city’s own police power can be used as

the legal basis for adopting and enforcing local ordinances that define and regulate nuisances, aesthetics and certain criminal behaviors. In addition, specific state statutes empower cities to deal with problems ranging from drug use and prostitution to graffiti and gangs. Community policing or comprehensive code enforcement strategies are particularly effective when criminal activity is related in some manner to real property, whether criminals are utilizing property for drugs, gangs, illegal sexual activity, counterfeiting, gambling or other criminal conduct. Property-related criminal activities negatively affect entire communities, perpetuating a vicious cycle of crime and blight. Consequently it is imperative that cities use every available tool to address the criminal conduct at its source. Cities may enforce certain existing state laws or adopt their own ordinances based on their specific needs in the following areas. Drug activity. The California Drug Abatement Act allows cities, through their city attorney, to remove occupants from any building or place where any illegal drug activity occurs. The city may obtain an immediate order, prior to trial, requiring the building to be vacated and boarded against entry for up to one year. Violations of that order are punishable by fines up to $10,000 and six months in jail. In addition, any fixtures (such as a stove, refrigerator, etc.) in the building that were used for drug-related activities can be removed. Furthermore, a fine up to $25,000 may be imposed against each defendant, half of which is payable to the prosecuting city. The property owner may also be ordered to contribute to the city’s drug prevention programs. Finally, the city is entitled to recover all of its attorneys’ fees and investigation costs, including from the property itself through a lien. Prostitution and sexual crimes. The Red Light Abatement Act allows any city, through its city attorney, to vacate and board up for one year any building or place used for prostitution, lewd behavior or any other criminal sexual behavior that could lead to transmission of AIDS. It also

covers places used for illegal gambling. The same penalties and cost recovery rules apply as with the Drug Abatement Act. Cities may use both the Red Light Abatement Act and the Drug Abatement Act without passing an ordinance. Financial and intellectual crimes. When a person is convicted of counterfeiting or manufacturing, possessing or selling fake currency or goods, any nonresidential location where the activity took place may be shut down and boarded up for one year. Gang activity. A city can file a lawsuit against gang members through its city attorney under the California Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act. Every building or place in which gang members commit certain offenses, including robbery, murder, unlawful drug sales, rape, intimidation, theft or burglary, as well as any offense involving dangerous or deadly weapons, can be declared a public nuisance under this law. In addition, a fine may be imposed against individual gang members and the property owner, and the city may recover damages against the gang members on behalf of the community to improve the neighborhood. Attorneys’ fees are recoverable if the city has a properly worded ordinance. Gang injunction programs developed in cooperation with the local district attorney can be a very effective tool in combating gang crime. Graffiti. In dealing with gangs and other criminals, cities may enact helpful ordinances that allow them to hold taggers or their parents, if the tagger is a minor, responsible for the damage they cause. The city may punish graffiti violations criminally or obtain damages for the cleanup costs and staff investigation time. Attorneys’ fees and investigation costs are recoverable, and the city’s award may be recovered by a lien, special assessment or even by garnishing wages. Civil penalties up to $1,000 may also be imposed for each act of graffiti. Dilapidated buildings and/or properties. Properties occupied by criminals are more likely to be kept in poor condition, leading to increased blight and crime in the neighborhood. While many cities continued

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Western City, October 2012

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Realignment: How Cities Can Maximize Existing Powers and Recover Costs to Fight Crime, continued

already have ordinances requiring that properties be adequately maintained, they should ensure their ordinances are sufficiently strict, specific and well-drafted to provide them with ample authority to use substandard buildings or lack of property maintenance as an effective method to proceed against criminals. Under such ordinances, cities can seek criminal enforcement, civil fines, injunctions, appointment of receivers, and even demolition of the buildings and foreclosure.

Sex offenders. Using their police powers, cities can enact ordinances restricting registered sex offenders who have been convicted of crimes against minors from engaging in conduct that leads to contact with minors — even including answering the door to Halloween trick-or-treaters. Violation of the ordinance is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 and six months’ jail or probation.

- POBR/FBOR ISSUES

activities in which career criminals often participate and that affect the community’s quality of life. Some common examples include possessing an open container of alcohol or drinking alcohol in public, peddling goods or soliciting without a permit, selling or dealing goods close to a school, trespassing in a closed park and sleeping in public. The ordinance may declare these crimes to be misdemeanors punishable by a $1,000 fine and six months in jail. However, the most potent weapon is probation. Should a criminal violate an ordinance, a city prosecutor may seek probation, which could prohibit the criminal from violating any law in the future, associating with certain people (including other gang members), going to certain places, drinking alcohol or entering bars. Perhaps most helpful, a probation term may result in a defendant giving up his or her Fourth Amendment rights, allowing police to search the person as well as his or her home without probable cause or a warrant. Probation may last up to three years, and any violation can result in jail time, fines and/or additional probation. Thus, a typically minor violation may result in serious penalties and provide a city with additional tools to restrict some common criminal behaviors.

- LABOR RELATIONS

Making It Cost Neutral

Other criminal conduct. Cities may enact ordinances that criminalize certain

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League of California Cities

Cities may enact ordinances that allow for maximum cost recovery, which can result in neutralizing the costs of enforcement — including staff costs and attorneys’ fees — or even generating new revenue. To do so, the city must adopt an ordinance declaring that any violation of the municipal code, state law or federal law constitutes a public nuisance. The

www.cacities.org


Specific state statutes empower cities to deal with problems ranging from drug use and prostitution to graffiti and gangs. ordinance should also allow recovery of attorneys’ fees, staff wages and any other expense in any action taken to abate or prevent those nuisances, whether through criminal, civil, administrative or other means (such as execution of warrants resulting in abatement actions). Furthermore, the ordinance should allow the city to recover those costs through a lien or by placing them on the property tax rolls as a special assessment; an internal administrative hearing should be required only if requested by the violator within a specific time frame. Finally, the ordinance should stipulate that subsequent violations within a year will result in the fines, penalties or damages being tripled. Cities may also enact ordinances that allow them to impose administrative fines for each violation of the municipal code. Subject to certain limits, the fine amount (usually up to $1,000 per violation for general law cities) may be set by the city and recovered by lien or special assessment. The ordinance should provide that a fine may be imposed on each and every person responsible for the violation and may be imposed for each violation and each day it exists. Administrative fines, unlike those imposed in criminal cases, are paid to the city, and neither courts nor attorneys are required. Cities may even www.westerncity.com

consider entering into regional agreements with neighboring municipalities to share resources, maximize expertise and personnel and minimize costs.

local level, city officials should keep in mind the available options for reducing crime. With properly crafted ordinances and an understanding of which remedy is appropriate for a specific situation, a city can target problems that arise and recover much — if not all — of its enforcement costs. Although using these tools comes with the drawback of impacting staff and attorney time, at least the costs associated with that time are often recoverable. The impacts, therefore, can be minimized while reducing crime and blight. For most cities this is a worthwhile effort. n

Conclusion As the process of realignment continues to shift increased responsibility to the

Looking for Footnotes? A fully footnoted version of this article is available online at www.westerncity.com.

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Western City, October 2012

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T

New High-Tech Tools Keep Residents Safe, Informed and Engaged

hroughout California, cities are using hightech tools to help keep residents safer. When technology became more readily available a few decades ago, only the largest or wealthiest cities could afford to modernize and enhance their public safety systems. But as high-tech tools have become increasingly affordable, more cities are using them as part of delivering public safety services. These tools aren’t just cool gadgets but have made a substantial difference in how rapidly police and fire departments are able to respond to residents as well as solve and prevent crime. California cities are using technology in different ways to meet their local communities’ unique needs.

Redwood City Police Officer Steve Barker chats online with a resident as part of the city’s Live Guide program.

by Eva Spiegel

Rancho Cucamonga Focuses On Schools The Columbine High School massacre in 1999 spurred police departments throughout the nation to examine the

best ways of responding to violence and emergencies on school campuses. First responders need access to road networks and building plans. Because an offthe-shelf product didn’t exist in 2008, Rancho Cucamonga’s Police Department and Geographic Information System (GIS) Division partnered to create a program to help first responders respond to an incident at a school campus. Los Osos High School served as the pilot campus. The program, which can be updated in real time, created interactive maps that comprise campus buildings, detailed floor plans and panoramic images. This provides deputies on the scene and in their cars with access to current information.

The city’s GIS Division and Police Department expanded the partnership in 2010 to include the Rancho Cucamonga Fire District and the city’s five school districts, which include four high schools and eight junior high schools. This coalition secured a $173,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice Community Oriented Policing Services Secure Our Schools Program, which covered half the cost. “We have almost 40 schools, but because there is more propensity to have this type of event happen in a junior high or high school we included those first,” says Fabian Villenas, principal management analyst in the City Manager’s Office. The program has facilitated greater interaction between the city’s law enforcement and schools. Rancho Cucamonga has used the program extensively in training public safety officers. It serves as a resource for any campus emergency. “It’s like disaster preparedness — you prepare for it whether it happens or not,” says Villenas. The program can be expanded to other highprofile facilities, such as the courthouse, civic center and elementary schools, once funding is available. continued on page 21

Eva Spiegel is communications director for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Public safety staff meet with neighbors; Sergeant David Norris and McGruff the Crime Dog join young residents in celebrating National Night Out. left

right

San Mateo Helps Residents

“Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” Located in the heart of the San Francisco Peninsula, San Mateo is a vibrant community of 97,000 residents with more than 25 active neighborhood groups and homeowners associations. In addition, an organization called the San Mateo United Homeowners Association provides a citywide forum for neighborhood leaders to share information and discuss common issues. The city has a long tradition of partnering with these groups to promote community safety and preparedness through the Neighborhood Watch program operated by the Police Department and the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) and Get Ready programs operated by the Fire Department. The city launched an initiative in December 2010 to enhance the connection between the Neighborhood Watch and CERT programs and homeowners and neighborhood associations. The goal was to expand awareness of these programs and promote resident involvement within their neighborhoods and the city. The city convened a working group comprising a police sergeant who served as the Neighborhood Watch supervisor, the deputy fire marshal and fire captain who led the CERT and Get Ready programs, the city’s volunteer coordinator and the president of the San Mateo United Homeowners Association. Over the next three months, the working group developed a collaborative campaign called “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” to help promote emergency preparedness and strengthen neighborhoods.

The campaign kicked off at a city council meeting in March 2011 with a joint presentation by fire staff, police and the San Mateo United Homeowners Association. The city council strongly supports the campaign. “It is always helpful for more people to become and remain interested in emergency preparedness,” says Mayor Brandt Grotte. “When a major event happens, we will all need to rely on our friends and neighbors while emergency responders may be occupied with high-priority calls.” The 2011 “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” campaign activities included: • A city council proclamation highlighting the campaign; • A city website page with information about the Neighborhood Watch, CERT and “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” programs as well as homeowners and neighborhood associations (http:// bit.ly/smneighbors); • Media outreach to local news outlets; • Campaign banners displayed in downtown San Mateo and in San Mateo City Hall; • Outreach about Neighborhood Watch, CERT and “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” at homeowners and neighborhood association meetings; and • Promotion of homeowners and neighborhood association membership in their respective neighborhoods. continued

The City of San Mateo won the 2012 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in the Public Safety category. For more about the award program, visit www.HelenPutnam.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, October 2012

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San Mateo Helps Residents “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” continued

Noteworthy Results

San Mateo conducted the promotional campaign again in March 2012, with noteworthy results. The number of Neighborhood Watch blocks and CERT graduates increased significantly. The city had about 300 active Neighborhood Watch blocks in 2011; now 350 blocks are active, a 16 percent increase. More than 40 blocks hosted parties for the 2011 National Night Out (a nationwide event held annually in August to promote community safety); the 2012 event featured 53 block parties. In addition, 142 residents graduated from the CERT program in the past year, joining the 500 previous graduates. More residents are volunteering their time and talents to assist with city services. An average of 1,374 volunteers each quarter contributed a total of 77,368 hours of services for a total in-kind service value of $1.65 million in 2011. These volunteers

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serve as office greeters, board and commission members and lunchtime “helping hands” at the Senior Center and in other important roles. The city continues expanding its volunteer offerings, which are online at www.cityofsanmateo.org/ volunteer. The campaign’s collaborative nature has strengthened connections between the city and homeowners and neighborhood associations. It’s also a catalyst for generating new ways for residents to work together on addressing issues and concerns. For example, the San Mateo United Homeowners Association developed “Top 10 Ways to Help Your City, Your Neighborhood and Your Community” (http://bit.ly/sm10ways), which includes activities such as “adopt the storm drain in front of your house,” “bring Neighborhood Watch to your block” and “volunteer in your community.” The city has also promoted the use of an online social network for neighborhoods, and nearly

1,500 residents have signed up in more than 20 neighborhoods. A Model for Replication

The “Be Ready, Be Safe, Be Involved!” campaign can be replicated in any city. The key elements include building on existing efforts, such as Neighborhood Watch and CERT programs, and working collaboratively with community groups, including homeowners and neighborhood associations. The campaign has provided an extremely effective mechanism for San Mateo to improve collaboration with neighborhood groups and increase community awareness of the importance of being prepared and ready for any emergency situation. Contact: Matt Bronson, assistant city manager, City of San Mateo; phone: (650) 522-7000; email: mbronson@cityofsan mateo.org. n

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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.com and click on the “Advertise” link.

Just announced . . .

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 2621801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity

We are passionate about local government and recruiting talented professionals with an affinity for public service! n

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City of Pismo Beach

Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for the latest information Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Steve Parker • 949.322.8794

To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.western city.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Did You Miss the September Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

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ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away.

We provide City Managers, Dept. Heads & Clerical Staff Finance & Accounting Staff for Year-End Closing MuniTemps provides experienced City workers at lower rates than our competitors

Interim Staffing for All City Departments! Call Us Toll Free

1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

Serving all Cities in California!

MuniTemps will Save Your City Money! Human Resources Director, City of Roseville, CA The City of Roseville, CA (approximate population 112,000) is located in Placer County along the eastern edge of the Sacramento Valley at the base of the Sierra Nevada foothills. Roseville is now seeking a Human Resources Director to oversee an operating budget of approximately $1.7 million and a staff of thirteen. The ideal candidate will be a team player who is engaging with staff and has the ability to get to consensus. The new Director will lead the Department to continued excellence while furthering the great vision of the City as it grows from its current population to nearly 200,000 at build-out. The City would benefit from a results-oriented individual with the ability to lead the Department with confidence and enthusiasm. A Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources, Public Administrative, or Business Administration and seven years of experience in human resources and risk management are required, along with at least three years of administrative and management experience. The salary for the Human Resources Director is $109,893-$147,268 annually; placement within the range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date October 19, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.westerncity.com

Western City, October 2012

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City of Colusa Take your career to the next level.

CITY MANAGER

Upcoming Opportunities: City of Dana Point, CA Director of Community Development

City of Santa Clara, CA Accounting Manager Assistant Director of Water & Sewer Utilities

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he City of Colusa, with a population over 6,000, is seeking a creative and innovative City Manager to operate the day to day affairs of the City. This person shall employ a team approach with City department heads and staff to problem solving and be proactive in addressing issues that impact the City Council and the community. This position requires significant experience in a management capacity preferably in a local government setting with similar issues. This position is also ideal for a professional who has been an assistant city manager or department director. A Bachelor’s degree in public administration or related field is required; a Master’s degree would be a plus. The salary and benefits package will be consistent with recent City compensation practices ($95,000.00 - $135,000.00 base salary) and will be solely based on overall qualifications, education, and salary history. An at-will employment agreement will be negotiated with the top candidate and may include moving and relocation reimbursement to move within the city limits. For more information: go to www.cityofcolusa.com. To apply: contact Patrick Clark at pc@patrickclarkconsulting.com or call 916-838-2806. Screening begins Nov. 15th, 2012. Open until filled.

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Please visit our website

www.peckhamandmckenney.com or call (866)

912-1919 for more information.

Business Development Manager, City of Roseville, CA The City of Roseville, CA (approximate population 122,000) is located in Placer County along the eastern edge of the Sacramento Valley at the base of the Sierra Nevada foothills. Roseville is now seeking a contract Business Development Manager. This position reports to the Assistant City Manager and is focused on supporting the economic growth of Roseville through a proactive business attraction and retention effort. The ideal candidate will be self-motivated, results-oriented, and skilled in business retention, attraction, and communication. Candidates for the position of Business Development Manager must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Finance, Economics, or a related field, as well as a proven track record and significant experience in job attraction, marketing, and negotiations. The salary for the Business Development Manager is open and dependent upon qualifications. The contract length for this position is open, up to 3 years, funded on an annual basis. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date October 26, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Photo/art credits Cover: Kinetic Imagery/Shutterstock Page 3: Alexei Nikolaevich/Shutterstock Page 4: Isak55/Shutterstock Page 5: graphic, My Portfolio/Shutterstock; photo, Andy Z./Shutterstock Page 6: Hu Xiao Fang/Shutterstock Page 7: Nevena/Shutterstock Page 10: left, Carl Ballou/Shutterstock; right, Sowar Online/Shutterstock

Page 11: left, John Roman Images/Shutterstock; right, Alex Aranda/Shutterstock Page 12: Courtesy Redwood City Page 13: Courtesy City of San Mateo/ League of California Cities Page 18: Losevsky Photo and Video/Shutterstock

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Regulating Lobbying Activities, Part II of II, continued from page 7

Alternative and Complementary Laws

also provide an effective cross-check on subsequent lobbying reports.

Given that lobbying laws can be challenging to administer and enforce, what alternative approaches can local agencies use? If one of the primary purposes of lobbying laws is to shed light on how public decisions are influenced and made, lobbyists are not the only source of pertinent information. Public officials can also serve as a source of information.

Another source of information about lobbying activities is the online posting of public officials’ calendars and appointment books. Such requirements

One option is to adopt “ex parte communication” rules that essentially take the burden of disclosure and shift it to or share it with the public officials being lobbied. This approach is unique because it expands a public official’s obligation to disclose his or her outside (“ex parte”) communications made in connection with quasi-judicial proceedings to include communications related to certain legislative or administrative actions as well. For example, the City of San Jose’s municipal code includes the following language: “Before taking any legislative or administrative action, the mayor, each member of the city council … and each member of the planning commission, civil service commission or appeals hearing board must disclose all scheduled meetings and telephone conversations with a registered lobbyist about the action. The disclosure may be made orally at the meeting before discussion of the action on the meeting agenda. The oral disclosure must identify the registered lobbyists, the date(s) of the scheduled meetings and telephone conversations and the substance of the communication ...” Not all public officials will be particularly excited about having to track and record the names of lobbyists they speak with, much less having to announce publicly that they meet with lobbyists at all on legislative or administrative matters. Still, few people are in a better position to know who is trying to influence decision-makers’ actions than a public official. A requirement to disclose ex parte communications on legislative and administrative matters has the advantage of providing the public with information that is both immediate and relevant to the decision at hand. It can www.westerncity.com

are usually adopted in the context of local transparency ordinances. But in conjunction with a local lobbying law, such requirements can provide relevant information about meetings involving public officials and lobbyists. Some public agencies and officials already use continued

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Public safety opportunities . . .

Police Chief

City of Menlo Park

Fire Chief

Alameda County

Police Chief City of San José

Visit the TB&Co. website for the latest information – www.tbcrecruiting.com Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Joe Brann • 310.265.7479 Steve Parker • 949.322.8794

Police Chief, City of Inglewood, CA The City of Inglewood is a vibrant and culturally diverse community of 120,000 residents situated less than a half hour from the Los Angeles, Long Beach, and San Pedro harbors in southern California. Inglewood is seeking a Police Chief to oversee an operating budget of $43.3 million, 179 sworn officers, and 73 full-time civilian employees. The ideal candidate for this position will be a progressive-thinking, open, and honest individual who will advance the City’s forward-thinking public safety policies while strengthening the Department’s relationship with the community. Candidates with experience in an urban, ethnically diverse community are highly desirable. The Police Chief position requires a minimum of ten years of progressively responsible senior command experience in an organization commensurate with Inglewood’s staff size and budget, as well as an educational background in police science, criminal justice, public administration, law enforcement, or a similar field; a Master’s degree is preferred. Candidates must also possess or obtain applicable POST certification. The salary for this position is open and dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date October 28, 2012. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, October 2012

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Regulating Lobbying Activities, Part II of II, continued

software packages that include electronic calendaring functions that can be adapted to include the pertinent meeting information. This information can be posted and updated daily if desired. The compulsory disclosure of meeting information is not without controversy.

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California courts have generally upheld disclosure requirements as part of the regulation of professional lobbyists. However, the courts have not addressed the specific issue of whether local agencies can compel uncompensated residents to register as lobbyists and provide informa-

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Multiple Director Positions City of Oakland, CA The City of Oakland (population 420,183) is located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay in the County of Alameda. The City is currently seeking qualified applicants for the following positions:

• Administrative Services Director • Budget Director • Human Resources Director • Information Technology Director Please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com for more information regarding these exciting career opportunities. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

tion regarding their communications with public officials. Privacy and First Amendment issues could also arise if public officials are required to publicly identify and disclose the names of constituents with whom they meet or produce records containing similar information. Legal issues aside, it would seem essential to consider as a matter of public policy whether a contemplated disclosure law — such as ex parte communications and public posting of appointment calendars — could chill public interest and participation for individual residents in the decision-making process.

Identifying the Right Approach for Your Agency An unfortunate reality is that ethics laws are often adopted reactively following a public crisis or scandal. Lobbying laws are no exception and are sometimes susceptible to the political dynamic in which legal, ethical or practical considerations give way to an overriding desire to “do something.”

Ralph Andersen & Associates www.RalphAndersen.com (916) 630-4900

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League of California Cities

A Tradition of Excellence

Providing Executive Search, Compensation, and Consulting Services Since 1972

Part of the measured consideration of whether and how to regulate lobbying should include an assessment of: • Which approach is pertinent and necessary within a particular jurisdiction; and

www.cacities.org


• How the information gathered will be put to use. What Problem Does the Agency Need to Solve? Looking at what other jurisdictions have done can be helpful in assessing which approach makes sense, but policy-makers are also well-advised to consider the dynamics within their particular community. Such considerations include:

How Will Any Information Collected Be Used?

Taking the community’s unique needs into account will help determine what type of information to seek from local lobbyists as well as what restrictions to place on lobbying activities.

The next question is what should be done with the information once it is obtained. This is a key element of a lobbying ordinance’s effectiveness. Some jurisdictions continued

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• Are there relatively few or many lobbyists operating in the community? • What types of interests do they represent, and what types of decisions tend to be influenced? • How do lobbyists exercise influence: by directly urging certain public policy decisions, financing political campaigns and/or channeling money to favored causes or organizations? • Which approach would best target the perceived need? It may be helpful to consider other options, too, such as: • A local campaign-financing ordinance that limits the amount and/or restricts the source of contributions; or

City Manager

Park City Municipal Corporation Sitting at an elevation of 7,000 feet within Summit County, Utah, just 30 miles east of Salt Lake City, Park City (7,500 permanent pop.; 3M annual visitors) provides a small town atmosphere, strong sense of community, historic character, outstanding facilities and amenities, and an exceptional quality of life. Appointed by the Mayor, with advice/consent of a 5-member Council, the City Manager will oversee this financially secure, AA+ rated, High Performance Organization of 344 FTE’s and $69M budget with the goal to be “The Best Led and Managed Resort Town in America.” A progressive, visionary, and collaborative local government professional is desired; resort and/or tourism experience is preferred, but not required. Bachelor’s degree required; Master’s degree desirable. Competitive salary DOQ.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline: October 22, 2012.

• A transparency ordinance that augments the local agency’s duty to disclose information.

Available in the fall . . . Seek Professional Advice Although the Institute for Local Government endeavors to help local officials understand laws that apply to public service, its informational materials are not legal advice. In addition, attorneys can and do disagree on the best interpretation of the complex rules relating to public service ethics. Officials are encouraged to consult an attorney or the Fair Political Practices Commission for advice on specific situations.

www.westerncity.com

Budget Officer City of Concord

Development & Resource Management Director City of Fresno

Director, Office of Management & Budget City of Palo Alto

Detailed information and submission instructions available at www.tbcrecruiting.com Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Western City, October 2012

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Regulating Lobbying Activities, Part II of II, continued

use interactive online systems. These can be more convenient for both those reporting information and those wanting to access it. Some have useful search functions and other helpful features. In jurisdictions without interactive systems, one option is to post a current

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list of lobbyists and their clients on the agency’s website. The goal is to present information in a way that allows the public and public officials to easily access key facts. Charts and tables can be beneficial tools in this regard.

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Chief of Police — City of Santa Maria The City of Santa Maria, on the beautiful Central Coast of California, is recruiting for CHIEF OF POLICE. With a diverse population of over 100,000; the City is a growing community balancing development while maintaining agricultural lands and promoting business. Under administrative direction, the incumbent plans, organizes, and directs the activities of the Police Department in the enforcement of law, prevention of crime, and protection of life and property; and performs related work as assigned. The Police Department has a current budget of $21.8 million and a full-time complement of 160 employees. The City recently purchased a 70,000 square foot facility and is beginning renovation for relocation of the department in 2014. Minimum qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in a police-related field, possession of or eligibility for a P.O.S.T. Management Certificate. Six years of progressively responsible experience in a variety of police duties, including holding a command-level rank. Full job requirements and online application available at www.ci.santa-maria.ca.us. $140,733 – 171,062* annually, plus 5% education incentive and 3% performance base pay; and an excellent benefit package. Contact the HR Division for further questions at (805) 925-0951 x203. Filing deadline date: 11/14/12 a 5:00 pm. *Does not reflect 2012 furlough program.

City Attorney, City of Fort Lauderdale, FL Located along the beautiful, pristine southeast coast of Florida between Palm Beach and Miami, the City of Fort Lauderdale is the seventh largest city in Florida and the largest of Broward County’s 31 municipalities. A diverse and vibrant community, Fort Lauderdale’s strong economy, exceptional amenities, and focus on neighborhoods contribute to its excellent quality of life. The City of Fort Lauderdale City Commission is seeking qualified candidates for the City Attorney position. The City employs about 2,300 full-time staff and is a full-service city, including Police, Fire-Rescue and Utilities. The City has a budget of $612 million, including a General Fund of $324 million. The City Attorney is one of four charter officers and is appointed by the Mayor and four District Commissioners to provide legal counsel to the City Commission, City Administration, City Advisory Boards and Committees, and to protect the legal interests of the City in the conduct of its day-to-day business. The City Attorney’s Office has 24 members including the City Attorney and 11 Assistant City Attorneys 12 attorneys and a departmental operating budget of $3.9 million. The ideal candidate will have administrative and management experience with a public or private practice, a variety of litigation experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills, and strong analytical abilities. Graduation from an accredited college of law and a license to practice law in the State of Florida is required, with a minimum of 15 years of progressively responsible legal experience of which at least ten years will be in public sector and local government law; experience in land use, historic preservation, public utilities and labor unions a plus. Deadline: October 29, 2012. Salary is open and dependent on qualifications, with a comprehensive benefit package. To apply, visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com and follow the prompt to create an online profile. Questions may be directed to Ms. Renee Narloch, Vice President, Bob Murray & Associates, at (850) 391-0000 or info@bobmurrayassoc.com. A detailed brochure is available. The City of Fort Lauderdale is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Pursuant to Florida’s open records law, the application/resumes are subject to public disclosure.

Sharing this information regularly with elected officials and staff can also be a good practice. Doing so can provide an important check to ensure that lobbyists are fully complying with disclosure requirements. Periodically transmitting such information can encourage recipients to contact the filing office if they notice any discrepancies or errors.

Measuring Lobbying Ordinance Effectiveness Tracking and analyzing the number of lobbyists and clients registered, the issues lobbied upon and the number of staff hours expended to administer and enforce the ordinance can provide valuable and useful information. The ultimate success of a lobbyist registration program, however, will ultimately rely on community perceptions. Has the law improved transparency and public confidence in the decision-making process? Does it help community members better understand lobbyists’ role in influencing public policy? Have problematic activities diminished? While there may not always be consensus about whether these subjective standards have been achieved, a publicly noticed discussion — as part of a governing board, ethics commission or committee meeting — can produce valuable insights as to the effectiveness of the local ordinance and produce ideas for future amendments. At the very least, a well-administered lobbying law can and should provide elected officials and the public essential insight into the role of professional influence on the people’s business. n

Looking for Footnotes? A fully footnoted version of this article is available online at www.westerncity.com.

phone 850•391•0000 fax 916•735•2402 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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www.cacities.org


New High-Tech Tools Keep Residents Safe, Informed and Engaged, continued from page 12

San Carlos Uses Multiple Communications Channels Located close to Silicon Valley, San Carlos was a natural early adopter of putting technology to work in its Police Department. Its initial efforts started with using cameras to video and audio record police stops. Today the city uses a wide variety of tools, including social media, because it’s imperative to employ every means possible to reach residents. The city doesn’t just post its daily crime log online, but also tweets it. “A key of disseminating information to your community is being multichannel. Some people read your website, some read Facebook and some respond to email,” says Assistant City Manager Brian Moura. San Carlos initially encountered a negative reaction when it began posting pictures of crime suspects on its website, but city officials firmly believe that it is critical to disseminate such information as widely as possible. “When we post a sketch, it gets people’s attention and increases the odds of finding the person,” says Moura.

Redwood City Offers Live Video Chat The Redwood City Police Department recently launched Live Guide (www. redwoodcity.org/police), one of the first online services that enable residents to have a live video chat with a police officer from the comfort of their own home. It’s not just for residents but for anyone with a computer and camera connected to the Internet who needs to talk with the city’s Police Department. Users can communicate in a two-way discussion with an officer via video, audio or text. Live Guide offers another level of customer service for a community that is often considered the Silicon Valley of the San Francisco Peninsula. “Our community is tech savvy and expects communications,” says Redwood City Police Chief J.R. Gamez. Not designed for addressing life-threatening emergencies, the new service operates Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and will expand its hours of operation in coming continued www.westerncity.com

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Community Development Director City of Novato, CA

One of the Bay Area’s premier communities, Novato is located in Marin County 29 miles north of San Francisco. The Community Development Department consists of four Divisions: Planning, Building, Code Enforcement, and Housing. The new Director will have a wealth of experience in planning and community development and will share the City’s interest-based problem solving approach to foster community involvement in successfully completing the General Plan update, including the Housing element. A strong manager and leader is needed with a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in a related field required, Master’s degree preferred. Salary will be commensurate with the experience and qualifications of the selected candidate and the City offers a competitive benefits package.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline: November 12, 2012.

City of Baldwin Park, CA

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR The City of Baldwin Park is a progressive city located in the central San Gabriel Valley, with a commitment toward recruiting a strategic thinker, results-oriented leader for the position of Public Works Director, Salary DOQ. The ideal candidate will possess the leadership and management skills, experience, and proven effectiveness to plan, direct, and organize the activities and operations of the Public Works Department which include engineering, capital improvements, traffic, street improvements, landscape maintenance, graffiti removal, and street lighting. Success in this role will require an outstanding communicator, mentor, and visionary who will develop and maintain successful programs to help shape the City’s infrastructure. The successful candidate’s background will include at least five (5) years of increasingly responsible experience in municipal public works or civil engineering, with a minimum of three (3) years significant administrative and/or managerial experience working in a public agency. Bachelor’s degree in civil engineering, public administration, or related field; and registration as a civil engineer. The closing date is Monday, November 5, 2012. For additional information regarding this excellent career opportunity, please visit our web site www.baldwinpark.com or you may contact Leticia Lara, Human Resources Manager via email: llara@baldwinpark.com.

Western City, October 2012

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New High-Tech Tools Keep Residents Safe, Informed and Engaged, continued

Santa Cruz Focuses on Mobile Apps

months. Live Guide doesn’t take a single officer off the streets because the department is using modified-duty officers who are injured and can’t be out on patrol.

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Watch for these Upcoming Opportunities: • Yolo County, CA: Chief of Finance, DESS • Chino Valley Independent Fire District, CA: Fire Chief • City of Marina, CA: City Manager • Monterey County, CA: Parks Director For more information and filing deadlines, please contact: Bob Murray and Associates, 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202, Roseville, CA 95661 Phone: (916) 784-9080, Fax: (916) 784-1985, E-mail: apply@bobmurrayassoc.com

MONTEREY COUNTY, CA Assistant County Administrative Officer & Economic Development Director Beautiful Monterey County, with world-class attractions, spectacular coastline, thriving agriculture, mild weather and outdoor recreation choices, announces top management jobs --

Assistant County Administrative Officer

Serves as the County Administrative Officer’s chief deputy _____________________________________

Economic Development Director

Leads countywide economic and employment development efforts

Salaries Negotiable Depending on Qualifications For more information about Monterey County, the positions, the requirements and the application process visit our website at www.rjamanagement.com. First Review October 22, 2012. Open Until Filled. Apply to:

Dr. Richard Garcia RJA Management Services, Inc. 2719 So. Mayflower Ave., Suite A | Arcadia, CA 91006 | (626) 447-3318 www.rjamanagement.com | Email: rgarcia@rjamanagement.com

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League of California Cities

smartphones to access news. This proved especially true in Santa Cruz, where in 2009 the city’s use of traditional media failed to adequately inform the public about a sinkhole that blocked the city’s most traveled intersection. A two-mile traffic jam ensued that took six hours to clear. Vowing to develop better channels of communication, the Police Department set out to develop the first consumerfocused law enforcement smartphone application in the United States. Launched in March 2011 and funded by a federal grant, the Santa Cruz Police Department’s innovative iPhone app won a 2011 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence. More than 10,000 people have downloaded the app, and approximately 3,000 have downloaded the Android app that was subsequently developed. These apps provide access to the police scanner feed, interactive crime maps, videos and photos of wanted criminals, a blog and instant public safety alerts. These tools have helped the city solve crimes, locate crime suspects and even find a missing child. “Younger residents expect that this is how their local government will communicate with them and how they will communicate with their local government,” says Zach Friend, Santa Cruz Police Department spokesperson. “We have to provide services this way. This isn’t a luxury. It’s the reality of how we have to communicate.”

Cloverdale Fights Crime With Cal-Photo Thanks to an online statewide criminal database, police officers in the City of Cloverdale can correctly identify suspects and easily show victims a photo lineup. Launched in March 2002, Cal-Photo is a collaboration between the departments of Motor Vehicles and Justice. Users of the system can access mug shots and driver’s license images and data both from the police station and a vehicle outfitted with a laptop and Internet access. According to Technical Services Manager Ann Turek of the Cloverdale Police Department, using Cal-Photo is invaluable. “It speeds up the process of identifying and finding people and also makes it possible to keep officers in the field,” says Turek. www.cacities.org


Santa Monica Speeds Up Public Safety Process The City of Santa Monica is another early adopter of using technology to conduct everyday business. Not only is each patrol car outfitted with audio and video recording equipment and the ability to stream video back to the commander in the

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station, but also with a special biometrics device that takes fingerprints and cross references them with the state justice system and FBI. The videos captured by police officers are used as evidence and as a training resource for police officers. “The city has public safety cameras in the right of way at various locations where we think we need to protect the public, such as the downtown pier, in alleys, public parking structures and downtown entertainment venues,” says Jory Wolf, chief information officer with the City of Santa Monica. The Police Department has used these videos to solve crimes including robberies, hit-and-runs and assaults. The city is also employing technology to speed up parking-related activities. Previously it took three weeks for Santa Monica’s traffic or parking citations to be delivered to the court. Using hand-held ticketing devices, this is now done in just two hours.

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Increasing Responsiveness As residents increasingly rely on smartphones to stay informed about local news and events, technology offers a variety of ways for cities to enhance public safety services. High-tech tools are making it possible for cities to issue alerts in real time to their communities, respond more quickly to emergencies and maximize scarce resources. For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. n

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