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Academic Catalog 2013-2014 Pre-K through 12th Grade


Academic Catalog

2013-2014

We invite you to come take a closer look at one of the reasons why Westbury Christian is so unique. Academics are one of three dimensions that are at the core of our mission as we strive to “prepare youth for here and eternity.” In the pages that follow you will see a myriad of class offerings. What you need to know is that inside the classroom of each of those courses is a qualified Christian teacher that recognizes that truth comes from God’s Word and it is that foundation and origin upon where true education takes place. Rigorous curriculum and passionate, professional teachers on a safe campus is an excellent recipe for college preparation and maturing to reach each student’s potential and purpose in life. The information in this booklet will give you a good idea of the thorough structure that supports our academic dimension. Please let us know if we can assist you in learning more about what makes Westbury Christian a great educational environment.

Greg J. Glenn

Executive Administrator


Table of Contents Lower School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Pre-K3 – Pre-K4 Curriculum Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Kindergarten – 4th Grade Curriculum Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Grades 5 – 6 Plan of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Grades 7 – 8 Plan of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Middle School Curriculum Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Upper School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Grades 9 – 12 Plan of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Timetable for College-Bound Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Distinguished Achievement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Descriptions of Pre-AP and AP Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Upper School Curriculum Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Community Service Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Preparing Youth…

…for Here and Eternity 3


Lower School Pre-K3 — 4th Grade

Mr. Greg J. Glenn Mrs. Jennifer White Mrs. Debbie Curtis Mrs. Sheila Kaldis Mr. Mike White Mrs. Linda Fabian

Executive Administrator Lower School Principal Lower School Administrative Assistant Primary School Coordinator Director of Guidance Registrar

The daily learning experience for Pre-K3 through 4th grade students captures and supports the learning of important skills and concepts needed for their future educational readiness. Our curriculum contains age-specific activities that promote creativity, family involvement, and the development of the whole child. WCS teachers are committed Christians who provide a warm, nurturing learning environment based on sound educational theories of child development and learning. As children mature and progress, they will encounter a higher level of learning that challenges growth while still having fun!

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Pre-K3 and Pre-K4 Curriculum

“Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.� Proverbs 22:6

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Reading and Language Arts Pre-K3: The DLM Early Childhood Express curriculum from McGraw-Hill Wright Group is a holistic, childcentered program that nurtures each child by offering carefully selected and sequenced learning experiences. It provides a wealth of materials and ideas to foster the social-emotional, intellectual, and physical development of children. At the same time, it nurtures the natural curiosity and sense of self that can serve as the foundation for a lifetime of learning. With The DLM Early Childhood Express, children develop concrete skills through experiences with music, art, storytelling, and teacher-directed lessons that, in addition to skills development, emphasize practice and reflection. Literacy concepts include: •

Listening Comprehension

Vocabulary

Verbal Expression

Phonological Awareness

Print and Book Awareness

Letter Knowledge and Early Word Recognition

Motivation to Read

Developing Knowledge of Literary Form and Written Expression

Cross-curricular connections are a powerful way to reinforce lesson concepts and expose children to the full spectrum of knowledge. Content connections include: •

Fine Arts

Music & Movement

Science

Social Studies

Health and Safety

Physical Development

Personal and Social Development.

Pre-K4: The Imagine It! Pre-K reading and language arts curriculum from SRA/McGraw-Hill combines the strength of proven, research based instruction with the fun, friendly, and engaging features in a complete reading program. Thought-provoking themes and genres introduce students to new worlds, new ideas, and new ways of thinking. Science, social studies, math and fine arts content are covered for cross-curricular connections. Imagine It! addresses the five key areas of reading, which research shows is necessary for a strong reading program:

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Phonemic awareness is the ability to hear, think about, and manipulate the individual sounds in spoken words. It helps children learn to read and spell.

Phonics instruction teaches children the relationships between letters of written language and individual sounds of spoken language. It improves children’s comprehension.

Fluency is the ability to read a text accurately, quickly, and with prosody. Repeated and monitored oral reading improves fluency and overall reading achievement.

Vocabulary skills are correlated to achievement throughout school. The purpose of vocabulary instruction is to introduce students to new words and to teach students a range of strategies for learning, remembering, and incorporating unknown vocabulary words into their existing reading, writing, speaking, and listening vocabularies.

Text Comprehension is getting meaning from what is read. Comprehension is improved by instruction that offers readers the ability to use specific strategies and skills.

Writing strategy and skill instruction is necessary for students to be able to express themselves and write for an audience.

Mathematics Pre-K3 and Pre-K4: The Pre-Kindergarten Everyday Mathematics curriculum from McGraw-Hill Wright Group is a program in which children “do mathematics.” The program relies on discussion, experimentation, and discovery. Students are introduced to number concepts informally, in the context of everyday activities, which builds a firm foundation for later mathematical learning. Students will participate in fun hands-on activities that promote early number sense. They will become aware of shapes and patterns all around realizing geometric shapes are part of everyday objects. Students will also have lots of opportunities to learn about sorting, patterning, spatial relationships, rote and rational counting, ordinal numbers and sequencing, and measurement comparisons.

Learning Centers Young children are interested in the world in which they live; learning centers are a symbolic representation of their world. The accessible, open-ended, multi-level learning environment of a center provides unique opportunities for discovery. Young children learn best by being active learners who are permitted to touch, feel, experiment and create. Play is an essential component of a quality early childhood program. During play, children develop problem solving skills by trying different ways of doing things and determining the best approach. Small groups of three to four students rotate through four to five carefully planned centers from the following: Block, Art, Sand and Water, Library, Science/Nature, Dramatic Play, Math, Home-Life, Writing and Listening.

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Bible and Chapel Children are taken on an exciting journey through the Old and New Testament using the NIV Read to Me Bible for Kids, High Reach Learning Curriculum and the Positive Action Bible Curriculum. Each day, teachers and students join in prayer, singing, and praising God. Students will learn about major Old Testament and New Testament Bible stories and characters, with a focus on Jesus and His life and teachings. Character traits, such as love, compassion, and kindness are the foundational principles established in every student. The teaching of Christian values and character is at the core of each Bible lesson, as well as the entire learning process. Pre-K3 and Pre-K4 students come together for chapel three times each week. They join the K-4th Grade students periodically throughout the year to participate in special Lower School Awards Chapels. They also join K-12th grade students in All School Chapel throughout the year. In addition, once every grading period a student from every class is honored in a special Student of Character Chapel and one department winner is honored in an All School Chapel in which parents are welcome to attend.

Enrichment Classes To further enhance the development of the whole child, students participate in daily enrichment classes. These classes are taught by teachers who are specialized in the subject they are teaching. Depending on the days enrolled, students will experience the following classes: •

Physical Education: As part of this developmentally appropriate program, students participate in activities that improve both their fine and gross motor skills, teach the importance of being physically fit, as well as sportsmanship and how to interact with their peers through the SPARK Program.

Music: Musical games & movement, fun songs, steady beat, and rhythm stick activities are all a part of our music program. Students will learn listening skills as they learn to accompany songs with simple instruments. At least once a year students will participate in a music program as well as special events such as Grandparent’s Breakfast and Veteran’s Day Salute.

Technology: Students begin an introduction to computers in their classroom during learning center time. Basic skills are developed to start their journey toward technological literacy. Both desktop computers and I-pads are utilized.

Spanish: Children are introduced to Spanish vocabulary while participating in planned activities revolving around interactive games, songs, stories and dialogue. These activities will expand their knowledge of the Spanish language while extending their speaking, writing and listening skills. Curriculum used is Pasaporte al espanola.

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Library: The librarian reads to the children during story time followed by table time where children have the opportunity to discover Bible stories, fairy tales, nursery rhymes and action stories. Students also enjoy special readings by award winning and popular authors and drama presentations of classic children’s books.

Art: Students are allowed to experiment with materials in new ways in order to further their individual creativity. Art is used in these grades to reinforce their classroom curriculum and the lessons taught during Chapel and Bible. Students also utilize the art lab one time each week with direct instruction about various techniques.

Enrichment Activities Students also have opportunities to participate in enrichment activities. These activities reinforce concepts learned in our classrooms, encourage the well-rounded development of our students, and align with our three dimensional philosophy of education in academics, spirituality and student activities. Depending on the days enrolled, students will experience the following classes: •

Community Service: Preschool students have the opportunity to join with our older students in projects such as “A Salute to Veterans” program, collecting coins for an orphanage in Honduras and in Haiti, as well as food and toy drives for the needy.

Recess: Gross motor activities, free play, and lots of time to socialize are crucial to a young child’s development. Children are taken outside daily, weather permitting.

Field trips: Students may attend one or two field trips a year. Age-appropriate trips to locations such as theatres, museums, and farms are carefully chosen to teach students about their community and their world.

In-School Presentations: Throughout the school year, special presentations, performances, and visitors enrich the student’s school experience.

After School Enrichment: Westbury Christian School offers a rich assortment of after school activities. Past offerings include: ballet, gymnastics, karate, piano lessons, mini soccer, and little dribblers. Extra fees are charged for these activities.

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Kindergarten — 4th Grade Curriculum

“Children are a gift from the Lord. They are a reward from Him.” Psalm 127:3

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Reading/Language Arts Text used: Texas Journeys by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt READING CURRICULUM IS SUPPLEMENTED WITH THE ACCELERATED READER PROGRAM Kindergarten: A kindergarten student engages in meaningful and organized activities to increase oral language, foster listening comprehension, develop phonological awareness, and most importantly, nurture a love of reading. When visiting your child’s classroom, look for many manipulative activities. These not only help build concepts but also develop and refine gross and fine motor skills. Each child participates in a variety of instructional settings such as whole group investigations, small group collaboration, and independent play to meet individual needs at the appropriate level. Through these meaningful experiences, your child builds a solid foundation for early literacy. 1st Grade: A first grade student continues to develop oral language and communication skills and moves to become a more independent reader and writer. Each child participates in a variety of instructional settings such as guided reading and writing, as well as readers’ and writers’ workshop, to meet individual needs at the appropriate level. Daily reading of a variety of texts and writing for a variety of audiences increase your child’s fluency and comprehension in the literacy process. 2nd Grade: A second grader reads and writes independently and has many opportunities to use spoken language. The student automatically recognizes a large number of words and uses a variety of word identification strategies. Reading familiar classic and contemporary works, a second grader increases fluency and demonstrates understanding by producing a variety of projects. The student transitions to reading longer texts with less picture support. Second graders compose and begin to revise and edit their own writing to make ideas clear, precise, and legible. Daily Oral Language (by Great Source/Houghton Mifflin) is also used. 3rd Grade: A third grader spends significant blocks of time reading and writing independently. Using increasingly complex word identification strategies, the student builds vocabulary and enhances comprehension. A third grader reads from a variety of classic and contemporary works and supports ideas and inferences by citing portions of text. Writing is more elaborate and detailed. The student revises and edits to produce final products. A third grader listens critically to spoken messages to make contributions during discussions. 4th Grade: Fourth graders have a student anthology which has six units on thought provoking themes. The students learn skills and strategies to help understand the text they have read. Students read a wide variety of genres and cultures written and illustrated by award-winning authors and illustrators. Open Court focuses on word analysis (vocabulary), spelling, writing process and grammar usage, and forms of writing. The students become better spellers as they learn the spelling patterns and rules. Daily Oral Language (by Great Source/Houghton Mifflin) is used daily to help students with proofreading.

“Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength.” Deuteronomy 6:5

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Social Studies Texts used: Open Court by McGraw-Hill (Kindergarten) Scott Foresman (Grades 1-4) Kindergarten: A kindergarten student focuses on the foundations of social studies. Concepts are built through examination, discussion, and exploration. The study of our state and national heritage begins with exploring celebrations of patriotic holidays and the contributions of historic people. A student compares family customs and traditions to develop cultural appreciation. The student learns about the geographic concept of location, as well as the physical and human characteristics of places. Basic human needs of clothing, food, and shelter, and the ways people meet these needs are introduced. Technology and social studies skills are an essential part of the social studies curriculum. Text used: McGraw-Hills Open Court 1st Grade: A first grade student continues to build upon early social studies concepts through literature, discussions, hands-on exploration, and simulations. The student develops patriotic identity through the study of historic figures, national anthems, state anthems, and mottoes. Students develop cultural appreciation by describing the importance of family customs and traditions. A first grader creates and uses simple maps to draw conclusions about physical characteristics of places and their impact on daily life. Concepts of time and chronology are developed by distinguishing between past, present, and future events. 2nd Grade: A second grade student focuses on a study of community. The student will learn about important individuals and events in the history of the community, state, and nation. Students continue to develop concepts of time, government functions, and basic economic principles. The student acquires knowledge of important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles. In geography a student locates places and compares information found in different sources. 3rd Grade: A third grade student learns how individuals changed their communities and consequently their world. The lives of heroes and how their contributions resulted in new ideas, new innovations, and new communities are explored. The student investigates the responsibility of local government and how it meets the needs of our communities. The student uses geography skills and concepts to find places on maps and globes and to create their own maps. Economic and governmental vocabulary is acquired. 4th Grade: A fourth grade student studies important events, issues, and people of the 19th and 20th centuries. The student examines Texas history from ancient times to the present in regard to human and natural characteristics of the regions of Texas. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the impact of Native Americans, European explorers, and Mexican influences, as well as other cultural groups on Texas. Computer and technology tools are used for support.

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Science Texts used: Open Court by McGraw-Hill (Kindergarten) Scott Foresman (Grade 1) Science Fusion (Grades 2-4) Kindergarten: A kindergarten student uses simple investigations to develop the skills of asking questions, gathering information, communicating findings, and making informed decisions about the natural world. Using the five senses and common tools, the student makes observations and collects information. The student learns about the natural world by identifying and investigating rocks, water, soil, living organisms, and objects. The student is introduced to the concept of a system as a collection of cycles, structures, and processes that interact. Computers and information technology tools are used for support. 1st Grade: A first grade student continues using simple investigations to develop the skills of asking questions and gathering information. The student also makes measurements, constructs explanations, and draws conclusions using non-standard units and tools to extend the five senses. The student identifies and investigates components of the natural world including rocks, soil, natural resources, heat, interdependence, and living versus non-living things. 2nd Grade: More than a traditional science program and more than an online science textbook, Science Fusion creates an exciting multi-model learning environment fusing print, digital, and hands-on experiences. Student plans and conducts investigations to develop the skills for making measurements using non-standard and standard units. Components and processes of the natural world, including the water cycle and use of resources, are identified. The second grader observes melting, evaporating, weathering, and pushing and pulling of objects. The student also observes living and nonliving things, needs of plants and animals, functions of plants, and how living organisms depend on their environment. The student continues to explore change and constancy in systems. Computers and information technology tools are used for support. 3rd Grade: More than a traditional science program and more than an online science textbook, Science Fusion creates an exciting multi-model learning environment fusing print, digital, and hands-on experiences. Students plan and implement investigations to collect information using tools such as microscopes. The student also makes inferences, communicates conclusions, and makes informed decisions. The student identifies the importance of components of the natural world including rocks, soil, water, atmospheric gases, and forces that change the Earth. The student explores magnetism, gravity, needs of organisms, habitats, and competition within an ecosystem. Students continue to explore constancy and change in systems. 4th Grade: More than a traditional science program and more than an online science textbook, Science Fusion creates an exciting multi-model learning environment fusing print, digital, and hands-on experiences. Student identifies components and processes of the natural world such as properties of soil, effects of oceans, the role of the sun as our energy source, the physical properties of matter, and the causes of change in the states of matter. The student observes the roles of living and non-living components and recognizes the differences between learned characteristics and inherited traits. Computer and technology tools are used for support.

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Mathematics Text used: Saxon

Kindergarten: A kindergarten student develops whole number concepts using concrete models. Basic foundations of math concepts are built through exploration of patterns, sorting, counting, making math connections, and problem solving. Problem solving skills are demonstrated through the use of informal language to communicate early understanding of connections within and outside of mathematics. Technology and math tools are an essential part of the math program. 1st Grade: A first grade student develops an understanding of addition and subtraction number concepts using concrete objects. Basic foundations of math concepts are built by using patterns, sorting, counting, making math connections, and problem solving. A student creates and uses representations to organize, record, and communicate emerging math ideas. 2nd Grade: A second grade student continues to build a basic foundation of math concepts. A student uses numbers to compare and order when solving problems. Whole number addition and subtraction problems are solved first with concrete models and then with symbolic representation to achieve fluency. Using informal and formal language, a student communicates math reasoning in verbal and written forms. Technology and math tools continue to be integrated into the math program. 3rd Grade: A third grade student has mastered the addition and subtraction of whole numbers and further advances that understanding by using concrete and pictorial models to develop the concepts of multiplication and division. An additional emphasis is the connection of fractional models to symbols. The student begins to use estimation and mathematical reasoning to solve real-world problems and is able to rationalize and communicate decisions effectively. Throughout third grade mathematics, the student evaluates, adapts, and selects appropriate strategies, vocabulary, and tools to solve problems. 4th Grade: A fourth grade student learns to create and apply mathematical concepts in a more abstract manner than in earlier grades. The primary focal points of fourth grade are the application of place value concepts, comparing and ordering fractions and decimals, long division, and developing ideas related to measurement and statistics.

“Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.� Proverbs 22:6

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Bible Text used: Positive Action for Christ Kindergarten: Learning About God Kindergarten students learn about God through Bible stories. Major characters throughout the entire Bible will be introduced. Activity ideas will help children comprehend and apply Bible truths. 1st Grade: Enjoying God’s Gifts First graders will learn that all we have comes from God and that the ultimate gift that God gave us is His Son, Jesus Christ. This study will focus on the many gifts of love provided for us by God. Emphasis will be on aspects of creation, our families, friends, possessions, Jesus Christ and God’s care for us. Stories from everyday life are used to encourage the development of inner character traits. 2nd Grade: Finding God’s Promises The life of Moses and his leadership of Israel are used to teach second graders that God rewards obedience. Students will learn that when God gives a command, He also gives a promise. Finding God’s promises helps students see that obedience to God’s commands brings blessings as God fulfills His promises in their lives. 3rd Grade: Growing with God The lives of Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, and Daniel have a lot to teach third graders about the rewards of living for God. All of these men faced rejection, but all of them remained faithful to God. Students will develop strong character as they draw upon the experiences of these men. 4th Grade: Building Life Castles The Bible studies will include the life of Christ from the Gospels; a study of the Holy Spirit from the Gospels, Acts and the Epistles; an understanding of how Christian character develops using Paul’s epistles and the life of Paul from the book of Acts. The students are assigned a memory verse each week.

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Homework Kindergarten: Ideas for fun, family based activities such as simple math activities, reading together, and reviewing sight words are assigned by our kindergarten teachers. These activities are required. 1st Grade: Students are assigned math homework three days a week and phonics readers are assigned several times a week. Some time at home may also include study for spelling tests and Bible memory work. During the second half of the year students will spend time reading for AR (Accelerated Reader). 2nd Grade: Students are assigned homework three to four times per week. Assignments include spelling mastery, math, Bible memory work, reading for AR (Accelerated Reader) and study for tests. Students will receive a study guide for social studies and science three to four days prior to a chapter test. Each student is given a planner at the beginning of school; homework is written down for the entire week on Monday in this planner. 3rd Grade: The third grade student will have math and spelling homework three nights a week. Students will need to spend time each week studying a list of vocabulary words, a Bible verse, and reading for AR (Accelerated Reader). Students will receive a study guide for social studies and science three to four days prior to a chapter test. Each student is given a planner at the beginning of school; homework is written down for the entire week on Monday in this planner. 4th Grade: The fourth grade student will have math homework three nights and spelling sentences are assigned on Monday. The students receive study sheets for science and social studies tests three to four days before a chapter test. There is a Bible memory verse to learn each week.

Art Students in grades K-4th visit the Lower School Art Lab for a unique blend of studio art and art history. Basic elements are introduced to students in relation to major artists and their work. A variety of medium is used throughout the school year in order to provide each child the opportunity to experiment with new materials. The focus of this class is to help students express their personal creativity and individual insight into the world around them. (Weekly)

Computer Technology experience is integrated into the curriculum using an Apple MacBook Mobile Computer Lab, which consists of 24 wireless laptops and I-pads. These are also known as Computers on Wheels (COW). The computers are used to enhance classroom instruction, build computer skills, and to do research on the internet with teacher guidance. 20


Physical Education Students have an organized P.E. class twice every week. They participate in activities that improve both their fine and gross motor skills, teach the importance of being physically fit, introduce them to the concept of teambuilding, as well as develop sportsmanship. Activities are supplemented with the CATCH (Coordinated Approach to Child Health) Curriculum.

Spanish Text used: Pasaporte al Espanola K –1st Grade: Students are introduced to Spanish vocabulary while participating in planned activities such as interactive games, songs, stories and dialogue. These activities will expand their knowledge of Spanish while extending their speaking, writing and listening skills. (Weekly) 2nd-4th Grades: To broaden their knowledge of Spanish vocabulary, student’s studies include geography, culture and an introduction to the basics of grammar. (Weekly)

Music Kindergarten: Musical games & movement, fun songs, steady beat, and rhythm stick activities are a part of our music program. Students learn to sing in unison and develop listening skills as they learn to accompany songs with simple instruments. Curriculum used is Spotlight on Music. 1st-3rd Grades: Musical games, movement, fun songs, steady beat, rhythm sticks, pitched and unpitched instruments, and extended rhythm studies are a part of our music program. In addition to singing in unison and rounds, students learn to sight-read, begin 2-part singing, and are introduced to composers and instrument families. Curriculum used is Share the Music. 4th Grade: Fourth grade students combine instruction in recorders and choral singing in 2 and 3 part harmonies. Students learn to sing and recognize full scale pitches, and are introduced to syncopated rhythms as well as reinforcing straight rhythms by reading and playing written mixed rhythms. Written music is translated to sound by creating rhythm, melody and accompaniments on pitched and unpitched instruments. Dances and games reinforce songs and allow exploration of a variety of rhythms 21


and styles from diverse cultures. Students are encouraged to participate in the Music Memory listening competition in the yearly academic meet. Both Spotlight on Music and Share the Music curriculum are used, and students have an opportunity to try out for the 4th-6th grade Honor Choir.

Library The library provides resources and programs to develop reading comprehension and research skills for students. Library skills are taught each week that support classroom concepts and students are allowed to check out books. Families are encouraged to participate in reading newly published books to their children with the READ TO ME PROGRAM, a program that rotates about 15 newly published, noteworthy books throughout the K3-2nd grade classes. Yearly Book Fairs provide parents the opportunity to refresh their own book collections while raising money for author visits and more books for the library. Each grading period students have the opportunity to “shop” at the Accelerated Reader Store with their accumulated AR points. Special Author Visits and Drama Presentations encourage reading and bring books to life.

Recess Gross motor activities, free play and time to socialize are crucial to a young child’s development. A daily recess is provided on the outside playground for K-4th grade. In the case of inclement weather, alternate activities are planned indoors that still provide socialization, play and movement.

Field Trips Age-appropriate field trips to locations such as children’s theatres, museums, and farms are carefully chosen to teach each student about their community and their world. These trips are taken in connection with and to enhance classroom studies. At the end of the year, fourth grade students go to Austin to make their Texas History come alive. All Lower School Students participate in Special Programs at Christmas and/or in the spring, with additional performance opportunities at Grandparent’s Breakfast, PTO functions, Chapel and other special presentations.

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Middle School Grades 5 — 8

Mr. Greg J. Glenn

Executive Administrator

Mr. Casey Farris

Middle School Principal

Mr. Mike White

Director of Guidance

Mrs. Linda Fabian

Registrar

Every aspect of our middle school program is designed to help your child prepare for adolescence spiritually, mentally and physically. At WCS we are given the unique opportunity to have all of our 5th and 6th grade students set apart from the rest of our school. We believe, and research shows, that this is a very important stage of development in a student’s life. We can all remember the fear and excitement of approaching our teenage years and the feeling of not knowing what was coming around the next corner. We want to help make the upper school transition as smooth as possible for your child. Our students are really at a time of discovery, they are experiencing independence and responsibility in a way they never have before. Our staff does a great job of nurturing your child while at the same time pushing them at a slightly uncomfortable pace helping them to grow and mature in ways that will make you proud to be their parents. 23


5th and 6th Grade Plan of Study 5th Grade Courses Bible 5

Social Studies 5

Reading/Language Arts 5*

Study Skills**

Math 5

Band

Science 5

Physical Education

6th Grade Courses

6th Grade Electives (Pick One)

Bible 6

Art

Reading/Language Arts 6*

Athletics

Math 6

Chorus

Science 6

Drama

Social Studies 6

Football/Basketball

Band Physical Education

*Students spend time in the library weekly with their Reading teacher. Additional check-in/check-out and testing times are also provided to support the Accelerated Reader program. Students are encouraged to participate in state and national reading programs: the Bluebonnet and Crown Reading Programs. A store is offered each 6 weeks to support the Accelerated Reader program where students may “buy� items with Accelerated Reader points. **Study strategies and organizational skills help to prepare the students for future educational endeavors and supports academic content areas as appropriate.

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7th and 8th Grade Plan of Study 7th Grade Courses

7th Grade Electives (Pick Two)

Bible 7

Art

Language Arts 7

Athletics – Basketball*

Math 7

Chorus

Science 7

Band

Texas History

Drama

Computer/Writing

Speech P.E. Forensics/Robotics

8th Grade Courses

8th Grade Electives (Pick Three)

Bible 8

Art

Language Arts 8

Athletics – Basketball* & Football

Pre-Algebra or Algebra I†

Chorus

Science 8 or IPC†

Band

American History

Drama P.E. Spanish I† Computer I† Forensics/Robotics

8th Grade Sports that Practice After School: Baseball*/ Track & Field / Softball*/ Volleyball*/ Golf*/ Cross Country * All students wanting to participate must try out. † Course taken for high school credit.

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5th — 8th Grade Curriculum

“But without faith, it is impossible to please God.” Hebrews 11:6

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Reading/Language Arts Reading/Language Arts 5: A fifth grade student continues to spend significant blocks of time engaged in independent reading and writing while refining and applying knowledge and skills in increasingly complex tasks. The student analyzes and evaluates classic, contemporary and information literature to enhance comprehension and create new understanding. Additionally, a fifth grade student selects and uses various forms of writing for specific purposes. Utilizing multiple resources, a fifth grader gains proficiency in creating polished final products including multimedia presentations as well as a variety of written texts. Texts used: Texas Journeys by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Reading/Language Arts 6: The student is actively involved with a variety of texts, including electronic media. The student reads for different purposes and employs multiple strategies to build vocabulary and increase comprehension. As students make connections beyond the text, reading responses reflect higher-level thinking. Sixth grade writers develop polished pieces with increased organization and varied sentence structure. Students have multiple opportunities to use language as a tool for collaboration. They listen to, research and produce oral performances and visual/textual presentations. Texts used: Prentice-Hall Pearson Literature; Laying the Foundation—A Resource for Pre-AP English; Wordly Wise 3000 (Vocabulary) Language Arts 7: Students in this course will define and utilize vocabulary words in context; study and analyze a vast array of genres including: Adventure, Realism, Folk Tales, Fantasy, and Poetry; and analyze a minimum of three full-length novels. They will explore the complex English grammar system by looking at the parts of speech, learning the parts of a complete sentence, utilizing correct capitalization and punctuation, and diagramming sentences. Students will learn how to organize sentences in paragraphs to begin creating well-developed essays. Writing/Computer 7: This class is designed to develop students’ writing and computer skills. To bring about the development of these skills students will write in many different modes on widely varied topics and will learn to use computer software, while also integrating grammar conventions and vocabulary. Students will study and put the writing process to use when writing for a variety of audiences and purposes including informing, entertaining, describing, and persuading. Students will revise, rework, and restructure writing by developing several drafts and presenting the final work. The computer aspects of the course focus on familiarizing students with computer programs and teaching them how to use those features throughout their academic careers. During the class students utilize three programs from the Microsoft Office Suite – Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as specific Apple products such as Garage Band and iMovie. Language Arts 8: Students will study and analyze a vast array of genres including mythology, realism, science fiction, humor, and poetry as well as read and analyze a minimum of two full-length novels. Students will define and utilize vocabulary words in context. Additionally, they will explore and utilize the complex English grammar system through investigating the parts of speech, learning the elements of a complete sentence, utilizing correct capitalization and punctuation, and diagramming sentences. Students will study and put the writing process to use when writing for a variety of audiences and purposes including informing, entertaining, describing, and persuading. Students will continue to develop writing skills by covering the necessary elements needed to write a proper paragraph and a three to five paragraph essay.

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Foreign Language Spanish I (Grade 8): The purpose of Spanish I is to help each student attain proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also develop an insight into the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and the various cultures that it includes. (Credit: 1)

Social Studies Social Studies 5: A fifth grade student learns about the history of the United States from its early beginnings to the present. The roots of the national democratic government as well as important ideas in the Declaration of Independence and the U. S. Constitution are identified. Through social studies, the fifth grade student uses critical thinking skills (sequencing, categorizing, summarizing information, and making inferences while drawing conclusions) to study the history of the United States. Text used is Scott Foresman. Social Studies 6: A sixth grade student understands the concept of diversity in our world from the study of contemporary world cultures and their contributions to civilization. The student identifies the relationship of ancient cultures and their influences on our modern society. They are able to locate geographic features that help them analyze the ways people adapt and modify their physical environment. Higher levels of thinking are developed by the use of primary and secondary sources, maps, and the study of scientific discoveries and technological innovations. Through the understanding of world history and its contributions, the student learns to better understand the important role of a citizen in a democratic society. Text used is Scott Foresman. Texas History (Grade 7): Students study the geography and history of Texas beginning with the prehistoric period to the present. During this course, students will learn about Native Americans in Texas; early explorers in Texas; the geography of Texas, including regions, natural landforms, and latitude/longitude; the Spanish influence on Texas, both past and present; the Texas Revolution, including an insight on what led to it and its aftermath; Texas becoming a part of the United States; Texas’ involvement in the Civil War and the aftermath; and an insight into Texas politics, government, and its constitution. American History (Grade 8): Students study the geography and history of the United States beginning with the prehistoric period to the early 1900s. During this course students will learn about Native Americans and how they got here, early exploration and significant explorers, Colonial America and its growth, causes of the American Revolution, the American Revolution and its aftermath, the type of government adopted by the early citizens of the United States, political parties and their effect on the United States, and the basic principles of important documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Students will also study the Christian principles of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, how our government operates within the framework of the three branches of government, the Jackson era and the growth of our nation, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the reshaping of the nation, including the growth of industry and the growth of urban America.

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Science Science 5: A fifth grade student understands that science is a way of learning about the natural world. The student investigates science as a vast body of changing and increasing knowledge described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models. The student develops skills in the areas of investigation and use of scientific equipment. The emphasis of study covers the structures and functions of life science, earth science, and physical science. The student investigates that change and constancy in systems can be observed and measured as patterns. Computers and information technology tools are used for support. Text used is Scott Foresman. Science 6: A sixth grade student understands that science is a way of learning about the natural world. The student knows that science has a vast body of changing and increasing knowledge described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models. The student develops skills in the areas of investigation, use of scientific equipment, and technology. The emphasis of study is life science, earth science and physical science. The student recognizes that there are patterns that exist within cycles, structures, and processes that interact. Computers and information technology tools are used for support. Text used is Scott Foresman.

Science 7: Students continue to learn about the natural world in which they live. As the concepts increase in depth and complexity, the student develops problem solving skills to think critically and make informed choices. The student uses models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world and systems. Emphasis is placed on life science, specifically on topics such as the structure and function of human body systems, sexual and asexual reproduction, and genetics. Students will also explore the relationships between force and motion and apply what they learn to biological systems such as the heart and circulation. Students will study about gravity and the phases of the moon within our solar system and the effects of forces of nature on the earth, such as hurricanes and earthquakes. They will explore chemical and physical properties of substances and the periodic table. This is a laboratory-based class that provides students with the opportunity to conduct field and laboratory investigations.

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Science 8: Earth Systems are a primary topic of study in the 8th grade. Students examine the altering effects of human activity on the Earth. They study the cycles of the earth systems including the lunar cycles and the geochemical cycles. Astronomy places special emphasis on stars and galaxies. Basic Chemistry and Life Science are also integrated in the course of study. Laboratory and field investigations are used to learn about the natural world. Students are required to develop their critical thinking and analytical skills. * Forensics/Robotics (Elective - Grade 7 or 8): Forensic Science is a one-semester hands-on investigative science and technology course. Forensics Science engages students in the science behind solving crimes. Students will learn how to observe, collect, analyze and evaluate evidence found at crime scenes. Some of the many topics covered are fingerprint analysis, hair and fiber comparison, serology, DNA profiling and crime scene analysis. The culmination of the course will include the analysis of a staged crime scene. MS Robotics uses a multimedia curriculum for LEGO Mindstorms NST developed by the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy. This hands-on program introduces robotics as a way to learn and to further develop STEM concepts. Students will learn how to program basic robot behaviors. This math and engineering rich curriculum uses problem-based learning involving programming, movement, sensors, and further research. Challenge questions reinforce key educational outcomes. (Credit: 1) IPC – Integrated Physics and Chemistry (Grade 8): An Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) student studies the natural world. The student conducts field and laboratory investigations and uses critical thinking, in addition to problem-solving skills, to make informed decisions. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry. Topics include motion, waves, energy transformations, properties of matter, changes in matter and solution chemistry. (Credit: 1)

Mathematics Math 5: A fifth grade student applies a strong foundation of whole numbers to develop a deeper understanding of decimal and fraction concepts. A student independently integrates and applies knowledge of different mathematical strands to make meaningful connections and solve problems. The primary focal points of fifth grade are representing and interpreting data in graphs, applying whole number operations in problem-solving situations, and extending concepts related to measurement and geometry. Fifth grade students sharpen their skills by justifying thinking and communicating understanding using appropriate language and tools. Text used is Saxon. Math 6: A sixth grade student further develops algebraic thinking, formal and informal reasoning, and communication of mathematical ideas. The focus of sixth grade shifts from basic operations with whole numbers to describing proportional relationship and addition and subtraction of decimals and fractions. Using various strategies, a student estimates, solves real-world problems, evaluates reasonableness of answers and justifies processes and outcomes. Throughout sixth grade, a student uses technology along with other mathematical tools to enhance conceptual understanding. A student also uses ratios to describe proportional situations and make predictions. Text used is Saxon. Math 7: Math 7 is designed to prepare students for their high school mathematics courses across the five math strands of number operation and qualitative reasoning: patterns, relationships and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics. It emphasizes a development of a 32


solid background in the following areas: whole numbers, decimals, number theory, simple equations, fractions, measurements, geometry, ratios, proportions, percents, statistics, and integers. Pre-Algebra (Grade 8): Math 8 is designed as a preparatory course for Algebra I using the five math strands of number operation and qualitative reasoning: patterns, relationships and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics. Students review many of the topics from the 7th grade year and are introduced to problems which are more detailed and complex. New topics include: equations, inequalities, graphing, rational numbers, and polynomials. Algebra 1 (Grade 8): The goals for this course are to develop proficiency with mathematical skills, to expand understanding of mathematical concepts, to improve logical thinking, and to promote success across the five math strands of number operation and qualitative reasoning: patterns, relationships and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics. Basic topics include linear, quadratic, and other non-linear functions; equations and systems of equations; integer exponents; polynomial products; factoring; and the analysis and solution of word problems. (Credit: 1)

Bible Bible 5: A survey of the Old Testament is the basis of this study. Beginning in Genesis, students will gain a much clearer perspective of how the stories of the Old Testament fit together in one pattern. As God desired His people to possess the land of Canaan, so He desires His children to live in a spiritual realm of promise and victory. Text used is Positive Action for Christ – Possessing The Land. Bible 6: In 6th grade, boys and girls have different Bible classes. Using the theme of athletic competition and drawing from studies of various Bible characters, students will learn how the principles of God’s Word can help them gain victory in the race of life. Drawing from the entire Word of God, students learn that the principals of God specifically affect their lives. Studies are drawn from characters in both the Old and New Testaments and the life of Christ. Text used: Preparing for Adolescence and other selected gender appropriate Bible lessons & scriptures. Bible 7: The seventh grade Bible curriculum teaches students that the basis for true character is God’s Word. During the year, students participate in a study entitled “Character Quest.” The students use a workbook of that title to study different topics in the Bible related to building character. Bible 8: Eighth graders spend the year studying the life of Jesus as portrayed in the book of Luke. The course covers the entire Gospel, beginning with an in-depth look at John the Baptist. Students will have daily reading quizzes in which the questions are taken directly from the scriptures. Extensive memory work is required, focusing on selected passages as well as ancient hymns. The goal of the course is for the student to be able to accurately answer anyone who makes the request to, “Tell me the story of Jesus.” To reinforce the teachings of the Lord, students participate in a number of projects aimed at fulfilling the teachings of James 1:27. In the Spring semester, the class weekly views and is quizzed over the McGee And Me series, produced by Focus On The Family.

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Chapel Grades 5 & 6: Students begin their transition into middle school by attending chapel twice a week with the middle school students. Students gather together to join in prayer, singing and praising God for loving us. Students also enjoy special Christian speakers, small group activities and presentations.

Computer Grades 5 & 6: Computer is integrated into the curriculum using an Apple MacBook Mobile Computer Lab which consists of 24 wireless laptops. The computers are used to enhance classroom instruction, build computer skills, and to do research on the internet with teacher guidance. Writing / Computer 7: This class is designed to develop students’ writing and computer skills. To bring about the development of these skills students will write in many different modes on widely varied topics and will learn to use computer software, while also integrating grammar conventions and vocabulary. Students will study and put the writing process to use when writing for a variety of audiences and purposes including informing, entertaining, describing, and persuading. Students will revise, rework, and restructure writing by developing several drafts and presenting the final work. The computer aspects of the course focus on familiarizing students with computer programs and teaching them how to use those features throughout their academic careers. During the class students utilize three programs from the Microsoft Office Suite – Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as specific Apple products such as Garage Band and iMovie. Computer 1 (Grade 8): This course focuses on the elements and principles of Digital Graphics and Animation. Students will learn when and how to use vector and raster graphics, typeface styles, resolution and file formats, color, lighting, sound, and 3D effects. Students will understand desktop drawing, painting and image editing tools, and how they will affect graphic work, as well as laws and issues governing the designer. The goal is to communicate ideas effectively through digital media. (Credit: 1)

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Health and Physical Education Grades 5 & 6: Students receive instruction daily. As part of this developmentally appropriate curriculum, students participate in activities that: improve both their fine and gross motor skills, teach the importance of being physically fit, help them work together as a team and build cooperation, as well as develop sportsmanship. MS Basketball (Boys - Grade 7 or 8): Basketball is taught in two parts. First, the basic fundamentals of basketball are taught: shooting, dribbling, rebounding, and defense. Special individual skill attainment is emphasized at this time. A secondary program of conditioning consisting of weightlifting, running, and other exercises that will benefit and strengthen the individual is implemented. The second phase places emphasis on competitive team play. Team offense and defense, as well as strategy and specific situation work, are emphasized. MS Football (Boys - Grade 7 or 8): The MS football class is used as a platform for our student athletes in the MS football program to develop discipline, teamwork, sportsmanship and the heart of a champion on and off the field. During the football season the MS football class will be used to implement the game plan for the opponent they will be facing that week. Strategies will be shared and student athletes will practice them on the field. In the off-season this period is used for strength and conditioning to help the team get quicker, stronger and faster through a variety of exercises designed to prepare them for the next season. MS Basketball (Girls - Grade 7 or 8): This course prepares girls for competitive basketball. Participants work to develop fundamentals of dribbling, passing, shooting, and defense. The first semester covers fundamentals, strategy, and competitive play. The competitive season begins in November and lasts through February. During the off-season students participate in weightlifting, running, agility, and skill development. MS Physical Education (Grade 7 or 8): This course represents a new approach in physical education and the concept of personal fitness. The basic purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for a lifetime of personal fitness with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness. The knowledge and skills taught in this course include teaching students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class. The concept of wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the cornerstone of this course and is exemplified by one of the course objectives—students designing their own personal fitness program. Students will also participate in team sports. Team sports activities may include basketball, flag football, soccer, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, softball and team handball.

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Fine Arts MS Band (Grades 5 & 6): Students are required to participate in a band program. Students will choose an instrument and focus on skills such as learning notes, rhythm, and correct breathing techniques. When they become more accomplished playing individually, students will then begin playing as a group. A student may either be placed in first or second year band depending on the expertise of the student. MS Band (Grade 7 or 8): This course is designed with the goal of continuing the development of musicianship on the many instruments of the band. The level of understanding takes on a significantly more advanced quality allowing these students to perform regularly during the football season in support of our athletic department. Their performances at the Christmas and spring concerts will involve much more complex music which begins to demonstrate and highlight individual accomplishments. Opportunities often become available for additional playing for special events in our community. Students have the opportunity to compete with students of their own age and ability throughout the area and be recognized at a regional level among all schools, both public and private. In addition to these performance opportunities, the students will have an opportunity to compete in solo and small ensemble events near the end of the year leading to recognition and performance at our yearly Recognized Soloist Recital. MS Art (Grade 6, 7 or 8): This course encompasses a wide variety of experiences, from elements of art and principles of design to art history. Students are exposed to a variety of media both two and three dimensional, pencil, ink, charcoal, pastel, tempera, watercolor, clay, and printmaking. Some media may vary. The goal is for students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art. The students will also have the opportunity through this class to compete in the PSIA competition and the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo School Art Contest. Students who choose to repeat this course will have the chance to apply the skills they have already learned in more detailed study. MS Chorus (Grade 7 or 8): This choir emphasizes the basics of music. Students will learn and apply techniques for posture, breath support, vowel and consonant formation, and vocal placement to improve tone quality. Students will be able to understand and read basic music notation, including rhythmic, melodic, form, and dynamic notation. Students will perform two part harmony in such styles as classical, spiritual and pop/jazz. The students will also be introduced to solo and group music competitions through this class. MS Theater (Grade 6, 7 or 8): Students in this course will learn about expression, projection, and inflection including poetry and prose interpretation and pantomime. In addition, stage movement, stage areas, and theater history from ancient Greek times to the present will be studied. Students will prepare two performances each semester during predetermined times, participate in various academic competitions and in class performances of duet acts, solo acts, group acts and Bible improvisation.

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MS Advanced Theater (Grade 7 or 8): Students in this class will have already studied the basics of theater allowing them to go more in depth into the different styles of theater and acting. They will work towards perfecting competition pieces and will participate in their own fully realized one act show in the spring semester.

Additional Academic Activities Field Trips: Age-appropriate field trips to locations such as children’s theaters, museums, and historical sites may be taken in connection with and to enhance classroom studies. Academic Meets: Students are encouraged to participate in an academic meet hosted each year by various Christian schools in Texas. This event allows students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in a variety of subject areas and be recognized for their achievement. Students may participate in two events and coaching sessions are held either before or after school several weeks prior to this event. National Elementary Honor Society: WCS is one of 300 schools in our nation sharing in the distinction of being named a founding chapter of the National Elementary Honor Society. Fifth and sixth grade students are selected for their outstanding academic achievements and their demonstrations of responsible actions at school, home and in the community. Students will be involved in providing service to the community and school and learning valuable leadership skills. National Junior Honor Society: National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) is the nation's premier organization established to recognize outstanding middle level students in the seventh and eighth grades. More than just an honor roll, NJHS serves to honor those students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of Scholarship, Leadership, Service, Character, and Citizenship. In-School Presentations: Throughout the school year, special presentations, performances, and visitors enrich the student’s school experiences. Homework: Students are assigned homework daily. Homework is used to reinforce classroom learning, not as busy work; therefore, homework loads vary from time to time. If possible, less homework is assigned on Wednesdays. Middle School Retreat: Students in 5th through 8th grade have the opportunity to attend a retreat at a near-by camp site such as Camp Coyote in Huntsville or Camp ChoYeh in Livingston. The retreat takes place during the first few weeks of the school year. Students and faculty get a chance to truly become a team as they participate in a Ropes Course, fishing, archery, swimming, horseback riding and other activities. Campfires and daily devotionals give students an opportunity to reflect on the goals for the new school year. Themes central to developing good habits in school and at home are begun at the retreat, and reemphasized throughout the entire school year.

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Upper School Grades 9 — 12

Mr. Greg J. Glenn

Executive Administrator

Dr. David Lacey

Upper School Principal

Mr. Mike White

Director of Guidance

Mrs. Linda Fabian

Registrar

Westbury Christian School’s Upper School program is focused on developing independence in the hearts and minds of young adults. Beginning in ninth grade, students are expected to move toward self-motivation and self-control in their spiritual, academic and behavioral choices. Ultimately, exhibiting spiritual maturity and having the ability to transition successfully into a collegiate program demonstrates success, both to parents and the school. Having Bible classes every day as part of our required curriculum, as well as chapel twice a week, promotes spiritual maturity, while a rigorous academic program, which provides the opportunity for students to select from more than a dozen AP classes, develops academic excellence. Behavioral choices are guided by a discipline program that promotes time-management, self-control and respect for both peers and those in authority. Watching responsible young men and women receive their diplomas is the ultimate reward. 39


High School Plan of Study The following is a guide of classes that are normally taken at each grade level; however, this may not apply to every student.

9th Grade

10th Grade

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Old Testament Survey Algebra I or Geometry World Geography or AP Human Geography IPC, Pre-AP Biology, Biology or Chemistry Pre-AP English I Expressive or English I English I Mechanics Elective 8. Elective

5. 6. 7. 8.

The Gospels Geometry, Models of Math or Algebra II World History or AP World History Pre-AP Biology, Biology, Chemistry or Physics English II or Pre-AP English II Elective Elective Elective

11th Grade

12th Grade

1. Acts and the Epistles 2. Algebra II, Geometry, Models of Math, or PreAP Pre-Calculus 3. US History or AP US History 4. English III, Pre-AP English, or AP English Language 5. Chemistry, Physics, Anatomy/Physiology, AP Chemistry, or AP Biology 6. Elective 7. Elective 8. Elective

1. Senior Bible 2. Algebra II, Pre-AP Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC or AP Statistics 3. Government/Economics, AP Government, AP Macroeconomics or AP Microeconomics 4. English IV, AP English Language, or AP English Literature 5. Anatomy/Physiology, AP Biology, Physics, Biotechnology or AP Chemistry 6. Elective 7. Elective 8. Elective

High School Electives Accounting AP Spanish Language AP Psychology AP Studio Art (Fine Art credit) Art (Fine Art credit) Athletics – Basketball or Football Band (Fine Art credit)

Chorus (Fine Art credit) Communication Applications * Computer 1 Concert Strings (Fine Art credit) Drama (Fine Art credit) Entrepreneurship Health Introduction to Business

Principles of Marketing Physical Education (1 credit*) Photography (Fine Art credit) Spanish I*, II*, III, IV Yearbook (Fine Art) *Required Elective Courses

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High School Graduation Requirements SUBJECT

CREDITS

Bible* English Mathematics Science Social Studies Foreign Language** Speech Fine Arts P.E. Electives‥

4 4 4 4 4 2 .5 1 1 3

Total

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1. Bible must be taken every year of attendance at WCS. 2. High school students are required to complete 20 hours of community service per year in order to graduate. Hours may not be rolled over from one year to the next and will be displayed on students’ transcripts. 3. Students are required to participate in at least one student activity per year. The chosen activity must be something competitive. 4. Students must take the ACT and are encouraged to take the SAT before graduation and have their scores reported directly to WCS.

* Students transferring to WCS must only take Bible for the semesters they are enrolled at WCS. ** Some colleges require three (3) years of foreign language. Students should check with the colleges/universities they are interested in attending for academic admission requirements.

High School Student Activities Program All high school students are required to participate in the Student Activities Program every year of attendance at WCS. Students may fulfill this requirement by being involved in the following: Varsity or Junior Varsity Sports Drama Productions Yearbook Staff Academic Competitions

Performing Chorus Performing Band Other activities, as approved

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Timetable for College-Bound Students FRESHMAN YEAR

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Begin filling out four-year plan.

October

Class rank and GPA are calculated using all high school classes, starting with a student’s freshman year.

All WCS sophomores take the PLAN and PSAT tests.

JUNIOR YEAR August, September •

Examine the educational opportunities available.

Study college admission requirements.

Discuss plan with parents.

October •

Juniors take the PSAT and National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.

February •

Meet with the guidance counselor.

Select appropriate courses to meet college entrance requirements.

Set up a calendar for taking tests and completing college applications.

Examine financial resources and review plans for college financial aid.

Consider people to ask for recommendations—teachers, employers, clergy.

Register for the SAT and/or ACT.

Registration forms for the SAT are available online at: www.collegeboard.com.

Registration forms for the ACT are available online at: www.actstudent.org. SCHOOL CODE: 443-459

March, April •

Visit college campuses; talk to graduates and students at the schools being considered.

SENIOR YEAR ALL SENIOR YEAR - Attend scholarship/college/career/technical school meeting with the guidance counselor. July, August, September •

Fill out senior information sheet for the guidance counselor.

Write 5-10 colleges requesting application forms, catalogs, and financial aid information.

Visit college campuses; talk to graduates and students at the schools being considered.

Most colleges require that students requesting financial aid provide a Parent’s Confidential Statement.

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Record progress in fulfilling application requirements.

Maintain or improve academic grades during senior year. Colleges look unfavorably on failing grades.

Make a list of your accomplishments. This should be given to those whom you ask to write recommendations. Always allow 4 weeks for someone to write a recommendation.

October, November •

See the guidance counselor when you have questions or need assistance.

Have the guidance counselor check your application forms.

Have someone proofread your college application essays.

Mail completed forms to colleges.

Learn which tests are required for college admittance and take them.

Registration forms for the SAT are available online at: www.collegeboard.com.

Registration forms for the ACT are available online at: www.actstudent.org. SCHOOL CODE: 443-459

Meet with college representatives when they visit the school.

Give the college’s recommendation form to the guidance counselor.

December • All applications and a copy of high school grades should be sent to prospective colleges by the middle of December, unless a college states otherwise. • Fill out a records request form from the registrar to send high school grades to prospective colleges. Give the registrar the proper forms at least 2 weeks (or more) before the college’s deadline to process and mail the requested documents. January • Register with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at: www.fafsa.ed.gov. • Check with the college’s admissions department to make sure they have received all the necessary documentation. • Some colleges offer tentative acceptance to outstanding candidates in January. February • Fill out a records request form from the registrar to send the first semester’s grades to prospective colleges, along with any other information not already submitted. March • Recheck college catalogs and handbooks. Visit with the guidance counselor again to make sure you have taken the necessary tests. • Take necessary College Board achievement tests, if required. April, May, June • Keep track of acceptances, rejections, and awards of financial aid. • Reply promptly to colleges asking you to notify them of your decision. IT IS IMPORTANT TO MEET DEADLINES IN ORDER TO KEEP THE ACCEPTANCE PREVIOUSLY GAINED.

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Records to Keep for Admissions and Financial Aid •

Cancelled checks or money orders

Admission tickets to tests and correction forms (in case you need to make a correction up to the day of the test)

Test registration numbers (printed on the admission ticket)

Student Descriptive Questionnaire Responses

All score reports

Transcripts of grades

Working copy of Parent’s Confidential Statement for use in filling out the FAFSA

Terms to Know ACT Test: The ACT is a 4-hour-and-30-minute test that assesses high school students' general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The highest possible ACT score is 36. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science. The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. The ACT is curriculum-based. The ACT is not an aptitude or an IQ test. Instead, the questions on the ACT are directly related to what students have learned in high school courses. FAFSA: The Free Application for Federal Student Aid website offers this description, “Federal Student Aid, an office of the US Department of Education, ensures that all eligible individuals can benefit from federally funded or federally guaranteed financial assistance for education beyond high school. We consistently champion the promise of postsecondary education to all Americans—and its value to our society.” FAFSA applications are filled out in the spring of a student’s senior year, preferably as soon as the parents receive their W-2 forms. Upon filling out the application, the family will be notified of the amount the Federal Government believes the family can pay for college education. FAFSA also notifies the family of grants and loans for which the student qualifies. FAFSA applications can be filled out online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. NCAA Clearinghouse: All athletes who intend to compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) must qualify with the NCAA Clearinghouse. Students may register by going to https://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter/common/ and follow the instructions under “Prospective Student-Athletes.” A core GPA for each student is figured based on 16 core courses. A sliding scale using the core GPA and SAT/ACT test scores determines whether or not the student will qualify academically to play in the NCAA. PLAN Test: Essentially, the PLAN test is a pre-ACT test that assists 10th graders in building a solid foundation for future academic and career success. The test results provide information needed to

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address school districts' high-priority issues. It is a comprehensive guidance resource that helps students measure their current academic development, explore career/training options, and make plans for the remaining high school and post-graduation years. PSAT Test: The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and gives students a chance to enter National Merit Scholarship Corporation scholarship programs. The PSAT/NMSQT measures critical reading skills, math problem-solving skills, and writing skills. The most common reasons for taking the PSAT/NMSQT are to receive feedback on a student’s strengths and weaknesses on skills necessary for college study, to see how his/her performance on an admissions test might compare with that of others applying to college, to enter the competition for scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, to help prepare for the SAT, and to receive information from colleges. Rolling Admissions: An admissions term used to describe a window of time that a student may submit an application and be notified about admission within a few weeks. Some colleges that use rolling admissions do not have a due date for applications and simply close admissions when they have reached the number of students they desire. SAT Subject Test: The College Board offers tests in specific subject areas that test beyond the SAT Reasoning Test (regular SAT). Some upper tier colleges require a SAT Subject Test. For example Rice University requires an SAT score, one SAT Subject Test of the student’s choosing, and one SAT Subject Test from their major field of study. Unless the college to which you are applying requests this, you do not have to take a SAT Subject Test. SAT Test: The SAT is a 3-hour-and-45-minute test that measures the critical thinking, mathematical reasoning, and writing skills that students need to do college-level work. The highest possible SAT score is 2400. SAT scores are intended to supplement a student’s record and other information, such as extracurricular activities and recommendations. At least half of all students take the SAT twice—in the spring of their junior year and in the fall of their senior year. Most students improve their scores at the second administration. All scores are reported to colleges; however, colleges generally look only at the highest scores.

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Distinguished Achievement Program The Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP) recognizes students at Westbury Christian School who demonstrate levels of performance equivalent to college students or demonstrate work done by professionals in the arts, sciences, business, industry, or community service. The DAP requires students to: 1. Complete the graduation requirements for the Recommended Graduation Plan, 2. Complete a level III foreign language, and 3. Complete a total of four advanced measures from the following categories: -Test Data (see information below) -College (or equivalent) Courses (see information below) Test Data Qualifying test data includes: 1. A score of three or above on any College Board Advanced Placement exam 2. Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) designation of Commended Scholar (or higher) by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation 3. National Hispanic Scholar awarded by The College Board or Outstanding Negro Student awarded by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation College Courses Any WCS-approved college course taken before the WCS graduation date must be passed with a 3.0 or higher to be accepted for high school credit.

Descriptions of Pre-AP and AP Courses Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) Courses: Pre-AP courses are offered to serious and disciplined students. Each course includes specific content and activities designed to prepare students for success in college-level Advanced Placement courses. The amount of material covered requires students to read and write extensively outside of class. Advanced Placement (AP) Courses: The content coverage for AP courses is developed by the College Board and is designed to provide college-level studies for high school students using college-level materials and strategies. The amount of material covered requires students to read and write extensively outside of class. Pre-AP Grading and AP Grading: Student performance is evaluated on rigorous standards appropriate for the grade and content of the course. Courses are weighted when figuring class rank; however, actual grades earned will appear on all report cards and transcripts. AP Examinations: Students successfully completing an AP course are strongly encouraged to take the corresponding AP examination. Depending on the requirements of the university to which the student applies, he/she may earn college credit for their AP exam score(s).

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9th - 12th Grade Curriculum

“Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord...� Colossians 3:23

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Bible Old Testament Survey (Grade 9): This course takes students on a journey from Earth’s creation to the prophecies of Jesus’ coming. Students will read about and discuss how from the very beginning of man, God had a plan. They will study the Israelite nation: their laws, promises and warnings to the people of the Old Testament, and will discuss the applications in today’s world. (Credit: 1) Gospels: The Life of Christ (Grade 10): This study invites students to know and understand Jesus’ life on earth and what His 30 years on earth mean to us today. This involves an in-depth study of the Gospels: Mathew, Mark, Luke, and John. As students study Jesus’ birth, life, death, and resurrection, God’s love for His people is revealed. (Credit: 1) Acts and the Epistles (Grade 11): A study of the book of Acts describes life after Jesus’ return to Heaven and the beginnings of the church during this course. Students will study the apostle Paul and his conversion from a Christian persecutor to one who loved and served God. His faithfulness led him on several missionary journeys and prompted him to write the Christian letters we call the Epistles. Though written to people who lived long ago, these letters are full of life applications. (Credit: 1) Senior Bible (Grade 12): The purpose of Senior Bible is to bring students to a deeper knowledge of scripture, to encourage personal exploration of faith, to apply God’s teaching to their lives, and to prepare them for the next steps in life. Senior Bible begins with an in-depth study of Hebrews and James. These books provide several opportunities to look back to the Old Testament and serve as a bridge between the Old and the New Covenants. The next study is of the Parables of Christ. Students learn to interpret these earthly stories, learn their spiritual meanings, and apply these teachings to modern life. The final study is a series about seeking God's direction in our lives called "Finding God's Will" by Andy Stanley. In addition to these topical studies, students weekly meditate on application exercises such as: Music/Movie Appreciation - seeking spiritual truths in our media, Facebook Scripture Pictures - posting pictures and comments about certain religious themes, and Lectio Divia - meditative readings and journaling over specific passages of scripture. (Credit: 1)

Business Education Principles of Marketing (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Marketing is all the various functions or activities that focus on the consumer to generate a profitable exchange. In this course, students learn to relate the concept of marketing to their daily lives and gain an understanding of consumer buying habits. Students gain knowledge and skills that help them to be proficient in one or more of the functional marketing areas associated with distribution, financing, marketing-information management, pricing, product planning, promotion, purchasing, risk management, selling skills needed to help customers make satisfying buying decisions, and solving marketing problems. (Credit: 1) Accounting (Grade 11 or 12): This course is a general introduction to accounting. Students will learn terminology, practices, and procedures used in an accounting system for businesses. Students will have hands-on computer experience using an automated accounting computer program. Any student interested in earning a business degree in college should take this course since six hours of accounting 51


are required for a business degree. Students successfully completing a full year of accounting would be prepared for entry-level accounting jobs. (Credit: 1) Introduction to Business (Grade 11 or 12): Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace, in society, and in making a successful transition to the work force and/or postsecondary education. Students develop a foundation in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of business to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge and exposure that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate business decisions. They learn proper business conduct and the impact businesses have on the community. (Credit: 1)

Computer 1 Computer I (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This course focuses on the elements and principles of Digital Graphics and Animation. Students will learn when and how to use vector and raster graphics, typeface styles, resolution and file formats, color, lighting, sound, and 3D effects. Students will understand desktop drawing, painting and image editing tools, and how they will affect graphic work, as well as laws and issues governing the designer. The goal is to communicate ideas effectively through digital media. (Credit: 1)

English/Language Arts English I (Grade 9): The English I course develops students’ reading comprehension, vocabulary, writing, and critical thinking skills through a study of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama from selections of world literature. Throughout the year, students will read and analyze a number of selections using their anthology and supplemental novels. Vocabulary is developed through reading and additional instructional programs. The grammar and writing component of the course introduces students to the requirements, conventions, and expectations of academic writing at the secondary level. English I students will learn to evaluate sources and apply the principles of documentation as part of the research process. (Credit: 1) Pre-AP English I (Grade 9): Students utilize Pre-AP strategies in this course and engage in activities that foster higher-level thinking processes. Advanced reading and writing skills are nurtured as the students shift from concrete to abstract thinking and reading. The course requires students to evaluate their writing and incorporate higher diction, more complex syntax, and efficient organization of ideas. Pre-AP students practice identifying the interrelationships among theme, tone, and style, and learn that an author establishes a certain tone by manipulating the rhetorical devices of imagery, diction, point of view, and syntax. Students will also annotate texts and look for patterns of symbolism and theme. Using annotations and skills acquired during class will improve composition during timed essays and out-ofclass essays. Evaluations of essays are rigorous in nature to achieve optimal writing. Students evaluate a variety of genres and styles throughout the year. (Credit: 1)

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English II (Grade 10): Prerequisite - Successful completion of English I : Students continue to refine their writing and literature skills in English II. Students present textual evidence to support answers and infer information from texts through their various reading assignments and through learning how to conduct research according to MLA guidelines. Additional literature terms are introduced and applied. Novels of different genres and cultures are read to broaden the students’ knowledge of literature. Students revise and edit drafts, both personally and with peers. (Credit: 1) Pre-AP English II (Grade 10 or 11): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Pre-AP English Expressive or English I : This course solidifies the students’ advanced English foundation by building on the skills students have acquired in Pre-AP English Expressive and requires them to perform increasingly more sophisticated tasks in their reading, writing, and thinking. This course requires a textbook purchase along with several selected novels. Pre-AP curriculum serves as the framework for the Advanced Placement Program. Critical and creative thinking skills are developed through a thematic analysis of literature, writing styles, and through a conceptual focus applied throughout the course. A yearlong poetry study and individual compositions are used to evaluate abilities in critical thinking and creativity. (Credit: 1) English III (Grade 11): Prerequisite - Successful completion of English II or Pre-AP English : English III surveys American literature from the pre-colonial times to the early 21st century. Students will become familiar with various texts so that they are able to understand their place in life and discover how to be active members of society. Reading diverse texts will enhance comprehension skills and show how others have viewed the human situation and the characteristics of America. Those different views will help students grow in their understanding of other cultures and beliefs. By examining and evaluating the views of others, students learn to understand their beliefs, principles, and values more clearly. (Credit: 1) AP Language and Composition (Grade 11 or 12) : Prerequisite - Successful completion of English II or Pre-AP English : Students in this college-level course engage in becoming skilled readers and writers who compose for a variety of purposes with a thorough knowledge of rhetoric in mind. The body of their reading provides them with ideas and models for their own writing. Class work involves both lengthy reading passages that often require revisiting and writing assignments that reflect the process of planning, prewriting, composition, and revision. The repetition of assignments that require careful reading coupled with time for discussion and careful writing instill an understanding of synthesis and of the analytical, persuasive, and creative skills necessary for success on the AP exam. Though the novels students read serve as an introduction to the rhetorical choices of fiction writers and a brief overview of American Literature, the AP English Language and Composition course focuses primarily on nonfiction. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the AP Language Exam. (Credit: 1) English IV (Grade 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of English III or AP Language and Composition : English IV surveys British and world literature from the Middle Ages to the early 21st century. The goal of this course is for the students to become familiar with various texts so that they may better experience the world and understand others as well as to polish their communication skills and comprehension abilities. Students will read a variety of novels that will enable them to broaden their horizons and foster discussion about contemporary themes and issues. Students will also be writing in a variety of styles and modes to prepare them for college composition classes. (Credit: 1)

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AP Literature and Composition (Grade 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of AP Language and Composition : This course is designed to develop skills at a level comparable to a second semester freshman in college as well as develop the aptitude necessary to take the AP exam. Students begin the year with a study of the different forms of literary analysis with exercises designed to sharpen their own analytic ability including the capacity to write their own critical responses to literature. Throughout the year, students will read several novels and plays, various prose passages, and numerous poems allowing exposure to various genres and different opportunities for literary interpretation. These works are chosen for their literary merit and for their frequent appearance on the AP exam as such this body of reading is intended to provide them with ideas and models for their own writing. To further assist with the transition to collegiate course work, a lengthy research paper is assigned and due at mid-term. Aspects of research including finding sources of merit, methods of quotation, weaving writer’s thought with scholar’s thought, paper formats, and citations are all introduced and practiced. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the AP Literature and Composition Exam. (Credit: 1)

Fine Arts HS Art (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Beginner and more advanced art students learn the elements of art and principles of design and refine skills which involve a variety of two and three dimensional media including: pencil, ink, color pencil, charcoal, pastel, tempera, watercolor, clay, and printmaking. Students also have the opportunity and are encouraged to prepare projects for various competitions during the year. The aim of this course is for the students to gain an appreciation of art and explore their individual artistic talents. (Credit: 1) AP Art (Grade 11 or 12): This college level course offers a rigorous and accelerated curriculum that prepares students to submit portfolios for the AP Art exam for possible college credit. Critical and creative thinking skills are developed through the production and critical analysis of 2-D and 3-D art. Students self-determine appropriate directions in which to develop artistic themes and media in which they are created. (Credit: 1) Band (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This course is designed for the most advanced instrumental students in our school. The primary focus centers on developing the complete musician with multiple opportunities to perform as an individual and in support of our athletic teams and community organizations. These opportunities are in addition to our regularly scheduled Christmas and spring concerts. Students at this level will be given the opportunity to compete against other high school students, both public and private, for possible recognition at district, region, area and state. When opportunities are available, this group will represent the school in concert contests available through TAPPS and other organizations. In addition to these performance opportunities, the students will have an opportunity to compete in solo and small ensemble events near the end of the year leading to recognition and performance at our yearly Recognized Soloist Recital. (Credit: 1) Chorus (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This choir emphasizes sight-reading, basic music skills, vocal development, vocal blending, and music theory. Many performance and contest opportunities are available. Previous choral experience is not necessary. Students will perform in three and four part harmony with an encouragement and emphasis on competitions. (Credit: 1) Photography (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Students will plan, interpret, and critique visual representation. Technology, visual, and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students explore the elements

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of art and principles of design through the lens of the camera. Digital cameras will be used and discussed. Students will create, clarify, critique, and produce artistic photography. Students must have a digital camera for course work. (Credit: 1) Three-Dimensional Art (Grade 10,11, or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Beginning Art : The 3D art course is an advanced course with a pre-requisite of students taking beginning art first. Students practice using the elements of art and principles of design, and will put into practice what they have learned. Projects include sculpture, relief sculpture, fashion and jewelry design, interior/exterior design and some 2D art as well. Many of the advanced projects will be used in the competitions throughout the year. (Credit: 1) Theater Arts (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): The first semester of this course will include a review and exercises in expression and projection as well as a study of stage areas and stage movement. There will be a study of theater history from ancient Greek times to the present including the preparation and performance of scenes from major works of each era. The second semester will include creation of subtext and character development and students will prepare and perform Reader’s Theater. Teams will prepare for academic competitions in duet acts, solo acts, and one act plays. Direction and production will also be studied with class performances each semester. (Credit: 1) Oral Interpretation (Grade 9, 10, 11, 12): This is a full year course in which students will explore all elements of performance and public speaking including: poetry, prose, acting, oratory and debate. The focus of this class will be taking the results of the exploratory process to competitions. (Credit: 1) Advanced Theater Arts (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This class will explore the classical styles of acting including Stanislavsky and Meisner. Students will also learn the different techniques and styles of directing culminating in student directed one act plays during the spring semester. (Credit: 1) Yearbook (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Yearbook students are introduced to yearbook production through workshop and classroom activities which stress creative marketing, design, writing, and photography. Staff members receive specific page assignments and deadlines which must be met in order to receive course credit. Due to the wide range of activities involved with producing the yearbook, this course may be taken for elective or fine art credit. Yearbook may be taken all four years if desired. (Credit: 1)

Foreign Language Spanish I (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This course helps each student attain proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also develop an insight into the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and the various cultures that it includes. (Credit: 1) Spanish II (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Spanish I : The purpose of Spanish II is to build upon the skills learned in Spanish I. The language is presented and practiced using listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Cultural material is integrated into the learning process so that students gain an awareness of the contemporary Spanish-speaking world. (Credit: 1)

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Spanish III (Grade 10, 11, or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Spanish II : The purpose of Spanish III is to continue to promote the development of listening, speaking, reading, Spanish grammar and writing skills. (Credit: 1) Spanish IV (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Spanish III : Spanish IV continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. This course includes a special focus on Spanish literature and culture. (Credit: 1) AP Spanish Language (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Spanish III and/or Spanish IV : Students will continue the emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a variety of formats while acquiring additional vocabulary and sophistication in their use of the Spanish language. Course content includes art, history, current events, literature, culture, sports, and other media. Students will be able to integrate language skills and synthesize written and oral materials. Instruction will be guided by the recommendations of the College Board. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Language Exam. (Credit: 1)

Health and Physical Education Health (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): In Health education students acquire the information and skills necessary to become healthy adults. To achieve that goal, students will understand the following: students are responsible for their own health decisions and personal behavior; personal behaviors can increase or reduce health risks throughout their life span; health is influenced by a variety of factors; students can recognize and utilize health information and products; and personal/interpersonal skills are needed to promote physical, social, mental, and spiritual health. (Credit: 1/2) Physical Education (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This course represents a new approach in physical education and the concept of personal fitness. The basic purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for a lifetime of personal fitness with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness. The knowledge and skills taught in this course include teaching students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class. The concept of wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the cornerstone of this course and is exemplified by one of the course objectives—students designing their own personal fitness program. (Credit: 1) Students may also participate in team sports. Team sports activities include basketball, flag football, soccer, ultimate Frisbee, and team handball. (Credit: 1) Basketball (Girls - Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Prerequisite – Freshmen - none; Sophomores, Juniors, & Seniors – coach approval : This course prepares girls for competitive basketball. Participants work to develop fundamentals of dribbling, passing, shooting, and defense. The first semester covers fundamentals, strategy, and competitive play. The competitive season begins in November and lasts through February. During the off-season students participate in weightlifting, running, agility, and techniques. Team sizes are limited; thus, coaches will make player selections. (Credit: 1) Cheerleading (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This is a physical education activity course designed for high school students who have tried out and made the Varsity squad. Students will develop skills and techniques while engaging in conditioning activities which are necessary to be a successful varsity cheerleader. Various team building strategies will be implemented. Cheerleaders are expected to be

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present for activities outside of class including but not limited to football and basketball games as well as pep rallies and other performances. (Credit: 1) Basketball (Boys - Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Prerequisite- Freshmen - none; Sophomores, Juniors, & Seniors - coach approval : Basketball is taught in two parts. First, the basic fundamentals of basketball are taught—shooting, dribbling, rebounding, and defense. Special individual skill attainment is also emphasized. Additionally, a conditioning program is implemented which involves weightlifting, running, and other exercises that will benefit and strengthen the individual. The second phase places emphasis on competitive team play. Team offense and defense, as well as strategy and specific situation work, are emphasized. Team sizes are limited; thus, coaches will make player selections. (Credit: 1) Football (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): Prerequisite- Freshmen - none; Sophomores, Juniors, & Seniors coach approval : Participants prepare to compete in scheduled TAPPS competition which lasts from August through November. During the off-season students participate in weightlifting, running, agilities, and techniques. (Credit: 1)

Mathematics Algebra I (Grade 9): The goals for this course are to develop proficiency with mathematical skills, to expand understanding of mathematical concepts, to improve logical thinking, and to promote success across the five math strands of number operation and qualitative reasoning: patterns, relationships and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics. Basic topics include linear, quadratic, and other non-linear functions; equations and systems of equations; integer exponents; polynomial products; factoring; and the analysis and solution of word problems. (Credit: 1)

Geometry (Grade 9 or 10): This course emphasizes the strong relationship that exists between geometric content and geometric applications in the physical world. Topics covered include: basic properties of geometric figures in two and three dimensions, applications of geometric formulas, dimensionality, transformations, right triangles, trigonometry, and structures of axiomatic systems, basic postulates of Euclidean geometry, comparing and contrasting Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometrics, and construction of proofs of geometric theorems. (Credit: 1) 57


Algebra II (Grade 10 or 11): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Algebra I : This course is an extension of Algebra I, across the five math strands of number operation and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships and algebraic thinking; geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics. Topics also include quadratic equations (and the methods of completing the square), complex numbers, polynomials, rational expressions, graphs of functions (including quadratic, square root, rational, exponential, and logarithmic), fractional exponents, radicals, linear and quadratic inequalities, absolute value inequalities, arithmetic and geometric sequences, the binomial theorem, and the analysis of word problems. (Credit: 1) Models of Math (Grade 10 or 11 (Before Algebra II)): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Algebra I : Students will continue to build on the K-8 and Algebra I foundations as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Students use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, to model information, and to solve problems from various disciplines. Students use mathematical methods to model and solve real-life applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design, and science. Students use mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics, with connections among these to solve problems from a wide variety of advanced applications in both mathematical and nonmathematical situations. (Credit: 1) Algebra III (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful Completion of Algebra II : Algebra III is designed for the student who is interested in progressing to Pre-Calculus or is college-bound. This course will include new applications of material addressed in Algebra II. Topics in this course will include sequences and series, conic sections, linear and non-linear systems, logarithms, and functions. Calculators will be used when appropriate. (Credit: 1) Pre-AP Pre-Calculus (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Algebra II : This course combines Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry. Students examine the following topics: the real number line, field theory, relations and functions, graphing techniques, sequences and series, parametric equations, circular and trigonometric functions, vectors (in the plane in space), polynomial functions, conic sections, polar coordinates, and exponential functions. (Credit: 1) AP Calculus AB (Grade 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Pre-AP Pre-Calculus : This collegelevel course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. AP Calculus introduces students to practical applications. With this foundation, more formal definitions and procedures are derived. Students will receive preparation for the AP Calculus AB tests for possible college credit. Graphing calculators will be utilized extensively. (Credit: 1) AP Calculus BC (Grade 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of AP Calculus AB : Calculus BC is a course in single-variable calculus that includes all the topics of Calculus AB (techniques and applications of the derivative, techniques and applications of the definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus) plus additional topics in differential and integral calculus (including parametric, polar, and vector functions) and series. It is equivalent to at least 1 year of calculus at most colleges and universities. Algebraic, numerical, and graphical representations are emphasized throughout the course. (Credit: 1) AP Statistics (Grade 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Algebra II : This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. Students who enroll in this course should expect a much more rigorous and accelerated program than in a regular class. The emphasis of this course will be on conceptual understanding and interpretation of various statistical models. Four major

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themes covered will be exploratory analysis, planning a study, anticipating patterns in advance, and statistical inference. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Statistics Exam. (Credit: 1)

Science IPC - Integrated Physics and Chemistry (Grade 9): An Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) student studies the natural world. The student conducts field and laboratory investigations and uses critical thinking, in addition to problem-solving skills, to make informed decisions. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry. Topics include motion, waves, energy transformations, properties and changes of matter, and solution chemistry. (Credit: 1) Biology (Grade 9 or 10): The Biology I course is an overview of Biology covering the following topics: Cell structure and function, energetics (metabolism, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration), genetics, evolution and creation, classification, animal behavior, plant structure and function, human biology and ecology. Science process skills will be infused throughout the course, including designing and conducting experiments, organization and manipulation of data including designing tables and graphs. Students will learn how to communicate scientific information in a variety of media (lab reports, presentations, and essays). Critical thinking skills will also be developed in each unit of study. (Credit: 1) Pre-AP Biology (Grade 9 or 10): Pre-AP Biology strives to provide students with the skills and basics that will translate into future AP course success. Students will become familiar with the logistics of an AP course. Their laboratory activities will reflect concepts covered in AP labs and they will learn to write formal laboratory reports in a format acceptable in an AP course, including such things as writing a hypothesis, identifying sources of error, building visuals from data such as tables and graphs and writing appropriate conclusions that reflect the results of data collected. Students will be introduced to essay writing which integrates prior knowledge with that being studied presently. Biology concepts covered include: cell structure and function, energetics (metabolism, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration), genetics, evolution and creation, classification, animal behavior, plant structure and function, human biology, and ecology. (Credit: 1)

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Chemistry (Grade 10 or 11): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Biology : Students continue to develop critical-thinking and problem-solving skills in this course. The student conducts field and laboratory investigations using scientific methods. Topics include characteristics of matter, energy transformations, atomic structure, the periodic table, gases, bonding, nuclear chemistry, oxidationreduction, chemical equations, solutions, acids and bases, and chemical reactions. The student investigates how chemistry is an integral part of everyday life. (Credit: 1) Physics (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry & taking or taken Algebra II : Students will conduct laboratory and field investigations that have practical applications in today’s world. Students learn to make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Topics of study will include laws of motion, changes within physical systems, conservation of energy and momentum, force, thermodynamics, characteristics and behavior of waves, and quantum physics. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills. (Credit: 1) Anatomy and Physiology (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of IPC, Biology, and Chemistry : Students study the structure of living organisms, how they function, and the close relationship between structure functions. Major topics include organization of the body; covering, support, and movement of the body; regulation and integration of the body; maintenance of the body; and the reproductive system, pregnancy, and human development. (Credit: 1) AP Chemistry (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry : This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. Students will receive preparation for the AP Chemistry exam. Topics of study and advanced laboratory investigations cover atomic theory, properties of matter, chemical reactions, kinetics, and thermodynamics. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam. (Credit: 1) Advanced Biotechnology (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite- Biology and Chemistry : Students will explore the field of biotechnology and the role of genetics in the biotech industry. This is a laboratory based course which was created as a result of a partnership with Rutgers University. Students will analyze the importance of recombinant DNA and genetic engineering. Standard biotechnology laboratory procedures will be performed such as DNA fingerprinting using gel electrophoresis. (Credit: 1) AP Biology (Grade 11 or 12): Prerequisite - Successful completion of Biology : This is a college-level course and follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. Students will receive preparation for the AP Biology exam. Biology concepts covered include: cell structure and function, energetics (metabolism, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration), genetics, evolution and creation, classification, animal behavior, plant structure and function, human biology, and ecology. Students will conduct field and laboratory investigations with opportunities to apply critical thinking and problem solving skills using appropriate scientific methodology (writing hypothesis, constructing visuals with collected data, identifying sources of error, and drawing conclusions based on data collected). Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Biology Exam. (Credit: 1)

Social Studies World Geography (Grade 9): Students study world climates, landforms, political boundaries, and peoples, including their cultures and societies. Emphasis is placed on developing an awareness of the

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difficult situations many people in the world face and the Christian response of compassion and willingness to help others. (Credit: 1) AP Human Geography (Grade 9): This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, including the use and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Human Geography Exam. (Credit: 1) World History (Grade 10): Students study the development of civilization from the beginning of time to the present, tracing the major eras and important turning points in World History. Special emphasis is placed on the study of significant people, places, and events as well as issues from the earliest times to the present. Students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilization around the world. Political and economic imperialism and major political revolutions since the 17th century are evaluated. The evolution of the democratic-republican governments and the ideas and documents that influenced this emergence of new government is examined. The connections between major developments in science and technology are explored with a relationship on the growth of industrial economies. Major religious and political traditions are also studied. (Credit: 1) AP World History (Grade 10): This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. The study of AP World History explores common threads of humanity over time: trade, religion, politics, society, and technology. Students investigate how these things have changed and continued over time in different locations. The course is designed to help students construct and evaluate arguments, as well as use historical evidence. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement World History Exam. (Credit: 1 replaces World History) US History (Grade 11): Students study the geography and history of the United States from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present, focusing on historical content of political, economic, and social events related to industrialization and urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies of the cold war and post-cold war eras, as well as the reform and civil rights movements. Students examine and analyze the causes and effects of major events such as the great depression and consider the impact of geographic factors on such events. Constitutional issues in American society are examined and evaluated. Students examine the arts and industry of the times and analyze the impact of technological advancements on such things as the American labor movement. Throughout the course, critical thinking skills are used to explain and interpret the past. (Credit: 1) AP US History (Grade 11): This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. It will provide students with the necessary analytical skills and factual knowledge required to conduct a critical evaluation of the problems and events in United States history, specifically, from the pre-Columbian societies through the post-Cold War world. AP US History will prepare students to enter intermediate or advanced college courses by placing demands on them equivalent to those made by full year introductory college courses. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement US History Exam. (Credit: 1) Government (Grade 12): Students study the foundation, principles, structure, functions, and sources of government at all levels. The primary underlying focus is centered on the beliefs expressed through the

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United States Constitution. The major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks and balances, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights are studied. Students compare the US system of government with other political systems; analyze the impact of individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the media on the American political system; evaluate the importance of voluntary individual participation in a democratic society; and analyze the rights guaranteed by the US Constitution. (Credit: ½) Economics (Grade 12): Students study the mixed-free-enterprise economic system. Topics students will study include: scarcity, opportunity costs and production possibilities, supply and demand, the business cycle, money and banking, personal fiscal responsibility, and the interaction of government and the economy (taxes, etc.). (Credit: ½) AP Government & Politics: United States (Grade 12): This collegelevel course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US politics and the analysis of specific examples. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Topics include constitutional underpinnings of the US government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Government & Politics: United States Exam. (Credit: 1 replaces Government) AP Macroeconomics (Grade 11 or 12): This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. Macroeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole, covering basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, economic growth and international finance, and exchange rates and balance of payments. Students will use knowledge and critical-thinking strategies to create models for economic problem-solving. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Exam. (Credit: ½ replaces Economics) AP Microeconomics (Grade 11 or 12): This college-level course follows a curriculum recommended by the College Board. Microeconomics gives students a thorough understanding of the principles that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. Students will study basic economic concepts, the nature and functions of product makers, factor markets, efficiency, equity, and the role of the government. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Microeconomics Exam. (Credit: ½ replaces Economics)

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Speech Communication Applications (Grade 9, 10, 11, or 12): This course focuses on skills that are essential for social and professional life. The course will utilize technological resources as well as group and individual speaking assignments to study problem solving, critical thinking, listening, and speaking behavior in a changing global corporate system. (Credit: ½)

* Elective courses may be added as the opportunity or need presents itself and may vary from year to year.

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Please return completed forms to the Registrar’s Office

Community Service Verification Form Student Name:___________________________________________________ Current Grade:_________ Reported hours should be hours of actual work, not counting sleeping, eating, traveling, etc.

Briefly describe the service(s) performed: ___________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Date(s) of service(s) performed: ___________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

Hours completed: ________________________

Organization name: ____________________________________________________________________ Representative printed name: ____________________________________________________________ Representative signature: __________________________ Phone: _______________________________

For Office Use Only: Date Submitted: _____________

Hours credited:_____________

Approved: ___________

Date Submitted: _____________

Hours credited:_____________

Approved: ___________

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WCS Catalog 2012-2013 Print  

2012-2013 Academic Catalog