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YEARS OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

The Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund®


AL FU

ARGAR M E E H T

ORI N D

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M A A R N A c

YEARS OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION


“It has been a great honor for me to be on the MMMF Board and to contribute my voice to support the extraordinary work of the organization. Updating the MMMF history is a wonderful way to celebrate the achievements of the Fund over the past 30 years. It certainly is a tribute to my mom that such a great idea which started with a small but dedicated and determined group of ladies has grown and succeeded on such a scale. She would have been very grateful and happy to be here in 2011 to see the results.� Kathleen McNamara


PREFACE

This resulting publication tells the MMMF story through 2011. Like the earlier history, it was written for two purposes: first, as a tribute to our courageous recipients and the many volunteers and donors who have been generous with their time and

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MMMF engaged a team of skilled and enthusiastic volunteers through the World Bank Family Network to carry out the research, interviews, writing and layout involved in this project. Past Board members, Selection Committee members and grant recipients, when contacted, provided wonderful stories of how a dedicated group of women empowered other dedicated women through education.

30 YEARS

AS THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY of the Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund (MMMF) drew near, MMMF’s Board of Directors decided to update the initial history prepared by Harriet Baldwin in 1994. Since then, a great many inspiring women have received MMMF educational grants and come to MMMF’s Washington, DC headquarters to tell how they overcame cultural and financial obstacles to get an education. MMMF began a regional program in South Africa and undertook a tracer study to determine if the grantees were indeed returning to their countries or elsewhere in the developing world to help women and children improve their lives. The number of universities aware of MMMF as an important source of funding for international female students has expanded significantly. There are lessons to be shared and more outreach to do. As of mid-2011, 186 women from 61 different developing countries had received MMMF funding. From one grant made in 1983, grants rose to six in 1995 and to nineteen in 2011.


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money and second, to inform those persons and institutions who seek to learn more about the MMMF. This book provides information on how to access grants or to help build resources for empowering women from developing countries and how MMMF has evolved as an organization. In the decades since MMMF’s founding, the nonprofit world has expanded to encompass a rapidly evolving universe of organizations focused on poverty reduction, environment, human rights and women. How this context has affected MMMF and how MMMF manages its program is part of our update. Throughout the years, MMMF has reconfirmed its determination to focus on supporting, through educational grants, women who, in turn, will benefit women and children in the developing world. The Board has many ambitions for achieving this: expanding regional programs to other continents, helping its past recipients to network and access knowledge sources and continuing to progress technologically in communications. The MMMF history team invites readers to become engaged in this story, to visit our website, www.mmmf-grants.org, and to get involved.

Charlotte Jones-Carroll, President


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Similarly, all the interviewees, especially past officers and recipients, have been generous with their time, memories and personal archives. As the “Voices” section of this book shows, the connection these persons still have with MMMF and its work

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Such a project would not have been possible without the original history book authored by Harriet Baldwin, The Story of the Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund (Washington, DC, World Bank. 1995) covering 1981–93. The team wishes to pay special tribute to Harriet’s work because it served as the inspiration, precedent and model for the updating efforts.

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MANY PEOPLE CONTRIBUTED TO THIS BOOK. The volunteer history team undertook the main work of combing through past minutes of meetings, annual reports and the original history of MMMF for key developments. Members of the team include Busharah Azhar, Viola Gnocchi, Deepika Shrestha, Monica Vidili, Ana Maria Zuñiga, Dharana Nepal and Elizabeth Twesiime. The team also conducted many of the interviews. Charlotte Jones-Carroll undertook a significant amount of the consolidation and reworking of the text and analysis of the financial trends. Caroline Berney assisted with identifying the past MMMF leaders to be interviewed. Caroline, along with Louise Shimizu, Joanne Garrity, Ineke de Haan and Sigrid Blobel provided institutional memory and records. Sarah Brau helped identify archival and other photographs to be used. Talaat Moreau and Barbara Catherwood edited the text. Gilda Dadush prepared the graphic design of the final product and Miguel Barreto designed the cover.


is tangible. People interviewed in person or via email include Sukriye Karaosmanoglu, Priscilla Linn, Hanna Woicke, Lois Khairallah, Caroline Berney, Hada Zaidan, Sigrid Blobel, Zane Stuggins, Georgine Ahmad, Vim Maguire, Carla Scearce and Dominique Lallement of the Board, Elna van Gruening and Vesna de la Borde of the Selection Committees and Marion Subah, Frannie Humplick Leautier, Arundati Muralidharan, Fanny Howard Newball and Refilwe Sello, past recipients. Earlier interviews with recipients Farina So and Grace Handy were also used.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter One: Who We Are ......................................................................................... 13

Chapter Three: How We Do It.....................................................................................27 Chapter Four................................................................................................................39

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Chapter Two: What We Do.......................................................................................... 19

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Voices—Recipients...........................................................................................39

Chapter Five: How You Can Help...............................................................................57 Appendix A: Recipients’ Data.................................................................................... 61 Appendix B: Financial Data........................................................................................73 Appendix C: Founders, Committee Members, Board Members, Officers...............77

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Voices—Supporters..........................................................................................45


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MARGARET MCNAMARA EXPRESSED CONCERN THAT THE LIVES OF MILLIONS OF WOMEN IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES WERE SHAPED BY HARD AND UNREWARDING LABOR. (Margaret McNamara on a trip to Bangladesh in 1976)


CHAPTER ONE

WHO WE ARE THE MARGARET MCNAMARA MEMORIAL FUND (MMMF)

cesses. This was only possible through the dedication of many volunteers and the support of what today is called the World Bank Family Network (WBFN), the original link between the founders and Margaret McNamara, wife of Robert McNamara, then President of the World Bank. Such dedication and support have been sustained for so long by the inspiring stories of each of the women who have received an MMMF grant. ORIGINS Margaret McNamara engaged enthusiastically in volunteer work as she accompanied her spouse in his various

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The story of the MMMF is one of focus and inspiration. Since its founding 30 years ago, the MMMF has concentrated on the single objective of financing the education of women from developing countries who were enrolled in universities in the US and later Canada and South Africa, and who were committed to work for the benefit of women and children in developing countries. The organization has evolved from a small committee to a charitable corporation, refining its selection techniques, building its financial resources, increasing the annual number of grantees and strengthening its institutional pro-

30 YEARS

was founded in 1981 in memory of Margaret Craig McNamara, in appreciation of her life-long commitment to women and children and her advocacy of education. MMMF is a not-for-profit public charity whose mission is to provide grants to women from developing countries to help further their education and strengthen their leadership skills to improve the lives of women and children in developing countries.


positions. In Washington, DC in 1966, she began what became a longstanding child literacy campaign, Reading is FUNdamental. She also helped sponsor a program to assist diplomatic families.

“OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS I HAVE

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BEEN PRIVILEGED TO PLAY A PART IN THE GROWTH AND WIDENING SCOPE OF THE MMMF SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM AND, IN THE PROCESS, TO HAVE MADE SO MANY GOOD FRIENDS AND TO HAVE MET SO MANY OF OUR EXTRAORDINARY GRANT RECIPIENTS.” CAROLINE BERNEY MMMF PRESIDENT 2008–10 Later, inspired by this experience, Mrs. McNamara became an invaluable supporter of a fledgling organization at the World Bank called WIVES, a multinational association formed by World Bank spouses. During her travels to the developing world, Mrs. McNamara also became interested in the lives of the

people she met. As she visited schools and health centers, she became concerned that women and children would be overlooked when development eventually took hold. She took interest in World Bank research that demonstrated that the education of girls has a measurable, positive impact on the health and education of children in the next generation, and arranged seminars and activities to raise the overall profile of women and their needs. In late 1980, aware that Margaret McNamara was gravely ill and in grateful recognition of her support for WIVES during her husband’s 12 years at the World Bank, two members of WIVES, Babs Knox and Ruby Wingate, wanted to find a way to honor her. In view of Mrs. McNamara’s focus on promoting education of women, they suggested providing a scholarship to a woman from a developing country. Mrs. McNamara was delighted with the idea, asking that the eventual grantee be someone interested in women and children and planning to return to her country. Within weeks of Mrs. McNamara’s death in February 1981, steps were taken by a newly


In keeping with the wishes of the McNamara family, initial requests for donations were confined to staff and families of the World Bank, through the WIVES’ newsletter and later through a cookbook of recipes contributed by the spouses. Over the next few years, the MMMF

Committee members persevered in the difficult task of raising funds through bridge parties, charity luncheons, benefit raffles, new cookbook sales and formal balls. Staff began to donate professional lecture fees and leftover foreign coins following trips. By 1983, $31,000 had been collected and the Committee was ready to name its first recipient. In view of its informal status, the Fund initially chose to deposit the money it had raised in the Community Foundation of Greater Washington, which would administer the grants. The founders contacted Washington area universities and

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formed working group within WIVES to create the Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund. The founders embraced Mrs. McNamara’s desire to improve the lives of women and children, putting it at the center of their policies, where it remains today.

30 YEARS

Carla Scearce, Ruby Wingate, Babs Knox and Sukriye Karaosmanoglu in 1991


MARION SUBAH, LIBERIA, 1983 GRANTEE The MMMF has stayed in touch with Marion Subah until today. She epitomizes the kind of woman MMMF hoped to help, returning to Liberia to become a manager and trainer in community health, and becoming involved in peacebuilding and trauma healing, especially of affected children, after their civil war. Marion works now with a Johns Hopkins affiliate (Jhpiego) in her country, rebuilding basic health services. She conveyed this anniversary greeting to MMMF:

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“The importance of an international education, to enable women from developing nations to work locally, cannot be over-emphasized. With education, they are able to combine the art of being a woman leader with scientific, evidencebased, management interventions. No wonder their quality of life improves and, of course, they continue working to improve the lives of their communities, families and nations. I can assure you with the assistance that the funds provide, the recipient passes that hurdle that keeps women from realizing their full potential. Congratulations on a job well done for 30 years!�


eventually proposed to make a $3,000 grant to a Liberian rural nurse, Marion Subah, who was studying at Catholic University’s School of Nursing. INCORPORATION AS A PUBLIC CHARITY

RELATIONS WITH THE WORLD BANK

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Though a separate legal entity by 1989, MMMF nevertheless retained close ties to WIVES, continuing today with the World Bank Family Network (WBFN), from which it draws advocacy, new volunteers and office support. World Bank has provided in-kind services such as office and event space, computer, phone, printing and mailing support. World Bank staff have continued to be generous donors to MMMF over the years.

30 YEARS

Between 1983 and 1989, the founders became a more formal Committee of WIVES and discovered other ways to raise funds. The MMMF attracted the attention of Charlotte Conable, wife of Barber Conable who was World Bank President 1986–91. Mrs. Conable became a generous supporter and the first “Honorary President” of MMMF. The Committee became more systematic about its grant program, widely publicizing the Fund through international development newsletters, grant-listing organizations, and mailings to universities. It appointed an independent Selection Panel, including World Bank staff ex-

perts, to select recipients. By 1989, to allow tax-exempt donations for fundraising, the MMMF committee filed with the US Internal Revenue Service for incorporation as a 501(c)(3) public charity, which was granted effective October 25 of that year. MMMF also registered as a charitable corporation in the District of Columbia.


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AS OF 2011, 186 WOMEN FROM 61 DEVELOPING COUNTRIES HAVE RECEIVED AN EDUCATIONAL GRANT FROM THE MMMF.


CHAPTER TWO

WHAT WE DO

projects—explored moving beyond such educational grants to offer grassroots development aid. Ultimately, the Board realized that many other organizations offered such aid while its own processes specialized in helping women to study. MMMF thus confirmed it would concentrate on providing educational grants; but, Board members asked, why not offer the grants for study in developing countries? In 2007, MMMF did just that by piloting a program of grants with South African universities, first in Pretoria and in 2008, Cape Town. Grants offered there were smaller in amount but covered a similar proportion of

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Geographic Expansion: With its focus on making educational grants to women from developing countries, MMMF began by seeking such women studying in Washington, DC area universities, an expectation of the Community Foundation of Greater Washington, which administered the initial grants. The search for qualified applicants soon expanded to other US universities in order to diversify the applicant pool. Women studying at Canadian educational institutions were included from 2003 on. During the 2000’s, MMMF—in response to occasional requests from former grantees seeking help to start up community

30 YEARS

FINANCING WOMEN’S EDUCATION to strengthen their ability to benefit women and children is the core of MMMF’s program. This has evolved in terms of universities and criteria, as noted below. MMMF has also been interested in getting to know the grantees personally and, more recently, to help them access sources of knowledge in their fields and to put them in contact with each other through networking.


annual costs of graduate study. The success of the South Africa program, once again the result of remarkable MMMF volunteer efforts, especially Elna van Greuning and Melanie Jaya, led to the mainstreaming of this pilot in 2010 as a regular part of MMMF grants (though on a different cycle owing to different academic years). MMMF has plans to expand similar grant programs to other continents in the future.

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Eligibility: MMMF’s main goal is to benefit women and children in the developing world. Thus, only women from eligible countries (low and middle income) can apply for grants. To enhance the likelihood that applicants will return to their country or region after getting their degree, MMMF’s selection criteria require applicants to have a track record of work with women and/or children and to be at least 25 years old. This often means that applicants are graduate students, though there is no restriction that applicants must be at graduate level. To ensure women are actually attending the targeted universities, the criteria state that they must already be enrolled at the institution from which they are

applying. Finally, in addition to satisfactory academic performance and demonstrated financial need, applicants are advised that they will sign a contract agreeing to return to a developing country within two years of graduation, or return the funds granted. These criteria have, over the years, produced recipients that are truly connected to resolving the problems of women and children in their regions. A 2008 tracer study found that 85% of respondents were in their home country or another developing country, doing work that impacted the status of women and children, usually in public sectors, academia or community programs.

“MMMF IS CHANGING THE WORLD, ONE WOMAN AT A TIME.”

GRACE HANDY, SRI LANKA 2009 GRANTEE Coverage: MMMF’s policy is to allow its grant to be used for a variety of needs in addition to tuition and university fees. Mindful of how difficult mature women find the financing of education—they


often have to leave families and jobs or bring children along—MMMF allows its grants to be used to cover living expenses and child care costs, travel and research. Expenditures from the grant must always be used to help the recipient advance her degree in the academic year for which it is given.

30 YEARS

creating a sort of “self-endowment,” although this limited the size of the grants each year. On this basis, MMMF made one $3,000 grant each year for five years (1983–87). The number of grants began to increase in 1988 and the size of each grant rose also, as constant fundraising and judicious investing added to the total resources available. The 2007 move to The MMMF Program in Numbers: In 1981, South African universities increased the the MMMF had set an initial fundraising demand for resources, though grants goal of $100,000, which it achieved sev- there were more cost-effective. The hiseral years later. To guarantee long term tory of grantmaking can be seen in this sustainability, the Founding Committee graph. A total of 186 educational grants initially decided to use only the interest were made between 1983 and 2011 to on the funds raised for grantmaking, women from 61 low and middle income

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2 0 11 2008 2005 20 02 19 9 9 19 9 6 19 9 3 19 9 0 19 8 7 19 8 4 19 81 0 50 100 150 200 $000s Total Annual Grants Value (1981–2011)


GIVING BACK—DIFFERENT APPROACHES Many MMMF grantees teach or work in community clinics or with local NGOs when they return to their countries. Occasionally, their trajectories are different —in search of even greater impact. Frannie Humplick Léautier (1985) joined the World Bank in 1992, and worked on infrastructure projects that provided safe water and sanitation, key areas affecting women’s lives. She later directed the World Bank Institute where she created a unit for Youth, and now heads the Africa Capacity Building Foundation. Kindy Marina (1999) of Indonesia wants to formulate a national-level appropriate STD/HIV/AIDS education and empowerment program for women and youth, in an effort to bridge the vast gap between rich and poor. Nuning Suliasih Purwaningrum (2011) of Indonesia has been working to end discrimination against women in mixed-nationality marriages, and their children. She became a political activist and lobbyist, using editorials to make her case.

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Malati Rao (2006) pursued film and media studies, with an interest in raising awareness about domestic abuse of women. She joined a university media and communications program in Pune, India upon completing her degree. Afia Serena Nathaniel (2003) studied film as a tool to convey messages to wider audiences. In 2008, Afia founded an independent film production house in Lahore, Pakistan and developed a film on the “honor killing” of women. Elizabeth Maeda (2004) studied agricultural extension. As the daughter of a female farmer who got little help from her country’s agriculture extension workers, Elizabeth chose to work with the Tanzanian Ministry of Agriculture to strengthen outreach to women. Jalele Erega Defa (2008) of Ethiopia returned to teach at her university, the only female lecturer in her department. Passionate about Africa and Ethiopia, her longer term dream shared with MMMF was “I want to run for public office some day!”


Meeting the Grantees Personally: The tradition of inviting MMMF recipients to the WIVES (WBFN) Annual Meeting began with the first woman selected, and continues today. In the early years, with one or two recipients a year, especially for those studying in the Washington, DC area, this was a simple and satisfying affair. The grantee(s) could tell their story during the WBFN dinner and connect with founding members. As the number of grantees grew,

The Forum: The Forum experience started in 2006. Initially an informal event, it later developed into a formal presentation with a keynote speaker and outside guests as well as staff in the audience. Grantees are fully engaged women, advocating for goals such as access to education, health and water services, environmental care, employment, and more generally, women’s leadership. Even so, for some grantees, speaking at a World Bank forum is an empowering process,

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NETWORKING AND KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE

bringing the women to Washington, DC became more complicated, and the time available at the dinner to tell their stories became inadequate. Yet the connections with recipients were too valuable to lose, so new formats emerged. A separate forum was organized at the World Bank, open to staff and interested public as well as WBFN members, where grantees were invited to share their stories. Today, their “three days in May” with MMMF have become filled with receptions, knowledge exchanges and networking opportunities as well as the forum. A ceremony is held in South Africa to meet and hear from grantees in that program.

30 YEARS

countries, totaling almost $1.7 million. Their studies are heavily concentrated in health and education, but also include engineering, peace building, economics and many other subjects. Half the recipients have come from African countries, especially since the programs in South Africa began. Efforts to diversify nationalities and course of study continue to be emphasized by the Board and Selection Committees, but dedication to benefiting women and children takes priority. Appendix A contains information on all grantees, their degrees and subject areas.


broadening their professional perspective. In 2011, the US/Canada grantees came to Washington, DC and spoke of their struggles and their plans.

22 SMANGELE MKHWANAZI SOUTH AFRICA, 2011 “In education, which I knew under apartheid and afterwards, teachers who are mostly women are struggling to learn a new way for teaching. Your generous contribution will impact not only my life but also the lives of young people in the rural villages and in the poorest townships, who will look at me and say ‘I can also be like her.’ ”

Networking: One important idea from discussions within the Board and with the recipients was the value of maintaining and developing relationships with and among grantees. Before email and social networking tools, it was hard to keep in contact with grantees and monitor their progress once they returned to their countries. Selection Committee members attempted to keep in letter contact, with partial success. As part of MMMF’s 25th anniversary, a tracer study was done to aggregate follow-up information and confirm to Board members and donors that the MMMF mission was generally being achieved. Since MMMF families host grantees during their stay in Washington, DC, informal relations are built that endure. The idea of an alumnae network emerged and grantee cohorts from US/ Canada in 2009–11 agreed to try social networking tools. An MMMF Family page was started on Facebook in 2010.


Knowledge Exchange: A further initiative emerged to take advantage of the World Bank’s deep knowledge base and experts on site to arrange an exchange of knowledge for grantees in a handful of common sectors. More informal versions of this had been taking place from 2000 on, but in 2010 and 2011, the US/Canada grantees, heavily specialized in health or education fields, were

able to meet more formally as a group with health and education experts. In addition, they were introduced to the Development Gateway program for sectoral knowledge exchange, and Results for Development experts while Board members identified community development and special education experts in the DC area and World Bank staff for individual visits by grantees. 30 YEARS

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“FOR THE FAIR, WE NEED TO BOOK THE ROOM, WE NEED ELECTRICIANS,

WE NEED PACKERS, WE NEED MOVERS … WE ACTUALLY HAVE A CHECK-LIST OF 194 THINGS WE HAVE TO DO!”

GEORGINE AHMAD, Fair Chair, 2007-Present


CHAPTER THREE

HOW WE DO IT

but in recent years, some Bank staff and retirees and IMF spouses have joined the Board. In addition to the directors, a number of non-director volunteers assist committees for finance, audit and ad-hoc groups, such as the team which updated this history book. Selection Committees: From 1984, the screening and selection of grantees from the many who apply (today US/ Canada applicants normally number

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Board of Directors: Since 1989, MMMF has organized its program through a volunteer Board of Directors of some ten to fifteen people of many nationalities. The Board meets almost monthly to carry out the normal activities of governance—approving budgets and guidelines, monitoring finances and overseeing the program. Board members also are the principal volunteers for fundraising. For many years, the Board was composed of World Bank spouses,

30 YEARS

FROM THE DAYS OF THE FOUNDERS, MMMF has sought to direct all the funds raised to the provision of educational grants to selected women. This has meant relying on volunteers and pro bono support and advice. Eventually, some important services—such as the annual audit—were paid for from funds raised by MMMF, but for the first 25 years, virtually all governance, fundraising and program implementation were carried out by unpaid members of the World Bank community devoted to the cause of women’s education, supported by the office staff of the World Bank Family Network. Only in the past few years has MMMF’s burgeoning program grown beyond the capacity of the WBFN office to support, resulting in recruitment of a part-time paid MMMF staff person in 2008.


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CARLA SCEARCE ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR CHAIR 1984–2004 “I had said that when MMMF assets reached $1 million, I would leave [the Fair chairmanship], then when it reached $1.5 million, finally, I just decided it was time to go—there is a time for everything. All I ever asked from my volunteer time was that we make a bit of difference and a few good friends, and this I think we did.”

150–200) has been carried out independently from the Board by a committee of many different nationalities, recently with around 16 members. When the South Africa regional program began, a separate Selection Committee was set up, having some overlap with the US/ Canada Committee to maintain consistency of process. A significant share of the South Africa Committee comes from the World Bank offices in Pretoria. At a final stage before proposing the grantees to the Board, the selection process moves to a panel composed of some of the original Committee plus around five World Bank staff to deepen the screening of qualified women. All of these activities are carried out on a volunteer basis. Fundraising: The key annual efforts to raise funds for the MMMF are an International Arts and Crafts Fair and a once-a-year solicitation by an informal group known as Friends of MMMF. More about these activities is described in the next section, but the Fair in particular demands intensive volunteer work, both from the Board members responsible and from many associates of the


30 YEARS

Selection Committees brief the FY12 MMMF Board of Directors

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MMMF’s staff: The position of MMMF Coordinator was added to the MMMF budget in 2008. MMMF sought a person of multiple talents willing to work only two-thirds time. Two such women have held the post between 2008 and 2011. The dedicated support and public face provided by the MMMF Coordinator helped free the Board of Directors to turn to longer term goals, while still successfully carrying out its annual fun-

draising and selection of grantees. The WBFN office staff is also now able to concentrate on their basic task of meeting the needs of the families of Bank staff who come from all over the world. WHERE DO OUR FUNDS COME FROM? Today, MMMF is able to count on its accumulated invested funds of over $2 million, which it draws down based on a 5% formula aimed at perpetuating the MMMF financially. This substantial amount came not from a few large

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MMMF who look forward to helping at this event.


benefactors but from decades of creative MMMF efforts to gather funds. (See Appendix B for 2011 MMMF Financial Statement and graphs on donations and fundraising). Also, the availability of inkind services, such as office and event space, from the World Bank has allowed most funds raised by MMMF to be directed to its grants.

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The Fair: In addition to the charity balls and cookbook sales of early years, an idea for a bazaar emerged, to sell crafts made by artistic spouses. The success of that bazaar, and the inspiration of the first Fair Chair, Carla Scearce, led to a broader International Arts and Crafts Fair held in November 1986, which produced a substantial profit and proved to be a great morale booster for the volunteer fundraisers of MMMF. It also raised the profile of the MMMF within the World Bank and wider community. Similar Fairs have been organized every year since then—providing a venue for many vendors (who commit a percent of their profits to MMMF) to bring goods from around the world and for both World Bank staff and the general public to find beautiful and useful gifts. This

three-day event nets around $50,000 each year on average and reached almost $70,000 in peak years. Friends of MMMF: Individual donors were the mainstay since the early years of MMMF, in response to requests made through internal WIVES newsletters and word of mouth, spouse-to-spouse. Individual World Bank employees donated their lecture honoraria and book royalties. In 1993, however, after serving on a Selection Panel, Dominique Lallement, a World Bank staff member, proposed to the MMMF Board the formation of the “Friends of MMMF” with the purpose of soliciting donations more systematically to increase the resources available for grants. This was approved by the Board and the first request went out to World Bank staff via a letter in 1993. While originally “Friends” was intended to mean staff who had formerly served on the selection panels, the term later came to mean all regularly solicited donors to MMMF. By 2006, over 6000 letters from Friends of the MMMF were being printed by the Bank and assembled with help from the MMMF Board. The MMMF annual report and a list of


30 YEARS

“I HAVE NOT LET MY POVERTY OR GENDER DETERMINE MY DESTINY.”

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VIOLET YEBEI, KENYA, 2007 GRANTEE

Serving on the Selection Panel was a life-changing experience. Reading story after story of women who had struggled against parents who wanted to marry them off at a young age, or who had to leave school because of poverty made me very frustrated that the MMMF was giving so few and such small scholarships. I reflected on my own experience: my mother had not been able to complete high school because her parents did not have the money. I was luckier: a scholarship enabled me to get a Masters Degree to pursue my dream career. I approached Harriet Baldwin—then the Chair of the Selection Committee—about options to increase the financial resources of the fund. We needed something relatively simple to administer and recurrent year after year, and we wanted to involve World Bank staff. Thus we came up with the idea of the Friends of the MMMF, which was promptly endorsed by the Board. The Bank’s administrative services agreed to help with the solicitation mailing. Several other staff joined me as founding “Friends” and we have continued to this day to supplement the MMMF revenues.

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DOMINIQUE LALLEMENT FRIEND’S CHAIR 1994–2008


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past donors were added and the letters sent to staff at headquarters and around the world as well as to recent retirees. As an eco-friendly move, MMMF today implements the request for donations electronically through a story on the World Bank intranet and the “Donate” button on its own website: www.mmmf-grants. org. However, a modest number of letters continue to be sent to longstanding Friends and recent retirees from the World Bank. Through the last sixteen years, the “Friends of MMMF” solicitation effort has added a total of almost $600,000 to the grant program. Other Sources: As more people became aware of the MMMF, occasional unsolicited donations came from unexpected quarters. Memorial gifts began to be received in 1983 and have continued, providing in 2011 sufficient funds for a full grant in memory of the late Bank staff member Leila Zlaoui. The estate of former Bank president Barber Conable transferred a generous donation, and former Presidents McNamara and Wolfensohn contributed through their family foundations. Gifts are sometimes given to honor retirees, as in the case of

funds for two grants collected by staff to honor Africa Region Vice-President Edward Jaycox on his retirement in 1996. A unique and sustained source of donations started when MMMF Board chair Sukriye Karaosmanoglu encouraged the World Bank to offer retiring staff who preferred not to be given an official farewell party the option of sending funds instead to the MMMF. Regional groups such as African, Asian, Indian and Japanese clubs at the Bank have directed proceeds to MMMF. In 2006, the BankFund Staff Federal Credit Union began to make an annual donation equal to a full grant. All of these cash donations have helped to build MMMF’s assets to levels that assure that the size of an MMMF grant forms an important share—at least 30%—of a recipient’s education expenses. HOW MMMF MANAGES ITS INVESTMENTS After incorporating in 1989, the Board of Directors chose to keep funds in the Bank-Fund Staff Federal Credit Union rather than gifting it to the Community Foundation of Greater Washington, as a way to have more control over invest-


and other nonprofits, local accessibility and low fees. An investment policy statement was developed and MMMF turned over its investments to that firm in 2009, with good results. MMMF continues its policy of drawing down 5% of these invested funds each year to supplement revenues from annual fundraising to cover its program and management costs. Thanks to this arrangement, MMMF has established a close-to-perpetual source of funding and has been able to keep program spending at 80% or more of total cash expenses.

Application Process: The first MMMF Selection Panel in 1984 developed eligibility criteria, standardized the application process, and introduced formal policies and procedures for future selections. Prospective candidates were identified by approaching universities and personally inviting grant applications. After each selection, the Panel reviewed its procedures and revised the application form. As the years went by, candidates were required to provide, in addition to two references and their application,

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HOW THE GRANTEE SELECTION PROCESS WORKS

30 YEARS

ments. To develop an appropriate investment strategy, in 1991, the Board invited the administrator of the World Bank’s pension fund to advise them. He counseled MMMF to hire an accounting firm to handle required nonprofit tax returns and to move its accounting from a ledger to a computer-based program, which led to development of a budget framework and accounting conventions and thus upgraded the monitoring of finances. The Board then took the big step of investing $100,000, split equally between a bond fund and equity fund, and managing this portfolio on its own. The portfolio continued to grow over the years, thanks to MMMF adding funds each year and to pro-bono investment advice from kind professionals. The stock market was good to MMMF over these years; assets peaked at close to $2.7 million in 2007. However, with the market downturn in 2008, the Board realized that it was time to contract professional managers for these funds. A Board investment working group solicited proposals and interviewed wealth management companies. Ultimately, they recommended the contracting of Raymond James Advisors, based on its knowledge of MMMF


an itemized breakdown of their educational expenses, course of study, past employment and volunteer activities, track record with women and children and their intended plans to benefit their country of origin. The Committee began to request a short, autobiographical essay from applicants and to interview by telephone those short-listed. In 2003, the MMMF launched an online application option; out of a total of 184 applications,

the MMMF received 79 via the internet and the rest by mail that year. In cooperation with World Bank staff and WBFN volunteers, the Selection Committee coordinated the launch of MMMF’s own website in 2007, which brought the application process 100% online. Selection Committee Chair Elna Van Greuning commented that “This was a major accomplishment for the MMMF

THE FOUR-STEP SELECTION PROCESS

32

Round 1: Screening After the application materials are determined to be complete and the applicant meets all the eligibility criteria to be considered a viable candidate, each application is read and ranked by three separate readers from the Selection Committee. The aim is to get an overall picture to determine the candidate’s suitability. Round 2: Preliminary Selection The second round of reading examines the candidate’s commitment to women and children and her likelihood of returning to her home country. Academic performance and financial need are also assessed. Each application is assigned randomly to three Selection Committee members


grant program since it made establishing a database so much easier, and streamlined the application process. It was the start of eliminating all forms of ‘snail mail’ from the MMMF and the applicant’s side, and really making use of internet technology to our advantage— saving money and volunteer time.” Encouraging Diversity: In 1987, the MMMF noted that all five grant recipi-

ents by that date were African students, although there had also been applications from Asian and Latin American women. Although the Selection Panel felt that existing eligibility criteria should be given priority, the MMMF Committee decided to publicize the MMMF more systematically and widely in order to increase the geographical distribution of MMMF applicants. They announced the grants through interna-

(the candidate and readers cannot be of the same nationality at this stage). Each member reads and ranks an assigned number of applications. The Chair and Vice-chair review the 33 tallied rating sheets, and rank all applicants. The Selection Committee meets and, using point totals and overall judgment, selects which finalists to shortlist for the Selection Panel. Round 3: Final Recommendation The third reading is carried out by the Selection Panel and determines which grant recipients are recommended to the Board. Telephone interviews with the shortlisted finalists are conducted at this stage. Each Panel member reads every shortlisted application, scoring each candidate using a standard evaluation chart. The volunteers have to make tough decisions to select among strong grant candidates. The Chair then reviews the tallied results. The Panel meets and again uses point totals and overall judgment to select the final recipients. At least two runners-up are chosen in case winning recipients are unable to accept the grant. Round 4: Board Approval The Selection Panel presents its list of finalists to the MMMF Board for final approval. Selected recipients are notified and asked to sign a grant contract before checks are sent to their educational institutions for their accounts.


34

tional development newsletters, grantlisting organizations and in mailings to educational institutions throughout the United States. Subsequently, applications for grants almost doubled and in 1988, a Master’s student in Education, Ren Zhang from China, became the first non-African MMMF grant recipient. The poorer countries of Latin America were still under-represented among MMMF grant recipients, so application materials were sent to universities on the US Pacific Coast to encourage their high populations of Latin American students to apply. Later the MMMF used similar targeting of specific universities to encourage applicants from developing regions in the Middle East. Diversity has continued to improve. Although the move to establish programs with universities outside of North America has not yet advanced further than the successful South Africa initiative, initial steps have been taken to link up with Latin American universities. The Board and Selection Committees continue to seek innovative ways to increase geographic diversity, while preserving quality in its applicant pools.

Addition of a Selection Committee: As the number of grant applications increased, so did the administrative workload of the Selection Panel, which included Bank staff. In 1990, two Panel volunteers, Lilian Silveira and Harriet Baldwin, examined the selection procedures followed by other comparable educational grantmaking charities. They proposed changing the existing MMMF system by introducing a separate Selection Committee, which would first screen the applicants for eligibility and read the initial rounds of applications. The Committee would pass the finalists to the Panel. This was implemented. With the 2007 establishment of the South African regional program, a separate Selection Committee and Panel were created, operating on the Southern Hemisphere academic calendar. New members for each Selection Committee are appointed by the Chair of the respective Committee for three-year terms, and approved by the Board. The President of the MMMF Board appoints the Chair of each Selection Committee with Board approval.


Nuning Purwaningrum

Bishnu Maya Pariyar

Fafanyo Asiseh

Eman Abu Sabbah

Ekawati Liu


36

“THE MMMF PLAYED A VITAL ROLE IN MY JOURNEY BY ENABLING ME TO SHARE THE STORIES OF MANY VOICELESS YOUNG WOMEN. ”

ARUNDATI MURALIDHARAN, India, Grant Recipient 2009 (3rd from left)


CHAPTER FOUR

VOICES—RECIPIENTS ARUNDATI MURALIDHARAN, a 2009 grantee from India, is a professional medical and psychiatric social worker, who studied for her doctorate in Public Health at Boston University.

37 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

My academic and professional experiences have given me a deeper understanding as to why women in India have little knowledge of and control over their own bodies. I have begun to appreciate how socio-economic and gender inequalities impact women’s health and rights and to realize that I am among a small minority of Indian women who had the privilege to get a good education. I strongly believe that I should use this to empower women who do not have the same opportunities.

30 YEARS

“My field experiences with unwed teenage mothers, women living with HIV, and women facing abuse taught me to appreciate the social, cultural and economic dimensions of women’s lives and their health. My interest in the social determinants of health led me to work with sex workers on HIV/AIDS prevention. My dissertation research also focuses on a much-neglected group of women—young unmarried women living in slums in India, and how they access care for sexual and reproductive health concerns. I am in the process of starting my own organization to encourage and support youth in slum communities in Delhi to develop technological and social innovations to address community concerns in a sustainable manner … MMMF has introduced me to other recipients of this prestigious award whose achievements and aspirations inspire me to take my own work forward.”


GRACE HANDY, Sri Lanka, 2009. “I too have promises to keep. As Robert Frost rightfully put it, I have a long way to go. I returned to Sri Lanka and though it was hard to adjust back to life at home, I was fortunate to find work almost immediately. I primarily work with an education program that is aimed at creating social cohesion through school programs in post-conflict and other areas. I work with teachers, training them on many aspects of psychosocial care and education. This work is ideal for me, as my background in education counseling and psychology are all utilized. I also do some private consultancies in schools in the area of special education … I believe the MMMF is changing the world, one woman at a time.”

38

FANNY HOWARD NEWBALL, Colombia, 2008. Fanny was trained originally in school counseling and worked in her country’s Caribbean island communities as an educator and counselor. She became interested and active in the environment and had the opportunity to do graduate work at Brandeis University in sustainable international development. She describes how MMMF enabled her to reach her goals. “I had some money from COLFUTURO for room and board and some funding from Brandeis; the MMMF money I received was the exact amount to pay the tuition. Sincerely, without it, I would not have been able to do the second year of the program. Now I am in San Andres Island working in alternative livelihoods for our ethnic group for fishermen, farmers, wom-


en and youth. I was able to get several contracts to work with children and the environment. I designed a model of a game for children related to the environment. It will be published soon. I will be project coordinator of the Marine Protected Area soon and alternative livelihoods will be an important part of this project.”

30 YEARS

39 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

DR. REFILWE SELLO, Botswana, 2010. Refilwe had a medical degree but found that many patients she was seeing at an HIV clinic were not progressing because of social factors that needed to be addressed. She decided to seek an MPH degree and was accepted at Tulane University. She recounts how crucial the MMMF grant was in enabling her to complete her studies. “I sold everything I had in Botswana so that I could study public health, but I could only afford to pay for the first semester at Tulane. I began to look at websites my advisors suggested, and Googled women’s scholarships, where I found MMMF. I was just holding my breath because I wouldn’t be able to complete my Master’s if I didn’t get that. When I heard I was selected, I was really thrilled! My school then allowed me to follow through the third semester and pay them later when I returned to work, so I was able to graduate. The MMMF opened a lot of opportunities for me. When I was applying for an internship as part of my degree and they heard that I was an MMMF scholar, they were happy to take me. After that, I got an award for showing commitment to underserved populations in America, so it really was


originating from the MMMF scholarship’s prestige. Also, I was able to fully concentrate on studies instead of worrying about being kicked out of school for lack of money. I was lucky to get a job in Botswana at a village clinic I knew, where I now am in charge of the adolescent program to provide comprehensive HIV treatment and support to those born with HIV and their families. I have to advocate for the children, who may be orphans. If I do my part, children born with HIV may have a full healthy future. But I cannot save people one-by-one; I need to save people on a bigger scale. This is why I plan to work with all the stakeholders and try to influence public health policy.”

40

FARINA SO, Cambodia, 2009. Farina is now a researcher at the Documentation Center of Cambodia. Over a four year period, Farina interviewed Cham Muslim women and recorded their oral histories, which are included in her book The Hijab of Cambodia: Memory of Cham Muslim Women after the Khmer Rouge. The Khmer Rouge regime that ruled Cambodia in the 1980s, among other brutal actions, forced Muslims to break major tenets of their religion, including dietary restrictions and frequent prayer, and separated Muslim women from their children and families. She talks about this in her recent interview with Voice of America News: “When they were deprived of these roles, it affected them not just socially, but religiously and racially as well, because their religion states that as mothers and wives, their role is to bring


happiness to the family and then they will be blessed. Speaking out about one’s bitter experiences, or sorrow, is difficult, but it provides one with long-term healing.” When she was awarded her MMMF grant, Farina was immensely grateful: “The MMMF grant not only helps me solve financial problems, but also gives me value, respect and hope, because it enables me to focus on my study and work more to make my dream a reality.” 30 YEARS

41 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION


42

“AFTER I FINISHED MY ON-CAMPUS TRAINING, I RETURNED TO MY

COUNTRY, MYANMAR AND WORKED WITH ‘SAVE THE CHILDREN’. I WAS VERY EXCITED TO TAKE INITIATIVE IN MY NEW ROLE AS ADVOCACY MANAGER.”

KHIN MAR AUNG, Myanmar, Grant Recipient 2006

(Here with Hanna Woicke, in Banda Aceh, Indonesia)


VOICES—SUPPORTERS HANNA WOICKE was MMMF President from 2001-2006. She recalled her ex-

Hanna Woicke tells the following story: “After my husband left the World Bank Group, he became chairman of the international Board of Save the Children. We were in Banda Aceh visiting reconstruction efforts after the tsunami. There I was approached by a young woman from Myanmar [Khin Mar Aung] who told me that she was a MMMF recipient and had worked in early childhood education in Indonesia. Our scholarship had changed her life, she said. She was on the way back to her country to work for Save the Children there. At that moment I felt that I had worked for a great organization.”

43 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

AN ENCOUNTER IN BANDA ACEH

30 YEARS

periences. “I was recruited at a welcoming coffee for newcomers and joined as a Board member and then became President of the Board. The biggest challenge during my time was to recruit new volunteers and to fundraise. The World Bank newcomers were younger and younger and the women either wanted a full-time paid job or had small children. The MMMF consisted of a wonderful team of dedicated volunteers; many of them are still my friends today. I remember two fundraising activities that were particularly special—a concert given by (Bank President) Jim Wolfensohn’s daughter and an evening of dances. Every year, May was a special month because we could welcome the year’s new recipients in Washington, DC. They were always exceptional women. They usually stayed with one or two Board members and friendships were formed, sometimes for years.


MARTINA ADANK the MMMF Coordinator since November 2010, is the focal point for all key MMMF activities; the hub of communications between the Board, committees, the Bank, volunteers, donors, lawyers and auditors; and responsible for maintaining, upgrading and redesigning MMMF datasystems. These tasks require superior social skills and ability to juggle multiple tasks.

44

“Working with the MMMF is not only a big commitment, but also very rewarding. The MMMF recipients’ strength, power, strong visions and belief in change are incredibly enriching and motivating to me. Thanks to the efforts, ideas and enthusiasm of all the volunteers in the MMMF Board, Selection Committees and various MMMF committees, the MMMF is not standing still but an organization that is constantly moving forward and developing further. As a staff, it requires flexibility, continuous communication and multitasking abilities to coordinate all of these initiatives. At the same time, the broad range of tasks and topics and the interaction with so many different cultures, personalities and ideas is incredibly inspiring and fulfilling. Never before have I felt such a positive energy of everybody—recipients, volunteers, donors—and I hope the MMMF will keep on spreading the ‘spark’ to its generous volunteers and donors and strengthening women and children in the developing world”.


45 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

HARRIET BALDWIN, early Selection Committee member and first historian of MMMF (now from Hanover, NH), recounts: “I am thrilled by the number of women the MMMF has supported, and I am proud of their accomplishments. Congratulations and affectionate greetings to the 2011 recipients—how I would love to meet them! And congratulations, too, to all the members of the Bank Family who work so hard year after year to raise the funds and select the women who are so deserving of our help. The MMMF is a jewel that

30 YEARS

GEORGINE AHMAD’S first introduction to the MMMF came seven years ago, as a volunteer at the Fair. Three years later, she assumed responsibility for the entire Fair when she was selected the MMMF “Fair Chair”— a huge undertaking. Georgine describes her job: “Everybody who works in the Fair is a volunteer. The work is spread over eight months from January through to the Fair in mid-October. We co-chairs get together on a regular basis and talk about things we have to do: application forms, pricing the inventory, inviting vendors and attracting volunteers. We go to fairs in the DC area to find vendors who have merchandise that is unique, and we encourage NGOs from all over the world to bring something special for us to sell. We ask volunteers to make baked goods; for example, we are very fortunate to have a group of ladies who, every year, make wonderful cookies and wrap them in beautiful packages. For the last two years, we have made around $50,000 at each three-day Fair.”


brightens the world. My work with the MMMF was always deeply satisfying, and I am grateful for the opportunity I had—and still have—to be part of it.”

46

BANK-FUND STAFF FEDERAL CREDIT UNION (BFSFCU) serves the staff and families of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund—both in terms of financial services and in the broader Bank-Fund community. BFSFCU Community Relations Committee said: “It is with great pleasure that we are able to lend support to the MMMF. The grantees are truly remarkable women embodying the mission to bring inspiration and improvement to their home countries through educational opportunities in the US and Canada. Margaret McNamara created a legacy of investing in educational development for community enrichment. We are only too happy to share in some small part of that investment.” VESNA DE LA BORDE previously worked with women’s organizations and with an NGO in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where she provided assistance to disadvantaged women and children. When her spouse joined IFC in 2007, Vesna discovered the MMMF and volunteered to serve on its Selection Committee, becoming its Chair two years later: “Being Selection Committee Chair is a huge time and energy commitment, but is also extremely fulfilling and exciting. The Committee is often faced with extremely tough choices when a group of very good candidates comes from


the same country, or specializes in the same field of study. Most rewarding of all is meeting the grantees. It’s wonderful to witness the impact that receiving the grant is having on their lives and being aware of the important role we played in it. We feel humbled and honored to meet these women who have managed to achieve so much, often in the face of what some might call insurmountable odds. Meeting the recipients is a time of joy for the Selection Committee, and the MMMF as a whole.” 30 YEARS

47 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

CECILE FERRI became MMMF’s first-ever salaried employee, when she was hired in November 2008. As the MMMF Coordinator, Cecile supported the Board members and committees and acted as an interface between the World Bank and the MMMF until leaving for Kenya in December 2010. She says: “Working with volunteers is very specific; you have to adapt and be very flexible … and always keep in mind that these people are generously offering their time to the organization. The more I’ve discovered about the organization, the more I’ve been impressed by the volunteers’ commitment. The determination of the MMMF members to perpetuate the organization’s mission has been a strong motivation for me in my day-to-day work. I also remember the first Forum I helped organize. Listening to the outstanding stories of the grantees is so moving and motivating. I will never forget these precious moments. I have been very lucky to work with the MMMF for two


years. Two years during which I’ve been surrounded by amazing women. I wish them all the best for the next 30 years! And I hope to be involved sometime as a volunteer to give back what this organization brought to me.”

48

LOIS KHAIRALLAH joined the WBFN Board and became its President, which brought her to MMMF meetings. She then joined the MMMF Board, becoming President from 2006-2008. During her tenure, the first online MMMF applications began, the first Forum was held, and the first regional program outside of the US/Canada started at the University of Pretoria. MMMF also celebrated its 25th anniversary, which inspired the formal tracer study that aggregated what MMMF knew about its former recipients. Lois recalls: “When I hear the recipients speak about the challenges they have overcome in order to pursue their studies and about their aspirations and goals, I feel both humbled and motivated. How comforting, how hopeful it is to know that such extraordinary women, in so many varied disciplines, are seeking to make a difference in their communities, in the lives of women and children. One recipient shared how receiving the MMMF grant strengthened and affirmed her own vision to develop means to assist former child soldiers and AIDS orphans, work which she profoundly char-


acterized as doable ‘daily tasks.’ The measurable success of the MMMF is a powerful testament to what can be achieved by determined and courageous women, from the organization’s founding mothers to all the MMMF recipients and many volunteers. I feel it is a privilege to contribute to the MMMF mission.”

30 YEARS

49 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

SUKRIYE KARAOSMANOGLU was the first MMMF President from the time of incorporation, and held the post for five years (1989–94). In addition to the incorporation—a crucial step—she also oversaw the initiation of Friends of MMMF during her presidency. Friends of MMMF has turned into one of the most important sources of donations from individuals. Sukriye also encouraged another practice that sends resources to MMMF years later—the option for World Bank retirees to decline an official retirement party and donate the funds to MMMF instead. Sukriye worked very hard to ensure most activities were performed by volunteers or professionals working pro bono, so that all funds raised could go towards grantmaking, she also oversaw one important new initiative that required a modest expenditure, the professional audit of MMMF finances. This assured donors that MMMF had adequate accounting and grantmaking procedures. She was a tireless promoter and fundraiser for MMMF, helping achieve a doubling of assets. Behind her energetic leadership was her belief that “If you educate a woman, you can solve most of the problems of the world.”


50

PRISCILLA LINN, MMMF President 1995-2001, recalls: “The 1990s was the decade of the Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund for me—first on the Selection Committee, then six years as President of the Board. How to capture a time so rich in memories? Two words stand out: gratitude and discipline. Gratitude for the very existence of the Fund, for being able to reach out to exceptional women, for the support from the World Bank with office space and staff, for the opportunity to meet and become friends with extraordinary supporters and recipients. Discipline has always come hard for me, but through the MMMF, I saw how things such as board management, annual reports, volunteer job descriptions, working with the Friends of the MMMF, promoting the Fair and other fundraisers and guarding spending helped us develop professionally as a nonprofit organization. Assets grew from $400,000 to $1 million. The most difficult discipline for me was restricting program money to only 5% of our endowment. Although a standard practice among many funds, knowing the great need for our scholarships made following the formula painful. I believed, however, that the MMMF needed to grow into the future, as indeed it has thrived twenty years later, with an expanded global program and healthy assets, having flourished under the guidance of many who prize its ever expanding potential.”


51 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

LOUISE SHIMIZU comments: “As Coordinator of the World Bank Family Network (2003-2009) approximately one-third of my time was spent handling business matters of the MMMF. I frequently dealt with persons in various parts of the World Bank Group and was always so impressed by the support that I found for the MMMF, without which the MMMF clearly could not have so readily carried out its mission. This support stemmed not only from respect for the worthiness of the MMMF mission, but in reverence to the hard work of the Bank spouses/ partners who so generously volunteered their time and skills. I shared this sentiment as well and did my best to support the MMMF myself as well as tried to maintain the goodwill that had grown over the years throughout the Bank.”

30 YEARS

VIM MAGUIRE served three years on the Selection Committee and later six years on the MMMF Board. Besides volunteering for many traditional MMMF activities, Vim brought creative ideas to fundraising, in particular, fashion shows and, in 2005, an international dance presentation known as the “Mosaic of Dance.” Vim had always loved dancing, so she contacted dance groups from around the world and ultimately, after a year of effort, put together a performance with ten groups from ten countries, including an Indonesian group and a US hip-hop group. The performance drew a full house, with all profits going to MMMF. Says Vim: “I believe in the MMMF heart and soul.”


52

ELNA VAN GREUNING trained as a teacher, and taught for 10 years at high school and university level. She joined the MMMF Selection Committee in 2003. She says: “I can only describe my experience as positive and enriching. I have learned so much about so many countries, different cultures and fields of studies. Every applicant’s personal story touched me in one way or another, and I still remember many of them very vividly. One of my strongest memories is that of a recipient studying for her PhD. Both her parents were illiterate, and her father was so proud of her that he even called her ‘Doctor’ long before she finished. Her dream was for him to attend her graduation ceremony, and see her walk down the aisle with her cap and gown. Another recipient I will never forget was the lady who was an acid victim, but called herself an acid survivor, and came to study in the US with a face that was terribly scarred. These are only a few examples of many inspiring stories. With determination, perseverance, and hard work it is possible to break out of circumstances, and rise above your peers. In general, I think the most important challenge is not to give into any kind of pressure to relax the criteria set by the founding members, and to adhere to the criteria in such a way that the very best applicants are always chosen. The MMMF Grant has earned its place as a very prestigious and sought-after grant in the US and in South Africa, and the aim should be to maintain this status by selection of only ‘the best of the best’ at all times.”


30 YEARS

COLIN AND MARGARET WARREN, longtime Friends of MMMF donors told us: “Over the years the MMMF has provided support to the education and progress of truly remarkable women from the widest range of backgrounds. Having lived in several parts of the world ourselves, we have seen what obstacles many women face in getting an education but also that the welfare of society rests largely in their hands, as parents, educators, politicians and workers. We ourselves were the beneficiaries of an education-based scholarship many years ago and know what a transforming experience such an opportunity can be. We are grateful to the MMMF for the good work that it does and congratulate its grantees.”

53 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION


54

“I CANNOT GET OVER THE OVERWHELMING EMOTIONS WE ALL FEEL AT

THE END OF THE PROCESS EVERY YEAR. WHAT A PRIVILEGE TO MEET THESE INCREDIBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE ‘MADE IT’ AGAINST TREMENDOUS ODDS!”

HADA ZAIDAN, MMMF Volunteer 1984-2011

(Christine Gumunyu-Manatsa, Zimbabwe, Grant Recipient 2010, conducts a training session in Zimbabwe)


CHAPTER FIVE

HOW YOU CAN HELP CONTRIBUTE

As MMMF is a 501(c)(3) exempt organization, your contribution is tax deductible in the US. Donors are requested to provide name and address so that we may acknowledge contributions. Retiring World Bank staff may also opt to forego an official retirement celebration and instead direct funds to MMMF. Individuals may also direct lecture honoraria and publication royalties to MMMF. BECOME A FAIR VENDOR, DONOR OR CUSTOMER Cash is not the only way to contribute. The MMMF holds an International Arts and Crafts Fair each year at which vendors sell crafts and donate a small percentage of earnings to MMMF. Potential vendors can apply through our website. At the Fair, MMMF also has a table of unusual items, which have been donated by friends

55 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

The Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund c/o World Bank Family Network 1818 H Street NW, MSN J2–202 Washington, DC 20433

30 YEARS

As a public charitable corporation, MMMF depends on donations from individuals. Cash donations make up about half of the revenues each year. Friends of the MMMF are contacted by mail only once a year. To become a Friend, go to www.mmmf-grants.org to donate using credit card, PayPal or bank transfer, or send a check made out to “MMMF” to:


MMMF VOLUNTEER 56FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES


and staff, as well as door prize items. Individuals can choose to donate valuable items (even gently-used ones) to either of these by contacting MMMF through its website, www.mmmf-grants.org (click on the Arts & Crafts Fair tab), by emailing mmmffair@mmmf-grants.org or by phoning 202–473–5804. The three-day Fair, usually in October-November, is open to the general public. One of the most enjoyable ways of helping the MMMF mission is to come to the Fair and purchase the wonderful goods on sale. VOLUNTEER

Sign up for MMMF’s e-newsletter from our homepage, www.mmmf-grants.org to get the latest news. Help MMMF deepen its applicant pool by publicizing the program to universities that attract women students from developing countries or directly to women who might be eligible. Relatives of World Bank families are not eligible. APPLY If you are eligible (eligibility criteria are discussed in Chapter 2), you can apply for an MMMF grant through our website.

57 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

KEEP UPDATED AND SPREAD THE WORD

30 YEARS

MMMF has always depended on volunteers to carry out its most important activities. Volunteers serve on the Board, work on Selection or other Committees, help plan the Fair and contact universities to advertise our program. All these tasks depend on more formal recruitment processes and imply longer-term commitments. Occasional short-term opportunities also occur, such as helping with research, office tasks and outreach. Interested WBFN volunteers for any of the above can let the MMMF office know by email: mmmf@worldbank.org or phone 202–473–5804.


“I PLAN TO EXPAND TWO PROJECTS I HAVE INITIATED THAT WILL BENEFIT

WOMEN AND GIRLS IN RURAL AREAS OF GHANA BY PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR EDUCATION!”

VIDA YAKONG, Ghana, Grant Recipient 2009

(Here explaining microfunding to a women’s group in Ghana)


APPENDIX A Recipients’ Data

Appendix A provides details about MMMF’s 186 grantees over its 30-year history. Graphs here illustrate the growing number of grantees each year, their professional subject majors, their degrees and a full listing of all recipients by year indicating their nationality and degree. On page 17 of the text, a graph also indicates the dollar amounts of grant funding allocated each year. The source for this material is MMMF’s recipient database. On MMMF’s website, www.mmmf-grants.org, more details can be found about each grantee, including her university.


Recipients by Year (1983–2011)

20 18

No. of Recipients

16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

Recipients by Degree (1983–2011)

Doctorate/PhD 60%

Others 3% Bachelor 2% Masters 35%

10

20

08

20

06

20

04

02

20

20

00

8

20

6

19 9

4

19 9

19 9

92

0

19

8

19 9

6

19 8

4

60

19 8

19 8

19 8

2

0


Recipients’ Area of Study (1983–2011) Social Work 5%

Other 13%

Agriculture + Environment 6%

Health 27%

International Studies 7%

Regional Distribution of Recipients (1983–2011)

Europe/Central Asia 4%

Middle East/North Africa 5%

Latin America 13%

Asia 26%

61 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

Sub-Saharan Africa 52%

30 YEARS

Education 22%

Social Sciences 20%


1983 MARION SUBAH, Liberia, MSN, Nursing 1984 NADU TUAKLI, Zimbabwe, MA, Public Health 1985 FRANNIE HUMPLICK-LEAUTIER, Tanzania, MS, Civil Engineering 1986 YESHI WORDOFFA, Ethiopia, Associate Degree, Nutrition & Family Health 1987 AGNES ASEKENYE-OONYU, Uganda, MA, Public Administration 1988 LUCY KEHINDE, Nigeria, PhD, Agriculture REN (JULIET CHANG) ZHANG, China, MA, Education

62

1989 CHANDRA BHADRA, Nepal, PhD, Home Economics LEOCADIE NAHISHAKIYE, Burundi, PhD, African Languages & Literature 1990 MONICA AYIEKO, Kenya, PhD, Vocational & Technical Education MARY BUENAVISTA, Philippines, PhD, Sociology SUMILA GULYANI, India, PhD, Architecture PHILIPPA MUDIDO, Uganda, MD, Pediatrics RUPHINA OKEYO, Kenya, PhD, Nutrition 1991 VIOLET BARRITEAU-FOSTER, Barbados, PhD, Political Science DURRE CHOWDHURY, Bangladesh, PhD, Community Health NANDITA KAPADIA-KUNDU, India, PhD, Public Health NEEMA NGWARE, Tanzania, MA, Human Ecology GUL OZYEGIN, Turkey, PhD, Sociology


1992 AKOSUA LOVE ANYIDOHO, Ghana, PhD, Foreign Languages & Applied Linguistics JOSEFINA BONILLA, Nicaragua, PhD, Public Health SHOBHA JOSEPH, India, MA, Special Education LUCY MALIWICHI, Malawi, PhD, Agricultural Education TANIA OLIVEIRA, Brazil, PhD, Social Work 1993 PRISCA AWANDA, Cameroon, BS, Nursing LUZ DONATO-MOLINA, Colombia, PhD, Anthropology MARLENE HABOUD, Ecuador, PhD, Linguistics GHAZALA PERVEEN, Pakistan, PhD, Epidemiology SUJITRA TIANSAWAD, Thailand, ScD, Nursing 1994 SARADA BALAGOPALAN, India, PhD, International Education

30 YEARS

PERFECTA HINOJOSA, Philippines, PhD, Resource Management & Policy

63

MALATI GOPAL, India, PhD, Special Education GITIARA NASREEN, Bangladesh, PhD, Political Science PRAPIMPORN SOMNASANG, Thailand, PhD, Nutritional Anthropology 1995 SOHEIR ABDELRAHMAN, Egypt, PhD, Rural Sociology HEBRET BERHE, Eritrea, MA, Sustainable International Development ORLEAN BROWN, Jamaica, PhD, Education OLGA GENERALOVA-KUTUZOVA, Russia, Certificate, Public Administration SOPHIA MAKHUBU, South Africa, PhD, Public Health Nursing MARGARET MBILIZI, Malawi, PhD, Education Policy Studies 1996 FRANCES BAKARR, Sierra Leone, EdD, Educational Administration

OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

FATIMA TANNI LAWSON, Nigeria, PhD, Education Policy & Administration


ANA DE SOUZA, Brazil, ScD, Maternal and Child Health LAZIMA ONTA-BHATTA, Nepal, PhD, Anthropology MALGORZATA ORNOCH-TABEDZKA, Poland, MPH, International Health & Development MARGARET WALUBUKA, Kenya, PhD, Deaf Education (Multiple Disabilities) DENISE ZINN, South Africa, EdD, Education 1997 MANISHA ARYAL, Nepal, MA, Journalism LUISA DEL CARMEN CAMARA-CABRALES, Mexico, PhD, Tropical Forestry & Agroforestry LAILA GULZAR, Pakistan, PhD, Nursing TANDEKA NKIWANE, Zimbabwe, PhD, International Relations CELESTINE NYAMU-MUSEMBI, Kenya, SJD, Law SLAVENKA SEDLAR, Croatia, PhD, Social Psychology

64

1998 JUDITH ALPUCHE, Belize, MA, Social Work CHRISSIE CHAWANJE, Malawi, PhD, Human Nutrition & Foods ALENA HALOVA, Czech Republic, PhD, Special Education PATCHARAPORN KERDMONGKOL, Thailand, PhD, Nursing AUMA OKWANY, Kenya, PhD, Educational Policy Studies CHAMPIKA SOYSA, Sri Lanka, PhD, Clinical Psychology 1999 VALENTINA BOPKOVA, FYR of Macedonia, PhD, Social Work LETINA NGWENYA JERANYAMA, Zimbabwe, PhD, Curriculum Teaching & Educational Policy KINDY MARINA, Indonesia, MA, Public Health THIDZIAMBI SYLVIA PHENDLA, South Africa, PhD, Educational Administration BUMO TSERING YESHI, Tibet/India, PhD, Educational Evaluation 2000 LOUISE BADIANE, Senegal, PhD, Medical Anthropology


ANGELA CHIMWAZA, Malawi, PhD, Nursing KHAIRUNNISSA DHAMANI, Pakistan, MS, Nursing NEDDY MATSHALAGA, Zimbabwe, PhD, Sociology ENNETTE TAWAH, Cameroon, MA, International Development 2001 CELENE GYLES, Jamaica, PhD, Special Education CHANTAL KAYITESI, Rwanda, MA, Public Health ALICE MITWARUCIN, Kenya, PhD, Counseling Psychology MARIA NNYEPI, Botswana, PhD, Human Nutrition/Maternal-Child Nutrition KADRI TAMM, Estonia, BA, Political Science 2002 HANH BICH DUONG, Vietnam, PhD, Anthropology/MA, Public Affairs KAMALA GURUNG, Nepal, MA, Speech Pathology

30 YEARS

CHUNG PHAM, Vietnam, MA, Clinical Social Work

65

MARY NAMUSONGE, Kenya, PhD, Education LUCILIA TREMURA, Brazil, PhD, Sociology 2003 ELIZABETH EKANEM EKANEM, Nigeria, MSW, Social Work YIT MUI KHOO, Malaysia, MSW, Social Work AFIA NATHANIEL, Pakistan, MFA, Film Directing ROSE ATIENO OGUTU, Kenya, MA, Horticulture CLAUDIA REYES-QUILODRAN, Chile, PhD, Political Science KAWKAB SHISHANI, Jordan, PhD, Nursing ELINAMI SWAI, Tanzania, MA, Adult Education (Women’s Studies) 2004 SENAIT ASSEFA, Ethiopia, MIA, Economic & Political Development/MPH, Public Health

OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

JAMILAH NUH, Indonesia, MA, South East Asian Studies & Environmental Policy


LAURA BALBUENA-GONZALEZ, Peru, PhD, Political Science VALENTINE BAPTISTE, Dominica, MA, Social Work AGNES KAHINDI, Kenya, MA, Expressive Therapies (Mental Health Counseling) LARISA KASUMAGIC, Bosnia-Herzegovina, MPS, International Development ELIZABETH MAEDA, Tanzania, PhD, Agriculture & Public Policy OKHIDOI OTGONJARGAL, Mongolia, EdM, International Educational Development DEIRDRE SMYTHE, South Africa, JSM/JSD, Law 2005 CARLA BRAGA, Mozambique, PhD, Anthropology ESTHER MAYAMBALA KISAAKYE, Uganda, SJD, Law GULIZ KURT, Turkey, PhD, Special Education (Learning Disabilities) ISABEL MADZORERA, Zimbabwe, MA, Nutrition SHEILA MAGERO, Uganda, MA, Management

66

SITHOKOZILE MAPOSA, Zimbabwe, PhD, Nursing DIYA MEHRA, India, PhD, Anthropology MARY MHANGO, Malawi, PhD, Textiles & Clothing PATRICIA WANGAI NJAGI, Kenya, MA, Education HASNAH TORAN, Malaysia, PhD, Education 2006 MORENIKE OLUFUNMILAYO AKPO, Nigeria, MA, Public Health KHIN MAR AUNG, Myanmar, MS, Intercultural Service, Leadership & Management TRUPHENA MORAA CHOTI, Kenya, PhD, Education SAKEENA AYOUB ELAYAN, West Bank&Gaza/Jordan, PhD, Education Administration ANNAH ANIKIE MOLOSIWA, Botswana, PhD, Teaching, Curriculum & Education Policy VAN THI NGUYEN, Vietnam, PhD, Social Work BISHNU MAYA PARIYAR, Nepal, MA, International Development & Social Change MALATI RAO, India, MFA, Film & Media Arts TASHI ZANGMO, Bhutan, PhD, Education


2007 MEKHRIBON ABDULLAEVA, Uzbekistan, MA, Intercultural Service, Leadership & Management NYAMBILILA ABDALLAH AMURI, Tanzania, PhD, Agronomy (Soil Science) ALEJANDRA CORTAZAR VALDES, Chile, MA, Education (Early Childhood) PRUDENCE KOMUJINYA, Uganda, MA, Women’s & Gender Studies PRUDENCIA MWEEMBA, Zambia, PhD, Nursing MARIE ANTOINETTE REYNOLDS, Jamaica, Dual MSW, Social Work & MA, Child Development LINDIWE BUSISIWE SIBISI, Swaziland, MA, Family Social Science VIOLET NAANYU YEBEI, Kenya, PhD, Sociology KUNCHOK YOUDON, Tibet/India, PhD, Political Science/International Affairs

JALELE EREGA DEFA, Ethiopia, PhD, Political Science FANNY HOWARD NEWBALL, Colombia, MA, Sustainable International Development NADIA ALICINA IBRAIMO, Mozambique, MA, Agronomy MARIE THERESE NJIE, The Gambia, MA, Counseling and Spirituality EUNICE OMANGA, Kenya, PhD, Public Health JACQUELINE ORAM-STERLING, Jamaica, PhD, Educational Administration LI PENG, China, MA, Public Administration ANAMIKA PRIYADARSHINI, India, PhD, Global Gender Studies ANITA SHARMA, India, MA, International Development Policy HAZEL ZARANYIKA, Zimbabwe, BSoc (Honors), Community Development 2009 STELLA AJABJI, Cameroon, MA, Sustainable Development MAINGAILA MOONO BANDA, Zambia, MA, Public Health MARCELA VECCHIONE GONCALVES, Brazil, PhD, Political Science (Int’l Relations) GRACE TAMARA HANDY, Sri Lanka, MA, Psychology, Special Education

67 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

MARTINA OCHIEL, Kenya, PhD, Education

30 YEARS

2008


MARYANNE NJERI KAMAU, Kenya, PhD, Education (Health Education) HELEN NAMONDO LINONGE, Cameroon, PhD, Sociology EKAWATI LIU, Indonesia, MA, International Development EDIDAH AMPAIRE LUBEGA, Uganda, PhD, Rural Development INGRID MEINTJES-MOAKES, South Africa, MA, Social Science GLADYS BOGONKO MOMANYI, Kenya, PhD, Conflict Analysis & Resolution ARUNDATI MURALIDHARAN, India, PhD, Public Health (Social & Behavioral Sciences) ELIZABETH NGADZE, Zimbabwe, PhD, Plant Pathology ANNA TINA SALIMO, Zimbabwe, MSc, Molecular & Cell Biology FARINA SO, Cambodia, MA, International Affairs (South East Asian Studies) BYELA TIBESIGWA, Tanzania, PhD, Economics VIDA NYAGRE YAKONG, Ghana, PhD, Medical Anthropology WAGANESH ABEJE ZELEKE, Ethiopia, MA, Education (Intercultural Youth & Family Dev.)

68

2010 KHITAM ABU HAMAD, West Bank & Gaza, PhD, Social Policy & Management (Health) TAHREER ARAJ, West Bank & Gaza, PhD, Sociology (Human & Community Development) COMFORT ASOOGO, Ghana, MSc, Nursing (Oncology) PRISCILA CAÇOLA, Brazil, PhD, Motor Neuroscience & Kinesiology CHRISTINE GUMUNYU-MANATSA, Zimbabwe, MSocSci, Community Development BIRKE ANBESSE HURRISSA, Ethiopia, MPhil, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry MAGGIE MADIMBO, Malawi, PhD, Organizational Leadership, Education Sector LILLIAN MUKANDIWA, Zimbabwe, PhD, Paraclinical & Veterinary Sciences RUTH HOPE MWANDIRA, Malawi, PhD, Public Health (Management & Policy) RANA OBEIDAT, Jordan, PhD, Nursing, Oncology (Breast Cancer) LILYANN OYUGI, Kenya, PhD, Special Education (Disabilities & At Risk Studies) CLARICE REIS, Brazil, MSc, Family Medicine EVELYN SAKEAH, Ghana, PhD, Public Health (Maternal & Child Health) NEO SELIKANE, Lesotho, MSc, Public Health (Monitoring & Evaluation)


REFILWE SELLO, Botswana, MPH, Public Health & Tropical Medicine EVALINA VAN WIJK, South Africa, PhD, Psychiatric Nursing 2011 EMAN ABU SABBAH, Jordan, PhD, Nursing Science (Women’s Health) OLUWATOYIN ADEWUNMI ADELEKE, Nigeria, MA, Public Health FAFANYO ASISEH, Ghana, PhD, Development and Health Economics GOODNESS CHIOMA AYE, Nigeria, PhD, Agricultural Economics CONSODYNE MUKAMA BUZABO, Uganda, MA, Transformative Arts SIGLIA PIMENTEL HOHER CAMARGO, Brazil, PhD, Education WEIWEI CHEN, China, PhD, Education AMBIKA GOEL, India, PhD, Mechanical Engineering (Biomechanics) SALMATTA IBRAHIM, Sierra Leone, MSc, Geology (Hydrogeology) GRACIOUS MADIMUTSA, Zimbabwe, BA (Honors), Community Development TRUELOVE SMANGELE MKHWANZI, South Africa, PhD, Education Leadership & Policy Studies

30 YEARS

BATOOL FATIMA, Pakistan, PhD, International Public Health

69

ELIZABETH BEATRICE NAMAZZI, Uganda, PhD, Curriculum Studies NUNING SULIASIH PURWANINGRUM, Indonesia, PhD, Global Gender Studies IVY RUKASHA, Zimbabwe, MSc, Medical Microbiology LIN SHI, China, MA, International Affairs GCINAPHI EMILY SIKHONDZE, Swaziland, MA, Education ITZEL ADRIANA SOSA SANCHEZ, Mexico, PhD, Sociology

Note: Degree indicates program for which recipient was enrolled at time of grant.

OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

ALBERTINA MAITUMELENG NTHO-NTHO, Lesotho, PhD, Education Management, Law & Policy


Margaret McNamara visiting women and children in Niger, Bangladesh, Bolivia, and Burma


APPENDIX B Financial Data

Appendix B documents MMMF’s latest audited financial statement as well as historical financial trends: the year-by-year cash donations and funds raised through events and sales, and total assets and invested assets. Dollars delivered as grants by year can be seen in the graph on page 17. The sources for these data are, for the early pre-incorporation years, the “long history” by Harriet Baldwin: MMMF: A Reference History, (1994), and for 1991–2011, the annual audit reports and annual reports. The MMMF website, www.mmmf-grants.org, contains the latest annual report, including the financial statement. The year 1990 was a transition year of only six months, as fiscal years changed to July 1—June 30. The cash donation peaks reflect large donations in 1990 from the Asia Region of the World Bank, in 1996 from the Africa Region, and in 2004, from the estate of late World Bank President Barber Conable. The dip in total assets in recent years reflects the impact of the 2008 recession on invested funds of the MMMF and subsequent recovery.


SUMMARY FINANCIAL STATEMENT FY11 Contributions and other revenues

$

Cash donations

87,941

Non-monetary (in-kind) contributions

59,755

Special fund-raising events

49,262

Less: direct expenses

(1,260)

Miscellaneous revenue Total Revenues (A)

2 195,700

Expenses Program services Grants and other recipient expenses

72

Other program expenses

189,636 39,503

Supporting services Fundraising expenses

37,152

Management and general

36,454

Total expenses (B)

302,745

Increase in net assets before investment return (loss) (C=A-B)

(107,045)

Net Investment income (D)

404,062

Increase in unrestricted net assets (C+D)

297,017

Net assets at beginning of year

2,140,048

Net assets at end of year

2,437,065

Notes: Full audited financial statements are available for inspection upon request. The following non-monetary (in-kind) contributions totaling $59,755 were received and are included above in both revenues and expenses: $43,417 from WBG for office space, communications, printing and administrative/event support; and $16,338 for pro bono legal support. MMMF also benefits from significant volunteer time to carry out its management and program.


Cash Donations and Fundraisings (1983–2011)

180

Cash donations including foreign coins Fundraising (cookbook, balls, fair)

160 140

$000s

120 100 80 60 40

11 20

08 20

05 20

02 20

02 20

19 9

9

6 19 9

19

93

0 19 9

87 19

4 19 8

19

81

0

73

Total Assets and Invested Funds (1991–2011)

OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION

3000 Total Assets ($000) Invested Funds ($000)

2500 2000 1500 1000 500

11 20

09 20

07 20

05 20

03 20

01 20

9 19 9

97 19

5 19 9

93 19

91

0

19

$000s

30 YEARS

20


The Early Days


APPENDIX C Founders, Committee Members, Board Members, Officers

In recognition of MMMF’s long tradition of volunteerism, through which virtually all of the governance, fundraising and program implementation took place, this Appendix lists the MMMF founders, and, following incorporation in 1989, its Board and officers over the years along with Selection Committee leadership. Years indicated are fiscal years (July 1—June 30). Source: Annual reports and, prior to incorporation, the Harriet Baldwin history MMMF: A Reference History (1994).


MMMF FOUNDERS BEATRICE KNOX, UK

VICE PRESIDENTS GEORGINE AHMAD, NL, 2010–11

RUBY WINGATE, CA

LORENDA ALISBAH, US, 1992–94

MMMF COMMITTEE CARMEN GONZALES, SP

NALINIE KOUAME, SL, 2008–10

MEG GABRIEL, US

CARLA SCEARCE, IT/US, 1994–2000

AIDA HABIB, EG

ROSEMARIE WAPENHANS, DE, 1989–92

CARLA SCEARCE, IT/US

HANNA WOICKE, DE/US, 2000–01

IRENE MOULD, UK JANE NORTH, UK KITTY BROCHES, NL YVONNE KENDALL, UK

76

CAROLINE BERNEY, UK/US, 2001–06

CARLA PEPERZAK, NL/US NADINE WETZLER, US HONORARY PRESIDENTS PEGGY CLAUSEN, US, 1983–86 CHARLOTTE CONABLE, US, 1986–91 PATSY PRESTON, US, 1991–95 ELAINE WOLFENSOHN, US, 1996–2005

HADA ZAIDAN, US/LB, 2006–07 TREASURERS MARYANN BRIGGS, US, 1991–95 JAYATI DATTA-MITRA, IN, 2010–Present INEKE DEHAAN, NL, 1996–2002 ANNE DICKERSON, US, 1989–91 CHARLOTTE JONES-CARROLL, US, 2008–10 LILIAN KEW, ZA/US, 2002–2008 SECRETARIES GEORGINE AHMAD, NL, 2006–07 TEMBISO CHIKOSI, ZW, 2001–04 ANN KERR, CA, 1997–2001

PRESIDENTS CAROLINE BERNEY, UK/US, 2008– 10

KRIS MARTIN, AU, 2009– Present

CHARLOTTE JONES-CARROLL, US, 2010–Present

ZANE STUGGINS, CA, 2007–09

SUKRIYE KARAOSMANOGLU, TR, 1989–95

MATILDE ZETTERSTROM, US, 1989–97

LOIS KHAIRALLAH, US, 2006–07

ALISON ORDU, UK, 2004–06

PRISCILLA RACHUN LINN, US, 1995–2001

FAIR CHAIRS GEORGINE AHMAD, NL, 2007–Present

HANNA WOICKE, DE/US, 2001–06

CAROLINE BERNEY, UK/US, 2005–06

Note: Board Directors list excludes directors listed as officers.


CARLA SCEARCE, IT/US, 1984–2004

KATHLEEN MCNAMARA, US, 2009–Present

COORDINATORS MARTINA ADANK, CH, 2010–Present

SUMAN MEHRA, IN/US, 2010–Present

CECILE FERRI, FR, 2009–10

LEONORA KIMI NYAWATA, ZW, 2007–09

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS JOANNE GARRITY, US , 1989–2004

ELISABETH RICE, BE/US, 2010–11

LOUISE SHIMIZU, US, 2004–09

PIETRONELLA VAN DEN OEVER, NL, 2007–08

DIRECTORS AT-LARGE HARRIET BALDWIN, US, 1994–99

MERETE VAN DER MANDELE, DK, 1988–91

CAROLINE BEENHAKKER, AT, 1992–2001

AIMEE WARREN, BR/US, 1988–2003

RUPA BHATTASALI, IN, 2005–07

HILARY WELCH, UK, 2010–Present

SIGRID BLOBEL, DE, 2002–08

RUBY WINGATE, CA, 2007–10

SARAH BRAU, US/DE, 2007–Present

ANDREE WYNKOOP, US, 2008–Present

EUNICE BUKY, UK, 1989–94 NADEREH CHAMLOU, IR, 2010–Present

SELECTION COMMITTEE CHAIRS HARRIET BALDWIN, US, 1991–93

YUNYING CHEN, CN, 2009–10

SIGRID BLOBEL, DE, 1994–96

CYNTHIA COOK, US, 2004–06

DEBRA BYAM, BB, 2003–05

CLEO CRUIKSHANK, HN, 2001–06

GEETA CHANDRASEKAR, IN, 2008

GILDA DADUSH, FR, 2009–10

URSULA DEHEIJA, DE, 2003

EDILENE DE GOUVELLO, BR, 2007–08

VESNA DE LA BORDE, GH/FR, 2009–11

JOANNE GARRITY, US , 2008–Present

NAVODINI HARMSEN, LK, 2009

JANET GELI, US, 1996–2003

KAREN HARRISON, US, 1997–98, 2002

AIDA HABIB, EG, 1989–95

YOSHIKO OKUSHI, JA, 2006–07

ANN HAMMOND, US, 1998–99

MAY PAYNE, UK, 1984–87

DOMINIQUE LALLEMENT, FR, 2006–Present

LILIAN SILVEIRA, SV, 1988–90, 1999–2000

MARGARET LANE, AU, 1989–2005

ELNA VAN GREUNING, ZA, 2006–08 (HQ), 2008–10 (ZA)

VIM MAGUIRE, LK/US, 2001–08

HILARY WELCH, UK, 1998–2001

TALAAT MOREAU, PK/US, 2010–Present

CHRISTINE RYRIE, UK, 1992–93

BETH VERGIN, US, 1996–2002 30 YEARS

77 OF SUPPORTING WOMEN’S EDUCATION


“EDUCATION IS A WOMAN’S RIGHT!” MARGARET CRAIG MCNAMARA

The Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund (MMMF) October 2011


The Margaret McNamara Memorial Fund 1818 H Street NW, MSN J2-202 Washington DC, 20433 www.mmmf-grants.org


30 Years of Supporting Women's Education