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IMPORTANT CARS AND CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES TUESDAY 22 MARCH 6:00 PM

important CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES vintage & collectable motorcycles

Th ce in an en in re

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18 Manukau Rd Newmarket PO Box 99251 Auckland, New Zealand Ph:  09 524 6804 | Fax: 09 524 7048 auctions@webbs.co.nz www.webbs.co.nz

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ThE auction and viewing is to be held at Shed 5, top deck, 90 Wellesley Street, Auckland Tuesday 22 Mar 2011 6.00PM PREVIEW: FRIDAY 11 MARCH 6PM – 9PM VIEWING: SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY

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IMPORTANT NOTE: A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all lots in this catalogue. GST is payable on the buyer’s premium only. The condition of items are not generally detailed in this catalogue. Buyers must satisfy themselves to the condition of lots they bid on and should refer to clause 6 in the Conditions of Sales for Buyers printed at the back of the catalogue. Webb’s is pleased to provide intending buyers with condition reports on any lots.

NOTE: DUE TO THE EXPECTED AUDIENCE, ACCESS TO THE AUCTION ROOM WILL BE LIMITED TO CATALOGUE HOLDERS AND REGISTERED BIDDERS ONLY.


FOREWORD Few pursuits other than that of speed bring art and industry together in such a convincing and, at times, intoxicating manner. It seems the 20th century was in many ways the century of speed. To be in willing partnership with a machine designed specifically to make you faster is intrinsically modern. From the Coliseum of Rome to Brooklands to the Can-Am track in the 1970s, the public’s insatiable demand for speed, greater performance and, in some cases, maximum risk is an ancient fetish. It is also true that the entertainment entrepreneurs of the day saw an opportunity and, for many, the advent of Speedway racing in the late 1920s (refer Lots 69, 70) encapsulated all that was loose and illicit about motor sport – purpose-built machines being piloted by intrepid pilots who were literally pioneering speed techniques off the cuff. If successful, they won fame and a little money to proceed to the next race.

The pure-bred racing machines offered within this catalogue are extreme works of velocity that should be approached by only the very best pilots. The Lolas, although possibly street legal, are not anything less than full-blown racing cars designed and created in a period where the pilot’s physical abilities were critical factors. Unlike the machines of today, these extremely powerful machines offered no safety net. You will not find a single computer chip on board these coursing machines. They are raw, highly focused designs celebrating the human condition and its ability to perform under maximum velocity. There is also a string of motorcycle design classics that capture a different type of balance between high performance and beauty. The 1950 Vincent Rapide (Series B) is one such machine – handsome, black and fast, the Rapide conjures up a sophisticated brutality that only the British (excluding Phil Irving) could get away with. The Rickman Métisse G50 is another machine that offered a wildly progressive equation for the privateer racer of the day. Announced in 1966, the Rickman brothers’ frame was designed to accommodate the formidable torque of the Matchless G50 – the ultimate over-thecounter racer of the day that could see you touching the bad side of 125mph. Raced by David Bell in the mid-1980s, it was a machine built to specifically challenge the 500cc Manx Norton. The machines offered here reflect a range of periods and designs that, in their own way, have affected the way we live and perceive our times. Although many would not agree, it is our belief that a number of these machines have added intrepid beauty to the world in which we live, and they have in some small way added potential to the life of one’s soul. Both the car and the motorcycle have brought more change to our lives than anyone might have suspected they would some 100 years ago.

Neil Campbell Managing Director, Webb’s

Jack Quinn Head of Department, Cars, Webb’s

important CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES vintage & collectable motorcycles

It was also a century that captured a great sense of modernist aesthetic that is still referenced in the 21st century. The 1963 Ferrari Lusso 250 (Lot 64) epitomises a period of deeply satisfying design: a powerful free-revving V12 (300 hp) embedded in one of the most sophisticated and influential designs created by Ferrari. The entire machine is informed from its relationship with the racetrack. It essentially offers itself as a luxury (Lusso) road-legal racing car and the beautiful interior reflects Ferrari’s implicit understanding that the ultimate pursuit of speed must be lined in perfection on all levels. In terms of 20th-century design, the Lusso 250 (one of 23 right-hand drives ever made) must rank as one of the most desirable and collectable cars of the 20th century.

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ClassiCon at Matisse

Mole Chair by Sergio Rodrigues - Saint Tropez Rug by Eileen Gray


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IMPORTANT WORKS OF ART 29 MARCH 2011

CONTACT: Sophie Coupland | scoupland@webbs.co.nz | +64 21 510 876

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Peter Robinson Buy Now Risk Free 1994 $700 O.N.O Red Light Specials Free Pipe with Each Purchase A Wee Gem Invest Whyte Bros Trusted Dealers Factory Prices NZ$40,000 - NZ$50,000


important CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES vintage & collectable motorcycles POST MODERN MOTORCYCLISM. DEUS.COM.AU 98 PARRAMATTA ROAD CAMPERDOWN AUSTRALIA, JL BATU MEJAN Nr8 CANGGU BALI

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FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY 1958 WORKS LISTER JAGUAR 1/15 BUILT EX PETER WHITEHEAD CIRCA 1958 POA

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: JACK QUINN HEAD OF DEPARTMENT, IMPORTANT CARS JQUINN@WEBBS.CO.NZ 8


ENTRIES NOW INVITED


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IMPORTANT HISTORIC CARS & RACING MOTORCYLES JUNE 2011 AUSTRALIA WEBB’S IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE AN INVITATION TO TAKE PART IN AN EVENT THAT WILL CELEBRATE SOME OF THE MOST DESIRABLE AND HISTORIC PERFORMANCE MACHINES EVER OFFERED WITHIN AN AUSTRALIAN SETTING. TO TAKE PART IN THIS UNIQUE EVENT CONTACT: JACK QUINN HEAD OF DEPARTMENT, IMPORTANT CARS JQUINN@WEBBS.CO.NZ NEIL CAMPBELL MANAGING DIRECTOR HEAD OF DEPARTMENT, IMPORTANT MOTORCYCLES NCAMPBELL@WEBBS.CO.NZ

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MEMORABILIA 13


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BP Sign Original enamelled tin sign from the ealry 1960’s. H.1210mm, W.1250mm NZ$450 - NZ$850

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Red Crown Gasoline Sign

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Texaco Motor Oil Sign

Original enamelled tin sign from the late 1950’s D. 1070mm NZ$750 - NZ$1,000

Orginal enamelled tin sign H.760mm, W.760mm. NZ$150 - NZ$250

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Original enamelled tin sign H.1210mm, W.1520mm NZ$750 - NZ$1,100

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Brunswick Tires Sign

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Amalie Oil Sign

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MacMillan ‘Ring-Free’ Motor Oil Sign

Orginal enamelled tin sign H.765mm, W.900mm. NZ$800 - NZ$1,000

Original enamelled tin sign H.715mm, W.765mm NZ$200 - NZ$400


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Orginal enamelled tin sign H.760mm, W.630mm NZ$800 - NZ$1,000

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White Star Gasoline Sign Orginal enamelled tin sign D. 760mm. NZ$900 - NZ$1,100

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Mobiloil ‘Gargoyle’ Sign Orginal enamelled tin sign H.765mm, W.915mm NZ$800 - NZ$1,000

Head Motor Oil Sign 10 Wolf’s Orginal enamelled tin sign H.760mm, W.580mm NZ$700 - NZ$900

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Royal Triton Motor Oil Sign

Limit 45’ Sign 11 ‘Speed Orginal enamelled tin sign H.765mm, W.610mm NZ$90 - NZ$150

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State Motor Oil 12 Quaker Orginal enamelled tin sign H.740mm, W.675mm NZ$500 - NZ$700

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H.610mm, W.610mm NZ$350 - NZ$550

Motors Sign 14 Hally Orginal enamelled tin sign H.920mm, W.1830mm NZ$250 - NZ$350

Sign and 15 Firestone Champion Sign Orginal enamelled tin signs H.210mm, W.1200 and H.900mm, W.450. NZ$350 - NZ$550

Motor Oil 16 Valvoline Orginal enamelled tin sign D. 760mm NZ$750 - NZ$850

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Oil Sign 13 Amalie Orginal enamelled tin sign

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State Oil Sign 17 Quaker Orginal enamelled tin sign H.310mm, W.1820mm NZ$600 - NZ$700


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Tires Sign 19 Hood Orginal enamelled tin sign H.525mm, W.650mm NZ$400 - NZ$600

H.720mm, W.2400mm NZ$600 - NZ$800 lot

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H.920mm, W.1830mm NZ$500 - NZ$600

Oil Sign 20 Standard Orginal enamelled tin sign

Sign 21 Certified Orginal enamelled tin sign H.1100mm, W.2300mm NZ$800 - NZ$1,000

State Motor Oil 22 Quaker Orginal enamelled tin sign H.880mm, W.2400mm NZ$800 - NZ$1,000

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Castrol Sign 18 Wakefield Orginal enamelled tin sign

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Sign 23 Pennzoil Orginal enamelled tin sign H.560mm, W.780mm NZ$500 - NZ$600

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Sign 27 Mobil Orginal enamelled tin sign

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H.300mm, W.350mm NZ$200 - NZ$300

Sign

Reproduction enamelled tin signs H.150mm, W.1060mm each NZ$100 - NZ$150

oil Sign 26 Mobil Orginal enamelled tin sign H.165mm, W.520mm NZ$300 - NZ$400

Blvd Sign 25 Harley-Davidson and Indian Motorcycle Co.

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Motor Oil One 28 Sinclair Gallon Drum Diametre.360mm, D.210mm NZ$150 - NZ$250

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Orginal enamelled tin signs H.255mm, W.505mm and H.310mm, W.190mm NZ$200 - NZ$300

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Motor Oil Sign and 24 Coop Houghton’s Oils Sign

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Gillette Tires signs 29 Two Orginal enamelled tin signs H.180mm, W.345mm each NZ$200 - NZ$300


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Sign

Orginal enamelled tin signs H.350mm, W.610mm and H.405mm, W.390mm NZ$200 - NZ$300

Sign and Castrol 32 Pennzoil Sign Orginal enamelled tin signs H.460mm, W.610mm and H.305, W.765mm NZ$200 - NZ$300

Gasoline Sign 33 Sinclair Orginal enamelled tin sign

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H.345mm, W.305 NZ$150 - NZ$250

Motor Spirit One 34 Plume Gallon Drum H.500mm, D.300mm NZ$200 - NZ$300

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You’ Sign

Orginal enamelled tin signs H.255mm, W.485mm and H.380mm, W.385mm NZ$200 - NZ$300 lot

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Supertune Service’ 30 ‘Shell Sign and ’Localized For

Sign and 31 Champion Standard White Crown

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T70 sales brochure 35 Lola orginal with Dan Gurney autograph NZ$500 - NZ$1000

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UNUSED.

NZ$14,000 - NZ$16,000

Mercedes Benz 37 CMC 300SLR model

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HARLEY DAVIDSON WLA 36 1942 FACTORY DISPATCHED ENGINE.

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Maseratri Tipo 61 38 CMC Model

Sign by Sir striling Moss Ltd EdItion of 722

sign by Dan Gurney Ltd EdItion of 600

NZ$800 - NZ$1100

NZ$800 - NZ$1100


OrIginal Tasman series 1964

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Poster 41 shell group of Vintage race cars REPRODUCTION NZ$150 - NZ$200

NZ$600 - NZ$800

Firestone Promo 43 OrIginal Graham Hill Promo Poster (very Rare) NZ$600 - NZ$800

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NZ$50 - NZ$100

farm poster 44 Warwick OrIginal 1968 Gold Star Meeting poster

NZ$600 - NZ$800 lot

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NZ$40 - NZ$60

lolo t490 SALES 40 SHEET ORIGINAL

Warwick Farm 42 Large poster

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racing team 39 bowmaker original booklet

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Firestone Promo 45 OrIginal Jochen Rindt Promo poster (very rare) NZ$600 - NZ$800

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IMPORTANT CARS 23


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46 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster NZ$180,000 - NZ$220,000

ACHTUNG BABY ‘Nothing that is desirable comes easily or cheaply and the Carrera RS is no exception, but without question it is one of the great cars of the 1970s; the personification of GT motoring and race breeding.’ - Motor Sport magazine. With only 2104 built, the Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster is the most exclusive version of the world’s greatest sports car. With styling based on the equally rare and desirable 356 Speedster 24

from the 1950’s the 911 is a design masterpiece that manages to reference the essence of all that is expected from Porsche while ensuring a contemporary experience. Porsche revived the Carrera name - previously used for the competition orientated versions of the preceding 356 - for its luxuriously equipped, top-of-therange 911 in 1973, applying the evocative title to all 911 models, co-incidentally with the

introduction of the 3.2-litre engine, from 1984. Not merely enlarged, the new engine was also extensively revised and produced 231bhp, 27 horsepower up on its predecessor. The 911 Carrera’s top speed was now 152mph. 1989 was the 911’s last year of production making this exquisite example highly collectable.


1978 Ferrari 308 GTB- Fibreglass NZ$100,000 - NZ$115,000

FORZZA AMORE One of only 712 fibreglass-bodied 308’s ever built, this has to be one of the iconic Ferraris created by one of most formidable design partnerships of the 20th century – stylist Pininfarina and designer Ferrari. When these two men worked together, astounding pieces of industrial art resulted. This mid-engined 275bhp V8 piece of automotive art is instantly recognisable as one of the classic Ferraris

of all time let alone of the ’70s. When your back is against the quad-cam V8 as it sucks large quantities of fuel into the four Weber carburettors, the note of the iconic beast is both refined and aggressive.

THIS MID-ENGINED 275BHP V8 PIECE OF AUTOMOTIVE ART IS INSTANTLY RECOGNISABLE AS ONE OF THE CLASSIC FERRARIS OF ALL TIME

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48 1963 AUSTIN Mini 850 Deluxe NZ$3,000 - NZ$5,000

SURF’S UP What is it about Alec Issigonis’s little car which makes people smile? Maybe it is because it is as the name says, not a small car, but a true scaled down version of a full sized car. Not to be confused with the “bubble cars” emanating from across the English Channel, nor with the awful little minicars such as the Bond, this was indeed a real, properly deigned motor car, just a bit smaller than the norm on the outside. Inside, due to brilliant packaging with the novel suspension system, and equally novel for the era 26

transverse-engined front wheel drive, the interior seemed bigger than the exterior, so it was no less practical and yet infinitely more efficient than the Morris Minor which it replaced. With it’s diminutive size and weight, even the 850cc examples such as this are great fun to drive, with good performance, and steering and handling like a go-kart, the early Mini is not only very collectible, but also one of those cars which will put a smile on your face and that of onlookers every time you drive it.


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49 1987 Audi Quattro - wide body

WHITE POWDER The idea for a high-performance four-wheeldrive car was proposed by Audi’s chassis engineer, Jörg Bensinger, in 1977. With this, the original Quattro was the first rally car to take advantage of the then-recently-changed rules which allowed the use of four-wheel drive in competition racing. It won competition after competition for the next two years. To commemorate the success of the original vehicle, Audi gave the general public access to the first road-legal production car that featured 27

Audi’s quattro permanent four-wheel-drive system enjoined to an aggressive rally-inspired turbo-charged engine. It is fair to say that the majority of original owners considered themselves to be superior drivers and to drive these cars to their limits required both skill and a certain amount of madness. Unrestored with a low mileage, this New Zealand-new example offers a unique opportunity to own a definitive 1980s’ sports car that gave rise to a new generation of driver expectations.

CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES important vintage & cLASSIC collectable CARS motorcycles

NZ$38,000 - NZ$48,000

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50 2001 Porsche GT3 Club NZ$90,000 - NZ$125,000

THE SILVER BULLET The Porsche 911 range reflects more than 40 years of continuous development focused on delivering ultimate car performance. Each incarnation builds on the last, ensuring the 911 remains at the forefront of the super-car ranks. Further still, the GT3 badge denotes the ultimate performance variation of what is already the ultimate sports car, and this particular example has had further tuning from Porsche specialists to boost the already-impressive performance to levels which need to be experienced to be believed. Just starting the engine and the resulting roar from the exhausts tell that this is no ordinary (although ‘ordinary’ is not the appropriate term for any 911) GT3. Not only that, but this is believed to be the only GT3 Mk1 in New Zealand never to have been crashed: quite a feat given the raw power this road-legal race car delivers. This is a Porsche without compromise. Delivering superb handling, radical acceleration and iconic Porsche lines, the GT3 Mk1 is without question a highly refined modern classic.

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51 1983 Lola T165 / 70 Gullwing Cam Am NZ$150,000 - NZ$250,000

DEATH PROOF Founded in 1958, Lola (Lola Cars International Ltd) is one of the great names of race-car engineering. Based in Huntingdon, England, Lola Cars started by building small front-engined sports cars and branched out into Formula Junior cars before diversifying to be one of the oldest and largest manufacturers of racing cars in the world. Of all the great endurance racing sports coupés of the period, the beautifully proportioned Lola T70 MkII coupés, such as this handsomely presented example, are perhaps the most beautiful from every angle. Lola Cars Ltd, under its brilliant founder Eric Broadley, not only built some of the most attractive sports, GT and single-seater racing cars that modern motor racing has ever seen, it also produced extremely competitive and well-engineered machines which earned broad custom and widespread acclaim not only in their home country of England, but also throughout the racing world: Europe, the USA, Australasia, Southern Africa and Japan alike. Lola underscored all that is illicit about motor racing. Wildly alluring, Lola’s aesthetic can at times make one forget that each of these handbuilt machines is dedicated 110% to extreme motor-sport performance. Further still, the design philosophy reflects the company’s pure focus on the capabilities of the few pilots who were physically and mentally good enough to 30

YOU DON’T SO MUCH DRIVE IT. YOU EXPERIENCE IT, FOR IN SPITE OF THE FACT THAT THIS PARTICULAR AUTOMOBILE (LOLA T165/T70) HAS BEEN TAMED FOR HIGHWAY USE, IT CONTINUES TO COMMUNICATE ITS RACING LINEAGE MOST CONVINCINGLY.


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strap themselves into one of the most highly refined pieces of racing kit available during the period. It should also be noted that Lola in many ways celebrates a period of driver skill that did not rely on motherboards and computer safety nets. These are 100% analogue beasts that rely on extreme human endurance. Lola was one of the top chassis suppliers in super-sports-car racing in the 1960s. After his small front-engined sports cars came various single-seaters including Formula Junior, Formula 3 and Formula 2 cars. Broadley designed a Lola coupé fitted with the Ford V8 engine. Ford took a keen interest in this and paid Broadley to put the company on hold for two years and merge his ideas with Roy Lunn’s work, giving rise to the now-famous and highly collectable Ford GT40. Broadley managed to release himself from this contract after a year and started developing his own cars again. He started off in sports cars with the Lola T70 which was used successfully all over the world from the World Endurance Championship to the CanAm series, until 1973. Lola (with rebodied Formula 5,000 cars) also dominated the CanAm sports-car series when it was revived in the late 1970s. Reaching cult status, the LA scene established the 200mph club which saw illegal racing on LA’s motorways; this car was clocked at 204mph! Each of the examples in the catalogue offer unique design provenance underscored by one thing – supercar performance. The final word should go to Road & Track, 1985: “You don’t so much drive it. You experience it, for in spite of the fact that this particular automobile (Lola T165/T70) has been tamed for highway use, it continues to communicate its racing lineage most convincingly.”

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52 1965 Lola CLONE T70 Mark II NZ$150,000 - NZ$220,000

HELLS BELLS Sports-car racing in the 1960s saw the rise of the specialist manufacturer. Stepping outside the corporate efforts of Porsche, Ferrari and Ford, free-thinking talent could flourish in small, wellfunded speed shops. This environment had the ability to produce some extraordinary cars. One of the most creative specialists in this arena was Eric Bradley’s Lola outfit based in Huntingdon (UK). His cars were fundamentally fast, relatively simple and very competitive. Better still, road versions were available. Lola quickly gained a reputation and attracted the serious privateer looking for a competitive mount. Indeed, it was a Lola T70 which won the first Can-Am championship, before the domination of McLaren, while in Europe the T70 Spyder was a very popular choice, driven by the likes of 1967 world drivers’ champion Denny Hulme. In many ways, the T70 is the ultimate roadgoing racer. This is a re-creation of a 1965 T70 Spyder; the body mould was taken from a genuine car. Slide into the hand-stitched leather seat, fasten the four-point harness, push the starter button and the 289ci Ford V8 breathing through Weber 48IDA carburetors delivers the appropriate heart shaking volume and power; the Porsche transmission with gate shift completes the 1960s’ sports-car experience.

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PUSH THE STARTER BUTTON AND THE 289CI FORD V8 BREATHING THROUGH WEBER 48IDA CARBURETORS DELIVERS THE APPROPRIATE HEART SHAKING VOLUME AND POWER


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53 1979/80 Gurney Eagle Indy Car NZ$220,000 - NZ$320,000

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A CUP OF GOOD MORNING AMERICA AAR was formed in 1965 by two of the most influential racing car personalities of the late 20th century; Dan Gurney and Carroll Shelby. By 1966 they had created one of the most aggressive and hardcore race cars of its era, the AAR Eagle-Westlake V12. Widely considered one of the best looking Grand Prix designs of its time, the Eagle was a straight-out crowd pleaser. Although Formula One success proved elusive, they participated in 25 Grands Prix, entering a total of 34 cars. With dwindling funding the team returned to the US and concentrated on Indy Car racing, racking up two Indianapolis 500 wins among their 51 Champ Car victories. This Dan Gurney built one of one machine, which took

part in the 1980 Indianapolis 500 was driven by Mike Mosley. Now fully restored, its current configuration is set up for contemporary road racing with the Gurney-Eagle fuel-injected V8 producing 650hp. Danniel Sexton Gurney (born April 13, 1931) has been a driver, a car manufacturer, and a team owner at racing’s highest levels since 1958. He was and remains an influential figure in the modern motor racing arena. This is a rare one opportunity to acquire one of his machines. With its provenance and pure potential the Eagle 001-5 is a brutal and highly competitive single seater racer from one of the most exciting eras of American motor racing history.


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WITH ITS PROVENANCE AND PURE POTENTIAL THE EAGLE 001-5 IS A BRUTAL AND HIGHLY COMPETITIVE RACER FROM ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING ERAS OF AMERICAN MOTOR RACING

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54 1963 Austin Mini Cooper S SPECIAL NZ$8,000 - NZ$12,000

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THE ITALIAN JOB Britain of the 1960s gave the automotive world two iconic cars; Jaguar’s E-type, and for the more impecunious, the BMC Mini Cooper S. The Mini is one of those cars with which almost everyone can identify with. It was made famous variously by its escapades through the streets of Turin in the world’s greatest car-chase movies ‘The Italian Job’, or Paddy Hopkirk’s 1964 Monte Carlo rally win, which is often overshadowed by the 1966 disqualification for not being French, although the actual reason given was a technicality over headlight bulbs! And

for a younger generation in New Zealand, the little yellow star of ‘Goodbye Pork Pie’ will always be part of local film-making legend. Here is your chance to pick which part of the Mini history you would like to re-create. This car left the factory as a genuine 998cc Cooper S, but has since been re-shelled, hence the ‘Special’ designation. It is still a proper Cooper and therefore the ultimate incarnation of the UK peoples car, and equally as much fun on road or track; now is your opportunity to own one of the highlights of British engineering.


1938 MG Series TA NZ$14,000 - NZ$20,000

The first of the famous T-series sports cars produced by MG was introduced in 1936 (TA) and defined for many what a British sports cars should look like with its tall square radiator, wire wheels, cut-down doors, folding windscreen, and rear-mounted fuel tank and spare tyre. It was equally practical for road use or for partaking in increasingly popular vintage racing. The 1,292cc OHV engine delivers a strong 50hp at 4500rpm which is harnessed by a relatively sophisticated four-speed gearbox which offers synchromesh on third and top. With the windscreen down, one could touch the bad side

of 80mph; this brings us to the anchors which are hydraulic, so stopping is also possible. What a jolly marvellous pre-war combination! With only 3,003 examples of this model ever produced, this barn find is quite a find. “The latest Series T MG Midget… gives an unusually good performance for its engine size, handles in a distinctly better manner than the ordinary touring vehicle and possesses those touches in the tout ensemble that endear it to the owner with sporting tendencies.” Autocar, 18 September 1936

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LONDON CALLING

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66 1962 MercedeS Benz 190 SL NZ$35,000 - NZ$45,000 A complete and prepared project including rolling chassis. Available for inspection in Nelson, New Zealand only.

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CLASS PROJECT The year of 1955 saw Mercedes-Benz concurrently reach the zenith and nadir of emotions in motorsport: the delight in winning the Formula One World Championship with Fangio and Moss winning the Mille Miglia in record time with the 300SLR was overshadowed by the disaster at the Le Mans 24 Hours which led to the company’s withdrawal from all competition for three decades. Max Hoffman was responsible for the sporty two-seat Mercedes-Benz 190SL:the S denoting ‘Sports’ and the L ‘Light’ or ‘SehrLeicht’. Based on the design of the 300SL, itself taken from the 300SLR, the 190SL was released in 1955 and is the epitome of the grand touring roadster, with

all of the technical excellence one could expect from Mercedes-Benz. When the work on this example is completed, the new owner will have the best of both worlds: an eye-catching classic design with rock-solid German engineering. Originally priced at $3,998, the SL190 was certainly not a cheap car. In its worst year, only 104 examples were produced; inits best year, 4,032 were created with production lasting through to 1963. Under the hood was a respectable 1,897cc, four-cylinder OHC engine that was capable of reaching105hp, which could deliver a stable 110mph. As an elegant and prestigious design, the SL remains one of Mercedes-Benz’s key design references.


1909 Panhard Levassor Model X5 12-15 hp Tourer Coachwork by Windover Ltd NZ$70,000 - $NZ80,000

Commencing in 1892, this Parisian firm is recognised as having built the world’s first make of car to be placed in continuous production. By the turn of the century, Panhard employed 1,500 people and, in 1905, it produced 1,275 hand-built vehicles which were considered to be the best money could buy. In 1885, Panhard established itself as worthy competition by taking a 1-2 victory in the Paris to Bordeaux rally; success in a wide range of competition quickly allowed Panhard to establish a good reputation. This example was supplied new to William ‘Bill’ Moss via Messrs Birt & Coy, Sydney, for £975; the car was delivered and Mr Moss went about teaching himself how to control the

machine. Being one of the first cars in the neighbourhood, it was called upon for some prestigious tasks such as delivering WWI troops back home in style. Mr Moss died in 1924 and the car lay dormant until his grandson (Ken Moss) claimed it and joined the Veteran Car Club of Australia (membership number 36!). In 1997, the vehicle left the guardianship of the Moss family and travelled to New Zealand where the car remains in fair running order. The chassis has been recently restored; the body offers original patina with original brass work. The paint is original in places with later brushwork also apparent. Overall, this is a rare piece of pioneering French automotive history.

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HEIRLOOM

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58 2003 MasErati 4200 Gt NZ$55,000 - NZ$65,000

GRAND TURISMO Who said that Italian supercars need to be highly strung and impractical? Maserati has learnt from the horrors of the 1980s Biturbo, and again the Trident emblem is where it belongs, adorning the grille of beautifully designed and built grand touring cars, carrying the proud traditions of the Maserati brothers of Bologna. The 21st century has seen Maserati regain its mana which was secured by competing aggressively at the top end of 20th-century 44

motorsports. With no less than eight Grand Prix wins being delivered by ultimate pilots such as Fangio and Moss, Maserati’s race prowess is well recognised. The 4,200GT combines this competition race pedigree of a Ferrari-based 390bhp V8 engine with Maserati’s unique style and performance. Offering the rare six-speed manual gearbox with less than 1,500km on the clock, this is, in essence, a brand-new car and is without doubt the best example in the country. The svelte coupé body, designed by Giorgetto

Giugiario’s Italian design studio, is quite possibly the best-looking car to come from the Turinese concern and, under the bonnet, the engine continues a long Italian tradition where function is every bit as essential as form.


1990 Ferrari 348 TS (Targa Sport) NZ$75,000 - NZ$85,000

ELECTRIC AVENUE The Ferrari 348 is a mid-engined, rear wheel drive V8-powered 2-seat sports car by Ferrari S.P.A., replacing the 328 in 1989 and continuing until 1995. The 348 marked a radical departure in the way Maranello constructed its cars. Replacing a chassis of traditional steel tubes was a much stiffer monocoque structure with a tubular rear subframe. A midships-mounted V-8 returned, but it was larger and more powerful. Displacing

3405cc, it mounted longitudinally and mated to a transverse gearbox. The displacement accounted for the new car’s Ferrari 348 designation. A higher compression ratio and updated fuel injection helped generate 300 horsepower, 30-40 more than the Ferrari 328, while a dry-sump oiling system gave the new Ferrari a lower center of gravity. The Ferrari 348 was the last design done under the supervision of legendary chief stylist Leonardo

Fioravanti. With styling cues toned down from the outrageous Testarossa, the 348 gives the you all the thrill of driving one of Maranello’s finest, but with a subtlety and simplicity in the design which is missing from some later models. It wears the Cavallino Rampante emblem with pride to warn any doubters that this is a serious sports car.

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60 1963 Lincoln Continental 4 Door Convertible NZ$55,000 - NZ$65,000

THE LONG GAME In the face of the stylistic extravagance perpetuated by Cadillac and Chrysler at the end of the 1950s, Lincoln, the luxury division of the Ford Group, on the contrary chose sobriety and purity of line for its 1960s models, whose design was entrusted to the stylists at Dearborn. The result was magnificent and was awarded the Industrial Design Institute Trophy, rarely awarded to an automobile. It was to become a pacesetter. The design, whose elegance sprang from the simplicity of the lines and the balance of the proportions, practically never deviated from these principles throughout the whole decade and the sales curve showed the rightness of the technical and aesthetic 46

choices made by the heads at Ford. To this aesthetic success was added technical rigour that was rare across the Atlantic giving preference to the rigidity of the chassis, the manufacturing quality of the mechanical parts, the definition of the suspension, the sound insulation, the anti-rust protection, the manual assembly and the multiple inspections carried out at each stage. The engine used was the indestructible 430-cubicinch (7-litre) Ford V8 which first appeared in 1958 with Lincoln but lowered from 350hp to 320hp in the interests of longevity and quietness. It was connected to a turbo-drive 3-speed automatic gearbox.

As a flagship model, the Lincoln Continental conveyed a special cachet, underpinning a distinctive platform and thoroughly stylised automobile which was highly equipped within the luxury category. These rolling works of art were costly and aimed solely at the rich and famous – the sticker cost of $10,000 was equivalent to that of a Rolls Royce. Anyone who could afford this tight-lined design was welcome. Ambassadors of the day included Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Louie Prima, Dwight Eisenhower, Spike Jones, Henry J Kaiser, Nelson Rockefeller and the Shah of Iran. President Kennedy was famously riding in a Lincoln Continental when he met his time.


1984 Spider Volmex Volmex NZ$38,000 - NZ$48,000

INTO THE WEB Based on the superb Fiat 124 Spider-Europa, this convertible performance car was produced for the discerning European market. A total of 500 were commissioned of which 139 were dressed in the classic black (the rest were finished in a metallic dark red). Pininfarina bought the rights for manufacturing this model after Fiat ceased production and went through the car with a fine toothcomb, improving many parts and critical performance components. With its Abarth-

tuned 2L four-cylinder engine with a Volumex supercharger, which produces 130bhp, and sophisticated geometry, the 1984 Pininfarina Spider Volumex delivers a superior driving experience. The wheels are specific for this model only and are made by Speedline; also specific are the wheel-arch extensions. It has four-wheel disc brakes and a five-speed gearbox. Overall this is a very collectable and capable design.

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62 1992 Dallara Mugen Formula 3 F3000 NZ$45,000 - NZ$55,000

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TOKYO DRIFT For any young driver wanting to make their way up in the world of single seater racing, after Formula Ford, the next step has to be Formula 3. The two litre four cylinder cars, with running wings and slicks offer a critical training ground for young ambitious talent. More than one pilot has gone straight from Formula 3 to Formula 1, with no better example than double World Champion Mika Hakkinen. This example combines the legendary Italian Dallara chassis and the refined and the powerful Honda power plant tuned by none other than Mugen (‘without limit’). Mugen Motorsports is the Japanese company formed in 1973 by Hirotoshi Honda, the son of Honda Motor

Company founder Soichiro Honda, and Masao Kimura. The company tunes and races Honda vehicles in the Super GT championship. It was part of partnerships that won the Formula 3000 championship in 1990 and 1991, and that eventually led to Mugen’s involvement in Formula 1, from 1992 to 2000. Up to 2005 Mugen was the exclusive supplier of Formula Nippon engines. This is a highly competitive machine and in the hands of local legend Ken Smith this chassis configuration won three times at the recent New Zealand Festival of Motor Racing at Hampton Downs. This car has high performance ability that will only be limited by its new pilot.


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63 1931 Bugatti T54 special NZ$90,000 - NZ$150,000

PUR-SANG AUTOMOBILIA The members of the Bugatti family were graced with a combination of artistic talent and engineering genius that was unique in their time. The artistic streak first manifested itself with Giovanni Bugatti, an architect and sculptor. Around the turn of the 20th century, his son Carlo Bugatti earned international acclaim with his revolutionary furniture designs which used exotic materials. Examples of his furniture are still highly sought-after with Webb’s selling an example of his chairs recently for $32,000. Both his sons, Ettore and Rembrandt Bugatti, were inspired designers; however, it was Ettore who became the most famous member of the Bugatti clan. Design, craftsmanship and high aesthetic standards were the defining elements of his work. The automotive scene still stands in awe of this legendary engineer who founded the Bugatti car manufacturing plant and remains one of the forefathers of modern automobile engineering. Bugatti is a brand that will not be forgotten; the legend and influence of Ettore Bugatti lives on today and is reflected in the remarkable resonance his cars have with the performance enthusiast. The first Type 54 was built in only 13 days, and immediately engaged in the Italian Grand Prix. In spite of problems with the brakes, the driver brought it home third. Developed in response to the trend toward larger engines for longer racecourses, T54 racing cars were very powerful, but heavy and difficult to handle. Only ten T54s 50

THE FIRST TYPE 54 WAS BUILT IN ONLY 13 DAYS, AND IMMEDIATELY ENGAGED IN THE ITALIAN GRAND PRIX


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were produced by the factory; six of these were sold between January 1932 and May 1934. By the end of 1934, the factory had five original cars and five remained in private hands. The factory dismantled their cars while the ones in private hands went through various forms of modification. This remaining T54 was recommissioned using genuine Bugatti parts; it holds a Bugatti Owners’ Club chassis number and has been accepted by the VCC NZ. This is a unique opportunity to enter the world of Grand Prix Bugatti ownership. The Jaguar engine 3.4 under the bonnet in no way dilutes the pure driving experience of this car, which delivers the performance and excitement you would expect from driving one of the ultimate 20th-century racing cars. 52

The Grand Prix T54 Bugatti is an elite class of automotive design. The thrill of driving this machine on the open road is something few have had the privilege of experiencing, and many aspire to. The handling is everything one could expect from a thoroughbred Grand Prix car of the era: raw and unforgiving. When you are seated low in the cockpit, looking through the aero screen, it is easy to imagine yourself in the place of Louis Chiron or AchilleVarzi racing on the tight streets of Monaco. Equally you could be blasting flat-out down a tree-lined rural Route Nationale, wind in the hair, bark of exhaust behind, and soaking up the unfolding views which frame the wonderful lines that echo the creative genius of Ettore Bugatti, one of the great artists of 20th-century industrial design.

BUGATTI IS A BRAND THAT WILL NOT BE FORGOTTEN; THE LEGEND AND INFLUENCE OF ETTORE BUGATTI LIVES ON TODAY


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64 1963 Ferrari Lusso 250 NZ$1,100,000 - NZ$1,400,000

ENZO’S MASTERPIECE Regarded as one of the most beautiful Pininfarina designs, the Lusso originally sold as a roadgoing machine and directly benefited from the successful line of Ferrari’s legendary 250 GT series. Developed from the dual-purpose 250 GT Short Wheel Base which was delivered as both as a full-on competition or a steel-bodied grand touring car. The Lusso was powered by the legendary Colombo designed Tipo 125 V12 engine which immediately captured the Lusso as the absolute epitome of 1960’s Italian performance design. The very first Lusso appeared in October of 1962 at the Paris Salon and generated a hugh amount of excitement with its exquisite proportions and modernist lines. Although the Lusso’s primary intent was grand touring, it

still shared many racing features with the allconquering 250 GTO race car. Both had the same wheelbase, disc brakes, Boranni wheels, suspension and all-aluminum engine. Despite the Lusso’s less robust chassis, steel bodywork and more forward mounted engine, many owners rigged their cars with a harness and went racing when a GTO couldn’t be ordered. Only 250 examples of the Lusso were constructed with the same steel body designed by Pininfarina and executed by Scaglietti with aluminum doors, boots and hoods. Nearly all were delivered with the same specification except for a few cars that received custom rear end ratios, 5-speed gearboxes and competition spec carburetion which may have been added after delivery. Sometimes, custom body and interior

alterations were executed by Pininfarina, including faired-in headlights, extra venting and air conditioning, but these factory modifications were rare. Of the 350 created only 23 right hand drive examples were produced – 21 survive today. This particular Lusso has been meticulously restored by world reknowned Auto Restorations which immediately places this example into a very refined and sophisticated pedigree. The car also offers museum provenance and less than 17,100 original miles. With previous car royalty such as Steve McQueen and Peter Sellers coveting the Lusso this is a rare opportunity to acquire one of the most desirable and collectable cars ever created. It is without doubt one of the most important and influential car designs of the 20th century.


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IT IS WITHOUT DOUBT ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT AND INFLUENTIAL CAR DESIGNS OF THE 20TH CENTURY.

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65 1902 Norton Energette NZ$140,000 - NZ$180,000

IN THE BEGINNING... Despite some early landmarks in its development, Norton Motorcycles lacks a rigid pedigree that can be traced back to a single idea or machine. Instead, the company evolved at a time when bicycle manufacture naturally blended with fledging petroleum-based technologies. It should also be remembered that, at the turn of the century, much of the activity was experimental with one-offs being created by hand. Very little information is actually known about the exact specifications of this period of machine. However, what is known suggests that Norton’s first foray into powered bicycles involved collaboration with Charles R Garard, who imported Clement clip-on engines from Flanders to install in bicycle frames to sell as Clement-Garards. James Norton was known to have an arrangement with Garard to assemble and service these popular Clement-Garard machines. In July 1902, they were still advertising themselves as the ‘Garard Company’s Expert’. However, later that year they placed a small advert in Motor Cycling magazine announcing their Energette incorporating the Clement-Garard ‘improved’ motor. It is generally accepted that the Norton machine was very similar to the Clement-Garard and, essentially, many other machines of the day except that it had a longer wheelbase, a design feature much favoured by Pa Norton in his later machines and which gave rise to the nickname ‘ferrets’. It is 62

unlikely that many of these machines were created and those that were would have been custom built to the customers’ specifications. Of those that are known, one exists in the Sammy Miller Museum, another is known to exist in Holland and one other at the London Motorcycle Museum. All are subtly different; however, each sports the long frame which, for many, defines the transition from motorised bicycle to the motorcycle proper. The machine’s recent history starts in 1945 when Russell Miell saw the bike while collecting scrap metal for the war effort; it was hanging in the roof of a workshop in Kingsland. Some 15 years later, the machine came to Russell in return for a good deed. As Russell undertook the task of bringing the machine back, he found the word ‘Norton’ stamped in small characters on the pedal crank casing. The chassis number 289 was located also. Although the machine was basically complete when first obtained, Mr Miell had to remake some parts such as the fork stem and the extra control levers, using the two bronze examples that were with the bike as patterns. The original tyres, which were still on the machine when restoration began, were white beaded-edge rubber that could not be replaced so 26”x2”x1 3/4” tyres on modern rims are presented. The behind-seat petrol tank is marked ‘Essence’, which betrays its French origin, and was originally nickel plated like many other

parts of the bike including the cylinder barrels. The 198cc Clement was widely considered the best clip-on motor of its day incorporating an overhead exhaust valve and an automatic inlet valve which was sucked open allowing the fresh fuel mixture to be vacuumed into the cylinder from the spray carburettor as the piston fell on its idle stroke. The complexity of the machine should not be underestimated either. With four levers required to control the performance of the engine – air, spark, fuel and timing – the pilot of the day required a certain amount of intrepid concentration. A number of articles have been written on this landmark machine which marks the beginning of one of the most successful and notorious motorcycle marques of the 20th century – Norton. It should also be said that some discussion remains about the actual configuration of this machine and its relationship to the ClementGarard machines that were being supported by Norton during the same period. What is certain is that, by late 1903, Norton was using mostly Peugeot engines and, by 1905, Clement-Garard had ceased production. Norton’s intimate and early association with Clement-Garard is obvious in the overall design and quality of the construction and, in many senses, the machine is both a Norton and a Clements-Garard; it is this that makes the birth of Norton so fascinating.


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66 1915 Indian Light Twin 680cc Model B NZNZ$55,000 - NZ$65,000

LIGHT FOOT Originally acquired from Christchurch dealer Ernest & Hines this immaculate 1915 Indian underscores why this marquee more than any other were so successful for the most part of 20th century. The overall aesthetic is both refined and purposeful. The balance between function and form is duly meet with great success. The detailing is exposed allowing the rider to constantly audit the machine to their pleasure. The solid state twist grip linkages are pure genius providing positive tuning for the intrepid pilot. Introduced in 1904 the lush deep Indian red is as iconic as the wonderful V-Twin configuration that Indian was first to introduce in America. Rare, the 680cc light twin was somewhat of a radical departure from the big V-twins which had already established a good reputation. Offering light smooth and efficent power delivery they were produced in small numbers with the British market acquiring the lions share of these aggressive looking machines. Wonderfully cared for over the years this machine comes with a full local history.

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67 1927 Royal Enfield 500cc NZ$18,000 - NZ$24,000

ENFIELD’S FIRST 500 Royal Enfield’s heritage dates back to 1898 making it one of the oldest motorcycle designers in existence. Building comparatively fast and robust machines, the company had the strap-line of ‘Made like a gun, goes like a Bullet’ and that seemed apt. By 1913, Royal Enfield was racing successfully in the TT and Brooklands, competing against the very best. WWI saw Royal Enfield’s resources diverted 66

to the war effort with them producing a vicious 8hp sidecar outfit fitted with a Vickers machinegun. In 1927, Royal Enfield won the Manufacturer’s Team Award on the Isle of Man and with this they introduced their first 500cc machine which is represented here. Offering a four-speed gearbox and strongly tested technology, the 4.88hp machine was fitted with an aluminium piston, roller-bearing

big end and an auxiliary handpump for mechanical lubrication. Other features fitted as standard were the 6.5-inch drum brakes, cush drive and detachable rear mudguard and carrier. This hand-change, fourspeed, side-valve machine is a very rare example from one of the longest-standing marques in the world. New Zealand-new, this machine runs well and offers a good honest patina.


1927 Harley Davidson 350cc BA NZ$18,000 - NZ$24,000

THE PEASHOOTER Bruce Anderson is known to many motorcycle collectors as one of New Zealand’s serious restorers having put his passion and expertise into a range of immaculately revived examples of significant New Zealand machines. He joined the New Zealand Vintage Car Club in 1954 with a 1924 Packard. Soon after this, he found a 1926 350 SV which was restored to factory dispatch standard and which he rode extensively in rallies. Soon after this, Mr Anderson was told of a similar machine that was sitting dormant on a farm. He acquired it for one pound; it was

stabilised and put aside for 30 years as a range of mostly Velocette projects overtook those years. In 1990, seeing a gap in his schedule, Mr Anderson focused on bringing the 350cc to life. It was then he discovered he had something special: a ‘BA’ export model of which only 481 units were created. Offering a generator and coil ignition, this example was supplied for export with a Bosch magneto and different timing covers and timing gears plus the optional carbide lighting and horn. It was also dispatched with the rare speedster handlebars. Producing approximately 12hp, this machine was

aimed squarely at the more demanding pilot. Particularly easy to repair, it offers fully removable cylinder heads with combustion chambers designed by Harry Ricardo, a three-speed transmission and the streamlined teardrop tank which provides for a lower seating position, foldup foot boards that accommodate aggressive corning manoeuvres, a rear wheel stand and, in the case of the Model BA, a Klaxon horn. The 1928 models also introduced reinforced frames and a stronger clutch spring. This is a very correct example of a high-powered OHV 350cc.

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69 1928 Douglas DT5 NZ$15,000 - NZ$25,000

THE ORIGINAL DIRT TRACKER The DT5 (Dirt Track 500cc) dominated the pioneering speedway and dirt-track scene of the late 1920s. It was introduced in 1927 although the bulk of production was issued in 1928 and 1929; a few were recorded as 1930 but were probably manufactured earlier. 68

During the first years of speedway and competitive dirt-track racing in the late 1920s, this was the bike to have. A lower centre of gravity and excellent power production were the perfect dirt-track combo. Any rough-track pilot worth his salt rode the DT5.

Both these machines are recognised by the London Douglas Motorcycle Club and have race histories leading back to the very beginning of dirt-track and speedway racing in New Zealand. One was raced by the legendary Wally Kilmister (Lot 70) and the other by Ben Bray (Lot 69), another


1929 Douglas DT5 NZ$15,000 - NZ$25,000

successful pilot of the time. Wally Kilmister was the star of Wellington’s first motorcycle speedway at the Kilbirnie Stadium. Entering competitive racing in the mid-1920s at the age of 17, while he was an apprentice mechanic, Kilmister went on to win both national and international honours

in his sport. In 1935, he rode in the Star Riders’ Championship and, in 1936, he won the New Zealand Championship. He was also a member of New Zealand and Colonies teams in the 1930s. He travelled to London where he also won fame with the formidable Wembley Lions team.

Both these machines offer an insight onto the raw machines that were campaigned during the very first years of competitive dirt-track racing. Over the years, they have been applied to various track surfaces and this reflects the versatile nature of this very successful design.

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71 1937 Indian Chief 1200cc NZ$60,000 - NZ$70,000

TRUE CHIEF In the 1920s and ’30s, Indian dominated the American motorcycle market and, in 1923, the Chief was unveiled with great fanfare. At the same time, Indian Motorcycle Company started to adopt some of the art deco touches with pinstriping, decals and a great range of twotone designs. It was this period of the company’s history that instilled the Indian Chief deep into the heart of 20th-century popular culture. In 1937, Indian sold more units than did HarleyDavidson and the Chief was considered to be the best large-capacity machine available (of course, this opinion shifted if you were a Harley fan of the day). This particular machine represents the pinnacle of pre-war Big Chief design. Considered by many to be superior to the later models because of their comparatively lightweight design and more refined centre of gravity, the 1937 Chief has a rider-characteristic unique to its period of design. The machine has undergone a full mechanical rebuild which was completed by legendary Bob Starks (www.starklite.com) who’s family have been working with Indian Motorcycle since 1918. Over this period of time the Stark family have built a reputation for having an extremely strong understanding of the design philosophy imbedded within Indian motorcycle. The 1937 Indian Chief is certainly a design master piece, and having been rebuilt by Bob Stark it is quite literally new and improved.

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72 1938 Harley Davidson Knuckle Head EL NZ$60,000 - NZ$65,000

KNUCKLE UP The 61-cubic-inch ‘Knucklehead’, named after its distinctively shaped rocker boxes, arrived powering a stylish all-new motorcycle in 1936. A twin-loop frame was deemed necessary to handle the increased power (37bhp in ‘E’ and 40bhp in high-compression ‘EL’ forms) while the front suspension too was beefed up, the forks switching to oval tubing in place of the previous forged I-beams. Teething problems associated with the earliest examples had been sorted out by 1937 and the Milwaukee factory quickly set about establishing the EL’s performance credentials. Joe Petrali set a new speed record of 136mph at Daytona Beach in March of that year while Fred Ham later averaged 76mph for 24 hours at Muroc Dry Lake in California to set a new bench mark. The Knuckle is, without question, one of the most handsome and well-recognised power units of its era. This example has been fully restored by one of America’s leading experts, Fred Lange, who is recognised as one of the old-school leaders in the preservation of heritage American iron. There is currently a four-year waiting list to secure a Fred Lange machine direct from his bench. This example is in excellent condition.

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73 1946 Indian Chief NZ$45,000 - NZ$55,000

HEAVY METAL If there were ever a machine that captured the industrial design sensibilities of the roaring twenties, it was, without a doubt, the Indian Chief. Designed with the throttle on the lefthand side of the machine to allow the police to brandish their pistols with their right hands in the comic pursuit of all manner of bootleggers and slapper crooks, the Indian Chief was, and remains, the classic art deco machine of the 20th century. Inspired at a time when youth culture was ‘the lost generation’ and F Scott Fitzgerald 74

was writing prolifically his most enduring novels such as This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned and The Great Gatsby, the Chief was somehow able to sit on both sides of the law and win. The Indian Chief, designed by Charles B Franklin, in some ways reflects the excesses of this success. However, the true mark of success for any piece of machinery is endurance and endure the Chief did, remaining in production for over 30 years. This example has been meticulously recommissioned and is ready to ride.


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FOR PRIVATE SALE: A SUPERIOR COLLECTION OF VETERAN MOTORCYCLES CONTACT NCAMPBELL@WEBBS.CO.NZ

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74 1950 HRD Vincent Rapide SerieS B NZ$55,000 - NZ$75,000

BLACK RAPID The Vincent Rapide is without doubt one of the most desirable and influential designs of the mid-20th century. Offering remarkable lines, the overall aesthetic combined grace and brute strength in a manner that, even today, is rarely repeated. Designed during WWII and released to the press before the end of hostilities, the Series B Rapide was a significant progression from the Series A prototype that had been launched in 1936. Its frame incorporated the first cantilever rear suspension, which was used on all subsequent Vincents. Other innovations included a foot gear change instead of a handoperated gear lever and a four-speed gearbox which has been extensively revised to deal with the unprecedented power of the new 50° V-twin. The powerplant was also used as a natural extension of the frame (a concept embraced by John Britten some 50 years later). The Rapide’s strengthened ‘Girdraulic’ front forks and triangulated rear springing were also highly successful when applied under extreme speed with virtually no front-end twist under 76

hard braking. The cantilever rear became the most widely used form of rear suspension for motorcycles after 1980. Brakes were dual 7-inch (180mm) single-leading shoes (SLS), front and rear. Quickly detachable wheels offered easy wheel and tyre changes. The rear wheel was reversible, and different-sized rear sprockets could be fitted for quick final-drive ratio changes. The brake and gear shift were adjustable for reach to suit individual feet and the rear mudguard was hinged to facilitate the removal of the rear wheel. Overall, the Rapide was the most sophisticated and refined super bike of the day. In fact, it is commonly recognised as the world’s first-ever super bike. Exclusive both in terms of quality of design and the nature of the riding experience, this wonderful example has been owned by three RAF engineers over its 61 years. Recently rebuilt (2003) by its third owner, this Rapide Series B is an extremely honest example of one of the most influential and superior machines ever designed. The Series B Rapide is a 20th-century masterpiece.


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75 1953 Matchless G80 NZ$6,000 - NZ$7,500

EVERY MANS MACHINE Associated Motor Cycles announced its post-war range of heavyweight singles in June 1945. The modest but highly successful Matchless G80 500cc began in 1945 and remained in production until 1966, being built alongside the sister machine from the Plumstead factory, the AJS Model 18. The power unit was a ruggedly constructed 80

overhead-valve engine which connected to a fourspeed gearbox. It developed a respectable 23bhp at 5,400rpm and, at just ÂŁ176-10s-0d in 1951, the G80 was a most affordable sporting machine available to the common man. Extremely simple to work on (no laptop required), the G80 continues to be a highly successful classic ride.


1954 Norton Dominator - Model 7 NZ$8,000 - NZ$10,000

TWIN SHOT Norton had responded to the success of the Triumph Speed Twin model in 1949 with the release of the Bert Hopwood-designed Model 7 500cc twin. The new model was followed in 1952 by a new twin combining the Model 7’s twin-cylinder engine and the ‘feather-bed’ frame.

This marriage offered sporting road riders the performance of the ‘cammy’ models in the range with the ease of use afforded by the twin-cylinder engine which delivered what everyone expected from Norton – beautiful handling, extreme reliability and rugged good looks.

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77 1954 Manx Norton 350cc NZ$35,000 - NZ$45,000

RAW POWER With a history stretching back almost to the beginning of motorcycling history itself, the Norton single is without doubt one of the greatest over-the-counter production racers ever produced – The Manx is the epitome of the British racing single. These extremely ‘cammy’ Norton’s dominated road racing at a Grand Prix level until they were finally eclipsed by the Italian and Japanese multi-cylinders. Even then, both factory and privately entered Manx models put up some tremendous performances often against heroic odds to win countless races well into the sixties. Mechanically, the Manx was immensely strong and, because of this, it earned a unique place as the privateer’s preference: a machine on which you could represent your Nation and heroically campaign the Grand Prix. This example was been extensively raced by David Bell during the 1980’s. It was also ridden by Geoff Duke when he raced at Pukekohe during the same period.

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78 1955 Vincent Black Knight Series D NZ$90,000 - NZ$120,000

THE LAST OF THE IMMACULATE BLACK While reading mechanical science at Cambridge University, Philip Conrad Vincent had already decided he wanted to build great motorcycles. He completed his first custom build using a 350cc MAG engine that was capable of 80mph. Soon after this, Frank Walker joined Vincent in his intrepid enterprise and they established a workshop at the now-legendary Stevenage site where, over the course of the next 30-odd years, they and Australian history-maker Phil Irving conceived of and brought to life one of the most intoxicating pieces of 20th-century design in existence. Initially developing a strong and aggressive single-cylinder 500cc in 1935, Irving saw this as a critical step in creating the 47-degree V-twin with which Vincent became synonymous. Having solved the gearbox and clutch problems that the 1,000cc power plant initially caused, over 70 Series A vehicles were sold before WWII ceased production. Vincent’s concept for the Series B Rapide reflected a highly evolved understanding of performance design. The angle of cylinders was increased to 50 degrees and the wheelbase was shortened by using the engine and gearbox as a structural 84

component. It proved to be the fastest production bike ever created with a top speed of 110mph. Putting that aside, it was quite possibly one of the most attractive and formidable pieces of industrial design ever released to the general public. However, more was to come. Only two years later, Vincent unleashed the Black Shadow which, in full race fettle it produced an astounding 150mph. Vincent’s machismo and sophisticated brute strength set aspirational benchmarks. Vincent reflected a global appreciation of what a super bike should be. The fact that it was British and aimed squarely at the gentlemen privateer was also a very important aspect which gave each of the Vincents a very defined accent both in terms of style and performance. In 1951, the Series B machines were replaced by a range of Series C designs which, due to tough economic conditions, did not evolve in any radical manner. By 1955, Vincent held a privileged place in the world of high-performance motorcycle design. Vincent was synonymous with design innovation, engineering excellence and superlative high performance. So, in September 1955, when it was revealed that production of the Stevenage-built

machines would cease, the news stunned the motorcycling world. At the time its demise was announced, Vincent’s final twin – the Series-D – had been in production for just six months. It offered a new frame and rear suspension, a userfriendly centre stand plus many improvements to the peerless V-twin engine, and Philip Vincent, always the creative visionary, also offered the public the world’s first fully faired super bike – a two wheeled Bentley, as he put it. This machine represented a remarkable development for the time and created a sensation at the Earls Court show that year. The enclosed Rapide and Black Shadow were known as Black Knight and Black Prince respectively. When production ceased in December 1955, around 460 Series-D V-twins had been built, some 200 of which were enclosed models. This immaculate example reflects for many one of the great feats in 20th-century design. The culmination of over 30 years of sustained creative dedication by Phil Vincent and his team, the Vincent Black Knight underscored the fact that, even in the face of severe economic challenge, their commitment to innovative high performance was and remains unmatched.


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79 1957 BSA Goldstar DB32 NZ$20,000 - NZ$25,000

STAR SPEED For many, the Goldie is one of the great race bikes of the 20th century. It originated from the legendary Brooklands Circuit in 1937 where the great Wal Handley piloted a specially prepared Empire Star which secured a 100mph lap as it made its way to a debut race victory where it was awarded the Gold Star; this christened BSA’s 88

new super-sport machine. Released to a hungry privateers’ scene in 1938, the Gold Star was adopted by any rider who had serious competitive ambition. Progressively developed by both the factory and the intrepid amateur, the Goldie gained cult status. Legendary dirt-bike pioneer Bill Nicholson brought his handling sensibilities to

the bike in 1952 with the introduction of the muchimproved geometry of the Duplex frame which remained competitive until the factory pulled the pin on the much-loved Gold Star. This example has particular appeal due to its very honest patina that reflects a period of privateers’ racing that has long since disappeared.


1957 Velocette Venom NZ$14,000 - NZ$18,000

ONCE BITTEN Veloce Ltd was founded in 1905 by Mr Johann Goodman and then proudly presided over by his descendants until its demise in 1971.By this time, to be fair, the vast majority of great British marques had finally realised that they had no wish to succumb to plain consumer demands and the great economies of scale the Japanese

industry was bringing to bear on the entire scene. Velocette, like so many other great British factories with astounding race histories, chose death before dishonour. In many ways, the Velocette Venom laid the groundwork for many of Velocette’s great moments on the race track. Indeed, Burt Munro and Duncan

Meikle chose a Velocette power plant to apply to their own eccentric pursuit of maximum speed. The black-and-gold engineering statement which frames the wonderfully robust 500cc OHV still barks heavy speed from a golden era of street racing.

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81 1958 Ariel SquAre Four MKII NZ$22,000 - NZ$26,000

PROPER BRITISH This machine represents the final development in the beautiful overhead-valve machine that was first loosely conceived of by Edward Turner in 1928 and finally introduced to the public in 1937. After that, the SQ4 steadily evolved, adopting rear suspension, telescopic forks, the all-alloy engine and, most importantly, a fourpipe exhaust outlet. In this form, it delivered on Edward Turner’s original ambitions of 90

creating the ultimate touring machine of the day with a power plant that delivered “ample power for high-performance riding without undue compression, racing cams or big choke carburettors”. The MKII is smooth, effortless and, above all else, imposing, especially in this original format. With its square-jawed good looks and broad shoulders, the MKII is one of the best-looking machines of its era.

Details such as the chrome tank scallops and that remarkable all-alloy four-cylinder layout capture something quintessentially British (remarkably, without being a parallel twin!). They deliver on Edward Turner’s vision that started with a sketch on the back of a cigarette pack some 25 years earlier to deliver “ultimate reliability and performance with minimum attentions”.


1958 Ariel Square Four MKII NZ$24,000 - NZ$28,000 Factory original, unrestored, 10179 original miles.

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83 Velocette Period Modified Racer 1937 KSS/MAC NZ$9,000 - NZ$12,000

SIBLING RIVALRY The heart of early motorcycle racing in New Zealand was fuelled by the privateer. Sure, there was the Motorcycle Union and the officials that ensured things ran smoothly and the right level of talent 92

was represented at a international level, but it was the group of men who dedicated their time and energies to local competition that ensured the race scene continued to grow into what it is today. The

two machines offered here, to me, represent the very essence of New Zealand’s early race scene. Both set up’s are based on pre war KSS (Camshaft Super Sport) Velocette 350’s – with a strong bottom


Velocette Period Modified Racer 1937 KSS/PRE WAR VELO FRAME NZ$8,000 - NZ$12,000

end, racing clutch and relatively free revving engine they were ideal for the relatively complex road tracks of New Zealand. Tuned well they were capable of 90mph. Each machine offers a different kind of frame,

one being the highly forgiving late model MAC frame, the other sporting a pre war modified Velo frame with Armstrong prototype leading fork setup. Both machines were raced well and consistently by

one of New Zealand’s long standing quite achiever in the early motorcycle racing scene. Simply put these are historic racers in the true sense of the word and they deserve to be raced again.

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85 1961 BSA Super Rocket A10 NZ$22,000 - NZ$28,000

FULL BLOOD The Super Rocket is widely considered to be one of the most desirable British classics. It represents a pinnacle in the development of the fabulous A10 powerplant that had delivered a wicked sense of speed and control to the pilot of the day. In The Motorcycle Magazine review of the day, it was described simply as a “full-blooded sports machine” and, for its time, it was, with the 1961 model offering the new ‘357’ full race camshaft that delivered greater lift, more dwell and instant valve action that delivered peak performance from the 650cc A10. To reflect the ambitions of the pilot, a new 140mph speedo with a twin94

mount tacho was offered. Add to this alloy heads, streamlined inlet ports, racing valve springs, a crankshaft drive supported by special high-duty variable valve springs, oversized inlet valves, a ‘357’ full-race camshaft, an improved free-flow exhaust system and a 1 5/32 Amal monobloc carburettor with a large-capacity air cleaner and you had a very capable motorcycle. The increased power delivery also required that a new clutch configuration be fitted, having a solid forged centre and bonded linings running on heavy-duty roller bearings. For greater stability at high speed, the frame was improved by making all vital tension

points stronger. Exceptionally fast, with excellent handling, the Super Rocket was aimed squarely at the American market and, in 1961, was priced at USNZ$1,200, which made it the only machine BSA produced that was more expensive than the legendary BSA Gold Star. Over the years, the Rocket has earned its reputation for being one of the most successful motorcycle designs of the 20th century. The Super Rocket was, and remains, one of the great swansongs of the British motorcycle industry. It is widely considered to be one of the true classics. Precisely rebuilt in 1991, this machine has had less than 500 miles placed on it since then.


1962 BSA Spitfire Scrabler NZ$22,000 - NZ$26,000

ORIGINAL DIRT SPEED The BSA Spitfire is another great piece of British steel. Delivering fistfuls of dirt power, the Spitfire 650cc scrambler was a highly competitive piece of English kit for the American off-roader. With its 40cu OHV twin powerplant, full race cams, highcompression pistons and a high-ratio scrambles gearbox, the Spitfire delivered true British brawn to a rather unsuspecting American public. With small numbers produced and most ending up

ground into the dirt having been ridden hard, fast and badly, a 100% original unrestored Spitfire is a rare find indeed. It was bought in 1962 from an Oklahoma race-bike dealer and the new owner set up the bike to ride legally (with bolton headlights). Heading to San Diego, he sold the machine to John Archer (known bike racer in California) and enlisted to fight in the Vietnam theatre of war.

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87 1964 MATCHLESS Rickman Matisse G50 NZ$45,000 - NZ$55,000

PURE TORQUE Developed in 1958 from the 350cc AJS 7R, the G50 was in many ways a grown-up version of the radically successful 7R. With the engine capacity increased to 500cc (for 50bhp), the G50 was first offered to the privateer in 1959. With only 180 examples ever created, the G50 is one of the rarest examples of classic racing design. Competing against the Norton Manx, its 90.0 x 78.0mm 50bhp engine produced a top speed of 96

135mph (217kph) which made it slightly slower than the Manx; however, the lighter Matchless could take the day on tight and twisty circuits. It was this that made the G50 a legendary piece of precision race kit. Just as the 7R had achieved a decade or more before, the G50 quickly made itself a good name, being acknowledged as exceptionally quick in the ‘middle-power’ range so essential on twisty circuits. In maintenance

costs, too, it found favour with the riders, for it seemed to maintain its tune far better than did the slightly faster 500 ‘Manx’ Norton and spares cost less: always a point with the hard-up chaps who constituted the backbone of the sport. This example is offered with a Rickman frame which extends the racing pedigree of the G50 to another level.


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88 1969 Triumph Bonnieville NZ$25,000 - NZ$30,000

GOOD GRACE Triumph produced some of the best-looking parallel twins. Viewed from any angle, the Bonneville design is characterised by strong, graceful lines, tight symmetrical geometry and modern graphic layouts. The bike offers a unified styling theme that is evident throughout the entire machine. The Bonneville is, for many, one of the true modern classics of the 20th century. It inspired 100

a great sense of freedom and achievement and epitomised all that was proper about English motorcycles. The 1969 model is considered to be one of the best for the T120 Bonneville from both a competitive and an engineering perspective as it won the Production Isle of Man TT in 1969. This is a wonderful example of a modern classic that offers a sophisticated contemporary ride.


1969 BSA Firebird 650 NZ$9,000 - NZ$12,000

URBAN SCRAMBLER By 1969, the entire production line for the BSA Firebird was allocated to the American market which had developed a taste for well-tuned street scramblers. The Firebird is, without doubt, one of the most handsome BSAs to grace the streets. It is, for many, a highly desirable piece of metal and, with its strong, well-tempered power

delivery and attractive geometry, the 650cc parallel twin is a highly capable machine even by today’s standards. A relative rarity in the UK and New Zealand markets, the Firebird today is one of the most highly sought-after BSA models and a handsome reminder of the very best of BSA design.

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90 1971 BSA B50MX NZ$18,000 - NZ$22,000

PAY DIRT Introduced in 1971, the B50MX (Motocross) was the last competition motorcycle announced by BSA, just as the company’s efforts came to a close. Developed through the great success of the BSA ‘works’ machines in motocross, and using bikes based on the B44 Victor, the B50MX offered a 102

strong and powerful 500cc engine. A new chassis design which saw the introduction of an oilbearing frame and its extreme slimline aesthetic that was enhanced by a beautiful tucked-in exhaust system ensured this machine’s place in history as it was one of the rarest and most successful BSA MX designs of the period.


1971 TRIUMPH Trailblazer - 250 cc LESS THAN 500KM NZ$5000 - NZ$8,000 NO RESERVE

CHRISTCHURCH FUNDRAISER Donated by a Christchurch collector to raise funds for Cholmondeley Home which is a child focused, quality care facility that supports children during short stays when families are

experiencing difficulties. Cholmondeley is the only service of its type in New Zealand. Professional staff work with families while Cholmondeley focuses on the children.

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92 1973 Cooper MX250 NZ$3,000 - NZ$5,000

MEXICAN FIESTA Born in Mexico in the early 1970’s, Cooper Motorcycles, produced by Frank Cooper, were a romantic melody of Italian engines that were placed into Cooper’s enduro and motorcross frames. Produced only between 1973 and 1974 the Cooper MX250 was a capable machine with excellent geometry and an aggressive powerband. This rare motorcross example has been sensibly restored and is read to be run in. 104


1977 MV Agusta 350cc with 400cc Magni kit NZ$8,000 - NZ$12,000

BLOOD SPORT Classic MV (Meccanica Verghera) Agusta was a successful family-owned Italian aircraft manufacturer forced, after the war, to make motorcycles instead. Styled by Giorgio Giugiaro utilising strong horizontal lines, the 350 entered production in 1975 establishing itself quickly as a desirable machine. The open duplex frame housed a twincylinder engine that had undergone a thorough redesign externally but retained the proven internals of the preceding model. A triple-disc

braking system was an unusual feature for a machine in the Ipotesi’s class. This example also offers the 400cc Magni kit which places it into another class of performance. Magni is well known in the motorcycle field because of its influential history with MV Agusta. In 1947, Arturo Magni began his distinguished career in the Gilera racing department working under the guidance of legendary speed engineer Piero Remor who was famous for creating the vicious four-cylinder, double-overhead-cams Gilera racing engine.

In 1950, Arturo Magni joined a newly formed MV Agusta racing department, where he remained until MV retired from racing in 1977. Under Magni’s management as chief of the famed MV Reparto Corsa, the team won 75 world championships and over 3,000 races: a record still untouched by any other manufacturer. Famous motorcycle racers riding for MV were John Surtees, Mike Hailwood, Provini, Ubbiali and, the most famous of modern times, Giacomo Agostini with 15 world championships.

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94 1977 Triumph T140 Jubilee NZ$25,000 - NZ$35,000

LONG LIVE THE QUEEN In celebration of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee in 1977, Triumph released a special edition based on the standard 750 T140. A silver finish with red-andblue lining was used and was complemented by a royal-blue saddle with red beading. The primary 106

drive and timing covers were chrome plated and the wheel-rim centres were painted and lined in the traditional manner. The result was a very British machine which quickly established itself as a collector’s item. Only 2,400 examples were built.


2003 Harley Davidson FatBoy NZ$35,000 - NZ$45,000

CRATE FRESH If you normally ride a sports bike, I’d like to commend you for reading this far. There are few machines that polarise opinion more than a Harley-Davidson. The most common catch cries are: they are immensely heavy and slow; they offer life-threatening handling characteristics; and they are comparatively expensive. However, let’s review that for a moment. It’s not that they don’t handle

well, it’s that they handle in a friendly, predictable way that encourages progressive riding rather than the point-and-squirt style of modern sports bikes. They maybe slow in relative terms but they make 180kph feel twice that and nothing can beat them in terms of outright torque. Which brings us to the issue of weight – yes, they are ridiculously heavy (FatBoy?) but the weight is down low and,

with the torque, it makes little difference. And, finally, in term of expense – you get what you pay for and, as a general comment, depreciation factors are low. Celebrating the 100th anniversary of Harley-Davidson, this Fat Boy was dispatched from the factory in 2003 as you see. It is, as they say, crate fresh – even the air in the tyres is factory original.

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PROVEN AND PROFESSIONAL INTERNATIONAL AUTOMOTIVE SHIPPING SERVICES WWW.GTLOGISTICS.CO.NZ GT INTERNATIONAL LOGISTICS. 31 AIRTREE AVE, AIRPORT OAKS, MANGERE, AUCKLAND CONTACT PHIL GIBBS OR JASON COLEMAN ON (09) 255 5555 OR EMAIL PHIL@GTLOGISTICS.CO.NZ

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Bidding Slip For absentee bidders on lots in THE IMPORTANT CARS & CLASSIC MOTORCYCLEs sale - MARCH 22 2011 Please bid on my behalf at the above sale for the following lots up to prices recorded below. These bids are to be executed as cheaply as is permitted by other bids or reserves if any. * I agree to comply with the Conditions of Sale as printed in the catalogue. I understand that in the case of a successful bid on items in the Important Cars & Classic Motorcycles sale a buyers premium of fifteen percent (15%) will be added to the hammer price and that GST is charged on the premium. On major lots customers may prefer to bid by telephone. Please enquire regarding this service which Webb’s carry out at no charge.

lot no.

catalogue description

Bid*

MR/MRS/MS

initial

surname/company

home pH

business ph

mobile

facsimile

email address

postal address

contact name

ARRANGEMENTS FOR PAYMENT: I agree to pay immediately on receipt of notice from Webb’s of my successful bid. Payment will be by cash cheque or bank transfer. I will arrange for collection of my purchases or I agree to pay for packing and freight costs incurred by Webb’s in having any purchases forwarded to me. In order to avoid delay in clearing purchases Buyers who are unknown to us are advised to make arrangements for payment before the sale or for references to be supplied. If such arrangements are not made cheques will be cleared before purchases are delivered. Bank details are as follows: Peter Webb Galleries Ltd 030104 0448184 03. Swift code for international payments is WPACNZ2W. Please record sale and buyer number in payment. * Webb’s will do its utmost to carry out bidding instructions for absentee bidders. It will not be responsible however if circumstances prevent it doing so.

SIGNED & DATED 109


CONDITIONS of sale for buyers 1. Bidding: The highest bidder shall be the purchaser subject to the auctioneer having the right to refuse the bid of any person. Should any dispute arise as to the bidding the lot in dispute will be immediately put up for sale again at the preceding bid or the auctioneer may declare the purchaser which declaration shall be conclusive. No person shall advance less at a bid than the sum nominated by the auctioneer and no bid may be retracted. 2. Reserves. All lots are sold subject to the right of the seller or his agent to impose a reserve. 3. Registration. Purchasers shall complete a bidding card before the sale giving their own correct name address and telephone number. It is accepted by bidders that the supply of false information on a bidding card shall be interpreted as deliberate fraud. 4. Buyers’ Premium. The purchaser accepts that in addition to the hammer or selling price Webb’s will apply a buyer’s premium of 15% of the hammer price (unless otherwise stated) together with GST on such premium, which combined sum shall be the total purchase price. 5. Payment. Payment for all items purchased is due on the day of sale immediately following completion of the sale. If full payment cannot be made on the day of sale a deposit of 10% of the total sum due must be made on the day of sale and the balance must be paid within 5 working days. Payment is by cash, bank (cashiers) cheque or Eftpos. Personal and private bank cheques will be accepted but must be cleared before delivery of goods will be given. Credit cards are not accepted. 6. Lots sold as Viewed. All lots are sold as viewed and with all errors to description faults and imperfections whether visible or not. Neither Webb’s nor its vendor are responsible for errors of description or for the genuineness or authenticity of any lot or for any fault or defect in it and make no warranty whatever. Buyers proceed upon their own judgement. Buyers shall be deemed to have inspected the lots or to have made enquiries to their complete satisfaction prior to sale and by the act of bidding shall be deemed to be satisfied with the lots in all respects. 7. Webb’s Act as Agents. They have full discretion to conduct all aspects of the sale and to withdraw any lot from the sale without giving any reason. 8. Collection. Purchases are to be taken away at the buyer’s expense immediately after the sale except where a cheque remains uncleared. If this is not done Webb’s will not be responsible if the lot is lost stolen damaged or destroyed. Any items not collected within seven days of the auction may be subject to a storage and insurance fee. A receipted invoice must be produced prior to delivery of any lot. 9. Licences. Buyers who purchase an item which falls within the provisions of the Protected Objects Act 1975 or the Arms Act 1958 cannot take possession of that item until they have shown to Webb’s a license under the appropriate Act. 10. Failure to make Payment. If a purchaser fails either to pay for or take away any lot Webb’s shall without further notice to the purchaser at its absolute discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: a. To issue proceeding against the purchaser for damages for breach of contract.

b. To rescind the sale of that or any other lot sold to the purchaser at the same or any other auction. c. To resell the lot by public or private sale. Any deficiency resulting from such resale after giving credit to the purchaser for any part payment together with all costs incurred in connection with the lot shall be paid to Webb’s by the purchaser. Any surplus over the proceeds of sale shall belong to the seller and in this condition the expression “proceeds of sale” shall have the same meaning in relation to a sale by private treaty as it has in relation to a sale by auction. d. To store the lot whether at Webb’s own premises or elsewhere at the sole expense of the purchaser and to release the lot only after the purchase price has been paid in full plus the accrued cost of removal storage and all other costs connected to the lot. e. To charge interest on the purchase price at a rate 2% above Webb’s bankers’ then current rate for commercial overdraft facilities to the extent that the price or any part of it remains unpaid for more than seven days from the date of the sale. f. To retain possession of that or any other lot purchased by the purchaser at that or any other auction and to release the same only after payment of money due. g. To apply the proceeds of sale of any lot then or subsequently due to the purchaser towards settlement of money due to Webb’s or it’s vendor. Webb’s shall be entitled to a possessory lien on any property of the purchaser for any purpose while any money remains unpaid under this contract. h. To apply any payment made by the purchaser to Webb’s towards any money owing to Webb’s in respect of any thing whatsoever irrespective of any directive given in respect of or restriction placed upon such payment by the purchaser whether expressed or implied. i. Title and right of disposal of the goods shall not pass to the purchaser until payment has been made in full by cleared funds. Where any lot purchased in held by Webb’s pending i. clearance of funds by the purchaser or ii. completion of payment after receipt of a deposit the lot will be held by Webb’s as bailee for the vendor risk and title passing to the purchaser immediately upon notification of clearance of funds or upon completion of purchase. In the event that a lot is lost stolen damaged or destroyed before title is transferred to the purchaser the purchaser shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid to Webb’s in respect of that lot but shall not be entitled to any compensation for any consequent losses howsoever arising. 11. Bidders deemed Principals. All bidders shall be held personally and solely liable for all obligations arising from any bid including both telephone”and absentee bids”. Any person wishing to bid as agent for a third party must obtain written authority to do so from Webb’s prior to bidding. 12.”Subject Bids” Where the highest bid is below the reserve and the auctioneer declares a sale to be “subject to vendor’s consent” or words to that effect the highest bid remains binding upon the bidder until the vendor accepts or rejects it. If the bid is accepted there is a contractual obligation upon the bidder to pay for the lot. 13. SALES POST AUCTION OR BY PRIVATE TREATY The above conditions shall apply to all buyers of goods from Webb’s irrespective of the circumstances under which the sale is negotiated.


a guide for buyers Webb’s have set out the following information for the benefit of first time buyers and those who are unfamiliar with auction procedures. Important note: Please refer to full conditions of sale for buyers printed in the reverse of this catalogue and displayed in the saleroom.

estimate at the Auctioneer’s sole discretion.

Registration: All intending buyers must complete a bidding form available from the reception desk

Webb’s will telephone the number you have given several minutes before the lot you have request comes up for sale. If your phone is engaged or we are unable to make contact the auction will proceed without your bidding.

Buying at Auction

Our staff will ask you to hold when we have made contact. They will then tell you that your lot is about to come up. The bids will be relayed to you and you can enter the bidding at any time by making your call. Please note that the bidding at many auctions can be fast and furious. The auctioneer will not favour a phone bidder over and above buyers who are attending the auction by giving them more time to bid. You will need to establish your limit and make sure that you bid clearly and promptly. Telephone bids are only accepted for catalogued sales and on items with estimates over 500.

1. Floor Bidders Ensure that you have registered and obtained a buyer number before bidding on the lot or lots you have chosen Be aware that a buyer’s premium of 15%+GST is payable by all buyers in addition to the hammer price. Please make sure that you are aware of the amount of the buyer’s premium. Make your bids clear preferably by holding up your buyer number card. If you make a mistake e.g. the auctioneer takes a bid from you at a higher level than you had intended or you realise that you had bid on the wrong lot call out to the auctioneer immediately so that the bidding can be adjusted. Waiting until after the hammer falls is too late. If your bid is the highest and the lot is knocked down to you then you have entered a binding obligation to pay for that lot.

Telephone Bids The same conditions as above apply to telephone bidders.

Pre-Sale Estimates Estimates printed in the catalogue or given verbally are intended as a guide only and can be subject to revision nearer to the time of a sale. Webb’s staff are available during pre-sale viewing times and by appointment to assist prospective bidders with estimates and any aspect of the auction procedure.

2. Sales Subject to Vendor’s Consent

Condition Reports

Where your bid is the highest but still below the reserve the Auctioneer may declare you to be the “buyer subject to Vendor’s consent”. This means that your bid is held as binding and will be communicated to the Vendor at the earliest opportunity. If the vendor accepts then there is a contractual obligation for you to pay for the lot. If the vendor does not accept you are released from any obligation however you will have first right to negotiate with the vendor through Webb’s until an agreement is reached and Webb’s will not present other offers to the vendor until your negotiations are ended.

Webb’s staff will provide condition reports for out of Auckland buyers. However please note that no 6 in the Conditions of Sale for Buyers will still apply despite the obtaining of a condition report.

3. Absentee Bids Webb’s will endeavour to ensure that your bidding instructions are executed but accept no responsibility or liability for failure to do so. Lots will be bought as favourably as is allowed by bidding in the sale room and any reserve imposed by the vendor. Please note that Webb’s cannot guarantee that another bidder will not be successful at your limit if in the course of competitive bidding someone else bids your limit first. Absentee bids are accepted by written instruction which can be sent by fax (e-mailed absentee bids are not accepted) up to l hour before the commencement of the sale. Absentee bids will be executed on the following basis: If your bid limit is equal to or above a reserve the Auctioneer may open the bidding at reserve on your behalf and will bid thereafter only in response to competition for the lot.If your bid limit is below a reserve the Auctioneer may open the bidding at your limit and if there are no further bids in the room may sell to you “subject to vendor’s consent”. In the absence of a reserve the Auctioneer may exercise your bid in advance of any opening bid or may open the bidding on your behalf at the Auctioneers

Payment Payment for all items purchased is due on the day of sale immediately following completion of the sale. If full payment cannot be made on the day of sale a deposit of 10% of the total sum due must be made on the day of sale and the balance must be paid within 5 working days. Payment is by cash bank cheque or Eftpos. Cheques will be accepted but must be cleared before delivery of goods will be given. Credit cards are not accepted. Packing and Freight Webb’s do not pack goods in house. However we will arrange for your items to be packed insured and shipped by a professional agent. All costs associated with packing and freight are payable by the purchaser. Valuation Service Webb’s provide free market appraisals on Monday mornings from 9am-1pm or at other times by appointment. Webb’s appraisers will come to your home to view and appraise larger items. Webb’s will provide valuations for insurance matrimonial division family division etc. Please enquire at reception for charges. Valuation charges are refundable on occasion when goods are subsequently offered for sale within a reasonable period.


lot

ENTRIES NOW INVITED NEXT NZ SALE SCHEDULED OCTOBER 2011 112


Webb's Important Cars and Classic Motorcycles March 2011  

Webb's Important Cars and Classic Motorcycles March 2011 auction catalogue

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