Page 1

MARCH 2020 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Napa Lighted Art Festival Draws January Crowds p.12 Build Economic Development 

Momentum With Tools, Teams, and Tactics p.8

Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs p.15

www.westerncity.com


Representing California public agencies for over sixty years.

Coastal Construction Election Law Eminent Domain Environment & Natural Resources

Housing Authorities Housing Successors Joint Powers Authorities Labor & Employment Litigation

Municipal & Public Agency Law Public Finance Real Estate School Districts Special Districts

Successor Agencies Telecommunications Transportation Waste Management Water Districts

888.479.4529


CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events President’s Message 3  New Approaches Build Local Economies

By John F. Dunbar

 ttracting new businesses, retaining A employers, and providing opportunities for a skilled workforce are essential to fostering a healthy economy in our cities. California cities are using diverse approaches, programs, and tools to help support economic development and thriving communities.

City Forum 7 

Tourism Powers Economic Growth in Local Communities

By Caroline Beteta

 ith the state’s tourism industry on W the cusp of unprecedented growth in 2020, there’s no better time to harness your region’s tourism economy. Establishing tourism hubs, advocating sustainable tourism, and renovating infrastructure are just a few ways cities are powering local economies and improving the lives of residents.

Build Economic 8 

Development Momentum With Tools, Teams, and Tactics

By Gurbax Sahota

In most cities, economic development competes for resources and attention as local officials deal with urgent issues that include affordable housing, emergency response, and more. Despite these challenges, many cities are building momentum in realizing their economic development goals. This article explores some of the tools, potential team members, and tactics that can help your city boost its economic vitality.

2019 Helen Putnam Award 12  for Excellence

Napa Lighted Art Festival Draws January Crowds  The Napa Lighted Art Festival takes a bold, contemporary approach to the visual arts by bringing emerging light technologies into the city’s streets, where buildings function as large outdoor canvases and attract crowds. With an economic impact of nearly $2 million, the family-friendly festival creates tremendous pride for the local public art community, enhances the community’s vibrancy, and supports the city’s economy.

Effective tools for the timely financing of community-based projects.

15 Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs

By Randi Kay Stephens

 When a public agency needs entrylevel professionals and lacks qualified candidates, what can be done? Cities and the public sector now have a number of available options, including apprenticeships, to consider.

Job Opportunities 19  Professional Services 24  Directory

Cover photo: Yvonne Hunter

CSCDA enables local government and eligible private entities access to efficiently finance, locallyapproved projects that provide a public benefit. Since 1988, CSCDA has issued more than $60 billion in tax-exempt bonds for affordable housing, healthcare, infrastructure, schools, and other fundamental services. CSCDA is a joint powers authority created by:

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


President John F. Dunbar Mayor Yountville

1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200; Fax (916) 658-8240

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jill Oviatt (916) 658-8228; email: joviatt@cacities.org Managing Editor Jude Lemons, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Contributing Editor Kayla Woods (916) 658-8213; email: kwoods@cacities.org Business and Creative Manager Amanda Cadelago (916) 658-8226; email: acadelago@cacities.org Advertising Sales Cici Trino Association Outsource Services, Inc. (916) 961-9999; email: cicit@aosinc.biz Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org Contributors Melissa Kuehne Erica Manuel

First Vice President Cheryl Viegas Walker Council Member El Centro

Second Vice President Cindy Silva Mayor Walnut Creek

Immediate Past President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents MARCH 4–6

Planning Commissioners Academy, Sacramento Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff, and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

18–20

Public Works Officers Institute & Expo, Monterey Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers the latest developments in public works.

APRIL 2–3

Policy Committee Meetings, Anaheim The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

22

Design Taber Creative Group

Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 20. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif. Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2020 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCVI, No. 3.

23

Board of Directors Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses, and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

MAY 6–8

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, Carlsbad This meeting covers trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

NT RI

ED US IN

G

P

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events.

W

R

0

GY

10

%

IND EN

E

Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

2

League of California Cities

For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities Visit us on LinkedIn at Western City Magazine.

www.cacities.org


President’s Message by John F. Dunbar

Through its Workforce Development Initiative, the City of Milpitas connects students with local career options in advanced manufacturing.

New Approaches Build Local Economies Virtually every essential community service that enhances the quality of life in our cities — from public safety to infrastructure, parks, recreation, and more — depends on a vigorous local economy that supports a robust tax base and generates municipal revenues. Attracting new businesses, retaining employers, and providing opportunities for a skilled workforce are essential to fostering a healthy economy in our cities. This month, Western City takes a look at some inspiring examples of the diverse approaches, programs, and tools that California cities are using to help support economic development and thriving communities.

Regional Collaboration Yields Positive Results Although cities historically competed for employers and businesses, newer models of regional collaboration and cooperative

efforts are delivering positive results. In the Town of Yountville, where I serve as mayor, our elected leaders have tapped into a regional endeavor. The Workforce Alliance of the North Bay serves communities in Lake, Napa, Marin, and Mendocino counties. By focusing on development and training for workers through employment services, training initiatives, and career centers, the alliance helps to build a labor pool that can meet the needs of local employers. It works with businesses to identify job skills needed in key growth industries and collaborates with educational institutions to offer career tracks that meet employers’ needs. The alliance also provides labor market data, including demographics and wages, along with information on the region’s priority sectors: health care, biotechnology and life sciences, manufacturing, hospitality, and tourism.

The Workforce Alliance of the North Bay is one of 45 local workforce development boards statewide that are part of the California Workforce Development Board (cwdb.ca.gov). These local boards implement regional and local plans that align partnerships with education, business, and community organizations to expand vocational training, career opportunities, and economic mobility. All 34 cities in Orange County participate in the Orange County Economic Development Working Group, which includes representatives of local, state, and federal public agencies. This collaborative effort, launched in 2013, is featured in the article “Build Economic Development Momentum With Tools, Teams, and Tactics” on page 8.

Workforce and Job Development at the City Level Cities also engage in individual workforce development programs. The City of Milpitas recognized the difficulties that local manufacturers were experiencing in attracting qualified young people and, in 2016, launched the Milpitas Workforce continued

A participant in the Milpitas Workforce Development Initiative tries out virtual reality goggles; entrepreneurs take advantage of support provided by the Santa Clarita Business Incubator, right.

left

3


New Approaches Build Local Economies, continued

Development Initiative to connect youths with local manufacturing and well-paying jobs. The city partners with the local school district, a community college, and area manufacturers to conduct programs that introduce students to high-paying careers in advanced manufacturing. The partners provide support and funding for the initiative, which helps to minimize the city’s costs associated with the program. Milpitas spent less than $2,300 in 2019 to support the initiative. The City of Santa Clarita uses a different approach to support job growth. It partnered with a community college and a business development center to launch a business incubator program in 2014. The city provided space in a municipal building, and local businesses donated services to support the needs of fledgling enterprises. The program has created 24 jobs and supported nine new businesses. Santa Clarita’s costs are $2,550 annually to underwrite the business incubator program. Cities also facilitate connecting residents with job opportunities in local government, which makes up more than 10 percent of jobs statewide. Many cities are grappling with a lack of qualified candidates, and “Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs” on

page 15 examines strategies, such as apprenticeships, that are proving effective in Coalinga and other communities. These are just a few examples of creative ways in which cities support workforce development and boost their local economies.

Changes Drive Innovation in Business Business in California has evolved from its historical industrial and manufacturing base to a more service-oriented economy. While many retail businesses have closed their brick-and-mortar stores as online operations have grown, these changes have created new opportunities. Millennial shoppers spend $600 billion in the United States each year; this is projected to grow to $1.4 trillion annually by the end of 2020. Their preferences are shaping the retail industry and driving it to become more creative. Many millennials still visit stores to evaluate merchandise, leading retailers to offer creative experiences as a value-added amenity. According to Forbes magazine, “ … a number of fitness brands realize the importance of experience, including popular athleisure brand Lululemon, which offers complimentary in-store fitness classes. Stores are evolving into entertainment

spots for millennials who share similar interests, allowing them to spend time together, while also enabling consumers to engage with the brand.” While millennials are driving the shift toward experience-based retail, researchers report that this trend is evident among older populations, too. Consumers are seeking unique and memorable experiences, not only in retail but also in recreation and vacation opportunities — an area where California communities excel.

Capitalizing on Tourism and Unique Local Features California’s diverse natural beauty and cultural amenities draw visitors and revenue to the state. Travel-related spending in 2018 topped $140 billion, employed 1.2 million people, and generated $11.8 billion in state and local revenue. The article “Tourism Powers Economic Growth in Local Communities” on page 7 provides a snapshot of how cities from Long Beach to Sacramento are enhancing tourism. Virtually every city in California hosts special events that promote tourism and the local economy. Festivals are among the most popular events, celebrating the arts, culture, food, and local agricultural produce. Smaller rural cities are no exception. Lodi has a Grape Festival, Ripon hosts an Almond Blossom Festival, Upland celebrates a Lemon Festival, and Courtland’s Pear Fair is a perennial favorite. Each year, dozens of agriculturally themed events showcase local communities statewide. On the coast, many festivals focus on seafood; examples include the Long Beach Crawfish Festival, the Pismo Beach Clam Festival, and the 10-day Mendocino Crab Feast. Celebrations centered on the arts and music also are flourishing. The three-day BottleRock Music Festival in Napa Valley encompasses music, food, wine, and craft beers and draws over 120,000 visitors.

4

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Local cultural and agricultural festivals are perennially popular with both residents and tourists.

The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio spans two weekends and also attracts more than 120,000 visitors. Technology and innovation festivals and conferences are relative newcomers to the array of local celebrations. These events include the California Nonprofit Technology Festival in Fresno and Los Angeles and the Bay Area Science Festival, which features activities that connect 50,000 attendees with the region’s scientists and engineers. In Silicon Valley, the AgTech summit showcases a business accelerator program that links agricultural technology startups with investors and farmers in the Salinas Valley and Central California growing regions. Festivals and conferences produce spikes of short-term economic benefits by drawing large crowds for brief periods of time. In the long term, how can cities help develop sustainable businesses that will support the local economy and provide jobs?

Jobs, the Environment, and Climate Action Economic strategies that support local businesses and create jobs include transitioning workers from industries that have cut jobs. Renewable energy sources offer a promising step toward building more resilient and diverse local economies. According to the U.S. Green Building Council, the two largest renewable energy sectors are solar and wind power, with significant growing demand for workers. In addition to renewable energy, “green” industries encompass water and energy efficiency, green building, sustainable agriculture, and clean vehicle manufacturing. These industries offer ways to build a viable workforce by retraining workers whose jobs have disappeared. To foster green jobs training, local government officials are working with a variety of partners, including community colleges, nonprofit organizations, green industry representatives, and labor unions.

www.westerncity.com

A 2018 report from the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Employment Benefits From California Climate Investments and Co-Investments, provides an overview of the jobs impact created by the state’s climate action legislation that focuses on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Clean energy programs funded through California’s climate investments and cap-andtrade programs include energy efficiency, renewable energy, and more. The report states that 26 of the 29 California climate investments support more jobs per million dollars of investment than the state’s largest manufacturing industry, computer and electronic products manufacturing — and that the first four years of cap-and-trade proceeds created 19,700 jobs and indirectly generated another 55,900 jobs.

cultural amenities, modern infrastructure, quality schools, and recreational opportunities that create vibrant communities and enhance the workforce’s quality of life.

Communities are also using community choice aggregation (CCA) to stimulate economic activity. Using the CCA model, cities and counties buy and/or generate electricity for local government, residents, and businesses; set rates; and decide what types of electricity to purchase and which programs to offer customers. Initially, cities favored CCA because it offered ways to reduce electricity costs and provide cleaner energy options; however, local elected leaders now value it as a tool to provide economic opportunity and create jobs. Two examples of CCAs include Monterey Bay Community Power, which serves Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Cruz counties; and Pico Rivera Innovative Municipal Energy. Today, CCAs serve as major drivers of new renewable energy projects in the state, creating green jobs and revenue sources.

In addition, multi-generational activities — including video game competitions, escape rooms, businesses that integrate artificial intelligence into patron experiences, and twists on traditional recreation, such as Topgolf — can enhance communities’ business dynamics.

Creating Vibrant Communities Successful economic development efforts rely on more than creating or retaining jobs — such programs also must foster a community where workers and families can thrive. Cities seeking to attract employers and investment need affordable housing,

As the state’s demographics shift, it’s important for local leaders to engage millennials and the fresh perspectives they can bring. Younger generations offer new approaches to address the challenges facing our cities, and we should welcome their ideas as we work together to shape our communities’ economic vitality. Examples of events that engage locals and visitors of all ages and that can be scaled to fit communities of different sizes and characteristics include chefs and farmers markets, downtown sidewalk sales, and temporary pop-up stores.

There are no one-size-fits-all solutions for how best to tackle economic development in California cities because each city comprises unique characteristics and needs. But the Golden State has long been a leader in innovation, and that tradition will serve us well as we seek effective ways to build strong local economies. I encourage you to explore new strategies and share your successes with the League as we move into the future. ■

More Resources Online For additional information and links to related resources, including examples of cities’ successful economic development programs and projects, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Western City, March 2020

5


Thank you to all of our 2020 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

1,2

1,2 2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1,2

2

1

1,2

1,2

2

BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Anaergia Charter Communications COX Communications Energy Upgrade California ENGIE Services Inc.2

Hanson Bridgett LLP Interwest Consulting Group Inc.2 Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 LECET Southwest

1,2

Lewis Investment Company2 Meyers Nave1,2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2

Probolsky Research1 James Ramos2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2

Western States Petroleum Association Verizon Ygrene2 Young Homes2

Silver ($5,000+) ALADS2 AMR2 Charles Abbott Associates2 Californians for Energy Independence Capitol Public Finance Group2 Crown Castle Dart Container Corp.2

Dividend Finance LLC EMS Management2 Fascination Ranch2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Joe A. Gonsalves & Son2 Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 Greystar2

Harris & Associates2 Keenan & Associates Mid Valley Disposal2 Mt. Diablo Recycling2 NorCal NECA Northrop Grumman Public Financial Management Inc.

Bronze ($3,000+) ABM2 AECOM Accela2 Advanced Disposal2 Aircon Energy Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Amador Valley Industries2 American Forest & Paper Association Association For Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs2 Athens Services2 Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo Avenal Finance2 Avery Associates2 Best Way Disposal2 Accretive Realtors2 Acquisition Partners of America LLC AndersonPenna Partners Inc.2 Associated Builders & Contractors2 BDE Architecture Inc. Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CARE2 CIFAC CR&R2 CSAC EIA California Apartment Association2 California-Cambodia Sister State Inc.2 California Consulting, LLC California Contract Cities Association2 California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission

Boulevard2 Brookfield Norcal Builders Inc2 CalPortland2 Cardiac Science Cerrell2 Colantuono Highsmith & Whatley PC2 Commercial Bank of California DD Dannar LLC DLR Group DW Development2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./ Prime Healthcare2 Dublin Crossing2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center California Independent Petroleum Association California Real Estate2 California Refuse Recycling Council California Waste Solutions2 Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc.2 City National Bank2 Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Computer Aid Inc. Contra Costa Association of Realtors2 Contra Costa Building & Construction Trades Council2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Der Manouel Insurance Group2 Desert Valleys Builders

Energy Efficient Equity Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Genentech2 Geo-Logic Associates2 George K. Baum & Company GovInvest2 Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP2 Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company IVAR2 Kosmont Companies2 Locke Lord LLP Lozano Smith Madaffer Enterprises1,2

Redflex Renovate America HERO2 Republic Services Inc.2 ServPro2 Southern California Gas Company State Farm Insurance Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth

Trane1 Transtech Engineers Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations Tripepi Smith & Associates1,2 Vavrinek Trine Day & Co. LLP Walgreens Zanker Green Waste2

Marin Sanitary Service2 Matarango Inc.2 McKinstry The Mejorando Group Mitsubishi Cement2 Bob Murray & Associates NHA Advisors NL Industries Inc. NV5 Inc. Nixon Peabody Orange County Realtors PARS2 Peters Engineering2 Ponderosa Homes II Inc.2 Prime Healthcare2

Psomas2 Quad Knopf2 Quality Management Group Inc. Rutan & Tucker LLP SCI Consulting Group SGI Construction Management2 San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino POA San Diego County Water Authority Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 TREH Development2 USA Properties Fund Inc. Willdan

J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc.2 Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner LLP Leibold McClendon & Mann Livermore Sanitation2 MCE Clean Energy Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Mechanics Bank2 Napa Recycling2 Newport Pacific Capital Company Inc. Nimitz Group2 Norton Rose Fulbright2 Phillips 662 Pinewave Development Group Inc2 Pleasanton Garbage Services Inc.2 Precision Advocacy Group LLC2

Recology2 Renaissance Downtown2 Retail Strategies Riverside Construction2 Rutan & Tucker2 San Jose POA San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica POA Seifel Consulting Inc. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Stifel Nicolaus Swinerton Management2 Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 Transwestern Vali Cooper & Associates Inc.2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 West Builders2

Basic ($1,000+) Dividend Finance2 Dokken Engineering2 EMS Management LLC2 East Bay Sanitary Company Inc2 Emanuels Jones and Associates Envise/Southland Energy Fard Engineers2 FlashVote1 Forefront Power Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc.2 Giacalone Design Services2 Gilton Solid Waste2 Gray Bowen Scott2 Gridley Galleria2 HR Green Highridge Costa Housing Partners Hospital Council of Northern California Innisfree Ventures2

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 02/03/2020


Tourism Powers Economic Growth in Local Communities by Caroline Beteta Tourism continues to be one of California’s most vital engines for economic growth. A decade of increasing visitor spending has helped transform many California cities and enhance life for both visitors and residents. Throughout the Golden State, tourism employs more than 1 million residents and pumps billions of tax dollars into local government coffers. Visitor spending generated $11.8 billion in tax revenue statewide in 2018 — and $6 billion went directly into local treasuries. Tourism is among the top three sources of funding for many California cities. In 2018, transient occupancy tax collected by hotels generated $2.7 billion for local government budgets statewide. Santa Monica collected $60.6 million in transient occupancy taxes, equal to nearly 12 percent of the city’s operating budget. In Mariposa County, tourism-generated taxes comprised more than half of the county’s budget and employed over half the workforce. California cities are exploring new ways to increase their appeal to tourists. Here are a few ways local governments are using tourism to spur economic development and improve the lives of their residents.

Sacramento’s New Downtown Beat With a new sports arena, growth in farm-to-fork restaurants and craft beer, and a vibrant public art scene, Sacramento is attracting visitors like never before. In 2015, the city partnered with developers and the Sacramento Kings NBA franchise to build the Downtown Commons and transform the heart of the city into a premier destination. Just blocks from the state Capitol, this sprawling plaza features hundreds of events year-round and a variety of retail, restaurant, nightlife, and lodging establishments. Sacramento’s investment is paying off for the region. In 2018, visitors spent $4.1 billion in Sacramento County, employing 31,300 people and generating $303 million in tax revenue.

Monterey Promotes Sustainable Tourism Monterey County is preserving its natural beauty, from beaches to vista views, for generations of visitors and residents through its Sustainable Moments program. Managed by the convention and visitor’s bureau, elected officials, and other stakeholders, Sustainable Moments provides visitors with practices to help them be environmentally friendly while traveling. Tips range from “pack

clockwise from bottom Tourism plays a vital economic role in Monterey County and the cities of Long Beach and Sacramento.

in, pack out” and “leave no trace” to suggestions for reducing the one-time use of plastics and respecting local traditions and cultures. Responsible tourism practices like these harmonize the economic necessity for travel with the needs of residents. Tourism plays an indispensable role in Monterey’s economy. In 2018, visitors spent $3 billion in Monterey County, employing 25,000 people and generating $135 million in local tax revenue.

Long Beach Airport Continues to Soar The City of Long Beach invested $59 million to ensure that its airport remains one of the nation’s top-ranked facilities and keeps tourism dollars flowing into the city. Long Beach Airport launched its first phase of upgrades in 2012. A sleek indoor and outdoor passenger terminal with new gate areas and upscale eateries was among some of the initial renovations — and it’s paying off. In 2018, tourism in the Long Beach-Catalina Island area generated $1.8 billion in economic activity, 15,000 jobs, and $184 million in tax revenue. New ticketing and baggage claim areas and a revamped car rental facility are among improvements planned for 2020–21. These upgrades will improve the flow of passengers from the curb to the gate, enhance passenger convenience, and reduce vehicle congestion in the terminal loop. A 125-room airport hotel is slated to open this year.

Leveraging Tourism to Grow Your City’s Economy With the state’s tourism industry on the cusp of unprecedented growth in 2020, there’s no better time to harness your region’s tourism economy. Establishing tourism hubs, advocating sustainable tourism, and renovating infrastructure are just a few ways to power local economies and improve the lives of residents. For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

Caroline Beteta is president and CEO of Visit California, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to develop and maintain marketing programs, in partnership with the state’s travel industry, that inspire travel to California. She can be reached at Caroline@visitcalifornia.com. www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2020

7


Redding’s Market Center Project, slated for completion in September 2020, is revitalizing the city’s downtown.

Build Economic Development Momentum With Tools, Teams, and Tactics by Gurbax Sahota The California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED) defines economic development as “the creation of wealth from which community benefits are realized.” Economic development typically involves a broad, strategic effort to create jobs and support current and potential businesses. But it’s more than a jobs program — it is an investment in expanding the local economy and improving prosperity and the quality of life for all residents. This investment starts with fostering collaboration among your city’s staff, community stakeholders, and partners who can enhance local business resources. In most cities, economic development competes for resources and attention as local officials deal with urgent issues that include affordable housing, emergency response,

and more. Despite these challenges, many cities are building momentum in realizing their economic development goals. This article explores some of the tools, potential team members, and tactics that can help your city boost its economic vitality.

Making the Best Use of Available Tools Economic development activities can be divided into two types: traditional and technical. Traditional activities include helping companies thrive through efforts that retain, expand, create, and attract businesses. Technical activities comprise cities’ efforts to prepare and assemble land for investment projects and opportunities. Today, California cities have access to many tools to support both types of activities.

For many years, redevelopment was the primary technical economic development tool in the Golden State. Redevelopment used tax-increment financing to revitalize blighted areas. At its peak, redevelopment generated over $6 billion a year for cities. But in 2011, the state abolished redevelopment. Beginning in 2014, the Legislature developed several tools to help replace some of redevelopment’s components. Enhanced Infrastructure Financing Districts (EIFDs) and Community Revitalization Investment Authorities (CRIAs) are now the primary economic development taxincrement financing tools. While both have useful powers, cities are turning more to EIFDs to further their economic development goals. The chart (on page 9) compares the features of EIFDs and CRIAs.

Gurbax Sahota is president and CEO of the California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED) and executive director of the California Academy for Economic Development; she can be reached at gsahota@caled.org.

8

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Comparing Economic Development Tools POWERS ACTIVITY

Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD)

Community Revitalization Investment Authority (CRIA)

Infrastructure Financing

Yes — for public capital facilities and projects of communitywide significance

Yes

Land Acquisition

Yes — finance acquisition only

Yes — may acquire or finance acquisition

Eminent Domain

Under Gatto Act, only for environmental remediation

Yes — 12-year limit

Land Conveyance

No

Yes — may convey surplus properties

Environmental Remediation

Yes

Yes

Affordable Housing Set-Aside

Yes — no set-aside but any housing units assisted must be affordable

Yes — 25 percent set-aside

Maintenance, Operations, and Services

Yes — maintenance of improvements financed by EIFD

No

FINANCING DETAILS

Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD)

Community Revitalization Investment Authority (CRIA)

Property-Tax Increment

Yes — only for consenting taxing agencies based on shares designated in plan. Education districts may not consent.

Yes — only for consenting taxing agencies based on shares designated in plan. Education districts may not consent.

Other Tax Revenues

Yes — only for consenting agencies to fund housing and infrastructure

No

Issuance of Tax Allocation Bonds

Yes — no voter approval required

Yes — no voter approval required

Term

Up to 45 years from issuance of bonds

Up to 45 years from district formation

Source: CALED Economic Development Finance & Real Estate Committee

LEGEND Full Power

Limited Power

No Power

In 2017, the City of West Sacramento (pop. 53,911) was the first to create an EIFD. Several more have been created since, including the first city-county collaboration with the City of Placentia (pop. 52,333) and Orange County. At least a dozen or more are underway; for example, the City of Sacramento (pop. 508,172) recently formed an EIFD to revitalize a former railyard site and jump-start local economic investment specifically to finance infrastructure that will support a Major League Soccer

Find More Information Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

stadium and surrounding development. In addition, AB 806 (Chapter 503, Statutes of 2016) allows cities and counties to acquire, sell, or lease real property to promote economic development. Opportunities still exist to improve the available technical economic development tools. More bills to address this issue will likely be introduced in 2020. The most important tool is effective local leadership. By listening to residents’ needs, creating a long-term vision for the city, articulating that vision in a strategy, and championing and funding the work needed to meet the metrics identified in the strategy, city leaders can create a vibrant future for their communities. For example, over the past decade, the City of Needles (pop. 5,085) has worked

to embrace cannabis-related businesses in an effort to raise revenue for community benefits and create jobs. The city embarked on this effort in 2012 — six years before recreational cannabis became legal statewide — because local leaders had a vision to prepare for opportunity, and they knew cannabis would provide a way to increase economic options for their residents. Along with strong local leadership, the following tools can also be helpful. Economic Development Element and Strategy. Because economic development doesn’t happen overnight, cities need to thoughtfully plan their future and chart a course in a document that current and future leaders can use to maintain focus and benchmark success. The Economic continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2020

9


Build Economic Development Momentum With Tools, Teams, and Tactics, continued

Development Element of a city’s General Plan provides a mechanism for this. Many cities already include this element in their plans; for example, in the City of Chico (pop. 112,111), the Economic Development Element “guides the city’s use of resources to protect and improve Chico’s economic vitality.” Numerous examples can be located with an online search; city officials may find those most recently adopted or amended to be of greatest use. Data. To support existing businesses and attract new ones, you must know your city’s competitive advantages and disadvantages, including demographics and key assets. Cities can access many data sources; in selecting one, make certain the data is current and maintained regularly, based on sound methodology, and paints an accurate picture of what your community has to offer. Such data is an essential component in developing the business case for your city; for example, the cities of Stockton (pop. 316,410) and Long Beach (pop. 475,013) used this type of information in marketing tools created to attract Opportunity Zone investments (see “About Opportunity Zones,” below).

About Opportunity Zones An Opportunity Zone (OZ) is an economically distressed community where new investments may be eligible for preferential tax treatment under certain conditions. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act created OZs in December 2017. To qualify as an OZ, the state nominated specific census tracts, and the U.S. Treasury certified the state list via the Internal Revenue Service. This tool is designed to stimulate economic development and job creation by providing tax benefits to investors. California has 879 OZs. For more information, read “Opportunity Zones: Is Your City Ready?” at www.westerncity.com.

10

An artist’s rendering shows planned development and waterfront features in the City of West Sacramento; far right Oceanside is part of the Innovate78 partnership.

Permitting. Many cities, such as Riverside (pop. 328,101), have done an excellent job of streamlining permitting processes to ensure compliance with local ordinances and to provide value to developers and businesses. Many cities post their process and fee schedules online and provide a direct point of contact for the business to facilitate faster turnaround on permit requests. To increase certainty and transparency, some cities offer developers and businesses an online portal to track their progress in the permitting process. Zoning. Land use and zoning are important tools for encouraging economic development. Many cities are seeing the benefit in creating Specific Plans, incorporating density bonuses, and adding to and capturing value through how property is zoned. For example, increasing a parcel’s density allowance or changing the land-use zoning increases the value of the land, and the city may then use that increased value as leverage to negotiate community improvements with a developer interested in the property. Infrastructure. The availability and adequacy of public infrastructure is frequently a “make or break” issue for economic development projects. Cities often prioritize infrastructure investments based on the benefits such improvements can offer to businesses; in these cases, the city strives to balance the needs of residents and businesses. Land Assembly. It can take many years and significant investment to assemble land needed for a priority economic development project. Cities are often better positioned than developers or others to undertake these long-term efforts. Training and Staffing. Cities can’t always fund every aspect of economic development, but they can invest in staff to research and identify partnerships and

funding resources — and gain the expertise to apply for those funds. For example, cities applying to the state Department of Housing and Community Development to access federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds need time to learn the rules, national objectives, and application process if they are to succeed. The 2020 Notice of Funding includes approximately $18 million available for economic development in California’s rural cities. CDBG is one of many resources to help cities with economic development.

Building the Economic Development Team Your city’s economic development team should extend well beyond city staff. You can leverage your city’s resources and create greater impact by convening the individuals and organizations that are working on making an impact in areas that coincide with your economic development goals — and aligning their efforts with those of the city. Through this team approach, the city can share resources and expertise and have a greater impact. Consider the following potential key partners. The Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (GO-Biz). Seeking assistance from GO-Biz can support your city’s economic development efforts in many ways, including: • Working to retain or attract businesses in partnership with its California Business Investment Services (CalBIS) unit. • Funding infrastructure through its Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank’s Infrastructure State Revolving Fund Program. • Working with its international team on recruiting foreign direct investment. • Helping local businesses apply for the California Competes Tax Credit.


left The

City of Carlsbad participates in a regional partnership; officials and residents celebrate the opening of new headquarters for a national company that provides jobs and training.

below Tehachapi

The most important tool is effective local leadership. Regional Groups. Regional economic development corporations partner with many cities to help them reach their economic development goals; for example, the Greater Sacramento Economic Council works diligently on behalf of its cities to promote the region and attract businesses. Other regional groups include councils of government, workforce development boards, and community college districts. Some cities have created their own regional effort; for example, the cities of Carlsbad, Escondido, Oceanside, San Marcos, and Vista collaborated in 2012 to create Innovate78, a program to boost economic prosperity along the State Highway 78 corridor. The effort has grown to also include Startup78, a service that helps startups launch their businesses. In 2013, in response to the dissolution of redevelopment, cities and resource partners formed the Orange County Economic Development Working Group, a collaborative forum composed of the 34 cities in Orange County and local, state, and federal business resource agencies. This group conducts quarterly meetings and training sessions where members learn best practices, hear presentations from industry experts, and engage in roundtable discussions on pertinent topics and legislation affecting their business communities. Federal Partners. Among the numerous federal economic development partners, some of the most engaged agencies include the U.S. Economic Development Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development program, the U.S. Small Business Administration, and the U.S. Department of Commerce International Trade Administration’s SelectUSA Program. Local Partners. Some of the most important potential partners on your team are already active in your community, such www.westerncity.com

as bankers, alternative lenders, nonprofit organizations, chambers of commerce, industry-specific groups like manufacturing councils, and commercial real estate brokers. Because brokers are familiar with the local business community’s current needs, cities often conduct familiarization tours and meetings with brokers to build relationships and share resources.

Taking Action: Tactics Economic development is not a onesize-fits-all proposition; what might be good for one community may not be right for another. It’s both challenging and critically important to identify and articulate what economic development success looks like in the context of the city’s unique competitive advantages and the needs of its residents, instead of using the metrics of another city to measure a program’s effectiveness.

Preparing for Action Before engaging in tactics, make sure you: 1. Are familiar with the components you have in place, such as a General Plan element, strategy, economic development resolution, etc. 2. Know your team’s composition and the people working on economic development issues in your community who should be on your team. 3. Take time to develop current, relevant success metrics.

Examples of City Successes The following examples illustrate how cities of different sizes implement economic development. The City of Tehachapi (pop. 13,668) worked closely with a private company to revitalize the city’s oldest commercial building, which was one of the few

masonry structures to survive the 1952 White Wolf earthquake. The building opened in April 2018 as the new headquarters for a wind and solar energy company that trains workers in renewable energy and manages projects nationwide. The City of Santa Clarita (pop. 218,103) created a Film Incentive Program focused on attracting and retaining reoccurring productions that film within the city limits. The program refunds permit fees to qualifying productions and is designed to reward repeat customers. Since 2009, filming days attributed to these productions produced an estimated economic impact of more than $125 million. The City of Redding (pop. 92,839) entered into a public-private partnership with a developer to revitalize the downtown through the Market Center Project. The project includes the construction of a four-story, mixed-use building with 82 residential units and approximately 22,000 square feet of ground-floor commercial/retail space. In conjunction with the development, the city is preparing to extend streets and add a two-way bike lane separated from traffic. Both the mixed-use and streets projects are targeted for completion in September 2020. Cities approach economic development differently depending on their unique needs. As the examples here demonstrate, the benefit of creating a healthy, diversified, sustainable local economy is well worth the investment. Fortunately, city officials don’t have to go it alone. Whether you are engaging in retention efforts to recognize the businesses that have already invested in your community, helping entrepreneurs looking to grow or locate in your city, or investing in public infrastructure to spur private real estate investment, many tools, partners, and methods are available to make a positive difference in boosting your local economy. ■ Western City, March 2020

11


Napa Lighte Art Fest

Draws January Crowds

The City of Napa (pop. 79,490), known for its vineyards and wine tasting, is also becoming a destination for cultural arts. With the Rail Arts District, BottleRock Music Festival, and the Napa Art Walk, the city is incorporating the arts into its community amenities. The City of Napa won the Award for Excellence in the Economic Development Through the Arts category of the 2019 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

12

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


left to right The

“Night Bloom” balloons attract visitors’ attention; art is projected onto buildings throughout downtown; and families take in the festival’s sights.

d ival Stimulating Economic Activity in the Year’s Slowest Time

The BottleRock Music Festival, held in late May each year in Napa, attracts 120,000 visitors. But from late fall to early spring in Napa Valley, things slow down in this world-renowned destination. The city’s transient occupancy tax revenue comprises 25 percent of its total revenues — and is lower during the month of January than at any other time of year. This occurs in conjunction with a steep decline in tourism and economic activity following the December holidays. Not surprisingly, it is also the slowest month for downtown businesses. Attracting visitors to the downtown area during this colder, darker month presented www.westerncity.com

a challenge. Most travelers have just visited their families, gone on a winter break vacation, or are recovering from spending extra money on holiday gifts. City leaders sought a way to offer an exciting and unique experience that would draw people to visit downtown in January. Napa city staff researched events worldwide looking for potential ideas. Their efforts inspired a festival focused on the arts, launched in partnership with the local business community and Arts Council Napa Valley in 2017. The event aims to embody creativity and innovation — and uplift and inspire those who attend.

Buildings Become Art Canvases in Family-Friendly Event The Napa Lighted Art Festival takes a bold, contemporary approach to the visual arts by incorporating emerging light technologies. The festival moves this high-impact artwork out of museums and ticketed venues and into the city’s streets, where buildings function as large outdoor canvases. The installation sites use a combination of private and public buildings in the heart of Napa. This provides an opportunity to highlight the city’s unique character and include many historic buildings in the downtown corridor. Napa’s iconic architecture becomes the “painting canvases” in this nine-day free festival. Showcasing innovative techniques using light and light technologies, laser and video projections, and sound systems, the Napa Lighted Art Festival is a celebration of creative arts, technology,

and light. Local and international artists create dynamic original artwork, using projected imagery and incorporating music and sound. This artwork is installed at approximately 24 locations in downtown Napa and the Oxbow District. The “Night Bloom” installation uses tethered hot air balloons to light up the night sky, with the Napa River as a backdrop. This feature is extremely popular with visitors and has become a staple of the festival each year. Artwork displayed at the Napa Lighted Art Festival includes light art, video art, 3D video mapping projections, lighted sculptures, and projects that employ technology, interactivity, or both. Residents and visitors can enjoy art, entertainment, and delicious food both day and night during the festival. The festival supports the city’s effort to expand the arts in the community and increase economic activity during the slowest time of the year. Napa Mayor Jill Techel says, “The Napa Lighted Art Festival brings the community together to view amazing displays. During the festival, the streets are buzzing, and local merchants say it’s like a busy summer night. It’s inclusive, family-oriented, and fun for locals as well as our visitors.” “The Napa Lighted Art Festival has become a must-attend event drawing talented artists from around the world — and also offering multiple opportunities for our local artists and students,” says continued Western City, March 2020

13


Napa Lighted Art Festival Draws January Crowds, continued

Chris DeNatale, director of Arts Council Napa Valley. “It is a delight to the senses and a unique way to showcase all that the city has to offer.”

Partnerships Provide Financial and Creative Support Funding for the event is provided through a partnership of the city’s Tourism Improvement District and Property and Business Improvement District, private property owners, and individual and corporate sponsors. In 2019, city staff raised over $225,000 from these partners, which paid for 80 percent of all festival costs; the other 20 percent came from the city’s General Fund. The event budget totaled $305,000 in 2020. City staff also developed a local community engagement component for the festival, which includes partnering with the Napa Valley Unified School District. In 2018–19, 30 students in the digital design lab at New Technology High School created an installation downtown. One of the festival’s international artists mentored the students via Skype to help them create a highquality installation. These students worked collaboratively, and the festival showcased their artwork next to other highly acclaimed international and regional artists. “This has been one of the most amazing teaching experiences of my career,” says Lisa Gottfried, digital design lab instructor at New Technology High School. In 2020, New Technology High School expanded the scope and reach of the effort. The school partnered with Adobe to give students access to the company’s Creative Cloud suite, and Adobe staff provided a day of hands-on training and support. The students reached out to other schools, both in the United States and worldwide, and invited them to contribute artwork to be incorporated into the final animated sequences. Schools from Virginia to Thailand responded and sent their creative contributions, which were combined with the imagery developed by New Technology High School students. The work was completed during a “Create-a-thon” on Jan.13, 2020, and displayed during the festival just four days later.

14

League of California Cities

Festival attendees enjoy hands-on opportunities to create projected art, and each installation creates unique effects.

The festival also partners with a local nonprofit, the Rail Arts District, and all seven of the district’s murals near downtown Napa are lighted up as part of an art walk. A lantern parade encourages community members of all ages to create their own lighted art and be a part of the celebration. The parade begins and finishes at the Veteran’s Park and weaves past the various downtown art installations. (Safety comes first, and all of the lanterns are battery powered.) During both weekends, the Napa County Historical Society conducts late afternoon tours of the historical buildings featured in the installations. A series of free daytime and evening gatherings provides opportunities to meet the artists and learn more about their work.

Festival’s Popularity Exceeds Expectations Approximately 35,000 people attended the Napa Lighted Art Festival in 2019, with approximately 40 percent coming from outside Napa County. The economic impact was estimated at $1.8 million. The community satisfaction and pride for the event was overwhelming, with nearly 97 percent of those surveyed stating it met or exceeded their expectations.

The significant boost in revenue during this nine-day period in January makes downtown business owners very happy. Operators of lodging properties are also pleased with the increase in room night stays during this traditionally slow period. By partnering with the Napa Downtown Association and Visit Napa Valley, the festival outreach efforts and engagement strategies surpassed expectations. In addition, the festival outperformed all other events on their websites and social media platforms. “The Napa Lighted Art Festival is incredibly well received by the whole community,” says Craig Smith, executive director of the Downtown Napa Association. “It drives more people to downtown Napa than any other public event and has a very positive impact on business across the board.” The Napa Lighted Art Festival creates tremendous pride for the local public art community, enhances the community’s vibrancy, and supports the city’s economy. For links to related resources and additional photos and videos, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. Contact: Katrina Gregory, recreation and cultural arts manager, City of Napa; email: kgregory@cityofnapa.org; phone: (707) 257-9958. ■

www.cacities.org


Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs by Randi Kay Stephens

N

early 15 percent of all jobs in California are public sector jobs; more than 10 percent — 1.7 million — are in local government. Approximately 25 percent of these local agency workers are 55 or older with the opportunity to retire in the very near future. Moreover, the public sector is evolving at an exponential rate, with changes in technology and administrative systems fundamentally redefining what work is needed and how that work is done. This underscores a growing need for cities and towns throughout California to focus on recruiting skilled employees and retaining existing staff to:

• Keep departments running efficiently. • Continue delivering innovative programs and services. • Design and maintain the infrastructure that residents and local businesses rely on.

Efforts are underway statewide to address the talent scarcity and retirement wave affecting local government and the greater public sector. California’s statewide chapter of the International City/County Management Association, Cal-ICMA, launched its Talent Initiative in 2016 to address workforce recruitment and retention challenges. In 2018, Cal-ICMA released its flagship report, Talent 2.0: A Modern Approach to Attracting and Retaining Top Talent in Local Government. The report outlines strategies to increase satisfaction among existing employees. These include the use of “stay” interviews and flexible work schedules. The report also offers tips to increase recruitment, such as eliminating minimum qualifications for entry-level positions, enhancing job announcements to highlight the meaning and purpose of

the work, and fostering opportunities for growth and development. The Institute for Local Government (ILG) leads a capital region group known as the Innovative Pathways to Public Service consortium, composed of officials from local and state governments, community partners, and educators from high schools, community colleges, and universities. The consortium’s mission is to develop a strong pipeline for a new generation of public sector professionals. In September 2019, the consortium published the Public Sector Workforce Needs Assessment report detailing the highest need positions, analyzing the critical challenges and opportunities, and offering recommendations to address continued

Randi Kay Stephens is a program manager for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at rstephens@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2020

15


Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs, continued

the workforce need-skills gap. These recommendations include: • Developing long-term, “high-touch” agency-community partnerships to support student and teacher awareness of jobs in the public sector and ensure that skills needed by government are part of the curriculum at both the high school and community college levels. • Assessing, implementing, and strengthening diversity practices and resources including outreach, policies, and culture. • Developing clearer career pathways, sharing best practices for recruitment across agencies, and training existing staff for upward mobility.

The report tackles some tough issues, such as the lengthy civil service hiring process, and provides government leaders with a realistic snapshot of existing challenges and opportunities.

Challenges in Recruitment and Multiple Barriers to Entry Unfortunately for public agencies, many qualified candidates do not consider local government in their career search — for many reasons. Often, position titles are

unclear or dissimilar to comparable positions in the private sector. Local government job application and hiring processes tend to be confusing and arduous to job seekers. And lengthy application timelines and scheduling of multi-panel interviews often leave candidates in limbo, waiting for long periods with little information. To fill positions that are vacant or soon will be, cities need to be creative in attracting, recruiting, and retaining talent.

Agencies that want to attract and retain a more diverse and talented pool of future employees should consider nontraditional partnerships and new programs.

Laborers’ International Union of North America

BUILDS PEOPLE BUILDS PROJECTS BUILDS CALIFORNIA The Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA) partners with public and private entities, elected officials, community groups, and responsible contractors to build and maintain the infrastructure needs of communities throughout California while providing residents a lifelong career in the construction industry.

16

League of California Cities

(855) 532-3879 LIUNAbuildsCA.org

www.cacities.org


Combining on-the-job training with classroom instruction helps apprentices develop essential skills.

To create a qualified and representative public sector staff that reflects community diversity and is prepared to tackle the issues of the future, local agencies may need to adjust their hiring and onboarding processes to enable more people to participate. All aspects of hiring and onboarding should be evaluated, from the time frames to the process itself. For example, city leaders should consider that hourly or entry-level participants may not be able to leave their current positions for hours at a time to participate in multiple interviews. Lengthy application processes are inadvertently eliminating qualified candidates who are accepting private sector positions before even finding out if their public agency application has been received or if they are eligible for an interview. These are just a few examples, highlighted in the Public Sector Workforce Needs Assessment report, of pervasive systemic issues that need to be addressed regionally and likely statewide as well.

Apprenticeship: An Innovative Solution for Training Talent Engaging with industry-affiliated groups for specific positions (accounting, information technology, management, etc.) may yield results for hiring seasoned professionals. But when an agency needs entry-level professionals and lacks qualified candidates, what can be done? As veteran workers retire and employee roles evolve, new skill sets are needed to maintain crucial city services. It is essential for cities throughout rural, suburban, and urban California to train and mentor their existing entry-level talent while also bringing new talent into the pipeline.

www.westerncity.com

Cities and the public sector at large now have a number of available options, including apprenticeships, to consider. Apprenticeships combine on-the-job training and classroom instruction. Trade positions have long used apprenticeships as part of the career path, but now apprenticeships are being developed for nontrade positions in areas such as information technology and human resources. Typically, apprentices develop critical hands-on experience aligned with their industry while continuing to receive theoretical and classroom instruction. The training is standardized and rigorous to meet the needs of the industry and specific occupations. Apprenticeship integrates the “why and how” of a job, which is typically accomplished through a progression of tasks that are completed under supervision and linked to classroom learning. The California Division of Apprenticeship Standards (DAS), part of the California Department of Industrial Relations within the state Labor and Workforce Development Agency, consults with employers to develop a skilled workforce with viable career pathways to increase productivity and strengthen the economy. DAS standardizes apprenticeships across industries, both private and public. Some exciting developments to help local agencies take advantage of this new solution are currently underway. Industry partners are working closely with educators to create Minimum Industry Training Criteria (MITC). The state is collaborating with local government agencies to develop core competencies for positions that share similar

qualifications, skills, and milestones and meet the needs of state and local government agencies. By developing shared criteria, local and state agencies can work with educators and workforce board partners to ensure that job candidates pursue apprenticeships to develop essential, relevant skills that are transferable among agencies.

Coalinga Apprenticeship Program Develops Talent Some cities are already exploring nontraditional apprenticeships to address their future staffing needs. The City of Coalinga (pop. 17,600) launched an apprenticeship effort with West Hills Community College District in June 2019. Apprenticeship programs historically attract local job seekers who are willing to learn and earn. Such programs tend to have a ripple effect in a community because trainees in paid positions with living-wage potential often refer their friends to organizations that invest in employee development. City Manager Marissa Trejo explained that her city hires and trains every employee, and most come to the city with only a high school diploma, one year of work experience, and a driver’s license. That’s why Coalinga is actively recruiting and developing its own employees for upward mobility within its ranks. Coalinga’s apprenticeship program formalizes the training experience and provides each employee with a certificate upon completion. In addition, the apprenticeship counts toward much of the coursework credit needed to complete an associate degree. continued

Western City, March 2020

17


Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs, continued

“Through this apprenticeship program, our employees are gaining new skills, which lead to higher wages and more upward mobility,” said City Manager Trejo. “The city is benefiting from a formal training program that supports our need for top talent and reinforces our value of prioritizing professional development.” Structure and clear parameters are critical to apprenticeship success. Work processes and qualifying hours should always be clearly defined. The City of Coalinga’s apprenticeship was designed for the human resource analyst position, where an incumbent worker would participate in more than 280 hours of classroom instruction and complete 4,000 hours of specific on-the-job training. Coalinga has clearly defined the apprentice’s job tasks for this position. The tasks include maintaining records, serving on interview panels, explaining human resources policies and procedures, completing the onboarding process, communicating with job applicants, addressing employee concerns, and preparing training programs throughout the course of the two-year apprenticeship. To receive a certificate of completion, the apprentice is also responsible for participating in six courses covering business, human resources, law, communication, and critical thinking. The apprentice’s wages are calculated over two pay periods, based on the training and instructional hours completed. All apprentices must be at least 18 years of age, and every apprentice remains on probation through the completion of the first 500 hours of on-the-job training.

Internships, job shadowing, and career days provide opportunities to introduce young people to public service careers.

Lengthy application processes are inadvertently eliminating qualified candidates. Coalinga’s program is new and currently limited to its human resources analyst position, but the city plans to expand its apprenticeship program to include an accounting position in the near future. Trejo sees numerous opportunities for growth of the program and professional development opportunities for her staff. “Our staff are accelerating their abilities and dedicating themselves to a profession,” said Trejo. “We can see the positive longterm impact, and this is a win-win.” Corinna Pereira is director of apprenticeship programs at West Hills Community College District, which partners with the City of Coalinga, and she agrees with Trejo about the benefits of such efforts. “Workforce creation takes a village, and rural communities are ready, willing, and able to assist when provided opportunities to grow,” said Pereira. “Apprenticeship is about providing employee training, achieving workforce goals, developing highly skilled and more productive employees, and contributing to local economic and community development.”

Raising Career Awareness Early It’s never too early to engage future employees. Cities and towns can collaborate with workforce boards and local educational institutions, like high schools and community colleges, to create opportunities for students to experience careers in public service as early as freshman year of high school.

There are numerous ways to provide a memorable and positive experience for youths that also benefits your local agency. For example, creating an opportunity for youths to spend the day with a public sector professional is a valuable way to transmit the nuance of the many professions comprising city services. Recently the cities of Roseville, Tracy, and Elk Grove worked with local high schools on Careers in Public Service Days, which highlighted career opportunities and helped young people develop a positive connection with local government. Students learned about careers in environmental services, public safety, economic development, administrative services, and more. In addition to career days, local agencies can implement job shadowing and internships. Job shadowing can provide an easy, shortterm way for agency staff to introduce students to a real-world work environment, workplace expectations, and employment requirements. Job shadowing helps students understand how the concepts they are learning in the classroom are relevant in the real world. The city reaps the long-term benefits of this handson civics education lesson by fostering greater understanding and appreciation for municipal services and functions. When surveyed about their job shadowing experiences, many students expressed gratitude for the opportunity to learn firsthand from practitioners. Employees who participated cited increased pride about their work and greater appreciation for the opportunity to mentor a younger generation. An internship program requires a lengthier investment of time than job shadowing, but offers numerous benefits to consider.

continued on page 22

18

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Cici Trino, Association Outsource Services, at (916) 961-9999 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email cicit@aosinc.biz.

Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

Need staff you can trust?

For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

Water and Wastewater Division Manager

MuniTemps has your back. 1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

Town of Telluride, CO Colorado’s incomparable worldclass resort town (skiing, summer festivals, and spectacular surroundings), Telluride seeks a qualified manager to take ownership of the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant project (2023 start, $20 million, design-build) and run the water and wastewater utilities. Bachelor’s, 5-10 years’ utility experience, certifications required. Salary DOQE. Filing deadline: April 6, 2020. Contact Andrew Gorgey: (970) 987-1238

SANTA CLARA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT The Santa Clara Valley Water District (Valley Water), headquartered in San Jose, California is the primary water resources agency for Santa Clara County, California. Its core business is to provide residents with a clean and reliable supply of water and protection from flooding. Valley Water encompasses all of the County’s 1,300 square miles and serves the area’s 15 cities, nearly 1.9 million residents, and more than 200,000 commuters.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & GENERAL MANAGER

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and General Manager (GM) is appointed by The Board and will be responsible for the operations, financial performance, safety and reliability for Valley Water. The CEO/ William Avery & Associates GM is one of three executives, along with the Management Consultants District Counsel and the Board Clerk, that 1 3 / 2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A are appointed by the Board. The new CEO/ Los Gatos, CA 95030 GM will be an exceptional leader and relationship builder who provides 408.399.4424 administrative expertise within a highly complex, multifaceted and heavily Fax: 408.399.4423 regulated business environment. email: jobs@averyassoc.net

www@peckhamandmckenney.com

www.westerncity.com

www.averyassoc.net The new CEO/GM will have background that includes 10 or more years of executive level experience in general management, line, or staff functions. A Bachelor’s degree with major course work in business or public administration, engineering, or a closely related field is required. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ to upload your letter of interest, resume and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Paul Kimura.

Western City, March 2020

19


J

O

Police

CHIEF City of Brawley, California

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

New Opportunities! City Manager, City of Auburn, CA City Manager, City of Camarillo, CA District Administrator, Coast Life Support District, CA Operations Compliance Supervisor, Dublin San Ramon Services District, CA Community Services Director, City of San Juan Capistrano, CA

DOQ – Contract position The Police Chief plans, oversees, and directs the operations and services of the Police Department, including law enforcement, crime suppression and prevention; works cooperatively with City departments and outside agencies; is committed to community engagement and provides highly responsible and complex administrative support to the City Manager. Minimum qualifications include a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in criminal justice, public administration or a closely related field. A Master’s degree is preferred. The successful candidate must pass an extensive background investigation, possess a valid California driver’s license and an acceptable driving record. Any combination of experience and training that provides the required knowledge and abilities qualifies. A typical way to obtain the knowledge and abilities would be: • Twelve (12) years of experience in police work, including at least five (5) years of supervisory/ management experience in a municipal police department or county sheriff’s department. • California P.O.S.T. Management certificate. • Possession of, or the ability to obtain, an appropriate, valid California P.O.S.T. Executive certificate. Applications available at:

383 Main St., Brawley or www.brawley-ca.gov Deadline to apply: March 31, 2020

20

League of California Cities

Property Development Manager, City of West Hollywood, CA Please visit our website to learn more about all of our active recruitments.

Peckham & McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Public Works Director, City of Blythe, California Salary: $117,000–127,000 annually with excellent benefits package including 2.5@ 55-CalPers Classic Members The City of Blythe, located in Riverside County along the Colorado River is seeking a progressive leader to plan, direct, manage and oversee the operation of the Public Works Department including: public works construction, City and traffic engineering, street, parks, facility and fleet maintenance and the production and distribution of potable water and the treatment and disposal of wastewater. The ideal candidate has five years of increasingly responsible public works experience including two years of management and administrative responsibility, a Bachelors degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in engineering, public administration or a related field. Registration as a Professional Civil Engineer in the State of California is desirable but not required. Qualified individuals must submit a completed application and resume to: Mallory Crecelius, Interim City Manager, City of Blythe, 235 N. Broadway, Blythe, CA 92225. Applications are available on the City’s website at www.cityofblythe.ca.gov. Filing deadline: 4:00pm on Friday May 15, 2020.

Photo/art credits Cover: Yvonne Hunter Page 3: Courtesy of the City of Milpitas and the City of Santa Clarita Page 4: Madzia71 Page 5: Left, Anouchka; right, Creativeye99 Page 7: Long Beach Airport, Marcus Mainka/Shut terstock.com; Sacramento DOCO, ZikG/Shutter stock.com; Monterey, courtesy of Visit California Page 8: Courtesy of the California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED)

Pages 10–11: Courtesy of CALED Page 12: Courtesy of the City of Napa Page 13: Left, Jude Lemons; right, courtesy of the City of Napa Page 14: (Clockwise from top left) Moon, courtesy of the City of Napa; church, Yvonne Hunter; projected art and crowd, Jude Lemons Page 15: Fizkes/Shutterstock.com Page 17: Left, Lechatnoir; right, Alvarez Page 18: Fizkes/Shutterstock.com

www.cacities.org


Current & Upcoming Opportunities City of Aurora, CO – Police Chief The City of Aurora, a diverse mix of urban, suburban and rural life at the intersection of prairie grasslands and the Rocky Mountains, offers something for every lifestyle, from convenient transit-connected living to master-planned communities. More than 381,000 residents and 10,000 businesses choose to call Aurora home. The City is now seeking a Police Chief who will be a strong and compassionate leader. The City is especially interested in candidates with an understanding of and sensitivity to the importance of diversity within the community and within the Department. Candidates must possess at least ten years of senior command level experience in a large police department, including at least five years of supervisory experience at a senior management level. In addition, candidates must also possess substantive knowledge of and experience with community policing principles and practices, and gang and drug-oriented programs and strategies. Competitive candidates will be technologically savvy and possess strong fiscal and budgetary management skills. A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Law, Criminal Justice or a related field is required. A Master’s Degree in one of these fields is preferred. The annual salary for the Police Chief is negotiable, DOQ. Contact: Mr. Regan Williams, (916) 784-9080 – Filing Deadline: March 20, 2020

City of Desert Hot Springs, CA – Deputy Police Chief The Desert Hot Springs Police Department is seeking an innovative law enforcement professional to serve as the Department’s Deputy Police Chief. With its elevated views of the Coachella Valley and thousands of acres of gorgeous mountain preserves, Desert Hot Springs is one of the fastest growing communities in Southern California. The Desert Hot Springs Police Department is part of a team of City Departments committed to keeping Desert Hot Springs a pleasant and safe place to live, work and visit. The Department is staffed with 33 sworn positions, 9 professional employees and many volunteers. A Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice, Police Science, Public Administration or a related field is required. Candidates must have a minimum of ten (10) years of increasingly responsible law enforcement experience including five (5) years of management or supervisory responsibility in a municipal police department or county sheriff organization. Candidates must possess a valid POST Supervisory Certificate. Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice, Police Science or related field, FBI National Academy, Command College, and West Point Leadership Program is preferable. Graduation from a POST Supervisory Leadership Institute, Command College, or the FBI National Academy will be considered favorably. Bilingual skills are highly desirable. The salary for the Deputy Police Chief is up to $171,203.18 annually, dependent upon qualifications. Contact: Mr. Joel Bryden, (916) 784-9080 – Filing Deadline: March 13, 2020

City of Fairfield, CA Assistant City Manager (Community & Economic Development)

Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency, CA Chief Engineer

City of Vancouver, WA Fire Chief

If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

www.bobmurrayassoc.com


Filling the Workforce Pipeline: Targeted Solutions Address Critical Needs, continued from page 18

Internships provide the opportunity for a student to learn, develop skills, and gain valuable hands-on experience. Such programs also help increase staff engagement and overall satisfaction. Even with limited staff supervision, student interns working in city offices have completed a variety of projects, including records management, videos and social media, research, data analysis, coordinating and leading meetings and events, and more.

By developing partnerships and working collaboratively, cities can achieve short- and long-term goals related to public sector career awareness, talent recruitment, and retention. Agencies that want to attract and retain a more diverse and talented pool of future employees should consider nontraditional partnerships and new programs. ILG can work with your agency to strategize youth engagement tactics that address your workforce development needs. Our team can discuss your agency’s goals and explore talent recruitment and retention partnerships that will help attract a new generation to public sector careers in your city or town.

ILG Can Help Cities Navigate Future Workforce Challenges Workforce development is a complex issue that can take many years to address.

J

O

For more information on these opportunities, plan to participate in the ILG Local Government Apprenticeship and Workforce Strategies webinar, Tuesday, March 31, from 11:00 a.m. to noon. Register online at www.ca-ilg.org/ apprenticeship. ■

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

More Information Online For links to related resources and additional information, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

T

I

E

S

City of Orange Cove, California

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS

Annual salary range: $90,000 – $110,000 The Director of Public Works must have 5 years of experience in administering public works functions and a BA in Civil Engineering or related field. Director will plan, organize, direct, coordinate and evaluates the activities of the Public Works Department which is comprised of the Water/Wastewater, Parks/Recreation, Animal Control, Streets, oversees the provision of departmental services to City residents; prepares, implements and evaluates capital improvement program and long-range infrastructure development plans; prepares and manages departmental budget; ensures compliance with regulatory requirements; provides technical assistance and liaison with City staff, developers, other agencies. Annual salary range is $90,000 – $110,000. Please fill out an employment application and email a copy of your resume to jvb@ cityoforangecove.com. The Director of Public Works job description and employment application can be found on our website under Employment Opportunities. Position Open until filled.

CITY MANAGER Annual salary $140,000

The City of Orange Cove is now accepting applications for the position of City Manager. Orange Cove is an agricultural community located in Fresno County about 34 miles east of the City of Fresno, CA. Qualified candidates should have prior experience as a City Administrator/Manager, Assistant/Deputy City Administrator/ Manager, Department Director, or similar capacity. A bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a related field is required and at least five (5) years of progressive management responsibility in municipal government is highly desirable. The City Council highly regards California experience and will also consider all viable out-of-state candidates provided the type and level of experience is in alignment with the City’s needs. Bi-lingual candidates are encouraged to apply. Annual Salary: $140,000. Qualified candidates should submit a resume and cover letter electronically to the Orange Cove City Clerk, June V. Bracamontes at jvb@cityoforangecove.com. Recruitment is open until the position is filled.

Qualified candidates should submit a resume and cover letter electronically to the Orange Cove City Clerk, June V. Bracamontes at jvb@cityoforangecove.com. Recruitments are open until the positions are filled. http://cityoforangecove.com/job-center/

22

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


For your consideration . . .

Assistant City Manager City of Redwood City

Assistant to the City Manager City of Palo Alto

Assistant Public Works Director – Transportation & Business Services Assistant Public Works Director – Public Services Division City of Mountain View

Public Works Director/City Engineer City of Antioch

Finance Director City of Rohnert Park

Public Works Director City of Huntington Beach Teri Black • Suzanne Mason Tina White • Bradley Wardle tel: 424.296.3111 • info@tbcrecruiting.com www.tbcrecruiting.com


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Specializes in Executive Search

Sherrill Uyeda Cindy Krebs 1 Centerpointe Drive, Suite 440 La Palma, CA 90623 T: (562) 901-0769 F: (562) 901-3082 www.allianceRC.com http://twitter.com/Alliancerc facebook/Alliance Resource Consulting LLC

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987. Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

24

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

WRITTEN TESTS Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies.

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Building Partnerships

Building & Fire Life Safety Planning | Public Works | Engineering

Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

Construction Management Post-Disaster Development Recovery 4LEAFINC.COM

HF&H   CONSULTANTS, LLC 

POWERFUL SOLUTIONS, PROVEN RESULTS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today 

Sales Tax

Property Tax

Business Tax

Economic Development

Cannabis Consulting

Software

Lodging Tax and Short Term Rentals

888.861.0220 | hdlcompanies.com

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

Helping local governments have successful   recycling, solid waste, water, wastewater, and  stormwater services for more than 30 Years 

 SB 1383 Compliance   Financial/Rates   Stormwater Funding   Management   Regulatory Compliance   Litigation Support  www.hfh‐consultants.com   Walnut Creek  (925) 977‐6960 

Irvine (949) 251‐8628 

matrix consulting group 1650 S. AMPHLETT BLVD., SUITE 213 SAN MATEO, CA 94402 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net Offices in CA, AZ, IL, MA, NC, OR & TX

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

Your Public Agency Investment Solution CalTRUST provides CA public agencies, efficient, convenient, and professionally managed investment solutions.

CALTRUST.ORG │ (888) 225-8787

Sponsored by the League of California Cities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2020

25


Profile for Western City Magazine

Western City March 2020  

Advertisement
Advertisement