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H C S E L N I R V A T H N C E S O C E T N L I N R TV OR N H E T C N N TO N R L AR CH C ES N I RL V T HA SC CEN ON T VIN RN NT HO NT TO


CATEGORIES Student Work

Personal Projects

Professional Work

CHRONOLOGY 2015

STEINBERG ROWLAND & BROUGHTON PERKINS+WILL 2010

NISDA

RISD ARCHITECTURE 2005

CORNELL ENGINEERING

2001

ANDOVER

Connection Screen, Spring 2010


WICKED AWESOME

PRETTY AWESOME

Line + Relation Drawings + Ceramics Lenticular Bridge Drawings Sightlines Sucrose Storefront Off-Season Tank Tops Housing on Slope Flooding at Farnsworth Introvert/Extrovert Land/Edge Florey Analysis Investigations Greenhouse How House Analysis Wood & Rope Enclosure Transgressing Boundaries Connection Screen Bridge Building Two Islands Expanded Blind Threaded Vector Whittier Science Center CAN-struction Four ATMs Two Parks Housing Digital Confessional Model Making Mello Residence Aspen Conference Untitled

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LINE + RELATION exhibit at Phillips Academy Andover, Fall 2010

I was invited to curate and show in a joint exhibit of work by my father, John Havens Thornton, and me. I selected work that emphasized the reciprocal relationship between our work, and highlighted the use of both geometric and expressive lines that create embedded figures, simulate spatial depth, and define character.

I designed this announcement card

To the left is a painting by John Thornton, and to the right is a painting of mine

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Personal Project | Line + Relation | Fall 2010


installation at the Gelb Gallery at Phillips Academy Andover

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porcelain teapot

stoneware vessel

stoneware vessel

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Personal Project | Ceramics + Drawing | 2004 - 2006


Cat & Bird, charcoal and pastel on paper, 18� x 22�

stoneware sculpture

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LENTICULAR BRIDGE High Performance Structures, Fall 2008

A lenticular bridge uses the diagram of the moment of inertia along a simply supported beam for its physical profile in order to most efficiently resist bending forces. Going beyond the traditional design of bridge supported by trusses, my design integrates the different elements into a cohesive whole. As opposed to defining the structural system and road surface as two distinct and unrelated elements, I chose to create a symbiotic relationship where the truss cradles the deck and the deck triangulates the section to create lateral bracing. The result is an efficient and sculptural structure.

tension / compression

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Student Work | High Performance Structures | Fall 2008


Untitled, graphite and ink on paper, 18� x 22�

sketchbook samples

Personal Project | Drawings | 2011-2015

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SIGHTLINES

Transgressing Boundaires, Spring 2010

My undergraduate dorm room had a window that looked directly onto an array of other students’ windows. The reciprocal views between the sets of rooms inspired me to make a physical manifestation of the invisible gaze in my room. I chose one window across the open space, and delineated this occupants field of vision with an outline of bright orange mason line. The materialization of the other student’s view cone into my room made me more aware of when I was within view or hidden.

the view out my dorm room window

installation of other’s view cone in my room

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Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Spring 2010


diagram exploring the experiential distance between dorm rooms against their literal proximity


SUCROSE STOREFRONT Digital Constructs, Fall 2009 in collaboration with Can Ustundag and Jared Hill

Tasked with creating a storefront installation for a local candy shop using digital fabrication, my first impulse was to develop a form that was three-dimensional and took advantage of the precision of laser cutting. I proposed replicating the tetrahedral geometry of atoms in a sucrose molecule, and together, we designed a modular system of acrylic units. The lasercut acrylic folds into tetrahedral pieces, snap together at carefully calibrated tabs, and then assemble into the overall structure.

we did not select the full-size automated carolers

sucrose molecule geometry

laser-cut acrylic units

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Student Work | Digital Constructs | Fall 2009


“OFF-SEASON” TANK TOPS Personal Project, Summer 2015

I began this project when I was an art education intern at Nantucket Island School of Design and Art. I was inspired by the amazing gradients of color in the sky and learned full immersion fiber dyeing to create “ombres” on tank-tops. While in Colorado, I was taken with the dramatic topography and spent hours tracing a map of a local mountain range to isolate the line-work. Once I moved to Los Angeles, I had access to the silk-screen industry for supplies and was able to complete the printing on my patio. In the future, I would like to create more designs that are unique to different locations and their topographies to create apparel that is subtly branded to place.

patio print studio

heat-setting

pop-up shop

drawing, fiber dying, and silkscreen printing done by hand

a happy customer Personal Project | Off-Season | Summer 2015

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HOUSING ON SLOPE Urban Design Principals, Fall 2007

This project developed in a series of stages. The first stage was exploring how to develop flat ground on a slope. The ground is held using a system of retaining walls that are either tall or cut down depending on orientation and triangulated for strength. Circulation was developed next. On the lower portion of the slope, the movement is grounded along the edges of the retaining walls, while higher up, the circulation is elevated to catwalks that cross the retaining walls and provide views of activity below. Lastly, programmatic and spatial definition were layered in. The large, grounded spaces accommodate communal activities such as cooking, eating, and entertainment, while the smaller spaces above are cantilevered off the ground for private bedrooms.

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Student Work | Urban Design Principals | Fall 2007

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forming ground, then circulation, then program

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Student Work | Urban Design Principals | Fall 2007

Section A


view towards entry terrace

view from kitchen

view down to common space

private and communal terraces

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1 bedroom 2 bathroom 3 music room 4 patio 5 kitchen 6 common space

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Section B

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FLOODING AT FARNSWORTH

Integrated Building Systems II, Spring 2009 in collaboration with Sandra Chow, Stephanie Gunawan, Robert Williams

The Farnsworth house by Mies van der Rohe has been plagued with problems since it was built. From rust, to window condensation, to massive flooding, many of the problems are the result of Mies’s attempt to express purity and the authority of man over nature. Charged with solving the problems of the house, our team proposed to build a 24 foot diameter water divergent tunnel with concealed drains to divert the entire flood 20 miles away to another tributary, playing off the same hubris that caused the problems initially.

study of Meis’s detail

WE PROPOSED DIVERTING THE FLOOD 20 MILES AWAY, EMPLOYING THE SAME HUBRIS THAT CAUSED THE PROBLEMS IN THE FIRST PLACE

distance between Farnsworth House and river diversion location

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Student Work | Integrated Building Systems II | Spring 2009


sections through river diversion pipeline

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INTROVERT/EXTROVERT Stirling Inversions, Spring 2009

A case study of the Florey Building in Oxford by James Stirling along with the visibility of the site, where the Sackler Museum currently stands, drive the design of this Museum. The museum is bent into a “U” shape in plan to create a publicly accessible courtyard terrace, and the outer corners of the building shift back and forth in response to their prominent visibility on the site. The museum’s interior spaces change form repeatedly from small, intimate galleries, to expansive, inclined exhibition spaces, to slender circulation ramps, and back again.

diagraming visibility of site reveals prominence of corners

N-S section at entry

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corners shift in response to site visibility

Student Work | Stirling Inversions | Spring 2009


thoughts on how the building interacts with its surroundings

entrance to museum and connection to courtyard

street side elevation sketch

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CAFE

DIRECTOR’S OFFICE OFFICES

OFFICES

MEDIA / LECTURE

SECURITY

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Student Work | Stirling Inversions | Spring 2009

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perspective developed in reciprocal process between digital and analog

N-S sectional perspective through ramped galleries and catwalks

facade study model

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Land/Edge 1, graphite on paper, 14” x 11”

Land/Edge 2, graphite on paper, 11” x 14”

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Personal Project | Land/Edge | Spring 2011


Idea-gram of James Stirling’s Florey Building for Stirling Inversions, Spring 2009

Student Work | Stirling Inversions | Spring 2009

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INVESTIGATIONS Design Principals - Fall 2006

In our first semester, we began by analyzing the structural system of biological cells, and then developed a tectonic system in wood dowels and plastic tubing. The system was created based on how the dowels joined in pairs or multiples. Columns alternate between hexagons and triangles in plan, and aggregate next to each-other forming a honeycomb pattern or dia-grid at the respective sections. During subsequent stages of the semester, we translated the tectonic systems into tempered steel wire, and then paper surfaces, altering the form to yield to the respective material properties, while maintaining the logics of joinery and aggregation.

biological cell structure tectonic system

“IF WE’RE ASKED TO HOLD A AND FOREFINGER. THERE’S A WE’RE CREATING A CANTILEVER

order concealed by flexibility

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Student Work | Design Principals | Fall 2006


tempered piano wire and plastic iv tubing

orthographic drawing of wire system

investigating porosity in surface system

curved scores and folds create structural rigidity

SHEET OF PAPER, WE GRASP IT BETWEEN A THUMB LOT OF INTELLIGENCE IN THIS SIMPLE GESTURE AND INTRODUCING DIMENSION TO THE PAPER.� Design Principals creator, Kyna Leski on creativity

sequential surface systems development

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shadow study of surface system with different angles of incidence, watercolor on paper, 30� x 42�


GREENHOUSE Design Principals, Fall 2006

This project began with close study of a plant cell, continuing with different material investigations, and ultimately resulting in the design of a greenhouse. The final design has a large retaining wall that opens to become four structural lobes that cover a series of southward oriented terraces. Small plant seedlings start at the nursery, located in the most closed and dark region, and as they grow they are moved out towards the terraces to receive more light, air, and water.

site plan and elevation

NURSERY ← POTTING ← GERMINATION

upper plan

LIGHT ← DARK

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Student Work | Design Principals | Fall 2006


transition from small darker areas to expanses of light

digital photograph of physical model rendered in Photoshop

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HOW HOUSE ANALYSIS

Architectural Design, Spring 2007 Bench designed and built in collaboration with Jay Kim, Katherine Detmer, and Ian Armitage

In the beginning of my second semester, we were tasked with diagramming and analyzing the beautiful How House by R. M. Schindler. The didactic nature of the house’s relationship between concrete, wood, and glass, allowed us novice architecture students to grasp the meaning of architecture in the way that a 2-year old now knows how to swipe on an iPad. A pair of concrete chimney pillars anchor the building into the hillside, and support the lightweight floor and roof diaphragms that cantilever out over wood framing and glass infill. The diagonal symmetry and interlocking L-shapes frame the void of a doubleheight living room, and display the best of midcentury modern architectural reasoning, while the unsupported corner that projects out towards the steeply sloping hillside adds an element of surprise and bravado. Even as Schindler gives away his secrets by showing the herring-bone pattern framing of the beak, one is lured into the suspended disbelief that, perhaps, the roof is actually floating. After creating individual drawings and models to pull apart these relationships, I worked in a group with three other students to build a bench that displayed our understanding of Schindler’s project. The bench displays measured rigor based on the dimensions of available materials, and employs an interlocking of heavy concrete and light-weight wood similar to the structure of the How House.

grain of circulation

visual porosity

connectivity of spaces

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Student Work | Architectural Design | Spring 2007


plaster and basswood analysis of structure

axonometric section through hearth

concept sketch

concrete and wood bench

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WOOD ENCLOSURE Architectural Design, Spring 2007

12’ x 4” x 1” firring strips and twine rope to build a full scale enclosure, with the entire class working as a team. When investigating the material at full scale, the flimsiness of the firring strips was immediately apparent. In response, we developed a bow-like tectonic that held the wood static and rigid by keeping it at the bending limit. The arched form and construction sequence was then dictated by this unit. The bow-like elements were pre-assembled and brought to the site. The class assembled multi-segment arches, erected and held the construction with clamps, lashed each joint, and then removed the clamps. The structure was sited at the start of a path to the beach to reinforce a natural threshold observed during the mapping phase of the course, and the geometry of the project allowed one side to have fewer points so it could touch the ground more easily in the thick brush.

study models

joinery mock-up

final scale model

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Student Work | Architectural Design | Spring 2007


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TRANSGRESSING BOUNDARIES Degree Project Thesis Statement, Fall 2009

For my degree project I had the desire to do something very concrete while exploring more ephemeral ideas. I decided to create a series of installations that started by being located in my room and moved progressively outwards. The title of my thesis was Transgressing Boundaries. The Olympian god Hermes is the guide of my thesis. He is the messenger of the gods and a guide to the Underworld. He is also the patron of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of thieves and road travelers, of orators and wit, of literature and poets, of general commerce, and of the cunning of tricksters and liars. What are the boundaries, and what does it mean to travel across them? The boundaries we tacitly interact with every day exist on different levels. Walls are material boundaries that separate myriad interiors from each other and from the outside. Individuals and institutions construct identities as boundaries to define themselves and guide their decisions, while laws and social codes exist to reinforce these limits and to delineate right from wrong. What takes place during crossing is poetry. The poet arranges language to place signified meanings within unexpected signifiers. Limits swing and slide open, creating reprieve from the monotony of definition and enclosure. A gaze out a window carries one’s self outside to inhabit the enormous void between one building and another, and the vision of another travels across to enter our space. An agreement between two people bridges the individual decision making of each. Transgression operates outside expected and institutionalized behavior. The action occurs in the void between buildings for the benefit of those inside looking out the windows.

“The action occurs in the void between buildings for the benefit of those inside looking out the windows.” 36


LIGHTLY STEPPING Transgressing Boundaries, Fall 2009

The degree project probe is the first material object that thesis students create as a statement of purpose for their study. The white frame references the kick guard often seen in museums, whose thinness is contradictory to the authority it holds. The material frame is really a vestigial indication of an understood authority. Two footprints are an index of someone transgressing this spatial limit, but the presence isn’t seen.

Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Fall 2009

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CONNECTION SCREEN Transgressing Boundaries, Spring 2010

Architecture is an event. After designing the location and size of a screen based on the projection angle of one of the school’s digital projectors, and which rooms I had access to, I prepared my ascent. I walked up, climbed up, and may have cleverly broken into where I needed to in order to install the screen, and then projected a showing of the film “Man on Wire”.

alignment of facades

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Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Spring 2010


“Were I to choose an auspicious image for the new millennium, I would choose that one: the sudden agile leap of the poet-philosopher who raises himself above the weight of the world, showing that with all his gravity he has the secret of lightness, and that what many consider to be the vitality of the times – noisy, aggressive, revving and roaring – belongs to the realm of death, like a cemetery for rusty old cars.” Calvino, Italo. Six Memos for the Next Millennium, p. 12, New York: Vintage Books, 1993.

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BRIDGE BUILDING Transgressing Boundaries, Spring 2010

The installations I created over the course of my degree project led me to propose an inhabitable bridge between the architecture and industrial design buildings. The bridge enables multiple programs in addition to circulation. Small niches provide quiet eddies for students to pause or have phone conversations in the privacy that is afforded by the constant movement of people. Meanwhile, the translucent white facade of the bridge building provides an unbroken surface on which to project films. The parking lot below is now an active amphitheater, and the interior of the bridge is activated by the portions of moving image that pass through the wall.

section A

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A

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Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Spring 2010


Sky Bridge, silkscreen print, 18” x 22”

relationship of massing and views

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TWO ISLANDS Transgressing Boundaries, Spring 2010

The architecture department and the industrial design department are located in two buildings whose flat brick facades and punched windows face each other across a surface grade parking lot. The students in each building don’t cross this divide often, even though their studies share many similarities, and they envy each other’s facilities, whether laser cutters or metal milling machines. This installation played with a number of contradictions. The function of the screen is to connect these two populations. Orange mason line is connected to the fabric at a metal grommet reinforced hole at each corner, and spans about 150 feet between the two buildings. While the screen is located so that it blocks views between two individual stairwell windows, it is physically connected to the two buildings. The floating black screen also functions as a common interest or conversation piece for the two groups as it sways around in the wind. Lastly, the process of installing the screen involved going between the two departments and interacting with the different administrators, students, and teachers to negotiate access to rooms and tying down the bright orange mason line tethers. The simple, lightweight, screen occupies the large void between the two buildings creating a connection through material, perception, and action.

explorations of space between buildings

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Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Spring 2010


“A real traveler needs a real Trial. A real traveler must be ready to everything during his journey. The bridge between two islands is invisible but mighty. It connects the islands but doesn’t change the landscape. Walking along it in calm and crossing the conventional boundary the traveler feels himself on the real boundary between the sky and the ocean.” Brodsky and Utkin. “Diomede IM”.

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EXPANDED BLIND

Transgressing Boundaries, Spring 2010

In this installation, I was playing with viewing and [concealment, hiding, blocking view]. I started with the simple observation of the phenomenon of reflection and transparency of windows on the face of a building. When it is bright outside, visibility in through a window is limited, but it is easy to see out. At night, the relationship inverts and one can see the bright interior from outside, but visibility out through the window is limited. Windows essentially become a one-way mirror that flips with the transition of day to night. I used this simple principal, but added a layer of complexity by expanding the space between the window and my constructed blind so there is a small space for an individual to occupy this threshold. Creating this intermediate space between outside and in the room triples the number of viewing relationships (outside to inside, outside to threshold space, inside to threshold space, inside to outside, threshold space to outside, and threshold space to inside). day and night visibility between interior, threshold, and, outside

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Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Spring 2010


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THREADED VECTOR Transgressing Boundaries, Spring 2010

As architects, we typically have a privileged vantage point of understanding a building and its spaces how it is in plan. That is, we understand how there is one space that is sub-divided by partitions. In contrast, I recall understanding rooms before having an architectural education more as the individual interior surfaces of each space. To demonstrate the actual continuity of the spaces in the architecture building, I installed mason line that followed precise vectors that I planned out in axonometric. While the line doesn’t actually pass through the wall (it is attached on each side) the parallel trajectory of the line supports the understanding of the rooms and spaces as parts of a cohesive whole, and challenges the perception of the walls.

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axonometric of RISD architecture building, plotting mason line vector and its intersection points with walls

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Degree Project | Transgressing Boundaries | Spring 2010


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 

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   

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







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

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 

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  

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 

 

 



 

 









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 

   

 

 





 

 



  

   

  



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 

  







 



 

  

 

  









  

 

  



 



The Whittier Science Center is an 80,000 square foot remodel of an existing 70’s brutalist building at Whittier College. I worked on this project from design development through construction documents, and was primarily responsible for developing the wall sections and managing the Revit model. I also produced renderings and worked on the design of the lobby and communal study spaces in collaboration with a senior designer at Steinberg.

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

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 



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 

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  

Steinberg, Los Angeles, CA, 2014

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 







                    

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 

         







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  







 



 



 



 

 





 



 





  









 

 

 

 





 











  







 



















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WHITTIER SCIENCE CENTER





 

 

  



 

 

 



 

 



 

 

 

 









elevation and wall section I created at North facade 







 

     





    

      



         



 

   





        









  

   







 

  

  









 



  



 





 



   





   

 

 

 

 

  













   







 

 

 

   











 



 









 





 

 

 

  

    

               







Professional Work | Steinberg | 2014

           

  

 

 

     







            



     

     





    

    











     

     





 



   

    







 



     





 













 

48



 

















  









 

 







elevation and wall section I created at South facade













 









 























 



 









 





 

 







 





 







    

 









 

 

















 







    





                          



  

 

 

 



 













 









 

 

 





 

 





   



 



 















           

    









     



 



     







 

 

 





           

        

      

    

     

     

 

     

       







 

   











      

    























  









    

 

 





     

 

 

     

 





   

    



     





The primary goals of the project were to put science on display, encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration, and turn the building into a hub of academic activity. On the North facade, existing pre-cast panels were completely removed and being replaced with expansive curtainwall to allow views between the interior and the quad, and to take advantage of natural light. The circulation was moved to the North edge of the building to accentuate the visible activity, and collaboration pods cantilever out from the building in large cubic masses. The red Swisspearl cladding of the projections references the Mission style context. The South facing facade overlooks the public street, and keeps the majority of its precast concrete panels to protect the laboratories from the Southern heat exposure, and mediate the privacy of the more introverted laboratories. Selected areas cantilever out on the South facade in glass and metal panel, reversing the relationship of solid to opaque that occurs on the North facade.

 



 



 





           

     

    

     

     

 

 



      

  




North facade rendering executed under direction of senior designer

South facade rendering executed under direction of senior designer

East/West wall options I modeled and rendered in Revit

49


entrance lobby designed in collaboration with designer Edmund Rivera, I was responsible for the production of the rendering


CAN-STRUCTION Los Angeles Food Bank, Spring 2015

As co-captain of Steinberg’s twelve person CAN-struction team, I was primarily responsible for over-seeing design and fabrication of a 10-foot tall Ms. Pac-man. Together we raised enough money to donate over 5,000 cans of food to the Los Angeles Food Bank, and we also won both the “Judges’ Favorite” and “People’s Choice” awards.

playing with power tools

LET’S MAKE HUNGER A GHOST the height restriction is now 8’, not 10’...

my 15 minutes

52

“Judge’s Favorite” and “People’s Choice” awards, nbd

Personal Project | CAN-struction | Spring 2015


FOUR ATMS

Integrated Building Systems II, Fall 2009

There is no what understanding without context. helpwhere us define who from. we areLike as a group and toandrecognize motivates us, we looked backTo to see came Brodksy Utkin, welarger are interested inand the human condition, thewerelationship between ancritique. individual and the collective, in architectural design as a tool for cultural We share a desire for visions architectural narrative through an awareness of contemporary social conditions. Their from two decades ago resonate withconsider us today, but withand our inclination towards questions of scale and circumstance, we must Brodsky Utkin within their context. Living through Soviet utilitarianism of the 1970s and under theunder shadowanofever-watchful disappointmenteye.in national propaganda, lifewithin for them individual isolation is clearly reflected that was work, and the relative obscurity ofdramatically this beautifuldifferent work This iscontext, further testament toantheir unique predicament. While we live in a their work is inspiration in the potential for architecture to effect global impacts

The people are paid in an hourly wage. The dollar of one hour pays for one brick. In this exchange they concretize their value. This value won’t be spent. Each brick is laid on the next to build staircases on the tops of sky bound high-rises so each individual may climb to the heavens.

FOUR ATMs is was created in collaboration with Sandra Chow, Stephanie Gunawan, and Robert Williams. We developed our concept together, and were each responsible for one section of the final board.

Student Work | Integrated Building Systems II | Fall 2009

53


TWO PARKS HOUSING Urban Design Principles, Fall 2007 in collaboration with Katherine Detmer

This project begins with a long, sloped wedge with over 100 ft of elevation change between two high traffic roadways. My partner for the project and I decided to continue an adjacent chain of green spaces along the length of the site. The proposed housing turns the site inward, shaping two types of park spaces while holding off the busy street with a wall-like facade. Speaking to the context of small homes south of the site, low townhouse style apartments cascade down the slope to form secluded, terraced gardens. On the northern end of the site, three residential towers look over an expansive public park while relating to nearby apartment buildings.

site model built in collaboration with five other students

54

Student Work | Urban Design Principals | Fall 2007


study models

upper level plan and N-S sections, joint collaboration

55


56

Student Work | Urban Design Principals | Fall 2007


street level plan and E-W section, joint collaboration

I built the high-rise portion and topography

57


DIGITAL CONFESSIONAL Integrated Building Systems II, Fall 2009 in collaboration with Sandra Chow, Stephanie Gunawan, and Robert Williams

58

Student Work | Integrated Building Systems II | Fall 2009


THE COLLECTIVE CONFESSIONS CONCEAL THE CONFESSOR, FINDING PRIVACY IN THE PRESENCE OF MANY, HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT

59


MODEL MAKING Steinberg, 2014-2015

60

Professional Work | Steinberg | 2014-2015


MELLO RESIDENCE Rowland+Broughton, Aspen, CO, 2012

I worked on the architecture and interior design for this 6,400-square-foot custom home with four bedrooms. The design of the house plays off the traditional form of a gable roof, but with contemporary detailing. My responsibilities included completing as-built drawings, building a 3-D model of the existing structure, executing design documentation, submitting for public approvals, and assisting in design and material selection.

photography by Brent Moss Professional Work | Rowland+Broughton | 2012

61


ASPEN CONFERENCE Rowland+Broughton, Aspen, CO, 2013

THE GANT

Since the Fall of 2011 I have been working in all phases of design on multiple projects at Rowland+Broughton Architecture, a talented, high energy ROWLAND+BROUGHTON firm in Aspen, Colorado. One project I worked on full time is the renovation and expansion of a conference center at The Gant Hotel and condominiums. The conference center is the focal point of the Gant properties and the renovation will update the face of the property to attract more business and improve the experience of the common area for both residents and visitors. For this project I took as-built measurements of the existing structure, and created visualizations of the proposed design in sketch-up. I also built the Revit model, while learning the program, and worked on the project through to complete construction documents.

The Gant Conference Center, Rowland+Broughton Aspen, Colorado Since the Fall of 2011 I have been working in all phases of design and assisting simultaneously with multiple projects at Rowland+Broughton Architecture. One project I worked on full time is the renovation and expansion of a conference center at The Gant hotel and condominiums. The conference center is the focal point of the Gant properties and the renovation will update the face of the property to attract more business and improve the experience of the common area for both residents and visitors. For this project I took as-built mesasurements of the existing structure, and created visualizations of the proposed design in sketch-up. This was also the first project that Rowland+Broughton put into Revit, and I worked intensively with our Revit expert to create the model, produce our drawing set, and work through trouble shooting from the DD phase through CDs.

exsisting

proposed

508.525.0682 | charlie@rowlandbroughton.com | P.O. Box 1771, Aspen, CO 81612 | www.CharlesVincentThornton.com

scheme A

I CREATED THE CLERESTORY SCHEME (A) WHICH WAS SELECTED FOR THE DESIGN

scheme B

62

Professional Work | Rowland+Broughton | 2013


completed

63


Untitled, painted plywood, 18” x 24” x 15”, 2001

Untitled, painted plywood, 18” x 24” x 15”, 2001

64

Personal Project | Sculpture | 2001


Charles Thornton is a designer at Steinberg Architects in Los Angeles, CA. The son of two artists, Charles was immersed in the world of art and design at a young age. After attempting to rebel against his artist parents by studying engineering freshman year at Cornell University, Charles returned to his interest in design and completed the five year Bachelors of Architecture program at Rhode Island School of Design. Charles has a variety of experiences, ranging from teaching youth art courses in Massachusetts, to interning at an international architecture firm in New York City, to working on private residences and historic hotels in Aspen, Colorado. In 2014, Charles decided to move to Los Angeles to work for Steinberg, and has been applying his energy and artistic sensibility to help create projects that are both conceptually rigorous and beautifully crafted, all while having fun along the way.


Graduate School Application Portfolio  

Academic architecture projects, some professional work, and personal projects from between the years of 2007 and 2015

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