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J U LY 2 017 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities®

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s d oa R d est n a B s t n t h bo e r g a e i r hl te C ort a t e S g Cr Supp p.9 i s l ion e n i t H 3 o t o a t i n i 1 t e C ds Ac . s c p n te er v d o t u F n s L r a I e a t’s .18 lim n c C i o p Aw ct em rees r a a Cl es T r P Sav

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CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 Executive Director’s Message  Maximizing Your Voice for City Priorities

Awards Highlight Best Practices

By Carolyn Coleman

Attend the League’s 2017 annual conference and advocate for your city during the final days of the legislative session.

6 City Forum

 A skRail App Provides Hazmat Data for First Responders

Local Streets and Roads 13 

 he app provides immediate access T to information about hazardous materials a railcar is carrying.

7

 leasanton Makes P Recycling Water a Priority

By Tracy Dunne

 y using recycled water for irrigation B and landscaping, the city’s efforts will save an estimated 450 million gallons of drinking water per year.

9

 alifornia Cities Create C Carbon Funds to Support Climate Action

By Karalee Browne

 fter proceeds from state capA and-trade auctions fell short, many local agencies began developing internal funding sources to implement energy and climate action activities.

 he awards program recognizes T local government projects that reduce waste and costs and promote sustainability.

18 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Claremont Crisis  Intervention and Outreach Saves Trees

DISCOVER The Difference • Best overall government agency pricing • Competitively solicited by a lead public agency • Free registration — no user fees or commitments

 oncerned residents volunteered C to implement a program to mitigate the drought’s impact.

Job Opportunities 19  Professional Services 27  Directory

Cover image: i-Stockr

EXPLORE the League’s 2017 Annual Conference and Expo for products and solutions for your city including those to help with emergency preparedness, response and recovery.

ENTER TO WIN a $3,000 voucher for your city to be used with any exhibiting U.S. Communities supplier.* *Visit booths 201-217 and 706-710 at the League’s Expo on September 13-14 to enter. A city representative must be present at the Closing General Assembly session on Friday to win. sponsored by

www.uscommunities.org/lcc


®

President JoAnne Mounce Council Member Lodi

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

Second Vice President Mark Kersey Council Member San Diego

Immediate Past President L. Dennis Michael Mayor Rancho Cucamonga

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org

leaguevents JUly June 30–July 1

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Monterey The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

SEPTEMBER

Administrative Assistant Kimberly Brady (916) 658-8223; email: kbrady@cacities.org

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Contributors Rony Berdugo Dan Carrigg Tim Cromartie Erin Evans-Fudem Melissa Kuehne Meghan McKelvey Bismarck Obando Katie Sacco-Pebler

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Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors. Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

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League of California Cities 2017 Annual Conference & Expo, Sacramento The conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities.

Design Taber Creative Group Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 20.

NOVEMBER

Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

30–Dec.1

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2017 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIII, No. 7.

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Santa Cruz The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

DECEMBER 13–14

Fire Chiefs’ Leadership Seminar, Newport Beach The seminar covers challenging leadership topics such as succession planning, labor relations, emergency response, late-breaking issues and more.

13–14

Municipal Finance Institute, Newport Beach This conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

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Supplied by Community Energy

City Clerks’ New Law & Elections Seminar, Newport Beach The seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as other aspects of clerks’ responsibilities.

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

Maximizing Your Voice for City Priorities The Legislature takes a recess later this month, from July 21 through Aug. 20. But legislative advocacy is a year-round endeavor that knows no recess. Although downtown Sacramento will be largely legislator-free during the recess, you will find legislators in their home districts, which means multiple opportunities for local officials to connect with them there. You can do this in several ways: • Meet with legislators and their staff in their district office to discuss local priorities and issues of concern; • Invite legislators and their staff to key events in your city (such as groundbreaking and ribbon-cutting ceremonies for infrastructure projects) or to tour a city project; and • Work with your regional public affairs manager to invite your legislators to speak at a League division meeting or regional meeting with neighboring cities. Whether in Sacramento or in their district, it’s important to foster relationships with your legislators and their staff in these ways. And if the legislator can’t meet with you, a meeting with staff is not a waste of your time. In much the same way your staff is a key advisor to you on issues and community concerns, the legislators’ staff is similarly influential in bringing matters to their attention and helping to set priorities. Meetings with staff can be just as valuable as a meeting with the legislator.

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During the legislative recess, the League will continue its efforts, too, by preparing for the final push in the last days of the session. Instead of relaxing, we’ll use this time to finalize strategy on legislative issues of key importance to California cities just in time for the home stretch of this race to the session’s end. Following the recess, the Legislature reconvenes Aug. 21, and the session concludes Sept. 15.

Leverage Your Time in Sacramento With the legislative session soon to be a sprint to the finish line, attending the 2017 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo provides the perfect opportunity for the League and cities collectively to continue our advocacy. This year’s conference will be held in Sacramento Sept. 13–15 and coincides with the last three days of the legislative session. Key votes typically occur during this crucial window as the Legislature approaches its final deadlines. continued

Western City, July 2017

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Maximizing Your Voice for City Priorities, continued

By coming to Sacramento to attend the conference, you will also be poised to head to the Capitol between conference sessions to advocate for your city — and California cities — in meetings with your legislators. As a former city official, a chief lobbyist for the National League of Cities (the League’s partner in Washington, D.C.) and now working in Sacramento with cities statewide, I know firsthand there’s no substitute for the weight of local officials’ voices on urgent legislative items at this point in the session. Plan to attend the annual conference at the Sacramento Convention Center and be prepared to take a short break from the conference sessions so you can walk across the street to the Capitol and weigh

in on last-minute developments. It is an excellent opportunity to connect with your legislators at this critical juncture in the policy-making process. To help support you in your meetings in the Capitol, the League will issue advocacy alerts for city officials during the conference to keep you informed as events develop in the Legislature. As I often say: When it comes to public policy decisions, if you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu. Don’t let that happen to your city. Be sure to take your seat at the table. Although your legislators will be on recess next month, city officials can’t afford to be. Use the opportunities in your district to make sure your city’s voice is heard. When legislators reconvene, join us in Sacramento for the League conference where city officials can continue to make a difference in the legislative process. ■

Find More Information Online

Sharpen your skills at the annual conference.

For links to legislative resources and related articles that offer advocacy tips and more, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. To register for the annual conference, visit www.cacities.org/events.

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Coming in August and September

Get instant alerts with the League app.

The August and September issues of Western City will feature previews of the 2017 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo along with articles about topics that will be covered at the conference, including: • CEQA: New Strategies for Streamlining the Environmental Review Burden; • Will Driverless Vehicles Create a Better Future?; • Protecting Your Professional Reputation Online; • Getting the Most Value From Your City’s Technology Investment;

Stay Informed With the League Advocacy App Become part of the League’s Legislative Advocacy Team by signing up for the advocacy app on your smartphone or tablet. Team members receive calls to action on highpriority legislative issues and instant updates on legislation that affects cities. The app’s special features make it easy to take action in several ways.

• Crisis Management for Cities; • The Public Official and the FPPC: Silent Partners in Transparency; and • Embracing Innovation and Not Getting Out-“Smarted.” Don’t miss these information-packed issues!

To sign up for the app, contact your regional public affairs manager to obtain a registration form (information on how to reach your regional public affairs manager can be found at www.cacities.org/ regionalmanagers) or email Sarah Nowshiravan, public affairs program manager, at snowshiravan@ cacities.org.

Get Key News on City Priorities Statewide Are you receiving the League’s Local News Roundup? This electronic newsletter provides an overview of policy issues and statewide news of interest to cities. It’s formatted for quick reading and provides highlights of articles with links to the full story. To subscribe, click the “News” link on the League website at www.cacities.org and fill out the online subscription form.

Speak Up for Your City Your regional public affairs manager is available to assist you with developing and submitting op-ed articles and letters to the editor on League legislative priorities. Take advantage of the resources provided by the League to help you generate media coverage about the important issues affecting your community.

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“Public service may well be one of the most interesting and challenging times of your life.” – Donald Rumsfeld

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AskRail App Provides Hazmat Data for First Responders Thousands of first responders from throughout the nation have signed up for one of freight rail’s latest innovations: a mobile app called AskRail. Launched in October 2014, the app is designed to prepare responders for a rail emergency by providing immediate access to accurate, timely data about what type of hazardous materials a railcar is carrying. Qualified emergency responders who have completed rail emergency training sponsored by one of the Class I freight railroads or at the Security and Emergency Response Training Center (SERTC) can download and use the restricted features in the AskRail app. In addition, railroads can offer the app to known emergency responders along their routes.

Training and Community Response Planning

also offers free, web-based training for those who cannot attend in person.

California’s 26 freight railroads collaborate with cities, counties, and the state and federal governments to provide training to first responders and draft response plans in the case of a possible rail incident involving a hazmat spill. More than 20,000 first responders are trained every year through individual railroad efforts and industry programs, like SERTC in Pueblo, Colorado. SERTC is a collaborative effort of the rail industry and the Federal Railroad Administration to give first responders hands-on experience with simulated hazmat incidents. The center

City officials should reach out to their local railroad representatives to work with them on safety issues related to potential hazmat spills.

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Pleasanton Makes Recycling Water a Priority by Tracy Dunne Gov. Jerry Brown declared California’s drought over on April 7, 2017, and lifted the drought order in every county except Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Tuolumne, where emergency drinking water projects will continue to help communities where wells have gone dry. However, California has an arid climate and will likely always experience periods of water supply shortages. Cities can face these future shortages with greater resiliency by investing in technology and infrastructure. The City of Pleasanton (pop. 74,982), located east of the San Francisco Bay Area, is taking action on this issue. “Californians are all in this together, so it’s important that local governments continue to explore local options while partnering with the state to find new solutions to the issues related to water demand and supply,” says Pleasanton City Manager Nelson Fialho. Using recycled water for irrigation and landscaping purposes offers one solution.

In 2014, Pleasanton piloted the use of recycled water in two parks and a retirement community and saved over 32 million gallons of drinking water. City officials also wanted to develop a more resilient water supply portfolio and decided to build on this initial success. Purple Pipe and Recycled Water

Recycled water is not new to California. Coastal areas began using treated wastewater to replenish groundwater basins in the 1960s; in the ’70s, California began using 175,000 acre-feet annually for agricultural use. In 2009, California used 669,000 acre-feet. (One acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons — the quantity of water that would cover an acre at a depth of 1 foot.) During the recent drought, many California cities initiated or increased the use of recycled water for landscaping. Purple pipe became synonymous with recycled water when a color-blind engineer, Keith Lewinger, designed the original

distribution system for recycled water in Irvine Ranch. Because many other colors were already being used — blue for potable water, green for sewers, yellow for natural gas and other flammables and so forth — Lewinger chose a distinctive shade of purple based on the assumption that if he could distinguish this color, so could everybody else. After four years of planning, preparation and construction, Pleasanton now has over 10 miles of purple pipe in the ground to distribute recycled water to more than 135 large water users, including a business complex and parks. The city is home to 44 community parks and 600 acres of undeveloped open space that require significant water resources; for example, the average annual water usage at the Ken Mercer Sports Park, which comprises 100 acres of parkland, is approximately 64 million gallons. continued on page 21

Tracy Dunne is community relations manager for the City of Pleasanton and can be reached at tdunne@cityofpleasantonca.gov.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2017

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Thank you to all of the 2017 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 2

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Gold ($10,000+) Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 LECET Southwest Lewis Investment Company2 LiveStories1 ABM AMR2 Albertsons American Fidelity Assurance Company Charles Abbott Associates2 California Charter Schools Association California Contract Cities Association2 Californians for Energy Independence DW Development2 Dart Container Corp.2

Meyers Nave1,2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Murphy Austin Adams Schoenfeld LLP1 Opterra Energy Services Probolsky Research1

Silver ($5,000+)

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Mt. Diablo Recycling2 Northrop Grumman Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Public Financial Management Inc. James Ramos Redflex Robson Homes LLC2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Sares Regis Group2 ServPro2

Colantuono Highsmith & Whatley PC2 Commercial Bank of California Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Genentech Geo-Logic Associates2 George K. Baum & Company Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP Hill International2

Holliday Rock Company ISES Corporation LaBarge Industries2 Library Systems & Services LLC Los Angeles Yellow Cab Madaffer Enterprises1 Marin Sanitary Service2 Matarango Inc.2 McKinstry Mid Valley Disposal2 Mitsubishi Cement2 Bob Murray & Associates

Accretive Realtors Acquisition Partners of America LLC AndersonPenna Partners Inc.2 Athens Services2 Avery Associates2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CARE2 CIFAC CR&R2 CSAC EIA California Consulting, LLC California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission

California Independent Petroleum Association California Refuse Recycling Council Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Desert Valleys Builders Dokken Engineering2 Emanuels Jones and Associates Envise/Southland Energy Fard Engineers2 Forefront Power

Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc.2 Gilton Solid Waste2 Josie Gonzales2 Hospital Council of Northern California Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc.2 Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner LLP

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Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

NV5 Inc. NL Industries Inc. Nixon Peabody Norton Rose Fulbright2 PARS2 Peters Engineering2 Precision Engineering2 Prime Healthcare2 Psomas2 Quad Knopf2 Kenneth Ramirez2 Recology2 Rutan & Tucker LLP SCI Consulting Group

SGI Construction Management2 San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association San Diego County Water Authority Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 SummerHill Homes2 TREH Development2 Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 USA Properties Fund Inc. Zanker Green Waste2

Kosmont Companies2 Leibold McClendon & Mann Livermore Sanitation2 MCE Clean Energy Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Napa Recycling2 Newport Pacific Capital Company Inc. Norton Rose Fulbright2 Riverside Construction2 San Jose POA San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association

Seifel Consulting Inc. Sobrato Organization2 South San Francisco Scavengers2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management TADD LCC2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc.2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 West Builders2

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 5/29/2017


California Cities Create Carbon

Funds to Support Climate Action by Karalee Browne California local governments have spent millions of dollars developing energy and climate action plans. To date, over 200 local governments in California have adopted climate action plans, but now many are scrambling to find ways to fund implementation. The state’s cap-and-trade climate investment program offers a glimmer of hope, but with proceeds from the past several carbon emission permit auctions lower than expected, many local agencies are developing their own internal, sustainable funding sources to implement energy and climate action activities. Watsonville Builds Its Own Carbon Fund The City of Watsonville (pop. 52,891), located in Santa Cruz County, is a densely populated agricultural powerhouse. Surrounded by the lush fields and orchards of the fertile Pajaro Valley, Watsonville serves as the manufacturing and processing hub for farms throughout the region and is home to many agricultural workers. Although the state government identifies

Watsonville as a disadvantaged community, the city manager is not bound by that label. “It’s up to us to change that narrative and bring balance to our community,” says Watsonville City Manager Charles Montoya. “We are trying to get more money into our system so we can determine our own future.” In 2012, Watsonville received a $277,811 grant from the state Strategic Growth Council to develop a comprehensive

Climate Action Plan. With this initial investment, the city hired a consultant who helped craft a community-driven plan that guides the city’s environmental initiatives. The consultant also created the structure for the city’s first Carbon Fund, which aims to boost energy efficiency and renewable energy projects and create a sustainable funding source for the city’s climate action initiatives. Formalized in an ordinance adopted in 2015, Watsonville’s Carbon Fund Program adds a carbon impact fee to all new development as a percentage of the building permit fee. The fees have ranged from $272 to $23,000. Development project applicants can receive a full or partial refund of the fees if they voluntarily reduce 40 to 80 percent or more of the new development’s estimated average annual electricity demand through energy efficiency measures and/or on-site renewable energy, such as solar photovoltaics. continued

Karalee Browne is sustainability program manager for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org.

The City of Watsonville is taking an innovative approach to climate action.

Affirm Your City’s Commitment to Addressing Climate Change More than 100 cities statewide have joined the Institute for Local Government’s Beacon Program to affirm their commitment to saving energy and adopting policies and practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote sustainability. To join the Beacon Program, visit www.ca.ilg.org/ BeaconProgram.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2017

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California Cities Create Carbon Funds to Support Climate Action, continued

Applicants use a simple form to complete the calculations as part of the permit process. The carbon fees collected are automatically routed to Watsonville’s Carbon Fund, which can be used only to implement greenhouse gas reduction projects in the city. “The city wins either way,” says Suzi Merriam, Watsonville’s acting director of community development. “We incentivize new construction to build more sustainably and reduce greenhouse gas emissions — or we get the money to realize those reductions in other ways.” Surprisingly the city has heard few complaints from the development community. “I think our development community and

our council know that this is important to keep moving forward,” says Montoya. “We are not dealing just with today, but this is for our future.” The City of Watsonville’s Carbon Fund currently contains approximately $40,000. Staff is considering whether to recommend some smaller projects or allow the fund to grow and ask the council to approve using the money to fund a larger initiative in 2018. For links to the city ordinance, the compliance worksheet and more about Watsonville’s Carbon Fund Program, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Carbon funds provide cities the financing and flexibility to implement creative energyefficiency and carbon-reduction activities.

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Sacramento Plants a Seed for Future Energy Improvements Talk to a Sacramento enthusiast and you are likely to hear about the new downtown arena built for the Sacramento Kings basketball team. Golden 1 Center is the NBA’s first-ever LEED Platinum arena, which provides a highly visible example of the city’s commitment to leadership in climate, energy and sustainability. Another example of Sacramento’s innovative approach is its creative energy financing program, which used a $1.9 million federal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) as seed funding. The city created a revolving loan program in 2009 that continues to fund energy efficiency projects in municipal facilities. Sacramento’s former Department of General Services (DGS) conducted an initial energy audit and modeling for all agency facilities, which helped identify and illustrate the savings that can be realized by changing to more efficient systems. DGS presented the options to various city departments, and five entered agreements to upgrade systems. A standard contract outlines that DGS will provide the loan, project design, implementation and measurement verification for the projects. The departments that chose to implement efficiency are responsible for paying back the loan using the estimated energy savings from the projects, plus a 3 percent interest rate to cover administrative costs. The fund now operates as an ongoing capital improvement project, the Energy Reinvestment Program, and the Department of Public Works manages it.

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City of Sacramento reaps savings through its energy efficiency efforts; the City of San Francisco’s Carbon Fund mitigates emissions, below.

Innovative Local Programs Generate Funds Tourist-rich areas like San Francisco and Monterey Bay offer businesses and residents the opportunity to mitigate event-related greenhouse gas emissions by buying carbon offsets or donating money to a Carbon Fund administered by a local nonprofit. Through a website, an online calculator helps determine the financial equivalent of a particular carbon-intense activity, such as air travel, and allows an individual to donate that amount immediately online. The money collected is used to fund local projects such as solar panel installations or tree planting in the community. These programs can net an average of $500,000 from individual donors and businesses annually.

“This program has been an important step in institutionalizing our commitment to energy efficiency,” says Sustainability Manager Jennifer Venema. “The original funding has come and gone, but we’ve been able to maintain progress by plugging savings and ongoing rebate incentives back into the fund. We’ve then used that money to support staff time so we can keep catalyzing new initiatives.” The payback is designed to be cost neutral for each department and will reduce the department’s budget after the loan is repaid in full. Through this program, the City of Sacramento estimates its departments will have saved 9.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity annually, which translates to an annual financial savings of $1.2 million. Santa Cruz Fuels Funding With Diversification The City of Santa Cruz (pop. 64,632) has long been an environmental leader, win-

www.westerncity.com

ning Spotlight Awards for energy savings, greenhouse gas reductions and sustainability best practices from the Institute for Local Government’s Beacon Program in 2015. The city adopted its Climate Action Plan in 2012 and has set ambitious milestones to measure progress in energy use, transportation, water conservation, waste diversion, urban forestry and green business development. But finding funds to implement specific projects is always a challenge. With no seed money, Santa Cruz launched its Carbon Fund by capturing energy efficiency and solar rebates from eligible projects that various city departments chose to undertake. Performancebased rebate checks that previously were routed to the General Fund are now directed to a special Carbon Fund, with the funds being used to implement carbon-reducing projects that align with the Climate Action Plan.

The San Francisco Carbon Fund is primarily funded through local legislation calling for 13 percent of the cost of municipal employees’ air travel for city business to be invested in local projects that mitigate and sequester travel-related greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, the fund provides an opportunity for events and conferences to mitigate event-related emissions by contributing to these local projects. Launched in 2009, the fund was the first of its kind to invest solely in local projects that reduce emissions close to where they were generated. Though it is not an official offset program, the San Francisco Carbon Fund uses widely accepted protocols to estimate carbon savings and secures approximately $170,000 annually. In addition to the carbon savings, projects provide other benefits, such as building a sense of community, helping small businesses save money through energy efficiency retrofits, providing food to underserved neighborhoods, creating a local source of biodiesel and creating a greener, safer and more walkable city. For links to these programs, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

continued on page 22

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The County Engineers Association of California (CEAC) and the League’s Public Works Officers’ Institute announced the winners of the 2017 Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards at their annual spring meeting in San Diego. The awards program recognized counties and three cities for their extraordinary efforts to preserve and improve the quality of the local streets and roads system. Imperial County was the overall winner. The City of Commerce, the Town of Windsor, the City of San Diego and Los Angeles County also won in specific categories. Sponsored by the League, California State Association of Counties and CEAC, the Outstanding Local Streets and Roads

Project Awards program features best practices that reduce waste and costs and can be replicated by other jurisdictions. The awards also highlight cities and counties that promote sustainability in the local transportation system. “Local governments really do have this ‘can-do’ spirit, especially when facing difficult conditions,” said Jay Spurgin, president of the League’s Public Works Department and the public works director

for the City of Thousand Oaks. “We see it on a daily basis, but I don’t think the general public recognizes it. So it’s good to celebrate some of these achievements in a more public fashion.” “This year, with all the storm damage to our local streets and roads, it’s even more important to recognize the need to provide adequate resources for our transportation projects, as well as the value that these projects provide to our local communities,” said John Presleigh, president of CEAC and public works director for Santa Cruz County. “The public and policy-makers need to know that when we have the resources, we can provide the highest level of service on our streets and roadway systems for our local communities.” continued

Meghan McKelvey, department and member services manager for the League, and Eva Spiegel, director of communications for the League, contributed to this article. To learn more about the awards program, visit www.savecaliforniastreets.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2017

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Local Streets and Roads Awards Highlight Best Practices, continued

Imperial County, Salton City Roadways Project

Before After Category: Overall

Winner: Imperial County, Salton City Roadways Project Imperial County is committed to improving the overall quality of its road system in the most cost-effective, environmentally beneficial and safest manner. In keeping with the county’s commitment, the 2.8-mile Salton City Roadways project employed a sustainable engineering approach that strengthens or recycles existing on-site materials instead of the more costly and more environmentally

detrimental “remove and replace” construction method. This project achieved the following impressive environmental benefits: • Used 67 percent recycled asphalt pavement; • Recycled 11,043 tons of existing asphalt assets; • Conserved 24,774 tons of nonrenewable aggregate resources; • Diverted 13,594 cubic yards of subgrade soils from the landfill;

• Eliminated 4,701 heavily loaded trucks exporting and importing materials to the project site, along with the associated wear and tear on roads, and reduced traffic congestion and fuel and oil consumption; • Reduced greenhouse gas emissions and energy usage by 80 percent; and • Saved over $1 million. The Salton City Roadways project demonstrates how the expertise of public works engineers helps solve the financial and environmental challenges associated with asphalt pavement infrastructure. Category: Efficient and Sustainable Road Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Projects

Winner: City of Commerce, Eastern Avenue Pavement Rehabilitation Project This was not a traditional pavement rehabilitation design and construction project. Eastern Avenue is a major corridor in the City of Commerce with heavy vehicular and truck traffic that connects with the Interstate 5 freeway. The work on Eastern Avenue involved extensive coordination with local businesses to ensure the roadway remained open and minimized the impact on the community. The project utilized reclaimed asphalt concrete pavement, a cost-effective approach to conventional rehabilitation,

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which reduced the cost by 50 percent (from $2.3 million to $1.15 million). The city used the savings for additional street rehabilitation projects to improve the quality of life for its residents. Traditional asphalt is not biodegradable material, and nonrenewable resources must be used to generate new asphalt. Commerce chose a material mix that minimizes waste by repurposing old asphalt, which has the advantages of having already been paid for and being in place. In addition, this approach is sustainable — it significantly reduces the number of trucks needed to transport materials. The material mix also provides excellent bonding qualities and increases the overall quality and durability of the roadway. The construction schedule was accelerated, despite cold weather and rain, to ensure that residents were not affected during the holiday season between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Commerce will use a similar approach for future projects. Category: Complete Streets Projects

Winner: Town of Windsor, Old Redwood Highway Improvement Project Oakmont Senior Living, the developer of Bell Village retirement community, initiated the Old Redwood Highway improvement project, which is a model of a

The expertise of public works engineers helps solve the financial and environmental challenges associated with asphalt pavement infrastructure.

successful public-private partnership with benefits for the greater local community. Oakmont’s development project comprised both commercial and residential components, and the conditions for the project included making improvements along the frontage of its property on the Old Redwood Highway. As part of the planning process with the Town of Windsor, Oakmont agreed to make improvements on both sides of the highway in exchange for reimbursement in the form of development impact fee credits. Prior to the project, the Old Redwood Highway consisted of a two-lane road with no sidewalks, intermittent or discontinuous bike lanes, minimal street lighting and no marked street crossings at intersections.

about-controlled intersections, LED streetlights, angled parking, elevated walkways to protect the root structure of some of the heritage oak trees, stormwater drainage units and two pedestrianactivated rectangular rapid flashing beacon warning systems at crosswalks. This complete street project’s innovative features significantly improve safety and access for pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles. continued

More Information Online For links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com.

The highway now features green bike lanes, extra-wide sidewalks, two round-

City of Commerce, Eastern Avenue Pavement Rehabilitation Project

Before

After www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2017

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Local Streets and Roads Awards Highlight Best Practices, continued

The awards program features best practices that reduce waste and costs and can be replicated.

Category: Safety or Intelligent Transportation System Projects

Winner: City of San Diego, Mira Mesa Phase I Adaptive Traffic Control System Activated in summer 2016, Mira Mesa Phase I Adaptive Traffic Control System is the City of San Diego’s most complex system deployment designed to improve traffic flow, reduce travel times, enhance safety in a traffic-congested area and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The city was already using the traffic control system at nine intersections on Lusk Boulevard, where the technology reduced travel times and fuel consumption by 24 percent and stops by 61 percent. These results led the city to install the adaptive traffic control system at 11 more intersections, including three controlled by Caltrans, for the Mira Mesa Phase I project. The Mira Mesa Phase I system initially created new challenges, including implementing a larger Ethernet network; coordinating with another agency, Caltrans; dealing with higher average daily traffic (ADT) of 42,000 vehicles (compared to

Lusk Boulevard with 10,000 ADT); and installing equipment at a high-traffic volume intersection with frequent railroad pre-emptions during the peak hours. The City of San Diego’s team designed and repurposed existing traffic signal interconnect cables to create a robust Ethernet network that could carry adaptive traffic signal system data. High-capacity Ethernet radios with high-definition video transfer capabilities bridged the two short communications gaps that existed between signals on Scranton Road. Staff from the city and Caltrans collaborated to establish a framework for future City of San Diego-Caltrans intelligent transportation system projects, which uses a streamlined permit and deployment process that will benefit the San Diego region. Travel times along two primary commuter routes in the area have improved by over 20 percent, with a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. Along Mira Mesa Boulevard, rapid bus routes receive the benefit of the system’s transit signal priority treatment to ensure that these buses are on time.

The Mira Mesa Phase I adaptive system demonstrates the effective use of advanced real-time adaptive traffic control systems in the region and will significantly reduce travel times for thousands of commuters. Category: Efficient and Sustainable Bridge Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Projects

Winner: Los Angeles County, Bridge Capacity System Collaborating with Caltrans and the Federal Highway Administration, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works developed an innovative, costeffective and user-friendly program for California regulatory agencies to process Oversize or Overweight Transportation (OOT) permits. The California Vehicle Code requires an OOT permit for movement of vehicles and loads exceeding statutory size or weight limitations. Many local agencies do not have the technical ability to review overweight vehicle impact on bridges and issue OOT permits without such considerations, which results in a high degree of risk and accelerated degradation of local bridges. The partnering agencies created the web-based Bridge Capacity System (BCS) software to streamline the review process. BCS provides local regulatory agencies a way to comply with OOT permit requirements that protect existing bridges,

Town of Windsor, Old Redwood Highway Improvement Project

Before After 16

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www.cacities.org


Los Angeles County, Bridge Capacity System

2017 Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards Finalists The following public agencies were finalists in the 2017 awards program.

Efficient and Sustainable Road Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Projects 1. Hayward $19 Million FY 2016 Pavement Maintenance and Rehabilitation Project, City of Hayward 2. Studebaker Road Improvement Project, City of Long Beach above The

Bridge Capacity System helped ensure the safe transport of a space shuttle external tank; Los Angeles County Civil Engineer Raymond Lui uses the Bridge Capacity System to conduct an analysis of an oversize and overweight truck load moving through Los Angeles County, at left. ensure public safety and improve the sustainability of local bridges. Its functionality can verify inputted weights of a permit vehicle against the load carrying capacity of all bridges on a route and check bridge clearances to prevent truck collisions with superstructures. The use of geographic information system (GIS) layers of bridge data and street maps eliminates the need for tedious calculations, manual map review and the use of bridge data tables. Staff with any level of engineering experience can use the BCS to conduct a highly technical review quickly and effectively. The Department of Public Works Structures Section uses the BCS to aid in the permitting process of approximately 40 overload permits per year that exceed the 250,000-pound weight limit. The

program also collects data about the most frequently crossed bridges, which provides analysis for appropriate mitigation and funding needs for future bridge maintenance. The program includes data for about 11,000 local agency bridges throughout 58 counties and 482 municipalities in California. Does Your City Have an Innovative Project?

The Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards program is conducted annually. If your city has an innovative project underway, consider submitting it for 2018. More information about the awards program is available at www. savecaliforniastreets.org. â–

3. Pavement Accelerated Repair Implementation Strategy Program, City of Redlands

Complete Streets Projects 1. Armorlite Drive Enhancements, City of San Marcos 2. Village Parkway North Extension Project, City of West Sacramento 3. State Route 32 Widening and Multimodal Improvements Project, Phases 1 & 2, City of Chico

Safety or Intelligent Transportation System Projects 1. State Route 89 Mousehole Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project, Town of Truckee 2. Donlon Road Realignment, Ventura County

Efficient and Sustainable Bridge Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Projects 1. East Campbell Avenue Portals Project, City of Campbell 2. East Fork Road Over North Fork San Gabriel River Bridge Retrofit, Los Angeles County

Traditional asphalt is not biodegradable material, and nonrenewable resources must be used to generate new asphalt. www.westerncity.com

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Claremont

Crisis Intervention and Outreach SaveS Trees

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esidents and visitors alike affectionately refer to the City of Claremont as the “City of trees and PhDs.” When the drought threatened to wipe out a significant number of mature trees in the community, city officials took swift action. With assistance from community volunteers, the city developed and implemented a Tree Crisis Intervention and Outreach Plan to get critical tree care information and tools into the hands of property owners.

Through an educational campaign and direct contact with property owners, the city and its team of dedicated volunteers educated residents on watering techniques that maintained tree health while achieving a 36 percent reduction in water consumption. Returning to Claremont’s Roots To find inspiration for its Tree Crisis Plan, the city looked to its own history of volunteerism and tree care. The City of Claremont was founded in 1887 as a

Santa Fe railroad stop and home of Pomona College. Two years later, the town council formed a three-member committee on sidewalks and shade trees. One of the committee’s first items of business was to discuss planting 250 trees that had been donated to the township. Word spread of the committee’s plan to plant trees throughout the town, and residents showed up after the meeting to collect trees to plant near the college and town buildings. More than 100 years later, many of these trees still stand as a testament to the community’s volunteer spirit and passion for trees. “Claremont’s trees and volunteers go hand in hand,” says Mayor Larry Schroeder. “From the very beginning, our trees have survived because of the efforts of volunteers. Today is no different from 100 years ago.” Over the years, climate change, development and drought have taken a toll on the city’s urban forest. Claremont has more than 24,000 city-owned street and parkway trees and many more privately

owned trees. To minimize the impact of climate change and development, the city’s planners have developed policies and programs that ensure the continued health and growth of the tree canopy. In 2013, the city council revised its tree policy to outline aggressive tree planting procedures and policies. Each year, the city plants hundreds of new trees and replaces trees removed due to disease and displacement. Throughout the process of developing and revising tree policies and guidelines, Claremont has relied on community groups and individuals who advocate for trees. The Tree Action Group (TAG) is a community group that formed during the tree policy update and continues to advise the city on tree-related issues. The city also collaborates with Claremont Heritage, the local historical society, and Sustainable Claremont, a community group whose mission is to protect the city’s natural resources. continued on page 24

The City of Claremont won the Award for Excellence in the Planning and Environmental Quality category of the 2016 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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www.cacities.org


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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Kimberly Brady, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: kbrady@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

Creating Staffing Solutions in 2017!

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FROM MAINTENANCE WORKER TO CITY MANAGER We Fill All Positions in Municipal Government!

Director of Public Works Salary: $132,000 – $160,000/Annually

The City offers a competitive benefits package

The City of Vista seeks an experienced and dynamic Director of Public Works who will help our city reach new levels of excellence. The Public Works Department provides a range of services via one administrative and five maintenance divisions including Building and Facilities; Fleet; Streets; Parks; and Wastewater. The ideal candidate holds a Bachelor’s degree in public administration, civil engineering, or related field and has at least five years of progressively responsible public sector management experience. For additional information please visit our website: www.cityofvista.com

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Call Us Toll Free 1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

City Manager, City of El Centro, CA The City of El Centro (population 45,170) is at the center of one of Southern California’s most promising new commercial and industrial regions. Covering 11.019 square miles, El Centro is the county seat of and the largest city in Imperial County. The City of El Centro is now seeking a forward-thinking, experienced manager to provide effective leadership while coordinating the activities of a municipal organization. A City Manager who is approachable and accessible, and responds in a timely manner to the needs and concerns expressed by the Council and the general public is sought. The ideal candidate will be a cooperative and responsive problem solver who can demonstrate initiative and drive and a sincere desire to move El Centro forward in order to successfully meet the complex challenges of the future. He or she will be capable of establishing clear and reasonable goals and a strategic vision for the City, and be able to communicate these goals to the Council, staff, and general public. At minimum, candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, or a closely related field, from an accredited institution which, when coupled with one’s professional experience, would provide the knowledge and theory necessary to successfully perform the duties of the City Manager. Candidates must have eight (8) or more years of progressively responsible administrative experience in local government and possess a valid and current California Class C Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record at the time of hire. The annual salary for the incoming City Manager is open, and DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please call Mr. Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080, should you have any questions. Closing date July 7, 2017.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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New opportunities . . .

Fire Chief

City of Fremont

Police Chief City of Palo Alto

City Clerk

Fire Chief

$8,690 - $10,833/month

The City of Whittier invites qualified applications for the position of City Clerk. Whittier is a progressive City with a population of over 87,708 residents and located 12 miles southeast of Los Angeles. The City is known for its high quality of management and sound fiscal practices. The City Clerk is a key member of the City’s Executive Management Team, who reports directly to the City Manager and works closely with the City Council and other City staff. The City is seeking a seasoned professional with extensive experience as a municipal clerk and the ability to manage the City’s election and information technology needs. Vacancy is due to impending retirement of long-term incumbent. This is a continuous recruitment with a first review date of Wednesday, July 7, 2017. If you are interested, please visit http:// agency.governmentjobs.com/ whittier for more information.

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League of California Cities

City of Berkeley Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

CITY OF ANAHEIM The City of Anaheim is one of the nation’s premier municipalities with a thriving business and vibrant cultural arts community and featuring charming and historic neighborhoods. With a population of over 350,000 residents, Anaheim is the largest city in Orange County. Anaheim features a mild year-round climate with easy access to a wide array of cultural, entertainment and recreational options, truly making it where the world comes to live, work and play. The City Attorney is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the City Council. The City Attorney has responsibility for planning, directing, managing and overseeing the activities and operations of the City Attorney’s Office including the Civil Counsel CITY and Criminal Prosecution Divisions. He or William Avery & Associates will also coordinate activities with other ATTORNEY she Management Consultants departments and outside agencies, and provide legal advice and representation to the City including serving as 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A legal advisor to the City Council, staff, officers, boards and commissions. Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424

The new City Attorney will have 10 years of increasingly responsible Fax: 408.399.4423 experience in all major phases of municipal law including three years email: jobs@averyassoc.net of management responsibility supplemented by a JD degree from an www.averyassoc.net accredited school of law. Membership in the State Bar of California and a license to practice in the federal courts is also required. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net to upload your letter of interest, resume, salary history and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by July 21, 2017.

Photo/art credits Cover: i-Stockr Page 3: Adonis Villanueva/Shutterstock.com Pages 4 & 5: Jeremy Sykes, courtesy of the League of California Cities Page 6: Top, Supannee_Hickman/Shutterstock. com; bottom, zhangyang13576997233/Shutterstock.com Page 7: Courtesy of the City of Pleasanton Page 9: Courtesy of the Institute for Local Government and the City of Watsonville Page 10: Cary Kalscheuer/Shutterstock.com

Page 11: DIIMSA Researcher/Shutterstock.com Pages 12–13: i-Stockr Page 14: Courtesy of Imperial County Page 15: Courtesy of the City of Commerce Page 16: Courtesy of the Town of Windsor Page 17: Courtesy of Los Angeles County Page 18: Courtesy of the City of Claremont and the League of California Cities Page 21: Courtesy of the City of Pleasanton Pages 22–23: Courtesy of the City of Santa Cruz Pages 24–25, 27: Courtesy of the City of Claremont and the League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Pleasanton Makes Recycling Water a Priority, continued from page 7

California will likely always experience water supply shortages.

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DIRECTOR OF PARKS, RECREATION AND COMMUNITY SERVICES Salary Up to $172,654/annually The City of Culver City seeks an innovative and energetic director to lead the City’s programs related to parks, recreation and community services. The new Director will oversee four divisions consisting of a complex full-service recreation program, park maintenance, auditorium/community center management, and a senior & social services division including a 27,000 sq. ft senior center. The department has an annual operating budget of approximately $8.9M with a full-time staff of 35, 100 part-time and seasonal staff and over 400 volunteers.

Pleasanton’s efforts were made possible by the state’s $800 million low-interest loan program, launched in 2014, designed to spur the development of recycled water projects. The city received a $17 million combination loan/Proposition 1 (of 2014) grant, which will be repaid over the next 30 years by businesses purchasing the recycled water. After all the customers along the recycled water distribution system are connected, Pleasanton will be saving an estimated 450 million gallons of drinking water per year, which will give the city more flexibility to better respond to future water supply uncertainty. Encouraged by the project’s overall success, the Pleasanton City Council invested another $1.3 million to further expand the system. Tapping a Sustainable Resource

Pleasanton is just one of many cities statewide that have implemented water recycling in response to supply challenges. Using recycled water for landscaping provides a reliable, sustainable and local water supply that is not subject to drought restrictions. Beyond the possibility of future state-mandated water reduction targets, complying with the Water Conservation Act of 2009 (which calls for a 20 percent water savings by 2020) further increases the need for cities to develop more diverse and resilient water portfolios and foster water-smart communities. For more information about waterrelated issues and resources, including links to city conservation projects, visit www.cacities.org/water. ■

www.westerncity.com

The new Director will need a minimum of five years’ experience as an administrator of programs and service areas pertaining to community services, parks, recreation, or a related program. A Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited institution is required. A Master’s degree is preferred. Final filing date is July 28, 2017. Submit cover letter, resume and at least three work-related references (who will not be contacted until mutual interest is established) to: City of Culver City— Human Resources Department Serena Wright-Black, Director of Administrative Services 9770 Culver Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232 | (310) 253-5640 | www.culvercity.org/jobs

ENCINITAS Encinitas is located in northern San Diego County along six miles of the Pacific coastline, with a population of close to 65,000 residents. The natural beauty of the communities, the moderate Mediterranean climate and the many recreational and cultural activities make Encinitas a spectacular and highly desirable place to call home.

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DIRECTOR

The Development Services Director will provide oversight for the recently reorganized Development Services Department. The Department will provide planning, building, stormwater, code compliance and housing services with the newly incorporated engineering division (transferred from public works). This position requires a background that includes eight years or more of recent William Avery & Associates professional experience in development services, planning, engineering Management Consultants and/or public administration, with at least three of those years 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A managing staff. A Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering, Planning, Los Gatos, CA 95030 Public/Business Administration or a related field is also required.

CITY ENGINEER

408.399.4424

The City Engineer will lead the Engineering Fax: 408.399.4423 Division through a critical transition in becoming email: jobs@averyassoc.net a part of the Development Services Team. In www.averyassoc.net reporting to the Development Services Director, the City Engineer will have a key leadership role in integrating the engineering staff that oversees CIP design, construction, and inspection, along with stormwater programs, traffic engineering and land development engineering. The City Engineer will have a background that includes six or more years of increasingly responsible professional civil engineering experience including two of those years managing or supervising staff. A Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering or a related field along with certification as a P.E. in the State of California is required.

CITY PLANNER

The City Planner oversees the areas of current and advanced planning, building, housing and code enforcement activities within the City. The City Planner also acts as the City’s Zoning Administrator and serves as the City’s Hearing Officer for Zoning Administration. Reporting to the Development Services Director, the City Planner will work closely with the City Engineer in assisting with the Engineering Division’s transition to Development Services. This position requires six or more years of increasingly responsible professional experience, with at least two years of supervisory or management experience along with a Bachelor’s degree in Planning or a related field. To be considered for these positions, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for detailed job announcements and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

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California Cities Create Carbon Funds to Support Climate Action, continued from page 11

Watsonville’s Carbon Fund Program adds a carbon impact fee to all new development as a percentage of the building permit fee.

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City of Alameda, CA

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ocated in the San Francisco Bay, the island City of Alameda is home to a population of 75,126. Spanning 10.6 square miles, Alameda is less than a mile from Oakland and is one of only 21 municipalities in the nation designated as a Coast Guard City. Operating out of four fire stations, the city’s full-service Fire Department is supported by 95 sworn and 6 civilian personnel. The Department is organized across six divisions: Administration, Operations, Emergency Medical Services, Training, Disaster Preparedness, and Fire Prevention. The ideal candidate will be a progressive leader in the fire service with Bay Area experience. A strong mentor and collaborative team player, he/she will be an exceptional problem solver known for encouraging and supporting innovation in the profession. Any combination equivalent to education and experience that provides the required knowledge, abilities, and skills will be considered. A minimum of five (5) years of command level experience and a Bachelor’s degree are preferred. A Master’s degree is desirable. Detailed information and submission instructions can be found at www.tbcrecruiting.com. The salary range for the Fire Chief is $203,536 - $247,400; placement within the range will be DOQE. Salary is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, July 30, 2017. Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299 Teri Black • 424.296.3111

Santa Cruz spent almost two years building the political support to get the fund up and running. “Our city leaders and staff saw the value in creating an internal revenue source for reinvesting in carbon reducing projects that implement our Climate Action Plan,” says Tiffany WiseWest, sustainability and climate action coordinator for the city. The program is designed so that the city spends two-thirds of the accrual in a given year, allowing the remaining onethird to roll into the next budget cycle. Each municipal department can propose projects as long as the projects are consistent with the city’s Climate Action Plan. The city’s sustainability team, which comprises employees from all departments, prioritizes the proposed projects based on preset criteria, and the city manager approves the projects recommended by the sustainability team. “The program gives us the flexibility and predictability to fund projects that align with our Climate Action Plan and achieve our goals,” says City Manager Martin Bernal. “This structure allows city employees to feel part of the process in helping make our city more environmentally responsible.”

CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO The City of San Bernardino, with a population of over 213,000, is located approximately 60 miles east of Los Angeles, 120 miles northeast of metropolitan San Diego, and 55 miles northwest of Palm Springs. The vision for the City is to be strong and prosperous. The City has a bright future, with new exciting projects, special events and new ways of doing business just over the horizon. San Bernardino is, now more than ever, a city of opportunity. The Director of Public Works is responsible for managing, directing and integrating the functions, programs and activities of the Public Works Department, which carries out comprehensive City-wide programs project engineering; construction PUBLIC inand capital inspection; street maintenance; traffic William Avery & Associates WORKS engineering, operations, and signals and street Management Consultants lighting; wastewater/storm water collection system DIRECTOR maintenance; fleet maintenance; and City facility 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 service and repair. The incumbent provides advice and strategic leadership 408.399.4424 to the City Manager and City Council and to other department directors on Fax: 408.399.4423 a wide range of short- and long-term Public Works initiatives that manage email: jobs@averyassoc.net and control City growth, development, improvement and reinvigoration. www.averyassoc.net

The new Public Works Director will have at least 10 years of progressively responsible development and municipal public works experience including five years in a management capacity and a BS/BA degree in engineering, public administration or a related field. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net to upload your letter of interest, resume, salary history and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by July 21, 2017.

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League of California Cities

Santa Cruz City Hall provides charging stations for electric vehicles.

www.cacities.org


The program netted approximately $70,000 in its first year, but with many energy efficiency projects already implemented and incentive programs like the California Solar Initiative Rebate Program fully subscribed, the city is looking to diversify its funding stream. Santa Cruz is exploring options to implement a fuel surcharge on fuel purchased for cityowned vehicles or establish a revolving loan fund like Sacramento’s that captures a portion of the first year’s savings from energy efficiency projects in the fund. The city is also evaluating more creative financing options, such as producing and monetizing low-carbon fuel standard credits and California-based greenhouse gas credits on the new California Air Pollution Control Officers Association Greenhouse Gas Reduction Exchange.

Find More Information Online

processes, such as permitting, the programs require nominal resources from local agencies — and could be the difference between being stuck with a Climate Action Plan that sits on a shelf or one that is implemented at a steady rate.

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www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Watch for these Upcoming Opportunities: • Santa Cruz Port District, CA – Port Director

Activating Climate Action

• City of Atwater, CA – City Manager

Whether it is $10,000 or $500,000, carbon funds provide cities the financing and flexibility to implement creative energy-efficiency and carbon-reduction activities without hiring consultants to complete applications or perform the exhaustive documentation associated with many grant programs. When cities can tie carbon fund initiatives to existing

• Castaic Lake Water Agency, CA – Public Information Officer – Principal Water Resources Planner • City of Imperial, CA – Police Chief • City of Arvin, CA – Finance Director • City of Menifee, CA – City Manager

For more information and filing deadlines, please contact: Bob Murray and Associates, 1544 Eureka Road, Suite 280, Roseville, CA 95661 Phone: (916) 784-9080, Fax: (916) 784-1985, E-mail: apply@bobmurrayassoc.com

Public Works Director City of Alameda, CA

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overing 10.6 square miles, the island City of Alameda is located less than a mile from Oakland in the San Francisco Bay. Home to a population of 75,126, the community is one of only 21 designated Coast Guard Cities in the country. The APWA Accredited Public Works Department encompasses the divisions of Engineering, Maintenance, and Administration. The Department’s activities are supported by a staff of 70.15 FTE and a FY2017-28 operating budget of $24.6 million and a FY2017-19 CIP of approximately $33.6 million. The City is seeking a big picture and forward-thinking public works professional who is also an exceptional people and project manager. Proven success serving in a highly responsive and dynamic environment will be expected. Any combination equivalent to education and experience that provides the required knowledge and abilities will be considered. The ideal candidate will possess ten (10) years of broad public works experience, which includes a minimum of five (5) years of management experience, and a Bachelor’s degree. An impressive engineering background is strongly preferred and a Master’s degree is desirable. Recruitment brochure and submission instructions can be found at www.tbcrecruiting.com. The salary range for the Public Works Director is $175,362 - $213,154. Salary is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, August 13, 2017. Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Teri Black • 424.296.3111

www.westerncity.com

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Claremont Crisis Intervention and Outreach Saves Trees, continued from page 18

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City of Henderson, Nevada Chief of Police The City of Henderson, Nevada is recruiting nationally for a Chief of Police. Reporting to the City Manager, the Chief of Police will oversee a total staff of 627 (434 sworn) with an operating budget of approximately $116.2 million. The ideal candidate will have excellent leadership, and decision-making skills and be a person of integrity and unquestionable ethics. Top candidates will have experience successfully managing organizational change and advancing collaboratively-crafted, comprehensive reforms. Master’s degree and FBI National Academy training or comparable executive-level law enforcement training are required. Annual salary range $125,985 to $193,823 plus an executive benefits package. The City of Henderson does not participate in Social Security except for the Medicare portion. Candidates should be aware that the State of Nevada has no personal income tax. Interested candidates should apply by July 24, 2017 by sending a resume, cover letter, and salary history to apply@ralphandersen.com. Detailed brochure available at www.ralphandersen.com. Confidential inquires to Ms. Heather Renschler or Chief Greg Nelson (Ret.) at (916) 630-4900.

Ralph Andersen & Associates

BENICIA Benicia, a San Francisco Bay waterfront city, is known for its small town charm and quality of life. Citizens enjoy low crime, good schools, affordable housing, culture and a wide range of recreational opportunities. The area features uninterrupted miles of public shoreline, a marina and boat launches for fishing and sailing, and the Benicia State Recreation Area.

ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER

The Assistant City Manager (ACM) is a critical and highly visible leader on the Executive Management team, supporting the City Manager and City Council in creating a desirable community with the ideal balance between quality of life services and a strong economic William Avery & Associates foundation. The ACM has primary responsibility for assisting the City Management Consultants Manager in overseeing the day-to-day operations of the City, providing 1 3 / 2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A expert advice and assistance to the City Manager, the City Council, Los Gatos, CA 95030 department heads and senior managers. The position requires at least six years of increasingly responsible and varied experience in 408.399.4424 public sector management, including at least three years as head of Fax: 408.399.4423 a city department or a major division. An educational background email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, with major course work in business/public administration, accounting/finance, human resources or a related is required. The Finance Director will oversee the activities and operations of the City’s Finance Department, including budget, treasury, accounting, collections, utility billing, and purchasing. As a key member of the City’s senior management team, the new Finance Director will bring exceptional leadership, proactive management and excellent communication skills to the organization. The position requires at least six years of increasingly responsible experience in governmental financial planning and administration, including three years of managerial and supervisory responsibility, coupled with a Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in finance, accounting, business/public administration or a closely related field.

FINANCE DIRECTOR

To be considered for these positions, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at http://www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ to upload your letter of interest, resume, salary history and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by July 26, 2017.

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League of California Cities

“The community’s involvement in creating our tree policies and programs is essential to their success. The depth of knowledge and the professional expertise in our community is unique and is reflected in the health of our urban forest,” says City Manager Tony Ramos. The Drought’s Effect on the City’s Trees Following several years of hot dry weather, Claremont conducted a survey of city-owned trees in fall 2014 to get a baseline assessment of their condition. Arborists found hundreds of trees in various states of decline due to disease and drought stress. The city’s arborists worked with an urban forester to categorize the trees as critically, severely or moderately drought stressed. The city outlined a plan to educate property owners on tree care and efficient watering techniques. In May 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown announced water restrictions and water conservation mandates for California cities to combat the four-year drought. The state gave Claremont a 32 percent water conservation goal. In response, the city enacted water restrictions that prohibited watering more than two days a week, reduced its watering in parks and stopped watering ornamental turf in its medians. City officials worried that the reduced watering in municipal facilities and private properties would accelerate the

Claremont volunteers plant hundreds of new trees each year.


decline of Claremont’s drought-stressed trees. Residents driving the tree-lined streets of Claremont began taking note of the many dying and withering trees. Concerned about the condition of the city’s prized trees, residents showed up at city council meetings and stopped by City Hall to express their desire to help save the trees. The city staff quickly realized that a large group of residents was willing to assist with tree education efforts and began developing a program to put the volunteers to work contacting property owners. The city reached out to Claremont Heritage and Sustainable Claremont to recruit volunteers to educate residents about tree care. Staff created informational materials and assembled tree-watering kits that contained soaker hoses, watering bags and instructions on how to properly water trees. City staff relied on tree data from the drought assessment to target homeowners with drought-stressed trees in their yards. Community Response Produces Results “We expected a few volunteers to show up for training and were surprised by the large number who turned out to help save our trees,” says Community Services Director Roger Bradley. “We were able to target many more property owners than we originally anticipated.”

After a training session with the city’s arborists, volunteers were given treewatering kits and a list of addresses of homeowners to contact. The volunteers went door to door and demonstrated how to water trees effectively using soaker hoses and tree bags. If residents were not home, the volunteers left door hangers J

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and conducted a follow-up visit with the assistance of staff as needed. The volunteers returned two weeks later to check if the bags and soaker hoses were being used. All visits were documented by the volunteers and given to staff for follow-up. continued on page 27

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CITY OF ENCINITAS Encinitas is located in northern San Diego County along six miles of the Pacific coastline, with a population of close to 65,000 residents. Encinitas boasts outstanding beaches, unbeatable surfing, and the largest coastal wetland in San Diego County, the San Elijo Lagoon Ecological Reserve. The natural beauty of the communities, the moderate Mediterranean climate and the many recreational and cultural activities make Encinitas a spectacular and highly desirable place to call home. The Public Works Director oversees the City’s facilities, fleets, streets, water distribution systems and wastewater collection operations. In reporting to the City Manager, the Public PUBLIC Works Director will provide progressive leadership and management to an WORKS William Avery & Associates organization that’s focused on providing DIRECTOR exceptional and valuable services in the 1 Management Consultants areas of operations and maintenance. In working closely with the City’s 3 /2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 management team, the new Director will provide a collaborative and team based approach to leadership. 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423

A background that includes seven years of professional or management email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net experience including at least three years of managing or supervising a maintenance and/or operational work force along with a BS/BA in Business or Public Administration, Construction Management, engineering or a related field is required. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

Closing soon . . .

Chief Technology Officer City of Fremont

Director of Human Resources City of Concord

Payroll Services Manager City of Pasadena

Human Resources Manager Contra Costa County Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

Western City, July 2017

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PeckhamMcKenney &

Presents Outstanding Career Opportunities

Deputy Director of Public Works

City of Hayward, CA

Strategically located on the thriving eastern shore of the San Francisco Bay, the vibrant and diverse City of Hayward (pop. 153,689) is on the cusp of yet another evolution, leveraging its unparalleled location, relative affordability, and a wide range of quality-of-life benefits to catch the eye of everyone from Fortune 500 companies to young professionals, families, tech startups, and major developers. The Public Works - Engineering & Transportation Department has 46 FTE’s organized into six divisions: Administration, Design/Development Services, Construction Services, Transportation, Survey, and the Executive Airport. This 2016 All-America City is seeking a Deputy Director of Public Works to assist Public Works Director Morad Fakhrai in planning, directing, supervising and reviewing the activities of a variety of projects and programs throughout the Public Works department. It is a busy time for the Public Works Department in the City of Hayward and an experienced professional is desired. A Bachelor’s degree with major course work in civil engineering or a related field is required, as is a Certificate of Registration as a professional civil engineer in the State of California, and five years of progressively responsible management experience in public works. Individuals who embrace the diversity of the community and bilingual candidates are encouraged to apply. Competitive annual salary range of $141,502 to $172,037; placement DOQE; with attractive benefits. Please do not hesitate to contact Phil McKenney toll-free at (866) 912-1919 if you have any questions regarding this position or recruitment process. Filing deadline is July 31, 2017.

Upcoming Searches Human Resources Director, Parker, CO County Executive Officer, Napa County, CA Transportation Director, Salt Lake City Corporation, UT

Congratulations to our Recent Placements! Doug Dunford, City Manager, City of Gustine, CA Steve McCulley, Police Chief, City of Atherton, CA Ryan Mahoney, Town Manager, Town of Basalt, CO Matt Sturgeon, City Manager, City of Centennial, CO Pamela Aguilar, City Clerk, City of Redwood City, CA Dan Buckshi, City Manager, City of Walnut Creek, CA Carlos Palacios, County Administrative Officer, Santa Cruz County, CA

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

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apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Detailed brochures are available at

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Claremont Crisis Intervention and Outreach Saves Trees, continued from page 25

Throughout summer 2015, Claremont continued to promote tree care through mailers, a special tree care video and interviews with local news stations and newspapers. Residents were encouraged to call the city for information or to schedule a visit from an arborist. City staff and volunteers contacted 147 property owners through the Tree Crisis Intervention and Outreach program. More than 200 trees received critical watering as a result of the program. In total, Claremont lost less than 1 percent of its trees due to drought stress. The city invested less than $10,000 for educational materials and equipment for the program. The direct personal contact among volunteers, staff and residents played a key role in the program’s success. By speaking with the property owners, the volunteers could assess the obstacles and misinformation that caused residents to stop watering their trees. P

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Volunteers of all ages help to plant trees as part of the effort to preserve the city’s canopy.

Due to the overwhelming success of the program, the city began the process of contacting an additional 200 property owners on June 1, 2016, using new and returning volunteers. Since then, volunteers have approached approximately 350

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

www.westerncity.com

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property owners and provided assistance for over 500 trees. Contact: Bevin Handel, public information officer; phone: (909) 399-5497; email: bhandel@ci.claremont.ca.us. ■

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

Western City, July 2017

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THINK BIG, BUILD BIGGER. Just off the side of I-5, in the Central Valley, is a giant testament to Robin Baral’s skill as an attorney. More specifically, the 1,100 acre business park is a demonstration of Robin’s ability to work with both cities and developers, while drawing from his extensive land use, municipal, and environmental experience – all reasons why Robin was the obvious choice to assist the City of Patterson through the entitlement process for the mammoth business park. In addition to negotiating development agreements, handling a contentious LAFCO annexation, and overseeing environmental review, Robin also managed to skillfully maneuver through the intricate political factors at play. The business park is now complete and home to distribution centers for large retailers such as Restoration Hardware. At Churchwell White, we understand that results are created by people. Together, our team of lawyers and legislative advocates combine unexpected ideas with decades of proven experience. If you need a strategic partner with creative solutions, call to see what we can do for you.

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Western City July 2017  

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