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INNOVATORS AND DISRUPTORS: THE 2017 TECH 25 PLUS: ROBOTS AMONG US, SMARTPHONE GADGETS & AUTHOR FRANKLIN FOER ON THE EXISTENTIAL THREAT OF BIG TECH


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EDITOR'SLETTER 

FEATURES THETECH .............................................. 

LIFESTYLES

Smartphone Gadgets............................................ Monumental Sports Network ................................

FASHIONEDITORIALErudite Edge............... TRENDREPORTBest Western .........................

ARTECHOUSE ..............................................

INGLOT Cosmetics Opening ................................

Robots ...............................................................

Book Parties ........................................................

Tech Parties.........................................................

BOOKTALK'World Without Mind' .................... ARTVermeer & Friends at the National Gallery .........



FYIDC INSIDER'SGUIDE ........................................

SOCIALCALENDAR ...................................

THEDISHCharlie Palmer Steak ........................ 

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY OVERTHEMOONThe Perfection of Elegance ......  Charlie Palmer Steak Reopening ..............................

AROUNDTOWNPower Couple ........................ 

POLLYWOOD

National Symphony Orchestra Gala.......................... 

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

Light of Healing Hope Benefit ................................. 

A Nod to Letterman ............................................. 

Spanish Catholic Center Gala ................................. 

Monkey Business Gala ........................................ 

Night of Hope ..................................................... 

78 Parties! Parties! Parties! .........................................

Puerto Rico: Apron Clad Hero ..............................

Hope for Henry's Strikes for Smiles ...........................

After Dark @THEARC.....................................

No Kid Hungry Dinner.........................................

HOMELIFE

EMBASSYROWAutumn Gatherings ..............

Freer Gallery of Art Reopening ................................

International Student House Gala.......................... 

'Renoir and Friends' Reception.................................

INSIDEHOMESSuzanne and David Chavern's Renovated Falls Church Farmhouse ..........................

Ambassadors Ball ................................................ 

Matt McCormick Welcome Reception .........................

Honoring an Empress .......................................... 

STITCHED Opening .........................................

Aladdin Project Dinner ........................................ 

Superfierce...........................................................

Boys and Girls Club Youth of the Year .....................

Miss America Reception..........................................

REALESTATENEWS...................................

OPENHOUSE .............................................. WINERIESVirginia Wine .................................. MYWASHINGTONMayor Muriel Bowser ........

ON THE COVER: Drawing by Cris Clapp Logan TOP FROM LEFT: David Letterman and Regina Lasko at the Mark Twain Awards (Photo by Tony Powell); XYZT: Abstract Landscapes exhibit at ARTECHOUSE (Photo Courtesy); SANDRO Black leather derby shoe ($385); MAJE Black belted trousers with wide darts ($325) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700. NOUR HAMMOUR "Temple" black studded jacket ($1,775); FAITH CONNEXION Grey crop turtleneck ($380); LAURIE & JOE grey wrap necklace ($50) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915. (Photo by Nick Ghobashi); Jonathan Fineberg admires a Renoir painting at the Phillip's Collection (Photo by Tony Powell); Chloe Marcie small saddle bag ($890), shop.nordstrom.com, A pour of Cabernet Sauvignon at District Winery (Photo Courtesy).

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

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Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

THE FUTURE IS NOW

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s children, many of us at WL remember watching reruns of the animated sitcom The Jetsons, about a family living in the future. George and Jane Jetson, and their children Judy and Elroy, commuted in a flying car, used video phones to talk to each other and had a robot maid named Rosie. The prospect of experiencing their magical, futuristic lifestyle seemed impossible in my lifetime, yet here we are — nearly 60 years after that show’s debut — and self-driving and flying cars are in development. Applications like FaceTime allow people across the world to communicate with each other on camera. Even Jane Jetson’s morning makeup mask, which she applied before video calls, is replicated by Instagram and Snapchat filters. And although we don’t have a Rosie the Robot making us breakfast and doing the dishes, smart home devices like Nest, Alexa and Bolt are controlling the thermostat, creating shopping lists and unlocking our front doors. Halcyon, the Georgetown social enterprise non-profit group, recently hosted a showcase and panel discussion on robotics, which inspired us to take a closer look at robots and their effect on our daily lives. It seemed a fitting topic for our annual technology issue and we asked local artist Cris Clapp Logan to create a cover illustration that poignantly depicted our collective love and addiction to technology. This issue also contains our third annual Tech 25, a compilation of the 25 individuals or teams nominated by their peers who are making their mark in the industry and contributing to our new reality. They include inventors, investors and business leaders. The newest company we feature, KnoNap, founded by Danya Sherman, debuts its napkin that can detect “rape drugs” next month. Including KnoNap seems particularly timely given the recent headline news about sexual harassment in Hollywood and across the country. While we’re praising innovators, it’s important to keep in mind that not all technology is good for us. Journalist Franklin Foer delves into the problems with becoming too reliant on the big four tech companies – Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon – to the point that we struggle to think for ourselves. Read all about his book “World Without Mind” in this month’s Book Talk. Also fitting in with this issue’s tech theme, we headed to WeWork’s H Street NE location for our fashion editorial. The co-working space made a great backdrop for studious, but chic apparel.

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Inside Homes this month features Suzanne and David Chavern’s Falls Church residence where designer Mary Amons joined us to discuss how they renovated the historic farmhouse and a 1940s addition into a stylish home that feels both modern and one-of-a-kind. Area chef José Andrés rallied the troops from his nonprofit World Central Kitchen and raced to Puerto Rico to feed the victims of Hurricane Maria, many of whom were left without power or access to food and water. After three weeks on the ground, he reported on Twitter that his team had fed over one million hot meals to island residents. Last month, we were excited to partner with world-famous chef Charlie Palmer to celebrate the revamp of his Washington restaurant.We ate, drank and chatted with him about his vision for the modern steakhouse and his broader passion for progressive American fare. Colder temps (if they ever arrive) beg for a glass of wine by the fire or if you’re feeling ambitious, a drive out to a few of our favorite Virginia wineries, all an hour away, that serve up both great views and vintages. Be sure to look out for event coverage of WL-sponsored parties like Afterdark@THEARC, the Night of Hope Gala and the Boys & Girls Club National Youth of the Year Celebration. December coverage will include the WL-sponsored Meridian Ball, Fight for Children’s Fight Night and the JDRF Hope Gala.

Nancy R. Bagley Editor in Chief Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington

THE FUTURE OF SPORTS

ART&ATHLETICS

Finally, an exhibition that appeals to both art lovers and sports fiends. This quirky, Instagram-worthy, two-story pop-up interactive exhibition spans 10,000 square feet and features different rooms dedicated to “soccer, basketball, track, tennis, boxing, volleyball and cycling.” There’s even a volleyball court made of salt. Open through Nov. 30, M-Sun, 10 a.m. - 10 p.m., $15, 700 H St. NE, thefutureofsports.co.

DUMBARTON OAKS CONCERTS

MUSEUMMUSIC Looking for a good date night idea? The concert series at Dumbarton Oaks is designed to impress. Single-concert tickets are available for the first time ever at the historic property’s Renaissance-inspired Music Room.The intimate, art-filled space seats no more than 100 guests. This month, GRAMMY award winning father and daughter duo Clarice and Sérgio Assad will play samba and classic Brazilian tunes. Nov. 12 and 13, $54, Call 202-339-6436 for tickets, Performances are Sundays at 7 p.m. and Mondays at 8 p.m., doaks.org.

CRAFTS FESTIVALS

SEASONALSHOPPING Find unique holiday gifts for everyone on your list at these top local festivals:

CRAFTYBASTARDSARTS&CRAFTSFAIR The talented artists at this 14th annual festival have been hand-picked by a jury for their DIY skills. Expect handcrafted jewelry, locally produced food, “punk-rock baby clothes.” and other funky finds. Nov. 11-12, Nationals Park, Advance price $6 for oneday and $10 for two-day admission, dc.craftybastards.com. SUGARLOAF CRAFTS FESTIVAL Hundreds of artisans from across the country come to the annual festival in Gaithersburg that bills itself as “America’s Handmade Market.” As many as 450 emerging and established artists showcase their crafts at the family-friendly event. Live art demonstrations, workshops, music and food add to the festive atmosphere. Oct. 20-22, $8 online, $10 at the door, FREE for kids under 12, Montgomery County Fairgrounds, sugarloafcrafts.com. DOWNTOWNHOLIDAYMARKETOpen daily including weekends, the 13th annual outdoor shopping “village” opens on Black Friday, with more than 150 regional artisans and boutiques represented. Seasonal music and holiday treats will put you in the spirit. F St. between 7th and 9th streets NW, Noon-8 p.m. daily, Nov. 24-Dec. 23, FREE, downtownholidaymarket.com. 10

MAGNETIC FIELDS EXHIBITION

AMERICAN ABSTRACTION Under-recognized artists take center stage at a powerful new exhibition with socio-political themes. “Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today” features multiple generations of black women artists “in context with one another – and within the larger history of abstract art – for the first time.” Many of the 21 featured artists, born between 1891 and 1981, have ties to Washington. Runs through Jan. 21, $10 admission, National Museum of Women in the Arts, nmwa.org.

“NINA SIMONE: FOUR WOMEN” AT ARENA STAGE

ACTIVISTANTHEMS

Arena Stage continues to produce engaging and politically-relevant theater, and “Nina Simone: Four Women” fits the bill. Beginning with the tragic church bombing in Birmingham that killed four young girls, the “provocative musical journey” is set against the backdrop of the civil rights movement and showcases how Simone found her voice and became a voice of the movement. Nov. 10-Dec. 24, Tickets range from $40 to $90, Kreeger Theater at Arena Stage, arenastage.org.

MARIAH CAREY AT MGM NATIONAL HARBOR

CHRISTMASCONCERT When you think of top-selling Christmas albums, multiple-GRAMMY-award winning music icon Mariah Carey comes to mind. The best-selling female artist of all time will croon such time-honored hits as “All I Want for Christmas Is You” at this one-night-only performance. Nov. 24, tickets start at $75, The Theater at MGM National Harbor, mgmnationalharbor.com. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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P H OTO CO U RT E SY T H E F UT U RE O F S P O RTS , P H OTO CO U RT E SY D U M BARTO N OA KS , M A RY LOV E L AC E O’ N E A L , RACI S M I S L I K E RA I N , EI TH ER I T ’S RA I NI N G OR I T ’S G AT H E R I N G S O M E W H E R E , 1 9 93 ; AC R Y L I C O N C A N VA S , 8 6 X 1 3 8 I N . ; M OT T-WA R S H C O L L E C T I O N , F L I N T, M I C H I G A N ; © M A R Y L O V E L AC E O ’ N E A L 2 O F 3 , I M AG E C O U R TE SY ARENA STAGE AND MARIAH CAREY ALBUM COVER COURTE SY

BY ERICA MOODY


FYIDC | SOCIALCALENDAR

NOVEMBER F IGHT NIGHT Guests will enjoy live boxing, mixed martial arts and musical performances at this year’s Fight For Children event, which raises funds for Washington-area students. Washington Hilton; 6 p.m.; black-tie; $1,050; tables start at $10,500; contact Judy Wrench 202-772-0417, Judy.Wrench@FightForChildren.org.

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K NOCK OUT ABUSE GALA Four local domestic violence charities will benefit from the evening, which will feature both live and silent auctions. Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C.; 6:30 p.m.; black-tie; $650; sponsorships start at $7,500; contact (202) 223-1906.

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L BJ LIBERTY & JUSTICE FOR ALL AWARD LBJ supporters will join event chairmen Lloyd Hand and Cappy McGarr to honor philanthropist David Rubenstein. National Archives Museum; 6:30 p.m.; $1,000; sponsorships start at $5,000; contact Amy Barbee, 512-721-0265, abarbee@lbffoundation.org.

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TH E LAB SCHOOL OF WASHINGTON’S AWARDS GALA The evening celebrates the school’s mission to nurture pupils with learning differences. Proceeds will benefit students on financial aid. National Building Museum; 6 p.m.; sponsorships start at $7,500; contact Marty Cathcart, marty. cathcart@labschool.org.

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INO VA SUMMIT Guests will enjoy a weekend full of food, cocktails and thought provoking health-centric conferences. Salamander Resort & Spa; contact Kara Burke, 703-289-2077, kara. burke@inova.org.

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PAS SION FOR CARING GALA The 40th anniversary celebration will support Capital Caring’s ongoing efforts to improve care for people facing life-limiting illness. MGM National Harbor Resort; 6 p.m.; cocktail; $400; contact Jeff Kost, jkost@capitalcaring.org.

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CEL EBRATE EVERY BREATH GALA The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation will honor Knox Singleton, CEO of Inova Health Systems. The Ritz-Carlton,Washington D.C.; 6 p.m.; $500; sponsorships start at $5,000; contact Erin Leahey, 301-657- 8444, eleahey@cff.org.

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NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY’S AME RICAN PORTRAIT GALA The event will celebrate distinguished honorees including Spike Lee and Madeleine Albright. Proceeds will go toward strengthening the museum’s endowment, which supports compelling exhibitions that tell the dynamic and multifaceted story of America. National Portrait Gallery, Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard; sponsorships start at $10,000; contact (202) 633-8553, NPG_Gala@si.edu.

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Jayne Sandman, Michelle Gloden Schoenfeld, Barbara Martin and Laura Evans at the 2016 Knock Out Abuse Gala.

SAVE THE DATE :/6321625('(9(176

DEC KENNEDYCENTERHONORS DEC WASHINGTONBALLET’SNUTCRACKERTEAPARTY DEC  THECHORALARTSSOCIETYOFWASHINGTON’SHOLIDAY CONCERTANDGALA

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P H OTOS BY TO NY P OW E L L

J UN IOR DIABETES RESEARCH FOUNDATION HOPE GALA Supporters will join chairwomen Michelle Dolansky and Susan Faries to raise critical funds for Type 1 Diabetes research to reduce the disease’s impact on people’s lives. National Building Museum; 6 p.m.; $500; sponsorships start at $5,000; contact Alexandra Barker, abarker@jdrf.org.

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Michael Wilbon and Reisha Raney at Fight Night 2016


FYIDC | THEDISH

PALMER’STOUCH Charlie Palmer adds new flare to his modern American steakhouse. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I PORTRAIT BY TONY POWELL

Chef and owner Charlie Palmer; the bi-coastal cheese cart with a selection of small artisanal varieties; Japanese A5 Wagyu on a Himalayan salt block and chef’s daily crudo selection.

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ith over 15 restaurant concepts, celebrity chef Charlie Palmer has built his dining empire upon a simple promise – ingredients of the highest quality that celebrate the American food story. He recalls beginning his career learning classically French techniques because the rest of the world did not take American cuisine seriously. Being relatively newer to the world’s cooking stage, Palmer thinks there is an advantage U.S. chefs have: “We’re not bound by a lot of tradition,” he says. “The world is our palette and we pull inspiration from everywhere.” It was this “the world is my oyster” attitude that influenced his future cooking progressive American fare. It’s those same core beliefs that translate into Charlie Palmer Steakhouse in Washington, which got both interior and menu refreshes last month. Palmer is careful not to use the word “change,” because that was not the goal. In fact, the updates were so slight that the restaurant never closed; all work was completed during off-hours. Custom furniture, textural fabrics and fresh carpeting by Barbara Gisel of BGD Interior Design all helped add to the “sexy atmosphere” Palmer hoped to achieve. Since its opening in 2003, the 200- seat dining room has been a mainstay for the politico/lobbyist set, but Palmer doesn’t want to be trapped by typical steakhouse stereotypes of dark wood, cigars and massive cuts of meat. He recognizes that females are a huge part of his business, noting that 70 percent of restaurant reservations are made by women. For the menu part of the revamp, he buddied up with executive chef Mike Ellis to test ideas. Ellis, who helped launch the steakhouse over a decade ago and came back last year after a stint at one of Palmer’s other concepts, jokes that he had experienced déjà vu after having to move furniture again. Notables on the roster are Japanese A5 Wagyu that is served on a block of Himalayan rock salt, as well as incredibly tender truffle roasted Poulet Rouge (also known as naked neck chickens) sourced from Joyce Farms in North Carolina. Perhaps the most exciting addition to food line-up is a handsome mahogany cheese cart that will be rolled out for guests to ponder postdinner if their savory tooth trumps the sweet one.Ten small-batch American cheeses will be offered with wine pairings. Sommelier Nadine Brown, coming off a RAMMY win for best wine program of the year, showcases over 3,500 exclusively American bottles. On the cocktail front, Lamar Lusk helped create a menu using a variety of local spirits including, Rye Street Whiskey from Baltimore – sourcing that Palmer is passionate about: “If we can help in anyway to promote them as makers, distillers, brewers and winemakers,” he says. “That’s a part of the equation.” Palmer’s commitment to quality ingredients ring true with every bite of food and every sip of wine. “We’re not masking flavors, we’re enhancing flavors and bringing out flavors of a natural product,” he says. “That’s our goal.” 

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P H OTOS CO URT E SY O F C H AR L I E PAL M E R , P O RT RAI T BY TO N Y P OW E L L

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POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy| International Student House Dinner and the Mark Twain Prize

Harrison Ford and David Skorton at the Friends of the National Zoo’s Monkey Business Gala (Photo by Tony Powell)

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POLLYWOOD

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

A NOD TO LETTERMAN

ALATENIGHTSHOWICONRECEIVESTHEMARKTWAINPRIZE REDCARPETCOVERAGEBYJANETDONOVAN|PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

The Kennedy Center honored comedian and former late-night talk show host David Letterman with the 20th annual Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. A star-studded cast of the now-bearded broadcasting icon’s friends and former colleagues, including Steve Martin, Martin Short, Amy Schumer (the only woman) and last year’s recipient, Bill Murray, came to pay tribute. Murray appeared dressed as a king as he metaphorically handed the crown to Letterman and encouraged him and his son Harry to throw food from the balcony into the crowd. The politically-tinged show (there was no shortage of jokes at the administration’s expense) ended with Letterman leaving the audience with a quote from Mark Twain: “Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.” The Mark Twain Prize, sponsored by Capital One, will air at 9 p.m. November 20 on PBS stations nationwide.

DAVIDLETTERMAN ONWHOMHEWOULDLIKETOINTERVIEW%

“The current president. It’s hard for me to recognize him as the President because I remember him as Don. And he would come on the show and I would make fun of his hair. That would be my base of strategy. I would just say, “Don, what the hell is going on here.”

PAULSHAFFER “ There are many kinds of friendships, but none more meaningful than the show business friendship. Stepping on the little people all day long creates a bond, stronger even than most second marriages.”

JIMMYKIMMEL

ROYWOODJR

BRUCEVILANCH

On what he and Letterman talk about: “I don’t think we’ve talked about anything other than fishing and heart surgery.”

“I wanna ask Letterman - just as a fan, as a comedian, just as a fan of comedy - if he’s aware of how many doors he has opened for other comedians?”

“He’s an oddball, a genuine oddball, and I think he appeals to a part of all of us that realizes that we are all strange in our own way, and it was interestIng to come home every night and watch his strangeness unfold. It made you feel a little bit less like an oddball because this was a world class oddball up there.”

“We know he’s funny, probably the funniest. He threw melons from a building, he crushed toasters with steamrollers, he did so many ridiculous things in the middle of the night. And it made a huge impression. Every talk show that’s on the air now, even directly or indirectly, learned to do what we all still do, from Dave. No one from his generation influenced American comedy more, but he also, when it was time to be serious, showed us how to do that too.” 18

SENALFRANKEN ONWHOISFUNNIER%

“David is funnier. He’s getting the Twain ... Yeah, I’m not getting the Twain.”

DEBORAH RUTTER

DAVID RUBENSTEIN

“For the 20th anniversary I really ““”For 32 years, the world would wanted it to be somebody iconic and spin around us, but we could important broadly. I really honestly always count on Dave - sitting didn’t know if there was any way to behind the desk, sporting his convince Dave Letterman to do it wry smile, bringing on intriguing because he is at the point in his life guests, giving his Top 10 List, where he is not looking for honors. sharing great music and introducHe is not looking to go to another ing us to Stupid Pet Tricks. Each event in his honor, no less. I was night, he put us to sleep, in a really thrilled when he accepted.” good way.“

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Angie Marriott and David Marriott

David Rubenstein and Brandie Smith

MONKEY BUSINESS GALA Harrison Ford and D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton Kogod Courtyard | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

, Susan Mars, Carol and Climis Lascaris and Mary Mochary

PARTYANIMALS Smithsonian Secretary David Skorton presented actors and conservationists Harrison Ford and Betty White (not present) with the James Smithson Bicentennial Medal for their commitment to animals, wildlife and the environment. Ford, the world’s top grossing movie star with career box office receipts of $6 billion, had a few things to say to Skorton before the “Monkey Business” Gala, benefiting the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute, in partnership with Friends of the National Zoo (FONZ). “I’m here because I’m terribly worried about one issue,” the 75-year-old actor said. “I’m scared to death about the denial of science. We cannot prosper where science is ignored, because science is tested knowledge. There must be human recognition of the right thing to do. Nature doesn’t need people, people need nature. We need to keep science relevant.” VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

David Skorton and Robin Davisson with Genny and Fred Ryan

Louie

Jan Chapman

Shailagh Murray and Betsy Fischer WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Susanna Quinn, Chris and Candace Ourisman

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Amber Hsu and Leana Katz

Ashley and Matt Bronczek

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POLLYWOOD

APRON CLAD HERO

José Andrés has served Puerto Rican victims of Hurricane Maria over one million hot meals. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

José Andrés serves food to children in Puerto Rico (Twitter/ Jose Andres)

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hen Hurricane Harvey struck Houston in August, Washington area chef and philanthropist José Andrés wasted no time mobilizing a team from his nonprofit World Central Kitchen to deliver food and supplies. When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in September, Andrés again raced to action, setting up ground relief to cook and serve meals to victims of the devastation.The newest numbers show that Andrés and his team have served Puerto Ricans over one million hot meals, surpassing aid from the American Red Cross. In Puerto Rico, FEMA has reported that only 14 percent of the island has power and millions are stranded without access to basic necessities like food and water. Andrés and his team began serving dishes like paella and traditional Puerto Rican stew, employing whatever means possible including mobile kitchens, restaurants and food trucks. The opportunity to serve on a larger scale came when they were able to move into the Coliseo de Puerto Rico in San Juan, where access to the commercial kitchen afforded Andrés and his team the ability to cook 60,000 meals a day. Images and videos from Andrés’ social media channels chronicle the massive operation. He has

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used Twitter to keep his followers updated on the progress of meal delivery using the hashtag #ChefsForPuertoRico. It was there he reported that after three weeks, 15 kitchens and 500 plus volunteers, they had served their onemillionth meal. Andrés hasn’t been shy about slamming President Trump on Twitter for what many consider an insufficient response to the disaster. Trump has repeatedly called Puerto Rico’s cries for help dramatic and after landing on the island, he was heavily criticized for tossing paper towels to those who had gathered to hear his recovery plans. The tension between the chef and president isn’t a first. Andrés notably backed out of a deal whereby one of his restaurants would open in the Trump Hotel after Trump’s controversial comments on immigrants. Andrés has vowed to keep serving meals until the need has subsided. In the meantime he is looking to his connections, partners and regular citizens to provide support. Goya recently loaned the nonprofit a helicopter to transport food to isolated mountain communities. On Oct. 13, chefs from 150 restaurants across the country united for World

Central Kitchen’s fourth annual World Food Day, giving 10 percent of proceeds to efforts in Puerto Rico. The chef founded World Central Kitchen in 2012 to focus on “smart solutions to end hunger and poverty.” The organization zeroes in on communities using food as a tool to empower people through education and job creation. Many of his projects began in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. Andrés cites resilient Puerto Ricans as his motivation to keep people fed. He recently told the Washington Post “The reality here is very hard to escape,” asking “If we don’t do it, who’s going to do it?”

HOW YOU CAN HELP The relief efforts are far from over — donate to World Central Kitchen to help fund food, fuel and supplies that will keep José Andrés and his team cooking Visit worldcentralkitchen. org/donate

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Lou Aronson, Kay Kendall and Jack Davies WL SPONSORED

AFTERDARK@THEARC Town Hall Education Arts Recreation Campus PHOTOSBYTIMETRAVELINGMEDIAFORTHEARC

THISISWHATHOPELOOKSLIKEThe annual event drew supporters and friends of THEARC, a project of Building Bridges Across the River, which provides access to low-cost and free programs and services to the children, adults and families living east of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. After the cocktail hour, guests were ushered into the 365-seat theater and were treated to a collection of inspirational performances in music, dance and song featuring The Washington Ballet, Boys and Girls Club FBR Branch and Step Afrika! to name a few. Afterwards, nonprofits based at THEARC escorted guests through a lantern-lighted “pathway to hope” that led them to the gym, which was transformed into a ballroom of twinkling lights for a seated dinner, more performances and dancing. Proceeds from AfterDark@THEARC support the construction of THEARC West, the new 94,000 square foot building opening on the campus this fall.

Phillipa Hughes and Nikki Peele

Mark and Lyn McFadden

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Performers from The Washington Ballet

Skip McMahon, Vincent Gray and Chris Smith

Michelle Freeman, Ami Aronson and Kimberly Douglas WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Delise and Rahsaan Bernard

Jean Marie Fernandez and Irfana Noorani

Amy Baier, Patrice Brickman and Bret Baier

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Autumn Gatherings Real fake news, name calling at the White House and a bipartisan party. BY ROLAND FLAMINI

PREMATUREINTIMATIONSOFMORALITY Reports that Saint Lucia Ambassador Anton Edmunds had died in the Las Vegas shooting

turned out to be exaggerated. In response to at least one media report that he had been rushed to hospital from the fatal concert site, and died of his gunshot wounds, Edmunds shot back on Facebook with a call for a tough response to fake news creators. “The writers of the false narrative need to be flogged for screwing around with my family and friends,” he wrote while at the same time denying he had been at the concert, or even in Las Vegas at all. The Saint Lucia embassy issued an equally strong denial, cautioning “people who have heard and/or are sharing this false news report [to refrain] from doing so due to its inaccuracy.” BYANYOTHERNAME “Welcome, Mr. President,” Donald Trump greeted Spain’s Mariano Rajoy. Considering that Spain is a monarchy,

some media chalked that up as another Trump blooper. MSN scoffed: “Trump inaccurately

calls Spanish prime minister ‘Mr President.’” Well, not quite. In response to a White House request for guidance on how to address him, the Embassy of Spain had indicated that “Mr. Rajoy is president of the Government of Spain and should be addressed as Mr. President,” an embassy spokesperson says. In fact, YouTube shows George W. Bush in earlier times welcoming “President” Jose Maria Aznar. But YouTube also shows Barack Obama referring to Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero as “Mr. Prime Minister.” So, was it Obama who made the blooper? “It’s not incorrect to say ‘prime minister’ because functionally that’s what he is,” the spokesperson explains, adding that “the right title is president of the government of Spain.” Ah, diplomacy! SWAMP PARTY What many say is just a memory these days in Washington politics actually happened at the Italian embassy recently when Ambassador Armando Varricchio hosted a dinner for members of the

bi-cameral, bipartisan Italian American Congressional Delegation. Many of the members of the 115th U.S. Congress were spotted in the residence’s imposing salons, circling the buffet table to savor various pasta dishes. There was a slight air of unreality when Reps. Pat Tiberi (R-Ohio) and William (Bill) Pascrell (D-N.J.) stood on the platform trading compliments while House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and White House presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway watched nearby. HOLLYWOODTIESThe Malta Day reception

included a screening of the 1941 Humphrey Bogart classic “The Maltese Falcon.” If this starts a trend, the embassy of France could show “The French Connection,” the Italian embassy “The Italian Job” and the Russians “From Russia with Love,” etc. But wait, the link in “The Maltese Falcon” is not just in the title. The film is based on a real fact in the Mediterranean island’s eventful history. If you want to know what that was, watch the movie.

SAUDI NATIONAL DAY:

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P H OTOS BY DAN I E L SWARTZ .

These young Saudi Arabian girls have something to dance about. A recent royal decree will allow them to drive when they grow up, ending a longstanding ban. The occasion was a Saudi national day event designed to project an image of a progressive and youthful nation at which Prince Khaled bin Salman (left), a son of the reigning monarch, made his public debut as ambassador to Washington.

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International Student House Chairwoman Cynthia Bunton, Betty Ann Tanner, Susan Blumenthal and Sen. Ed Markey

Portuguese Amb. Domingos Fezas Vital, Isabel Fezas Vital and John Tanner WL EXCLUSIVE

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Esther Coopersmith

HONORING JOE BIDEN

International Student House | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL GLOBALLEADERSHIPAWARDEE Former Vice President Joe Biden wasted no time making the connection between International Student House and the history of immigration in the United States as he addressed guests dining in support of the facility’s mission to provide an exceptional residential experience to 100 foreign students. “Our strength as a nation” comes not only from “Americans’ disdain for orthodoxy,” he told the crowd, but from “our being able to cherry pick the best of every single country.” POSH QUARTERS: “My accommodations in college were never this good,” he told residents. “In fact, it’s nicer than the house I live in now.”

Rep. Ed Royce and Marie Royce

Marie Ridder and Didi Cutler

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Donna Edwards and Rep. Ryan Costello UAE Amb. Yousef Al-Otaiba, Chartese Berry, Jennifer Kildee, Cristina Antelo, Lesli Foster and James Rosen

David Marriott and Italian Amb. Armando Varricchio

AMBASSADORS BALL Marriott Marquis | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Lala Abdurahimova, Jessica Hogle and Natalie Jones

DIPLOMATICWALTZ The National MS Society’s 39th annual Ambassadors Ball welcomed envoys, members of Congress and business and philanthropic leaders to its signature annual fundraiser, which over the last 38 years has raised more than $20 million to support research and treatment for Multiple Sclerosis. The evening was co-chaired by UAE Amb. Yousef Al-Otaiba, the American Bar Association’s Jennifer Kildee and the Podesta Group’s Cristina Antelo, who enthusiastically toasted the crowd. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Elise Conner and Catherine Phillips

Micaela Varricchio, Carrie Marriott and National MS Society CEO Cyndi Zagieboylo 23


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Princess Farahnaz Pahlavi with her nieces, Princesses Noor and Iman Pahlavi WL EXCLUSIVE

Prince Ermias Selassie of Ethiopia and Princess Saba Selassie

HONORING AN EMPRESS

Empress Farah Pahlavi (right) with Annie Totah

Annie Totah Residence, Potomac, Md | PHOTOSBYERINSCHAFFANDGEDALIAVERA “SOURCEOFLIGHTBEACONOFHOPE” Those who might have felt intimidated in the presence of an imperial majesty were soon put at ease at a dinner honoring Farah Pahlavi, the former shahbanou (empress) of Iran, when hostess Annie Totah asked guests to sing a musical tribute to the honoree with specially composed words set to the song “To Life” from “Fiddler on the Roof”(!) More serious accolades followed for “a people’s queen” who “gave life to peace and gave her life to peace” from friends and family members, including her son, Prince Reza, and granddaughters Princesses Noor and Iman. Princess Yasmine poignantly thanked her mother-in-law for “all the wonderful things” she had done for their family, noting that “Iran’s loss will always be our gain.” The Empress’s response was both moving and filled with hope: “Light will come out of the darkness,” she told the crowd, “Iran will rise from the ashes.”

Prince Reza Pahlavi and Princess Yasmine Pahlavi

Mert and Alev Bakan

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Willee Lewis, Iraq Amb. Fareed Yasseen and Amb. of Jordan Dina Kawar

Abe Radkin, Danielle Parris Canfield, David Mercer and Leah Pisar

ALADDIN PROJECT DINNER Thomas Canfield and Danielle Parris Residence | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ LIVELYDIALOGUE An intimate group gathered at the Georgetownhome of Thomas Canfield and Danielle Parris to learn more about the Aladdin Project’s educational initiative to promote cross-cultural relations. Launched in 2009 under the patronage of UNESCO, Aladdin, under the leadership of its new president, Leah Pisar, is now taking on a much stronger international presence. Guests discussed the topic, “Can Peace Be Built Through Knowledge?” over cocktails and a dinner in the garden that featured fresh crudités, figs and fromages, salmon tartare Tuscan chicken, arugula salad and gâteau à l’orange.

Philippe Géliero and Kristin Killion 24

Mirella Levinas

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Nick Cannon, Kelly Rowland and Jim Clark Callie Harkins and Jessica Moore WL SPONSORED

BGCA YOUTH OF THE YEAR AWARDS 2017-1018 National Youth of the Year Carlos Polanco National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Lynne Lightfoote and Stephanie Polis

HONORINGYOUTHLEADERS Dartmouth College-bound Carlos Polanco, a Dominican-born teen from New Jersey, took home the Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) National Youth of the Year title — plus $145,000 in scholarships, a trip to Disney World and a new Toyota Corolla — at the annual celebration honoring club members throughout the country who are making a difference in their communities. Alumni, including turban-clad emcee Nick Cannon and Grammy Award-winning musician Kelly Rowland, helped shepherd the evening, which included remarks by BGCA supporters Rep. Steny Hoyer and then-Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, just days before a private jet scandal forced him to resign. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Tom Price and Stephanie McMahon

Monique and Chris Samuels

Skylar Diggins-Smith and Rep. Steny Hoyer

Eric Lubaczewski, Cydney Hatch and Sarah Chamberlain WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Nicole Venable, Kara Johnson and Emil Hill

2016-17 National Youth of the Year Jocelyn Woods

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special feature

tech 25

TECH the

O

WA S H I N GTO N L I F E

25

The Entrepreneurs and Investors Making an Impact in 2017 Plus: Robots Among Us, Monumental Sports Network, ARTECHOUSE & Smartphone Gadgets

ur third annual Tech 25 highlights individuals (or teams) who are making noteworthy contributions to the technological landscape of our city, whether it be through a newly-launched company, the continued development of an already-existing brand, or as funders and supporters of entrepreneurs.All were nominated by their peers, and all exhibit unparalleled exuberance, dedication and focus – likely because they are doing undeniably cool and impactful things.We also take a look at the robots among us, indispensable mobile phone gadgets, the digital sports network that is transforming how fans interact with their favorite teams and a local museum that is using cutting-edge technology to wow visitors.The future, dear readers, is here. >> A R T b y c r i s c l a P p l o g a n | p o rtra i t s b y t o n y p o w e l l p h o t o g rap h e d at w e w o r k w h i t e h o u s e

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andrew chang

Co-Founder and CEO, Eastern Foundry @andrew_chang11

A former counter-intelligence company commander in the U.S. Army, Chang leads Eastern Foundry, a technology incubator and co-working and networking space for government contractors. The group boasts over 200 member companies and has offices in Rosslyn and Crystal City, with plans to expand to Tysons Corner in 2018.

jordan mcbride

amelia friedman

Co-Founder and COO, Hatch @ameliafriedman

Operations Manager, WeWork DC @JT_McBride

Hatch, an automated app development platform, enables companies and individuals to develop custom apps without knowing code for a fraction of the cost of hiring a software development firm. The company has grown from two to 17 employees in the first year. Friedman also helped launch the Vinetta Project in D.C, an organization which supports and backs female tech founders in the Washington area.

McBride oversees operations and logistical support across ten buildings and 10,000 desks in the D.C. area for co-working juggernaut WeWork. The company’s most recent valuation tops $20 billion, making it the fourth most valuable startup in the U.S. after Uber, Airbnb and SpaceX.

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special feature

tech 25

jenny abramson

FOUNDER AND MANAGING PARTER, RETHINK IMPACT @abramsonjenny Abramson leads the largest U.S.-based impact venture capital firm investing in female leaders using technology to tackle major challenges in health, education, environmental sustainability and economic empowerment. In March, the firm partnered with UBS Wealth Management Americas to raise more than $110 million dollars for their fund.The venture capitalist previously served as CEO of LiveSafe, a mobile security company focused on preventing school shootings and sexual assaults.

Serene Al-Momen

CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, SENSEWARE @SereneMomen “Every building contains a wealth of data,” says Al-Momen. Her Internet of Things (IoT) company, Senseware, uses software, hardware and cloud data technology to tap into that information including temperature, energy usage, air quality and water consumption in apartments and office buildings. Such data allows managers and engineers to monitor and control building systems in real time. It’s “smart building” technology that saves energy and ensures residents and workers are in a safe and secure environment. In January alone, the company was issued five patents related to wireless sensors that can be used in commercial buildings.

AERICA BANKS

PATENT POLICY ANALYST, GOOGLE @erikashimizu Banks monitors the legislative and legal patent landscape and integrates diversity initiatives into

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Google’s patent strategy. As part of Google’s efforts to bring more diverse voices into technology, she also leads the company’s sponsorship of BEACON, an initiative launched by D.C. area tech leaders in 2016 to support women entrepreneurs.

dan berger

FOUNDER AND CEO, SOCIAL TABLES @danberger Berger’s award-winning software platfor m, Social Tables, has been used to source, plan and execute nearly two million events since 2011. Earlier this year, the former congressional staffer rallied members of the tech community to sign an open letter to President Donald Trump in protest of his immigration policies.

teresa carlson

VICE PRESIDENT, WORLD WIDE PUBLIC SECTOR, AMAZON WEB SERVICES @teresacarlson Carlson’s been credited with putting Amazon Web Services (AWS), a division of Amazon that provides cloud computing solutions for individuals, corporations and government, “on the map.” In 2016, AWS reached an unprecedented $12 billion in sales, cementing itself as a leader in the cloud computing space, ahead of Microsoft, Google and IBM.

Zach Christenson

C0-FOUNDER AND CEO, CROWDSKOUT @zackchristenson Crowdskout is a data management and marketing platform that helps campaigns and non-profit and advocacy groups analyze their data, track engagement, send emails

and manage personnel. The company was founded in 2014 and has since raised over $4 million in funding. It hit its stride during the 2016 presidential campaign when clients included the Republican National Committee. “Our software was powering all their field operations, Christenson says. “We had over 1,000 RNC staffers using it on a daily basis.”

Max Duckworth and Sarah Godlewski

CO-FOUNDERS, MASA PARTNERS @MaxRDuck @SarahGodlewski The husband-and-wife team behind MaSa Partners, a social impact venture firm that invests in companies seeking to shape a better future, first met in 2013 on a regional volunteer board of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. The idea began to percolate then and by 2015 they had formed their for-profit entity to invest in early-stage, socially responsible companies in a financially sustainable manner. To date, they have invested in agriculture, renewable energy and healthcare startups, including mOm Incubators, a portable inflatable baby incubator for preventing neonatal complications.

kate Goodall

CEO, HALCYON @goodallkate Goodall is the strateg ic force behind Halcyon, a non-profit which supports innovators with aspirations in science, art and social entrepreneurship. She helped develop and launch the prestigious Halcyon Incubator, which has shepherded 55 ventures that went on to raise more than $23 million in funding, create more than 360 jobs and impact half a million lives around the world. In 2016,

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anna mason

Director of Investments, Rise of the Rest @AnnaMasonDC

Mason helps guide the strategy for Revolution’s Rise of the Rest campaign, a nationwide effort to find and support entrepreneurs. The brainchild of Steve Case, the campaign and bus tour has traveled 8,000 miles to 33 cities and counting. A pitch competition at each stop results in the winner taking home a $100,000 investment from Case. Mason manages the bus tours and the web platform, and maintains contact with companies who have received investments from her boss. She is also the co-director of the Vinetta Project in D.C., an organization that helps empower early-stage female founders.

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Goodall aided Halcyon founder Sachiko Kuno and Salamander Hotels and Resorts CEO Sheila C. Johnson in creating WE Capital, of consortium of local female investors supporting gender diverse and women-led companies.

kyle hendrick

FOUNDER AND GENERAL PARTNER, ARAB ANGEL FUND @ArabAngelFund Hendrick’s early stage venture capital fir m helps U.S.-based startups enter the Middle Eastern, North African and Western Asian markets. In October, the firm announced it was closing its $25 million dollar flagship fund after raising an additional $15 million from high net worth individuals and private family offices in the Middle East. “The oversubscription is a testament to the growing demand from the region for early stage venture investing in North America,” Hendrick says, “as well as an interest to diversify into an asset class that invests in cutting-edge technologies.”

TODD HITT

CEO, KIDDAR CAPITAL @toddhitt This year, real estate and construction veteran Todd Hitt’s private equity firm Kiddar Capital launched the Built World Fund aimed at investing in companies with innovative technology that modernizes America’s most fundamental industries: real estate, construction, automation and logistics. “This fund is the natural next step for Kiddar’s growth,” Hitt says. “We are on the verge of the next industrial revolution.” Hitt has $50 million of his private capital at work in his technology portfolio. Built World has thus far invested in the likes of energy management company Aquicore, known as “a Fitbit for buildings,” and Building Connected, a tool that revolutionizes the construction bid management process.

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RACHEL HOLT

VICE PRESIDENT AND REGIONAL GENERAL MANAGER, UBER @RachelJHolt The Distr ict-based Uber executive who oversees the company’s business in over 200 cities across the United States and Canada say she sometimes moonlights as a driver to “see where the pain parts are.” Holt, who helped launch Uber’s Washington office before rising through the ranks to senior management, unveiled her secret at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Next Gen Summit last year. “You learn so much about what the driver experience is from actually doing it,” she said.

MARc KATZ

CHAIRMAN AND CEO, CUSTOMINK @marc_katz Fairfax, Va.-based CustomInk has created over 60 million custom t-shirts, hoodies, bags and hats since launching online 17 years ago, when Katz left a job on Wall Street to start the company with two former college pals. The gamble paid off. CustomInk has raised over $40 million in funding, the bulk of it from Revolution Growth. Revolution’s co-founder Ted Leonsis sits on the company’s board of directors. In 2016, the retailer made over $300 million in sales.

JONATHAN MARKS AND ALEX WiRTH

CO-FOUNDERS, QUORUM @QuorumAnalytics While still undergraduates at Harvard University in 2013, Marks and Wirth founded Quorum Analytics, a data analytics platform that helps break down the workings of Congress, including tracking legislation and who is most active on certain issues. Today, the company hails itself as

“the world’s most comprehensive database of legislative information.” It’s a product in high demand from lobbyists and activists looking to target members, as well as from Senators and congressmen themselves who want to know who they can work with to get things done. High-profile subscribers include Walmart, Lyft, GM, The Podesta Group and the National Restaurant Association.

NIGEL MORRIS

CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING PARTNER, QED INVESTORS @QEDInvestors The founder and former President and CEO of Capital One Financial Ser vices now uses his vast knowledge of the consumer lending industry to invest in disruptive financial technology companies around the globe. Current investments include online lending platform Avant, credit score tracker Credit Karma and Zopa, the UK’s leading peer to peer lending service. In October, QED took part in the largestannounced venture capital funding of 2017 in Latin America when it contributed to a $39 million round for Brazilian financial hub startup GuiaBolso.

LAURA O’Shaughnessy CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, SOCIALCODE @SocialCodeInc SocialCode, founded in 2010 by O’Shaughnessy, a granddaughter of the Washington Post’s Katharine Graham, manages digital advertising for large international brands, including Capital One, Visa and Nestlé, across Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest and Snapchat. The platform also analyzes media engagement, giving its customers invaluable insight about their audiences. In 2017, SocialCode acquired Israeli predictive marketing techology platform MentAd, widening its international reach.

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goldy kamali

Founder and CEO, Scoop News Group @goldykamali

Kamali’s Scoop News Group, a government technology news, information and events platform which she launched nine years ago as a single newsletter has grown into four full media properties—CyberScoop, FedScoop, StateScoop and EdScoop—each with its own website, daily newsletter and video offerings. Her properties boast one million monthly web visitors and half a million subscribers.

michael beckerman

President and CEO, The Internet Association @InternetAssn

danya sherman

Founder and CEO, KnoNap @Real_KnoNap

Whiles studying abroad in 2016, Sherman was drugged at a party by a person she considered a friend. The experience served as the inspiration for KnoNap, a detection device disguised as a napkin that detects rape drugs. KnoNap formally launches in December. Sherman says she is passionate about combining human rights and technology innovation to create lasting, sustainable social change.

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Beckerman represents the interests of leading global internet companies, with a focus on fostering innovation and empowering people through a free and open Internet. In September, he announced a private sector commitment of more than $300 million dedicated to K-12 computer science programs to complement a presidential memorandum that directs the Department of Education to expand access to STEM and computer science education. The contributions were led by association members Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft.

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special feature

tech 25

JAMES QUIGLEY

CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, GOCANVAS @James_Quigley Quigley’s GoCanvas helps businesses save time and eliminate paperwork by allowing them to create forms such as work orders and invoices via a mobile app. Since launching in 2008, GoCanvas has raised over $29 million in funding, grown to over 100 employees and is used by businesses in 70 countries. Fun fact: their technology has replaced more than 35 million paper forms—enough paper to wrap around the Earth two times.

ARCHANA Vemulapalli

CTO, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA @dccto As the District’s chief technology officer, Vemulapalli established the nation’s capital as a global leader in Smart City innovation, working to improve efficiency and productivity in the local workforce. She is also helping to lead East Coast expansion of the San Francisco-based Startup in Residence, which connects government agencies with startups to develop technology products that address civic FOR challenges. MORE INSPIRATION, READ

TAMMY OUR MONTHLY INNOVATORS WINCUP

COO, EVERFICOLUMN AND DISRUPTORS

@tmwincup is the nation’s AND VISITEverFi US ONLINE AT largest online education network. More than 15,000 schools, colleges and universities now use the platform to teach off- curriculum subjects such as digital and financial literacy, harassment prevention and health and wellness. The company raised $190 million in Series D funding in 2017.

washingtonlife.com

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innovators and disruptors

Hall of Fame Reggie Aggarwal Charlene Brown Michelle Brown Evan Burfield Steve Case Alan Clifford Gregory Coleman Kevin Conroy Ian Costello Jack Davies Donn Davis Mark Ein Phil Esterman Trever Faden Raul Fernandez Allen Gannett Miles Gilburn Kate Glantz Sean Glass Shana Glenzer John Gossart Paul Guthrie Richard Hanlon Donna Harris Gary Hensley Yuriko Horvath Mariama Kabia Jim Kimsey Ajay Kori Daniel Kuenzi Ted Leonsis Zach Leonsis Ben Lundin

Meagan Metzger Jose David McPeek Ben Miller Todd Moore Mario Morino Carey Anne Nadeau Rob McGovern Bill O’Hara Geoff Orazem Garrett O’Shea Dale Nirvani Pfeifer Rep. Jared Polis Jon Powers Susanna Quinn Sage Salvo Steve Senkus Juan Pablo Segura Fred Schaufeld Jeff Sheely Eric Shih Alex Skatell Manu Smadja Chris Spanos Lisa Throckmorton Susan Tynan Benjamin Young Daniel Yu George Vradenburg Mark Walsh Mark Warner Elise Whang Tom Wheeler Stacie Whisonant

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GADGETS

LOCKITRON BOLT Ditch the keys and unlock the front door via smartphone with a Bluetooth lock. You can give friends and family their own codes so they can get in when you’re not there, or use an optional accessory called Bridge to unlock a door remotely when you’re away and someone without a mobile phone needs to get in. Works with both iOS and Android devices. (Starts at $99.99) lockitron.com.

FONBOOTH Ever been in a public restroom and needed a clean, dry place to set your phone down? FONBOOTH to the rescue. These handy fixtures are available in a variety of colors and can be used in both public spaces and bathrooms (and kitchens) at home — wherever you’re in a potentially messy situation and need to go hands-free. Fun fact: According to the founders, 75% of Americans admit to bringing cellphones into the bathroom and nearly 25% say they’ve dropped their phones in the toilet. ($25) thefonbooth.com.

SMARTPHONE TECH-CESSORIES Where to put your phone when you go to the loo and other indispensable mobile phone accessories. APPLE WATCH SERIES 3 HERMES EDITION The newest Apple watch with GPS and cellular connectivity is connected to your iPhone service plan, meaning you can still initiate and receive calls, texts and emails even if you leave your phone at home. The Hermès edition with a stainless steel case and leather band gives the watch a decidedly non-techie, upscale look. ($1,299) apple.com.

QBRACELET No need to worry about losing power on the go when you wear this sleek, stylish bracelet that doubles as an iPhone charger. Works with iPhone 5 and up. Available in gold, rose gold, black and silver ($149) www.qdesigns.co.

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GOATCASE ANTI-GRAVITY PHONE CASE This iPhone and Samsung Galaxy case adheres directly to walls and other smooth surfaces so you can go hands free when taking photos and videos of yourself. Or you can stick it to bathroom tile and watch a movie in the tub. How does it work? We think it’s magic. The company calls it “revolutionary nano-suction technology.” ($39.99) goatcase.com.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

MONUMENTALSPORTS

GAME CHANGER

Monumental Sports Network is at the forefront of expanding how fans experience sports. BY ERICA MOODY

Zach Leonsis

Z

ach Leonsis recalls sneaking out of his bedroom past his bedtime to watch Washington Capitals games in his family’s living room. He remembers the Stanley Cup Finals in 1998 and how those games “totally captured” his imagination. As the son of Monumental Sports Founder Ted Leonsis (whose teams include the Capitals, the Mystics and the Wizards), it’s not surprising that Zach is a die-hard sports fan. “It seems I’ve been with Monumental Sports all my life,” Zach says. “I grew up around the teams and at this point, they feel like a second family to me.” Now Leonsis is senior vice president of strategic initiatives for Monumental Sports & Entertainment and general manager of Monumental Sports Network, the very first over-the-top, direct-to-consumer regional sports network ever, co-owned by NBC Sports Group. The subscription-based product launched in 2016 allows members to experience live events on every device, view original and on-demand programming and get exclusive access to players and coaches, such as meet and greet happy hours where they get served drinks by Caps players. Membership packages start as low as $6.99 a month. “Last year we streamed nearly 400 live games

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and this upcoming season we plan to stream well over 500 live games,” Leonsis explains. “We deliver all of this content through multiplatform applications and digital channels, including the web, mobile web and tablet web, but also apps on iOs, Android, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Xbox and Chromecast. We felt a significant need to do this because of the changing demographics of media consumption behavior of our specific region.” In a way, Washington is the perfect place to launch such a product. “One of the advantages we have is that we’re a particularly young community,” Leonsis says. “Thirty-five percent of our community is made up of Millennials and Gen Z customers, who are more likely to cut the cord and no longer sign up for cable.” The way fans experience sports is definitely changing. In 2016, Netflix subscriptions officially surpassed the number of cablesubscribed homes in the United States. Sports entertainment categories like eSports (organized multiplayer video game competitions) are growing in popularity, and virtual reality technology is only going to become more refined as the technology progresses. Monumental Sports Network has

brought virtual reality in-house, streaming games that give customers the feeling of being in a live arena. Leonsis is also excited about AR (augmented reality), and about a new partnership with Kiswe Mobile that puts users in control of how they view a game, in a choose-your-own-adventure style broadcast. “When people watch live games on television, it’s really a one-way conversation. There’s a producer and a truck saying, ‘go to camera one, now go to camera three.’ We give that power to our subscribers,” Leonsis says. Members are given the power to rewind, to clip highlights and save them for future use, to tweet them out or post them to social media accounts for their friends, family and followers to enjoy. “We really think that there’s a lot of inner activities that can come from watching a game on a mobile experience where touch is very much a part of the engagement within the app, so I would expect more and more interactivity within our video player to come. “We felt like we couldn’t keep our head in the sand,” Leonsis continues. “We wanted to be innovative, progressive and really try to get ahead of new consumer trends and behaviors.”

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ARTSPOTLIGHT

ART OF THE FUTURE

ARTECHOUSE strikes a harmonious balance between tech and art. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

A

P H OTOS CO U RT E SY O F ART EC H O U S E ; “ S P I RI T O F AU T U M N ’ P H OTO C R E D I T H A S NA I N B H AT T I

RTECHOUSE’s current exhibition, “Spirit of Autumn,” which runs through November 5, invites visitors to activate a digital rainstorm by clapping, or to dance and watch a whirl of leaves follow their arm and leg movements on a large screen. And then there are the augmented reality cocktails that come to life when looked at through the lens of the ARTECHOUSE app, furthering the surreal experience. The Instagram-worthy 15,000-square-foot underground space in Southwest Washington is the brainchild of Sandro Kereselidze and his partner Tatiana Pastukhova, whose vision was to transform and elevate the museum experience for visitors, evolving them from passive viewers to active participants.They’ve done it using state of the art sound projection, sensory systems and 270 degrees of seamless projection screens, all at the disposal of a rotating cast of artists. “What is next for the arts?” Kereselidze pondered years ago. The Georgian-born artist noticed a lag between the rapid advancement of technology and art that reflected it. His thought process sparked the idea to create a cutting-edge space that would meld art, science and technology. The concept is meant to explore the inextricable connection between the human experience and tech. Pastukhova explains that “art is supposed to reflect what our world is about.” The boundary-pushing couple has been a fixture on the art scene for years – they launched Art Soiree in 2009 to give artists a platform to showcase their work and network with like-minded creatives.They hoped to cut through the air of the formal art museums and institutions D.C. is best known for. ARTECHOUSE was developed on the same premise– to be super-approachable, innovative and fun for people of all ages. Kereselidze’s goal has always been to inspire with art. It’s the “instant connection” people have when engaging with ARTECHOUSE, he says, that excites him the most. Watching visitors forget their age as they move wildly to create art is what Sandro calls “escaping from reality to the Milky Way – to the world of happiness.”

FROMTOP “XYZT : Abstract Landscapes” Kinetic Sand exhibit; “Spirit of Autumn” exhibit, XYZT and a rendering from the augmented reality cocktail from the new “Kingdom of Color” exhibit opening this month.

ARTECHOUSE | 1238 Maryland Ave SW | tickets required for exhibitions | daytime admission for all ages; evening 21 + | tickets start at $15

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SPECIAL FEATURE

ROBOTS

AROBOTCAN’T WRITETHISARTICLE–YET BY ROLAND FLAMINI

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n the numerous high tech trade shows in the U.S. and elsewhere, the space that (after video games) draws most media and public attention is robotics. The robots on show are almost always painted a neutral white, and the emphasis is on cuteness as they chat with children and whizz around displaying inane skills like serving cocktails while blinking cheerfully at the public. There is, however, a more serious side to robots as their use grows exponentially, leaving science fiction behind and raising serious, nagging questions that remain largely unanswered. Over the past two years, Halcyon, a Georgetown non-profit group that examines 21st century problems and how to deal with them, brought together an army of experts for a detailed study of robotics, and then issued a final report that sheds some light on their future development. Since the computer Hal rebelled in Stanley Kubrick’s movie “2001: A Space Odyssey” (“I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that”), robots have made great strides. They are used extensively in a wide range of fields including manufacturing, aviation, health care and agriculture. What is a drone, if not a robot? Or a self-driving car, for that matter? As for agriculture, a Swedish firm has created a cow-milking robot that makes the milk maid of literature and legend redundant. The robot allows the cows to come and be milked on their own, when they want to. The list of robots already in use is endless. Bomb disposal robots used by the military and the police save lives; in the U.K., a prototype robot called Pepper is teaching math classes; a fully automated chef invented by a British robotics company can memorize recipes and create gourmet meals; and in many U.S. hospitals, robots perform surgical procedures. The Halcyon report predicts a quantum leap forward in the use of robotics in virtually

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all areas of human endeavor, and includes proposals for advancing technology to achieve this, and ways of confronting some of the problems created by what is without question the most profoundly disruptive technological shift since the 19th century industrial revolution. Depending on one’s view of the spread of robotic automation, the Halcyon report (compiled in association with the American Association of Advanced Science) is either timely, overdue or too late. Already, according to the

Robotics Industries Association trade organization, more than 265,000 robots are now in operation in the U.S., making it third in worldwide terms in robot use behind China and Japan. As the numbers increase the Halcyon report emphasizes the need for new legislation, more regulation, training for workers who could lose their jobs to robots, and a campaign to emphasize the positive aspects of shifting to robotic technology. “Robots,” the report says, “are not inherently good or bad. However, they can have effects that are negative for particular people and groups of people.” Topping the list of particular people are workers who have lost their jobs to robots, and others who will doubtless suffer the same fate in the future. Robots are considered ideal to perform work categorized as the three ds, “dull, dirty and dangerous.”The problem is that there are already millions of

unskilled laborers earning a living in those dull, dirty and dangerous jobs. But progress being what it is, the prestigious Geneva-based World Economic Forum predicted recently that robotic automation will result in the net loss of more than five million jobs in 15 developed nations by 2020, and experts regard that as a conservative estimate. As any economist will tell you, an American company obeying President Donald Trump’s call to repatriate its manufacturing operations will be hit hard by higher labor costs and will have to replace workers with robots to maintain profit levels acceptable to its shareholders. The pro-robot crowd points out that manufacturing the robots has introduced a new range of high skilled jobs – as have other high tech developments. Ruchir Sharma, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley, writing recently in the Wall Street Journal, argues that “if robots threatened human labor, human joblessness would be growing. But it’s not. In fact, since 2008, job growth has been strongest in countries like Germany and Japan, which deploy the most robots.” Sharma also quotes new Pew Research showing that “most Americans do not think that animation threatens their own jobs.” However, at least one other expert has interpreted the findings of the same Pew survey as a false sense of security among Americans who don’t know enough about the spread of robotics. The Halcyon report also refers to the need for mechanisms to ensure against the Hal factor. The “how robots should behave themselves” list includes: “Robots should abide by the law,” and again that they “should be as least expressive and manipulative as possible.” It also says care needs to be taken not to create robot replicas of human limbs, such as hands or legs, that are excessively stronger or could run faster than the human version. But that’s another movie.

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TECHIEGATHERINGS Posing with robots, CyberWeek kickoff and a tech family picnic. HALCYON ROBOTICS SHOWCASE [HALCYON HOUSE] P H O T O S  B Y  Y U TA K A  I I J I M A

Halcyon hosted a VIP robotics showcase and panel discussion in conjunction with the release of its Halcyon Dialogue series report, “Shaping Robotics Policy for the 21st Century.” The event, streamed on Facebook Live, featured a special appearance by Miss America Cara Mund. But the star of the day was Hitachi’s humanoid robot, EMIEW3, who gamely posed for photos with event-goers. The robot can recognize multiple languages and may one day provide customer service assistance at airports and stores.

Dr. SachikoKuno and Patrice Brickman

Rep. Will Hurd

Kate Goodall, EMIEW3 and Miss America Cara Mund

CYBERWEEK OPENING RECEPTION [NEWSEUM]

Audrey Pichy and Garrett Bauman

P H OTO S  BY  E R I N  S C H A F F

DC CyberWeek, hosted by Goldy Kamali and CyberScoop, kicked off with a buzzy reception atop the Newseum. The week-long SXSWstyle cybersecurity festival featured dozens of events across the region that brought together cybersecurity experts, decision-makers and leaders from the government and technology communities.

Chris Bing, Goldy Kamali, and Patrick Howell O’Neill

Joseph Clemonts and Kristy Singletary

Ben Clilffor and Kristina Benoit

TECH DAY BY THE BAY [BOWLINGLY ESTATE, QUEENSTOWN, MD] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

Martin Ringlein and Yasmin Naghash

Meredith Fineman

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Sean and Kellee Glass

Tech executives, founders and venture capitalists gathered at Bowlingly, the Queenstown, Md. estate of Advantia Health founder Sean Glass and his wife Kellee Glass, for the fourth annual Tech Day by the Bay. The early summer party is a company picnic of sorts for the tech community and allows guests to network in a relaxed waterfront setting, complete with dips in the pool, three-legged races, burgers and beer. The day ended with a pictureperfect sunset over the Chester River, an offshoot of the Chesapeake Bay. More than a dozen fellow entrepreneurs co-hosted the event, including Ezra Weinblatt, Susanna Quinn and Shana Glenzer.

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LIFESTYLES

SANDRO Black leather derby shoe ($385); MAJE Black belted trousers with wide darts ($325) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700. NOUR HAMMOUR “Temple” black studded jacket ($1,775); FAITH CONNEXION Grey crop turtleneck ($380); LAURIE & JOE grey wrap necklace ($50) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915.


ERUDITE EDGE

HIGHWAISTEDPANTSAND OVERSIZEDKNITSFORFALL

PHOTOGRAPHYNICKGHOBASHI|WWW NICKGHOBASHI COM STYLISTJOELLEFIRZLI|THEARTISTAGENCY MAKEUP/HAIRGLAMSQUAD|WWW GLAMSQUAD COM HAIRSTYLISTCHEKERACARTER MAKEUPARTISTERICAJONES MODELEMMAPATERSON EDITORIALDIRECTIONCATHERINETRIFILETTI EDITORIALASSISTANTJOCELINDIAZ PHOTOGRAPHEDATWEWORKAPOLLOTHSTNE


MAJE Embroidered knit jumper ($495); MAJE Tartan skirt with braces ($325); SANDRO white leather ankle boot ($385) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO diamond 18 karat white gold Atlas ring ($3,750); TIFFANY & CO diamond 18 karat white gold hardwear ball ring ($4,000); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat white gold Atlas ring with round diamond ($875); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat white gold diamond bangle ($11,500); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat white gold T square bracelet with pavĂŠ diamonds ($10,500); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat white gold diamond lock pendant necklace ($2,500); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat white gold hardwear ball pendant necklace ($9,000) Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-8777.


ENZA COSTA white tee ($118); FAITH CONNEXION navy and bottle green midi skirt ($1,290); CAROLINA SANTO DOMINGO Amphora green cross body bag ($795); JOANNA LAURA CONSTANTINE large earrings ($343) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915. SANDRO White leather ankle boot ($385); MAJE Khaki cotton blend shawl ($135) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold chain pendant ($600) Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-8777.

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SANDRO Evana velvet blazer ($470); SANDRO Marthe lace shirt ($395); SANDRO Chris vintage high-waist cropped jeans ($295); MAJE black high heels ($370) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold hardwear wrap necklace ($13,500); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold hardwear ball wire bracelet ($1,300); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold hardwear ball wire bracelet ($1,700); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold hardwear ball bypass bracelet ($1,700) Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-8777.

HUGO BOSS Diganira dress and Cipeila jacket; Hugo Boss CityCenterDC 1054 Palmer Alley NWWashington, D.C 20001 (202) 408-9845; STUART WEITZMAN nudist song patent heels ($398) Bloomingdales 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO. Schlumberger multiplication earrings in 18k yellow gold with diamonds ($17,500) . Tiffany & Co, 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (301) 657-8777.


N / NICHOLAS dress ($529), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (301) 6522250; HALSTON HERITAGE clutch ($345) and SJP Sarah Jessica Parker pumps ($560), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; TIFFANY & CO. Enchant scroll earrings in platinum with diamonds ($11,000), Tiffany & Co., Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (301) 657-8777; CARTIER Paris Nouvelle Vague Delicate white gold and diamond necklace ($16,300) and LOVE bracelet in white gold, pave diamonds and ceranic ($43,700), Cartier, 5471B Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (301) 654-5858


MICHELLE MASON Oversized ivory turtleneck ($258.75); LAURIE & JOE Suede camel leggings ($225); SARAH’S BAG Lucite happiness clutch in gold ($1,050); VANINA Willie long necklace ($210); d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915. SANDRO Black leather derby shoe ($385) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700.


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FAITH CONNEXION Oversize embroidered Burgandy cardigan ($2,190) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915. MAJE cropped locknit striped sweater ($325); MAJE Wide camel tailored trousers ($295); MAJE black high heels ($370); SANDRO Lou leather envelope clutch ($495) Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, NW, Chevy Chase, Md. (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO Citrine cushion ring ($1,900); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold diamond infinity ring ($2,250); TIFFANY & CO Metro 18 karat gold diamond hoop earring ($2,650); TIFFANY & CO 18 karat gold round end cuff bracelets ($600) Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-8777.

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LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

SENSI STUDIO Fringed wool-jacquard poncho ($570); net-a-porter.com

MIU MIU Long sleeve denim dress ($1,505); farfetch.com

YVES SAINT LAURENT Lace-up longsleeve suede dress ($5,990); ysl.com

&)78 ;)78)62 Cowboy boots, saddle bags, fringe and embroidered denim. BY ERICA MOODY

ANNA SUI Printed metallic fil coupé chiffon and embroidered tulle blouse ($525); nordstrom.com

COACH Western aviator vest ($428); coach.com

PAUL MORELLI Turquoise beaded bell hoop earrings ($8,000); neimanmarcus.com

STUART WEITZMAN Smashing boot in leather ($775); stuartweitzman.com

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CHLOÉ Marcie small saddle bag ($890); shop. nordstrom.com

ADAM SELMAN Rodeo jeans ($425); intermix.com

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Jerry Pierce

Ashley Bright and Cara Kelly

Rob Short and Marissa Ferraraccio

WL SPONSORED

INGLOT COSMETICS OPENING Zbyszek Inglot, Kenya Pierce and Mekki Karrakchou

Tysons Corner/Filippo Champagne Lounge PHOTOSBYBENDROZANDMARIASOVA

CHICCOSMETICS The globally-recognized brand that has become a mainstay of the makeup world opened its U.S. flagship store in Tysons Corner to much fanfare. INGLOT Cosmetics president Zbyszek Inglot was on hand for interviews as were entrepreneurs Kenya Pierce and Mekki Karrakchou, who will serve as the brand’s exclusive partners for the U.S., Brazil and Morocco. The celebration began with pre-launch cocktails at Filippo Champagne Lounge above Flavio restaurant in Georgetown and ended with a ribbon cutting on location the next day. Guests took advantage of makeup demos before departing, swag bags in hand.

Sabrina Bachai and Jasmina Mann VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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LIFESTYLES

All the Books FALLBOOKPARTIES|PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL&DANIELSWARTZ

Mark Riddle and Molly Sims Jaap Scholten, Aniko Gaal Schott and Gen. Peter Zwack

‘EVERYDAY CHIC’ ROOM&BOARD

‘COMRADE BARON’ ANIKOGAALSCHOTTRESIDENCE Aniko Gaal Scho and Nash Scho welcomed friends to a party honoring Dutch author Jaap Scholten, whose latest book, “Comrade Baron: A Journey Through the Vanishing World of the Transylvanian Aristocracy,” chronicles the lives of an entire class of people who somehow managed to survive despite being dispossessed of all their property and forced into menial labor when communist governments seized power in Romania and Hungary.

Coming off a whirlwind few days of press junkets, actress and supermodel Molly Sims stopped in Washington to meet with fans and sign copies of her second book “Everyday Chic,” in which she shares organizing, decorating and entertaining tips. Room & Board’s Mark Riddle welcomed Sims to his 14th Street NW location, praising the author for her style sensibilities. Guests sipped Chardonnay and munched on crudites while Sims graciously posed for selfies and laughed along with her fans. The book encapsulates her journey from being a single 30-something storing cashmere sweaters in her oven to having three kids, a husband and a home to manage.

Elizabeth Thorp and Edith Gregson

Alison Newman Mike and Kathie Williams and Kurt Newman

Daniel Lippman, Margaret Carlson and Steve Clemons

‘HEALING CHILDREN’ POLITICS&PROSE A[er 30 plus years of treating young patients, president and CEO of Children’s National Health System, Dr. Kurt Newman decided to share his journey through a book that chronicles his experiences as a pediatric surgeon. In “Healing Children: A Surgeon’s Stories from the Frontiers of Pediatric Medicine” he shares stories of brave patients and the resiliency of sick children. His wife Alison and friends joined him for a book signing at Politics & Prose.

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‘THANKS, OBAMA: MY HOPEY, CHANGEY WHITE HOUSE YEARS’ COMETPINGPONG

Robin Friedman and Jennifer Miller

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James Alefantis, Kimball Stroud and David Litt

President Barack Obama’s former speechwriter David Li was fêted at a “pizza, beer and book signing” party hosted by Comet Ping Pong owner James Alefantis to celebrate the release of “Thanks, Obama: My Hopey Changey White House Years.” The book is a comedic coming-of-age memoir from Li=, who at age 24 became one of the youngest White House speechwriters in history. Guests included a mix of journalists and many of the author’s friends and former colleagues, including Erik Smith, Emily Heil, Rebecca Cooper, Maria Trabocchi and Democratic National Commi=ee press secretary Mark Paustenbach.

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BOOKTALK

BATTLING BIG TECH Franklin Foer’s “World Without Mind” challenges the power of Silicon Valley. BY ERICA MOODY

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oogle, Amazon, Facebook and Apple — from how we get our news to our shopping habits, these four behemoths have come to dominate our lives. Author Franklin Foer argues in his new book, “World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech” (Penguin Press), that this scope of influence has been planned by major tech companies since their inception and that, if left unexamined, humanity will suffer dangerous consequences.

who own these companies. And I was so surprised at how many interesting things they said about the future of humanity … it’s much more explosive than you think. For instance, Zuckerberg talks about how you need to be the same

Why do you think people with smartphones and social media accounts need to read this book? Anybody who has a phone knows the

quality of being addicted. It’s true for me. If my phone is in the other room, it feels like my arm has been cut off. That addiction is not an accident; it’s designed to be addicting in the same way that a bag of Doritos is designed to be addicting. It has sugar, fat and salt — the mental equivalents of those things. Facebook is a totally powerful example in that it’s a feedback loop. Facebook has taken data and knows everywhere you’ve been, everything you’ve read, everything you’ve bought. They know your habits and they take that information about you and try to arrange your information in the news feed so that you stay engaged for as long as possible, but by engaged what they really mean is addiction where you can’t help but keep checking all day long. Are we becoming more dependent on our devices? Is it getting worse? Without a doubt.

Facebook measures the amount of time that people spend on it. It keeps ticking up and now 55 minutes a day is what the average user spends on Facebook, which is a lot of time for one app or one website. Is there anything that you discovered when writing the book that you didn’t know before?

What I did a lot of was watch YouTube videos of Larry Page or Mark Zuckerberg, the people

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election of Trump? I wrote my book and

handed it in, I think, on November 1. Suddenly I was like, oh my gosh, I wrote a book that was really about this last election and I hadn’t even realized it. So, I made some adjustments. People think about Facebook so differently now because of Russian ads, because of fake news. Facebook is bearing the brunt right now for the rest of the tech industry, but I think it’s really just a first debate. They had prestige, that prestige is diminishing and that means journalists, economists and regulators are all thinking about these companies a little bit differently now. Do you present any solutions in the book for what government can do? Yes. There’s no

person in the office that you are at home, like you’re a hypocrite if you present a different sort of way to your friends than you do to your coworkers and you need to kind of blend this into one persona and if you don’t, you don’t have integrity. There are a lot of problems with that but there’s not a problem for him because it’s the basis for his business, which is that he wants people to share without self-consciousness.You shouldn’t have to worry what people think about your political opinions, just share it, even if in some ways, it’s not just more polite but better for society if everybody’s not wearing their political opinions on their sleeve, It makes if possible for human beings to relate to each other outside of politics. Are people starting to think about big tech, particularly Facebook, differently after the

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law right now in the United States protecting your data. There was a woman who wrote an article in The Guardian recently about her Tinder data and she worked with lawyers in Europe to use their privacy laws to get their data. They gave her 800 pages with every text she had sent, every swipe, all of her Facebook data, combined. She had no idea it was being saved and was like, “I’m so ashamed this exists. If it was ever exposed to the world, I’d want to kill myself.”And that’s true for everyone else. We enter stuff into Google that you’d never tell another human being. And you do it with the expectation that nobody will ever know. So, a strong privacy law is hugely important and it would actually hurt the power of these companies in a pretty big way. Then we get this tradition of trying to limit monopolies and we basically abandoned that awhile back. But if those laws are there and they could be reapplied to those companies and it doesn’t mean that you take a hammer and you smash them into bits but there are ways in which you can limit the ability to buy new companies or you can separate some of the powers out, like they did with Google in Europe by separating the search engine and advertising divisions.

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LIFESTYLES | NATIONALGALLERY

VERMEER AND FRIENDS AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY BY ROLAND FLAMINI

Johannes Vermeer, Woman Holding a Balance, c. 1664. A woman holds a balance seemingly intending to weigh gold and jewelry spilling out of the box onto the table. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection.

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n the National Gallery of Art’s great Johannes Vermeer exhibition of 1995, the Dutch painter was portrayed as a solitary genius, the “Sphinx of Delft,” as he had been called by Théophile Thoré-Bürger, the 19th century French art critic who re-discovered him after 300 years of obscurity. This October, Vermeer is back at the National Gallery, and he has brought along his friends – or, more precisely, some of his contemporary rivals. “Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry” sets out to refute the misconception that Vermeer worked in isolation by placing him at the center of the

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flourishing network of so-called genre painters working in different cities in what is now the Netherlands, but sharing similarities of inspiration, subject matter, composition and technique. Dutch genre painting of the 17th century is a narrative of the every day pursuits of the leisure class, when Holland – newly liberated from Spanish domination – was the leading economic and colonial power in Europe. The result is a series of paintings Adriaan Waiboer, curator at the National Gallery of Ireland who first conceived the idea of the exhibition, calls “high life imagery” in which men and women

are shown writing letters, playing musical instruments, in social settings and even holding exotic pet parrots. The exhibition offers variations on several of these themes in one brilliant painting after another, the work of an artists’ collective that included Vermeer, Gerard ter Borch, Jan Steen, Gabriel Metsu and more than a dozen others who repeatedly quoted each other but still managed to develop and retain a personal manner. “Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting” drew massive crowds in Dublin and Paris, where it was previously shown, and National Gallery director Earl (Rusty) Powell predicts that it will be a major draw in Washington. Organizing a major exhibition is like concluding an international treaty. This one involved negotiating loans from dozens of museums and private collections and was six years in the making. For that reason, if no other, it is unlikely to be repeated. With 10 paintings (out of his total production of 36) on the walls,Vermeer is the exhibition’s major presence.What is likely to come as a surprise to many visitors is the superb quality of the work of some of his very accomplished peers, including Gerard ter Borch, who seems to have been one of the originators of the genre movement. But Vermeer’s mastery still stands out. In part this is because we know his work best, but also because his creativity operates at a consistently higher level. Compare Vermeer’s “Woman Holding a Balance” with Pieter de Hooch’s “Woman Weighing Coins,” both executed in the 1660s. The features of de Hooch’s woman are barely visible under her bonnet; but the woman in Vermeer’s painting is a stronger, contemplative presence bathed in diffused sunlight from an open window. And – a favorite Vermeer device – on the wall of Vermeer’s version hangs a painting of Christ weighing souls at the Last Judgement, thus adding a moral point.

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Gabriel Metsu, Woman Reading a Letter, c. 1664-66. The woman is holding the letter to catch the light. Letters are conspicuously numerous in the exhibition reflecting the high level of literacy for the time in Holland. National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, Sir Alfred and Lady Beit, 1987 (Beit Collection.

Hanging over the show is the inevitable question why genre artists copied each other so frequently. In art, it is frequently the case that what goes around comes around. Competition was a strong factor, as the group worked in an atmosphere of anything-you-can-paint-I-canpaint-better. Another was market forces. Unlike portraits, few, if any, of these masterpieces were executed on commission. The models were generally the artist’s wife and members of the family, and the interiors fantasy settings based perhaps on the artists’ experience. The final arbiters were the elite circle of discerning collectors who recognized and valued the quality and bought these paintings at high prices. Take, for example, the pet parrot trend. The exotic birds symbolized the country’s colonial reach, and owning one was a status symbol.The first parrot paintings were painted more or less at the same time by Gerrit Dou, an artist in Leiden, and his pupil Frans von Mieris. Soon the subject had become a theme with personal variations, and Caspar Netscher’s particularly fine work “Woman Feeding a Parrot, with a Page” is in the show along with the two originals.

Pieter de Hooch, Woman Weighing Coins, c. 1664. An ornate Oriental rug is pushed aside as the mistress of the house establishes the worth of gold coins against small piles of silver ones. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie, Property of Kaiser Friedrich Museumsverein bpk/Gemäldegalerie, SMB, Eigentum des Kaiser Friedrich Museumsvereins/Jörg P. Anders.

Whatever else it is, the exhibition is a celebration of women in 17th century Holland. It includes over 60 images of women, compared to barely a dozen males, including Vermeer’s “The Geographer” and “The Astronomer,” the artist’s only two paintings of solo male subjects. Nine paintings depict women writing, or in two cases sealing letters, a reflection on the unusually high level of literacy among Dutch women of the period. Women also dominate in the musical department: 12 are painted playing fine musical instruments or singing. And the exhibition is a virtual fashion parade of period elegance with great attention paid to the attire of both men and women, in particular the latter. Vermeer’s “Woman with a Pearl Necklace” in her ermine-trimmed jacket sets the tone in fine silks, satins and velvets. The genre painting boom came to an abrupt end in 1672, the Rampjaar or “disaster year” in which the French invaded the Low Countries and the English fleet destroyed Dutch sea power. Vermeer went bankrupt, and died a few years later. This is his renascence.

Johannes Vermeer, The Love Letter, c. 1669-70. In Vermeer’s renowned painting The Love Letter a young woman playing a musical instrument is interrupted by a maid who hands her a letter, the brightly lit scene is viewed from an adjoining darkened space. Rijksmuseum, purchased with the support of Vereniging Rembrandt.

Visit Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry at the National Gallery of Art from Oct 22, 2017 - Jan 21, 2018. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y overthemoon﹐aroundtown﹐inglotcosmeticsstoreopeningandmore!

Children’s National CEO Kurt Newman poses with superheroes at Hope for Henry’s celebrity bowling tournament. (Photo by Tony Powell)

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OVERTHEMOON

The Perfection of Elegance Manuel Simpson’s design mastery, Sandy Lerner’s high-end farming and Lawrence Kocurek’s luscious local cuisine personify sophisticated living in Hunt Country.

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Chef Lawrence Kocurek (top) of the Gentle Harvest food emporium (middle) in Marshall, Va. Boom: vintage boles used as part of the décor for the 80th birthday party of Listerine heir Stacy Lloyd III.

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ne of the many attributes of life and style in Hunt Country is restrained elegance, which is often (but not always) found. This can be seen in the frequently spotted British inspired fashion, tastefully edited interiors and even the type of automobile (or better yet beat up truck) one drives. It is an innate attribute and doesn’t necessarily require unlimited funds. Middleburg-based party planner and designer Manuel Simpson, grew up in nearby Winchester and struck out on his own design path right after high school. His tasteful talents may be experienced at private parties as well as glamorous charity soirées such as the Nov. 17 Gatsby Gala at Salamander Resort to benefit The Windy Hill Foundation. One such outré celebration was the 80th birthday celebration of Stacy Barcroft Lloyd III, the son of Bunny Mellon and her first husband Stacy Barcroft Lloyd Jr., a founder of the highly regarded magazine The Chronicle of the Horse based in Middleburg. His mother, a Listerine heiress, later married oil and banking heir and philanthropist Paul Mellon. Simpson sought out vintage Listerine bottles for the party and then filled them with delicate flowers done by Amy Potter including butterfly weed, coxcomb with matricaria and helenium salvia with dahlia. This tiny touch was something that perhaps his late mother, an avid and adept horticulture devotee, may have incorporated. In fact, she defined restraint. We should also mention that the party was held at the circa 1800 Carter Hall in Millwood, once owned by Lloyd III’s grandfather, Gerald Lambert. It was especially poignant since this is where the octogenarian was born. Sadly, Lloyd III died in March 2016, six months after the party. Simpson,

who had became a close friend, was again called upon to attend to the many details of the funeral. Over in Upperville, farming entrepreneur Sandy Lerner has expanded her love of all types of sophisticated agriculture. She renovated the circa 1750 Carr House and transformed the Hunter’s Head tavern. Now, guess what? The place is a hit and a destination for locals and visitors. At Lerner’s nearby 800-acre Ayrshire Farm, she raises certified humane and organic Old Spot Ancient White Park cattle, Gloucestershire Old Spot hogs, Scottish Highland cattle and Heritage Breed Turkeys. She has since expanded her food business at the Gentle Harvest emporium with fresh organic meats and produce from her farm and local sources. Gentle Harvest chef Lawrence Kocurek recently created a Heritage Breed Dinner at the stately stone and white columned mansion. After sparkling wine cocktails, guests began their meal with crispy pork belly of Mangalitsa Old Spot Cross, a current local favorite, followed by a Kelly Bronze turkey confit terrine and then the White Park sirloin steak as the main course. The divine dessert was a hazelnut yummy with poached roasted Ayrshire Farm pears, candied hazelnuts and ice cream. All of this was accompanied by a parade of seven wine pairings. Best of all, this fabulous farm is for sale, albeit privately. The 17,000-square-foot, circa 1912 house has been meticulously renovated by Lerner. It has been listed at $30 million. Contact Brook Middleton, dbmcpa@aol. com. While you’re cooking, take notice of the kitchen with new oak floors, custom chestnut cabinets and a local artisan-made central island and pot rack. The tabletop was made from (standing dead) maple trees on the property. Bone Appetit!

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P H OTO S CO U RT E SY O F AY R S H I R E /G E N T L E H A RV E ST; P H OTO BY LU CY B R OW N /O N A R O L L , CO U RT E SY O F E Y E M A N U E L

BY VICKY MOON


Bret Baier, Reem Sadik and David Tafuri

Chinyere Hubbard and Wine Director Nadine Brown WL SPONSORED

Charlie Palmer and Executive Chef Mike Ellis Jonathan Capehart, Kosovo Amb. Vlora Citaku and Nick Schmit

CHARLIE PALMER STEAK PREVIEW Charlie Palmer Steak, Washington, D.C. | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL MODERNSTEAKHOUSE Chef Charlie Palmer spent over a year considering his Washington eatery’s refresh, including updated lighting, new furniture and fresh design details. Palmer and his wife Lisa graciously welcomed friends of the restaurant to a preview reception, posing for fan photos throughout the evening. Guests mingled while sipping on new craft cocktails, which Palmer says are an essential element to making the steakhouse feel contemporary. Several food stations sated partygoers’ appetites, including a “pork” table that offered bao buns, meatballs and pork belly sliders, plus a shellfish table showcasing an impressive roster of ceviches and oysters on the half shell. Palmer’s new menu addition, Japanese A5 Waygu, had everyone talking. “It literally melts in your mouth!” one adoring guest exclaimed. Needless to say, no one left hungry. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Louie

Rep. Don Beyer, Lauren Culbertson and Megan Beyer

Christine Warnke and Yelberton Watkins WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Deborah Sigmund and Heather Louise Finch

Jessica DeihlAmber and Alex HsuVenditti and Leana Katz

Andrea and Enrico Cecchi

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AROUNDTOWN

Power Couple Former FBI and CIA Director Bill Webster and his wife Lynda are quintessential super-achievers who know how to kick back and relax.

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D O D G E B Y P H O T O P O W E L L ;

As far as work-life balance is concerned, the Websters seem to have found it. Lynda Webster decided early on that she wanted to work in international areas. That’s not quite how it worked out, but everything she acquired along the way contributed to her strengths. She received her B.A. from Stephens College in Columbia, Mo., where she studied history and languages, beginning with French. Subsequently, in Spain she gained certificates of study at the universities of Madrid, Granada and Salamanca and then acquired Master’s degrees in Business and International Management. Lynda started working in sales and marketing for luxury hotels, a great training ground in an industry where guests expect the best. She numbers the Willard InterContinental, the

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William and Lynda Webster at the 2013 Choral Arts Holiday Gala

Four Seasons and the Watergate among the hotels where she worked and learned. Lynda regularly came into contact with high-level individuals from a myriad areas including corporations, industries and associations, and from the social and diplomatic worlds. After she and Bill married, she left the hotel business and turned her attention to service, volunteering for philanthropic groups. She became known as such an effective and responsible fundraiser and creative events planner as a volunteer that she eventually turned professional. Lynda founded The Webster Group, a sought-after team effort that helps clients develop strategies to reach their goals and raise their expectations. The Webster Group has worked on some of the most impressive events produced in Washington, including the dedications of both the Pentagon’s 9/11 Memorial and the soaring Air Force Memorial, which was attended by 44,000 people. Logistics indeed. The Websters have always led a high powered, awesomely busy life, with an active social calendar. How do they manage it? “Don’t sweat the small stuff,” Lynda answers. “On Fridays we gather the two dogs and the cat and head for the country. We relax, read and fish.”

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ill and Lynda Webster are one of the best-known couples in Washington. Knowledgeable, capable and successful, they have long been at the top of their game in their respective fields. William H. ”Bill” Webster made history when, after being director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and serving in that role for nine years, he was unexpectedly appointed director of the Central Intelligence Agency — becoming the only person ever to head both agencies. After graduating from Amherst College and Washington University School of Law followed by service as a Navy lieutenant in World War II, Bill joined a law firm, but left after a few years to follow his calling, public service. He served as judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit until he was tapped to head the FBI. After his time at the FBI and the CIA, he practiced law at Milbank,Tweed, Hadley and McCloy, specializing in arbitration, mediation and investigation. He now chairs the Homeland Security Advisory Council, which leverages the experience and wisdom of it members to advise and support the Secretary. Bill Webster has amassed many honors, awards, medals, citations and honorary degrees. This month the International Spy Museum, which he helped found, will present the first annual William H. Webster Distinguished Service Award dinner before a large audience of notables. As a letter regarding the dinner states, “Judge Webster is a man whose reputation for integrity and forthrightness remains the standard by which all others are measured.” Do note that he is also the man who said, “Security is always seen as too much until the day it’s not enough.”

William and Lynda Webster on their wedding day

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P H O T O

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BY DONNA SHOR


Event Chairmen Amanda and Earl Stafford

Renee Fleming and Roger Sant

NSO OPENING GALA

Gianandrea Noseda and Deborah Rutter

The Kennedy Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL ACONDUCTOR’SDEBUT Acclaimed Italian conductor Gianandrea Noseda made his debut as the new music director of the National Symphony Orchestra at the NSO’s annual season opening gala concert. The all-Bernstein show, part of the Kennedy Center’s “Leonard Bernstein at 100” celebration, opened with a stunning performance of the overture to Bernstein’s operetta, “Candide,” moving some in the sold-out crowd to tears. Noseda was surrounded by admirers, not least of whom were event chairmen Amanda and Earl Stafford and Italian Ambassador Armando Varricchio, at the lavish Carnevale-themed post-concert dinner featuring masked performers, an aerialist and a menu inspired by Italian chef Lidia Bastianich.

Jeanne Ruesch

JoAnn Mason, Elaine Wynn and Dan and Rhoda Glickman

Barby Allbritton

Nina Totenberg and David Reines

Susan Rice and Maris Rice-Cameron WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Toni Bush and Ann Jordan

Masked peformer

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Shannon Fairbanks and Nina Pillsbury

Annie Totah, Ann Nitze, Alexandra de Borchgrave, Didi Cutler, Suzi Cordish and Huberta von Voss-Wittig

LIGHT OF HEALING HOPE BENEFIT German Ambassador’s Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL ARTFORTHEAFFLICTED Supporters of the Light of Healing Hope Foundation gathered at the residence of German Ambassador Peter Wiig and Huberta von Voss Wiig in support of Alexandra de Borchgrave’s success in distributing more than 26,000 beautifully illustrated books of poetry to hospitals and hospices since 2010. Her effort follows through on research showing that writing and looking at beautiful works of art can help bring comfort to those who are suffering.

Fred and Marlene Malek with Roderick von Lipsey

Stuart Bernstein and German Amb. Peter Wittig VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Maria Elena Fisher, Alejandra Segura and Maria Bergeglio

Monsignor John J. Enzler, Cardinal Donald Wuerl and Bishop Mario E. Dorsonville

Lucia Marquez, Veronica Dolan, Eileen Dolan and Maureen Orth Zbyszek Inglot, Kenya Pierce and Mekki Karrakchou

SPANISH CATHOLIC CENTER GALA

Oscar and Maria Morinigo

Washington Marriott Marquis | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES AIDINGIMMIGRANTS Honorary chair Cardinal Donald Wuerl was joined by esteemed guests in the Catholic community including Bishop Mario E. Dorsonville and Monsignor John Enzler to celebrate 50 years of the Spanish Catholic Center. The evening raised funds for its programs to support immigrants such as immigration legal support and medical services. Catholic Charities D.C. is the largest independent social services agency in the Washington area.

Gloria Reyes and Colombian Amb. Camilo Reyes

Tara Arras and Kim Browne

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Amy McNamer, Maria Weber and Joshua Johnson

Petch Gibbons, Tamara Gifford and Lyle Schiavone

Rachel Lieber, Alyse Graham and Colin Stretch

WL SPONSORED

NIGHT OF HOPE 101 Constitution Ave. NW | PHOTOSBYNAKUMAYO

Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III and Community of Hope CEO Kelly Sweeney McShane

Bill Conway and Laura Zeilinger

POSITIVEOUTLOOKS The battle against homelessness has been hard fought by the Community of Hope. Over 440 supporters and friends heard how their volunteerism, partnerships and generosity move forward the organization’s mission to create opportunities for low-income families, including those experiencing homelessness, to achieve good health, a stable home, family-sustaining income and their own hope. Joshua Johnson, host of NPR/WAMU’s “1A,” served as the master of ceremonies of the event where guests enjoyed cocktails and hors d’oeuvres with the organization’s CEO Kelly Sweeney McShane and event co-chairmen Amy McNamer, Jim Neill and Maria and Lee Weber. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Joanna and Mark Goodin Wayne and Carla Turnage, Kevin Clinton and HyeSook Chung

Tiffany Durr and Ashley Reiser WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Joyce Lockhart with Cecil and Annabelle Lockhart

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Melissa McGuire, Christian Miller, and Andrew Miller

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Jake Tapper

Kurt Newman, Pamela Brown, Laura Evans and Leon Harris

Laurie Strongin, Callie Nierenberg, Brad Nierenberg and Alain Nu WL SPONSORED

HOPE FOR HENRY’S STRIKES FOR SMILES Pinstripes Georgetown | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BOWLAPALOOZA Hope for Henry’s third annual celebrity bowling tournament was its biggest one yet, packing a Georgetown bowling alley with members of Congress, journalists, sports figures and restaurateurs, many of whom led teams of bowlers competing to raise funds for the non-profit’s programs. The organization, led by Laurie Strongin, who lost her son Henry to a rare genetic disorder, helps bring smiles to seriously ill children in the hospital. SPOTTED: Host Jake Tapper bidding on silent auction items and Children’s National CEO Kurt Newman posing with superheroes.

Erik Komendant, Chip Davis and Alan Goldberg Rep. Joe Crowley

Robert Wiedmaier

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Chefs Bryan Voltaggio and Ruben Garcia Victor Shargai, Sharon Bland and Craig Pascal

Jonathan Silver and Melissa Moss

NO KID HUNGRY DINNER Peter Kaye, Adele Nelson and Josh Wachs

Range | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ FUNDRAISINGFEAST Guests at No Kid Hungry’s benefit for Share Our Strength experienced an unforgettable tencourse meal prepared by some of the best chefs in town: Bryan Voltaggio, Erik Bruner-Yang, Ruben Garcia, Spike Gjerde and Aja Cage. Just under $115,000 was raised to fight childhood hunger and make sure kids get the healthy foods they need. A VIP experience included Table 21 Chef’s Table, an iteration of the popular reservation at Chef Voltaggio’s restaurant, VOLT, with wagyu beef and Maryland lobster caviar on the menu. Auction items brought in $81,000, and included Chef Garcia hosting a “Paella Party” at your home. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Amy and Alan Meltzer, Diane Tipton and David Bradt

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Dorothy Kosinski and Thomas Krahenbuhl Michael Pillsbury and Japanese Amb. Kenichirō Sasae Dame Jilllian Sackler and Susan Pillsbury WL EXCLUSIVE

FREER GALLERY OF ART REOPENING Freer Gallery of Art | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL “ATTITUDINALREVIVIFICATION” Eager to tour the premises after a three-month closure, friends and patrons of the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art were overheard questioning curators about the newly revitalized exhibition spaces and updated technological features intended to encourage cross-cultural understanding. “It’s more than just a refurbishment, it is also the renovation of our attitude,” the gallery’s soon-to-retire director Julian Raby told guests before encouraging them to “stroll, wander, gaze and wonder.”

Freer and Sackler Galleries Director Julian Raby (center) with Paula and Peter Lunder

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Jonathan Fineberg Judy Lynn Prince Laith Alnouri, Meridith Weaver and John Mason

‘RENOIR AND FRIENDS’ RECEPTION The Phillips Collection | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL IMPRESSIONISTEVENING Pierre Auguste Renoir’s “Luncheon of the Boating Party” is the best known artwork at the Phillips Collection; those who love the plein-air painting were thrilled to experience the first exhibition devoted to the masterwork at a VIP preview and reception. “Renoir and Friends” includes 40 carefully selected works, many by contemporaries who also depicted the eclectic group of friends who posed for his most famous creation.

Lindsay Ellenbogen and Jessica Lang

Steve and Andrea Strawn VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Afreen Lakhani, Anita Sciacca and Gary Epstein

Matt D’Amico and Scott Brinitzer

Mark Lowham, Jonathan Taylor and Matt McCormick Christie Weiss and Joe Ruzzo WL SPONSORED

MATT MCCORMICK WELCOME RECEPTION Squash on Fire | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL REALESTATEWELCOME Sotheby’s International Realty welcomed new executive vice president Matt McCormick with a party at the District’s new squash club, Squash on Fire. McCormick joined Sotheby’s after previous affiliations with Compass and Washington Fine Properties. Real estate industry notables spotted in the crowd included Mark Lowham, Christie Weiss, Laura Cox Kaplan and many more.

Laura Cox Kaplan, Chad Hoeft and Aimee Burck

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FP Santangelo and Blake Anthony

STITCHED OPENING Damian Ruth, Eamon Springall, Bryce Harper, Sam Glaser and Ricci Lopez

Krista Johnson, Stewi Corno and Alexa Johnson

MGM National Harbor |

PHOTOSBYSHANEO’NEAL

WELL-SUITED Washington Nationals baseball star Bryce Harper turned heads at the opening party for STITCHED, as MGM National Harbor added the Las Vegas menswear hotspot to the resort’s evolving retail collection. For once it wasn’t merely starstruck fans, but rather the fashion set keen on sizing up the haberdashery well known in Vegas for its custom clothing and hand-tailored ready-to-wear menswear. Harper, who serves as the spokesperson for the bespoke suit brand, posed for fan photos and watched along as bartenders concocted hand- STITCHED old fashioneds using dry-ice for effect. “STITCHED brought a vibe and energy to retail in Las Vegas that was new for the city,” said Bill Boasberg, the resort’s general manager. Eamon Springhall, founder and president of STITCHED, agreed: “The greater D.C. market is an ideal fit for STITCHED as we share a unique culture of suiting-style that ranges from classic elegance to colorful irreverence.”

Leah and Patrick Fisher VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Mikel Blair and Maggie O’Neill

Teri Pantelakos, Bela Aggarwal, Michelle Schoenfeld and Tiffany Sanders

Aisha Bond and Lesley Devrouax

Kasey O’Boyle

SUPERFIERCE Blind Whino | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Nicole Elkon, Hayley Pivato and Rebecca Fishman

THEARTOFRESISTANCE Superfierce wowed guests at its second annual showcase of progressive art from over 30 female artists. This time the girl gang helmed by artist Maggie O’Neill transformed the Blind Whino space in Southwest Washington into a feast for the senses on the exhibit’s opening night. Sakerum provided bites of sashimi and Veuve Clicquot supplied sips alongside the “Superfierce” specialty cocktail made with grapefruit juice and Belvedere vodka. As the night progressed, guests slowly made their way upstairs to rock to beats by DJ Neekola alongside human disco balls. In recognition of breast cancer awareness month, artist Kasey O’Boyle created an interactive exhibit where visitors were invited to paste different sized nipples on the wall. A portion of proceeds from the evening went to EBeauty, a local nonprofit organization that supports women undergoing treatment for cancer through its Online Wig Exchange Program.

Violetta Markelou, Meg Schaap and Anne Marchand

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Miss D.C. Briana Kinsey, Elaine Rogers and Miss Virginia Cecili Weber

Sen. John Hoeven and Miss America Cara Mund

Kate Bennett, Hunter Schwarz and Betsy Klein

MISS AMERICA RECEPTION Karen and Kent Knutson Residence |

PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

CROWNINGGLORY A smile never left her face as newly-crowned Miss America Cara Mund of North Dakota posed for photos with nearly every guest at a garden party in her honor. Hostess Karen Knutson served as a preliminary judge for the pageant along with CNN’s Kate Bennett. North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven, for whom Mund had interned, expressed pride in the pageant winner, who hopes to be a future governor of her home state. Mund told partygoers she attempted four times to reach the Miss America competition before ultimately taking the crown, adding she “wanted to show young girls across America the only one who really limits you is yourself.” VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Gloria Dittus and Karen Knutson

Alexandra Peters and Miss America President Josh Randle

Miss America executives Sam Haskell and Lynn Weidner

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PARTIES PARTIES PARTIES

ONTHESCENE From dinners and tributes to film screenings, we raise our glasses. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

COMMITTEE OF 100 EVENT

THE TRISH VRADENBURG ‘OUT OF THE SHADOWS’ DINNER

CO U RT E SY  P H OTO S

[RONALD REAGAN BUILDING]

WendyStabenow, Benchley,Sen. Honoree Sen. Debbie Roy Blunt Sen. Schatz, Dr. Nancy andBrian George Vradenburg Knowlton and David Helvarg

John Hagedorn and Diane Rehm

[RONALD REAGAN BUILDING ]

Fred Teng and Betty Liu

P H O T O S  B Y  DA N I E L  M C G A R R I T Y

This year’s dinner honored and celebrated the life of the late Trish Vradenburg who tirelessly fought to find a cure for Alzheimer’s. Senators Roy Blunt and Debbie Stabenow were presented with the Congressional Champions Award. The event also featured a conversation between several well-known women whose lives have been affected by the disease, including Sally Quinn.

Clement Leung, Jean Lee, Wilson Chu and Herman Li

After a three day conference promoting U.S.-China relations, Committee of 100 hosted an event emceed by Bloomberg’s Betty Liu to celebrate Terry Branstad as the new U.S. Ambassador to China. Chairman of C100 Frank Wu said he looked forward to addressing with Branstad the “key macroeconomic and geopolitical issues affecting U.S.-China relations.”

880 P AT CITY MARKET AT O OPENING [880 P STREET] P H O T O S  B Y  DA N I E L  S WA R T Z

Mandy Spring and Teresa Foss Del Rosso Second Lady Karen Pence, Vice President Mike Pence, Actor Josh Brolin and Kathryn Boyd Brolin

Roadside Development hosted VIP guests for a benefit event at the brand new 880 P at City Market at O. Top chefs, Cedric Maupillier of Convivial, Marjorie Meek-Bradley of Smoked & Stacked, Mike Rafidi of Arroz, Victor Albisu of Taco Bamba, Michael Friedman of All-Purpose, Aschara Vigsittaboot of Beau Thai and Irvin Van Oordt of Tiger Fork came together to support the Capital Area Food Bank’s relief efforts for recent hurricane victims. Patrons also enjoyed a special performance by Award Winning Rock/Jazz pianist ELEW.

‘ONLY THE BRAVE’ FILM SCREENING [LANDMARK E STREET CINEMA] P H OTO  BY  K R I S  CO N N O R

The Columbia Pictures’ production recalls the true story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots – a group of Arizona-based firefighters specializing in combatting wildfires. In 2013, a powerful blaze called the Yarnell Hill Fire killed 19 of the 20 Hotshots. Attendees of the movie screening had a chance to meet and greet with Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen as well as actor Josh Brolin.

Jean Paul Sabatier, Greg Kakaletris, Nycci Nellis and Drew Porterfield

Haidar Karoum, Mike Isabella, , Jeff Edelstein, Yohan Allender and Jared Meier

David Nellis and Cedric Maupillier

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HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL GLOBAL NETWORKING EVENT [13TH STREET NW] CO U RT E SY  P H OTO S

Over 100 Harvard Business School alumni attended a an evening of catching up and networking. Guests included local real estate developer and founder of the Trust for the National Mall, Chip Akridge, who was the key-note speaker for the evening. Akridge shared snippets of his life, telling stories of how he got accepted to Harvard, his time serving in the Vietnam War, and how he built a successful real estate company from scratch. He attributes his business and philanthropic success to the power of networking.

Chip Akridge, Antonio Alves and William Akridge

Conchita Sarnoff, Kandie Stroud, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Barbara Harrison and Dr. Susan Blumenthal

STROUD HOEDOWN [CARNOT RESIDENCE] CO U RT E SY  P H OTO

Over 200 guests gathered in their best western attire for the Fourth Annual Stroud Hoedown, which raised over $50,000 for the family’s foundation that honors the memory of the late pediatrician Frank Stroud by providing scholarship money to local schools that work with learning disabled children. Bales of hay and a barbecue feast helped the theme come alive.

Alon Kremer and Heather Kachlon

TRIBUTE TO VETERANS [CAPITOL HILL CLUB] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

Fame Academia and Jennifer Griffin

The sixth annual bipartisan event celebrated all the members of Congress who have served in the United States military. The cocktail reception featured light bites and whiskies courtesy of Beam Suntory. With his pup Cena by his side, veteran Corporal Jeff DeYoung gave a speech on the lifesaving power of military and service dogs. Remarks were also made by Reps. Mike Coffman, Steve Young and former House appropriations chairman Bob Livingston. Jennifer Griffin of Fox News Network served as emcee. Programming also included a performance by renowned tenor Anthony Kearns.

Gabi Valentine and Margaret Given

Corporal Jeff DeYoung and Cena

Veterans Affairs Sec. David Shulkin

DINING AWAY DUCHENNE [EASTERN MARKET] P H O T O S  B Y  H E AT H E R  F E A S T E R ANDMEREDITHRAIMONDI

James Wood and Tommy McFly

Jeff Buben, Jose Andres and the Wood Family

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Dave Heil and Rep. Erik Paulsen

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Twenty local area chefs cooked up a storm to raise awareness and funds for the Foundation to Eradicate Duchenne founded by Joel and Dana Wood. In its 17th year, the event raised over $500,000 that will go toward cutting-edge research into treatments for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. In addition to a star-studded roster of chefs, over 40 members of Congress dropped in to show their support.

Chef Mike Spurlock of Rappahannock River Oysters Co.

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandDeveloperMontyHoffman

;LEX¸W3PH-W2I[ David and Suzanne Chavern renovated a historic Falls Church farmhouse, with the help of designer Mary Amons. BY ERICA MOODY PHOTOGRAPHS BY TONY BROWN


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

hen David Chavern proposed purchasing an old farmhouse in Falls Church, his wife Suzanne thought he was crazy. “There was so much work that had to be done!” she says with a laugh, conceding that she could see the appeal of the unique property, which is half turn-of-thecentury farmhouse and half 1942 addition. It was certainly different from anywhere she had lived before. The inside was pretty run-down, David admits, but he fell in love with its “dramatic spaces” and quiet energy. “It feels like you could be anywhere, like you’re in the middle of thee country,” the News Media Alliance CEO says. For their busy lifestyle — working, entertaining and keeping up with their four children age 20-25 — the peaceful residence must seem like a refuge. Relatively new to the local scene, Pittsburgh transplant Suzanne didn’t know whom to call for design help, so when her personal shopper at Nordstrom Tysons raved about Mary Amons, she was quick to call the former “Real Housewives of D.C.” star for help transforming the house into a modern and comfortable dwelling that retained the integrity and charm of its historic features. “It was a real challenge to figure out a way to marry these styles in a way that made sense,” Amons says. “The addition is very much not aligned in style to the farmhouse on the other side. The house was in a serious state of disrepair.” An intense renovation project ensued. It was so thorough that the Chaverns ended up living in the apartment over the garage for six months while the house was being finished. To solve the disconnect between rooms, Amons felt “it was really important to have the spaces speak to one another. Pieces in the living room were custom designed to speak to pieces in the dining room.” For example, a custom metal table base on the formal dining room table matches that of the living room coffee table. Other standout custom pieces include distressed mercury glass mirrors in the foyer and a heat-resistant plexiglass

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OPENING PAGE: Suzanne and David Chavern in their Falls Church home. PREVIOUS PAGE: (clockwise from left) A screened-in porch on farmhouse stone is the Chaverns’ favorite room in the house; custom distressed mercury glass mirrors and unique Art Deco low-profile radiator covers are featured in the well-lit foyer of the 1942 addition; kitchen ceilings were raised and the room expanded in a major overhaul project with the help of Saba Construction and Design; a balcony off their son Jacob’s room; an original 1942 lighting fixture was restored over a period of six months with every piece taken apart and refinished. THIS PAGE: (clockwise from top left) A formal living room is decorated with colorful artwork from Miami and custom furniture including kidney shaped sofas with no seams, oversized transitional blue velvet chairs and a 200year-old redwood slab coffee table with custom metal base; David and Suzanne Chavern look over original 1942 blueprints with their designer Mary Amons of Mary Amons Design; the formal dining room includes high-backed parsons dining chairs, a walnut top and custom metal base dining table and a custom plexiglass and stainless steel buffet table; the master bathroom on the second floor was completely renovated and enlarged; a view from outside the home, comprising a former farmhouse and its 1942 addition.

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and stainless steel buffet table in the dining room. Walls were knocked down and doors removed to give the space a more harmonious flow from the old abode to the 1942 addition.The ceiling was raised in the kitchen, a major overhall. They found ways to highlight the original exposed stone from the farmhouse (leaving it peeking out from the ceiling in the family room) and the marble stone terrazo on the grand entryway staircase leading to the second floor, where a master bathroom was installed and canary yellow walls were painted a simple white. “David likes clean design,” Suzanne says, though she and Mary joke that her husband “had a lot of input, but not a whole lot of choice” in the process. Having a home that suits their lifestyle is most important to the Chaverns, high school sweethearts who reconnected over Facebook three years ago and married last year.They love that the house is divided into both “public” and “private” spaces. “It’s a big house that lives small.” David explains. “The private spaces are actually pretty intimate, but it’s got these grand public spaces that are great for entertaining.” More of that looms over the horizon. The couple’s “aggressive entertaining schedule” includes plenty of business lunches and dinners where the expanded kitchen comes in handy. “I like to cook, so it works out for everyone,” Suzanne says. “I’ve never done so much entertaining in my life!” When the entertaining is over, the newlyweds retreat to their favorite room in the house, a screened-in porch where they can experience the peaceful atmosphere of their historic home (which they insist has no ghosts that they’re aware of). “I have a religious view that everybody in their life should have a screened-in porch because it’s the best possible thing in life,” David says. “Especially if you’re a cigar smoker.”

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

River Road Rush Artis Senior Living and the Feynman School purchase estates less than two miles apart on Montgomery County’s famed River Road BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

Mahinder Tak sold  RIVERROAD in Potomac for $5.1 million to Artis Senior Living of Potomac LLC. Tak was also co-chairman of the DNC’s Indo-American Council during the 2008 Obama campaign and is one of the largest private collectors of Indian art in the U.S. The sevenbedroom, ten-bath 1991-built brick residence, which sits on over four acres of land, exemplifies a classic country manor while maintaining its close proximity to downtown Washington, D.C. Artis has major development plans for the mansion to create one-of-a-kind senior living residences. Exterior features of the 8,000-square-foot estate include a large outdoor patio centered on lushly landscaped grounds, a swimming pool, tennis court and pool house. The partially finished basement includes a large bar, wine cellar, recreation room, au-pair suite and an indoor lap pool that connects to the rear pool house. A gated driveway leads up to the front of the house with an attached garage for four cars plus a covered carport, circle driveway and plenty of space for additional parking. TTR Sotheby’s David DeSantis was the listing agent while Long & Foster Real Estate Inc.’s James Coley was the buyer’s agent.

THE DISTRICT Cinthia Lopez and Sheldon Hall purchased FOXVIEWCIRCLENW from Kathryn and William J. Davis for $3.85 million. Mr. Hall, also known as Trip, is president of Capital One Auto Finance at Capital One Financial Corporation. The last time the house was on the market it sold for $1.45 million in 2012. The newly built custom six-bedroom Arts and Crafts style property by Sandy Springs Builders includes four levels and an elevator while also featuring a gourmet kitchen, an adjoining family room with a coffered ceiling, a large master suite and home theater. Marc Fleisher of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty listed the house. Long & Foster Real Estate’s George Koutsoukos was the buyer’s agent.

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MARYLAND The Feynman School , a North Bethesda-

based academy for gifted children, recently purchased

RIVERROAD in Potomac for $3.35 million from Louis Donatelli for possible future campus expansion. Donatelli is the chairman and founder of the residential development company Donatelli Development. The sprawling 1937 Southern Colonial estate is sited on over five acres was recently renovated by Natelli Builders. It includes grand entertaining spaces, a swimming pool, tennis court and expansive patios. TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Michael Rankin was the listing agent. Charis Realty Group’s Christine Issler was the buyer’s agent.

Danielle and Simon Warner bought   YORK MANOR WAY in Potomac from the Steven Buckley Trust for $3 million. Mrs.

Warner is the founder and CEO of Expat Insurance. The custom Bogdan-built and John Neufeld-designed property boasts a dramatic two-story foyer with a sweeping staircase, a banquet-size formal dining room, private first floor guest suite and a children’s computer room. Ideally sited on a level and private two acre lot in the prestigious and gated Rapley Preserve community in the heart of Avenel, the 12,000-square-foot 1992 chateau-style residence include a cherry-paneled living room with a built-in entertainment center, a gourmet kitchen with a domed breakfast room and a second floor family room. TTR

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Carla A. Hills, a former HUD secretary during the Gerald Ford administration and current co-chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, sold  CHAIN BRIDGEROADNW in Wesley Heights to Luis Riesgo Pablo and Maria Teresa Modrono Hernandez for $3.5 million. Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher R. Leary of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties represented both parties in the transaction. The three-story stone and stucco Contemporary was constructed in 1941 by Alfred Kastner, a theorist who applied modernist principles to public housing. The seven-bedroom property was first owned by Raymond Clapper, a journalist who reported on World War II and traveled with the U.S. Navy in the South Pacific. The residence is close to Battery Kemble Park and includes a wine cellar, pool and tennis court.

Sotheby’s International Realty’s Marc Fleisher was the listing agent; W.C.& A.N. Miller Realtors, Long & Foster Company’s Sharon LaRowe represented the buyer.

VIRGINIA   QUEEN STREET in Old Town fetched $2.8 million when Linda Fuselier and former

Time magazine writer and noted author Christopher Ogden sold the property to Thomas Anthony Vecchiolla and Martha Jane Vecchiolla. Mr. Vechiolla is an analyst at Calamos Investments. The charming Federal was listed by Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe and Christopher R. Leary of Washington Fine Properties.The historic brick five-bedroom house was renovated from top to bottom by D.C. designer David H. Mitchell, architect Thomas Manion and builder Harry Braswell. The property was built in 1842 by Alexandria Classical Academy boarding school founder Robert Brockett and sits on a prime corner lot complete with a private brick garden including a serene fountain and two- car carriage house featuring an additional guest suite. McEnearney’s Joan Shannon was the buyer’s agent.

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VIRGINIA Mark and Maria Greenway purchased  RIVERBENDROAD from the 500 River Bend LLC for $3.4 million. The 2015-built six bedroom 14,000-square-foot Georgian Colonial mansion in Great Falls features luxe finishes, mahogany floors, a designer kitchen, elevator, slate patio, pool and four-car oversize garage. Compass’ Tracy Dillard was the buyer’s agent while Pearson Smith Realty’s Linda Greenway represented the seller.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

PROPERTYLINES

DISTRICT CHARM: Ron and Beth Dozoretz, noted Democratic party fundraisers, listed   THSTREETNW in Wesley

Heights for a cool $18 million, making it the second most expensive listing in the District (top honors go to   CHAIN BRIDGEROADNW, which is holding steady at $22 million). The private 1927 stone estate is nestled on a half acre manicured lot complete with a 50-foot heated pool and separate guesthouse. Previous owners of the house include Huffington Post founder Arianna Huffington and her former husband, the late Rep. Michael Huffington. Embassy size entertaining rooms, five fireplaces, two garages and a separate catering kitchen complete this six-bedroom historic Colonial. Washington Fine Properties’ Chuck Holzwarth is the listing agent.

WOODLEY WARDMAN: Kathleen and Stijn Claessens are selling their classic Woodley Park Wardman at  CATHEDRALAVENUE NW for $2,250,000. Mr. Claessens is a Dutch economist who currently serves as assistant director of the International Monetary Fund’s research department. Built in 1926, the charming five-bedroom residence has been updated to include a top-of-the-line gourmet kitchen, a well manicured garden and patio, a formal dining room that seats 16, a second floor library and a finished lower level recreation room. Washington Fine Properties’ Chuck Holzwarth is the listing agent.

MODERN MARVEL: People with glass houses list them for $4.25 million. Fred Bahrami is selling his unique glass-walled residence at  RSTREETNW with the help of listing agents Robert Hryniewicki, Adam Rackliffe and Christopher Leary of Washington Fine Properties. Bahrami also designed and built the 28unit condominium building Q14 in Logan Circle. The R Street property is a 6,100-square foot Contemporary complete with a 1,300-square-foot roof deck with panoramic views. The house boasts a two-story living room with floor-to-ceiling windows and an owners suite with a double steam shower, jacuzzi, and heated floors. The lower level is complete with a second kitchen and three-car gated parking.

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CLASSIC COLONIAL: Obama advisor Elizabeth SherwoodRandall and her husband, neurosurgeon Jeffrey Randall, listed

  INDIAN LANE NW for $3.3 million. The 1929 Colonial has six bedrooms and six baths and is located on a one-third acre lot in the historic neighborhood of Spring Valley. The charming property has been extensively renovated to include a gourmet kitchen and home theater while still retaining the original character of the era in which it was built. The listing agents are Michael Rankin and Matt McCormick of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@ washingtonlife.com.

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OPENHOUSE

District Living Enjoy all that Washington has to offer by purchasing one of these residences. GEORGETOWN  RDST NW This beautifully renovated semi-detached Federal-style townhome features high-end finishes on three levels of living space over 3,000 square feet. Hardwood floors, expansive master with remodeled bathroom, five fireplaces, multiple staircases and spacious living and dining areas for entertaining. A gourmet kitchen with breakfast area opens to a wonderful side patio.

ASKING PRICE: $3,795,000 LISTING AGENT: Salley Widmayer, 202.215.6174, Long & Foster | Christie’s

DUPONTCIRCLE  SST NW

ASKING PRICE: $1,299,000

Pacific Row at 1713 S Street NW offers a boutique collection of residences featuring fine European designer finishes, private outdoor space and parking; it’s where modern luxury meets history. The building, a historic Dupont Circle mansion, was expertly transformed into five stunning condominiums in 2017 with the chic and sophisticated urban lifestyle in mind. A twobedroom penthouse floorplan is still available and priced at $1.299 million.

LISTING AGENTS: Kerry Fortune Carlsen, 202.257.7447, and Liza Tanner Boyd, 202.641.7064, Washington Fine Properties

DUPONTCIRCLE   THST NW A major 2014 renovation transformed this 25½-foot wide townhouse into a residence of top quality and workmanship.With stunning Porcelanosa kitchen cabinetry and top Miele appliances, this home is designed for luxury living and entertainment. The open floor plan has distinctive architectural details. The master bedroom suite offers a custom dressing room. A 1,500-squarefoot two-bedroom apartment is included.

ASKING PRICE: $2,895,000 LISTING AGENT: Camille Gemayel, (202) 2102314 mobile (202) 333-6100 office (202) 471-5281 direct, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

LOGANCIRCLE  THST NW

This newly-renovated Victorian townhome — located in the heart of Washington, D.C.’s vibrant Logan Circle neighborhood — features five bedrooms, four full bathrooms, secure parking for two cars and two private outdoor deck spaces.

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ASKING PRICE: $1,999,000 LISTING AGENTS: Daniel Heider, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

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HOME LIFE | WINERIES

VIRGINIA IS FOR [WINE] LOVERS

Serious wine and serious views make these five vineyards worth a quick one-hour drive. P H OTO S A N D STO RY BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

V

RdV Vineyards

RDVVINEYARDS 2550 Delaplane Grade Rd, Delaplane, Va. MUSTSIP Lost Mountain

Rutger de Vink is a marine-turned-winemaker who, after a stint in business, answered the calling to work with his hands. He founded RdV Vineyards not to make the best wine in Virginia, but rather some of the best wine in the country. He spent three years tracking down the perfect plot of land to realize his lofty goals and happened across a 100-acre gem in Delaplane, previously an angus beef farm, where he planted vines of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot. RdV’s two Bordeaux-style wines spend 20-22 months in French oak, then a year in bottle. The land is buttressed by granite, which tricks the plants to put energy into ripening fruit instead of laying down roots. A slab of granite hangs outside of the production room as a reminder that “It ain’t about us, it’s about the land,” says master sommelier Jarad Slipp. VISIT: Tasting appointments required. $65 includes cellar tour, welcome champagne and a cheese and charcuterie board. Call (540) 3640221, rdv@rdvvineyards.com.

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irginia winemaking dates back four centuries to Jamestown settlers hoping to produce bottles for export to the British empire. Then there was Thomas Jefferson, who was said to have failed at the craft repeatedly. Fast forward to today and the Old Dominion state has rebounded in impressive form. With over 250 vineyards and counting, the state’s wineries have varietals for every palate, and more importantly, environments to suit all visitor’s tastes. Whatever you’re seeking, Virginia’s wine country has it. The true beauty is in the dedicated winemakers who continue to experiment and familiarize themselves with Virginia’s terroir. For our criteria, we focused on five vineyards with wellbalanced wines, all within an hour’s reach of the District. Now that fall is here, there is no better time to get past city limits, breathe in the mountain air and sip the fruit of the vine.

LINDENVINEYARDS

ARTERRAWINES

3708 Harrels Corner Rd, Linden, Va. MUST SIP: Claret ($27) and Hardscrabble Chardonnay ($40)

It is nearly impossible to read about Virginia’s winemaking world without stumbling across Jim Law, who some refer to as the “father of Virginia wine.” He crafted Linden’s first vintage in 1987. Law’s wines are entirely estate grown, using fruit hand-picked and handsorted from three vineyards – Hardscrabble, Boisseau and Avenius. He is best known for his single vineyard varietals from Hardscrabble, which holds the vines viewable from the tasting room and Law’s home. One member of his knowledgeable and friendly staff tells us that the oenophile can often be seen pacing through the vines in his wine boots and a tshirt covered in holes, further confirming the passion already evident in Law’s well-balanced wines. “My heart is always in the vineyard,” he tells us. VISIT: Normal tastings offer five pours for $8; cellar tastings are $25 and offer six tastings of Linden’s single vineyard bottles. Visit lindenvineyards.com.

1808 Leeds Manor Rd, Delaplane, Va. MUST SIP: Tannat ($49) From the moment you turn up a hidden driveway to Arterra’s cabin-like tasting room, there is an immediate sense of calm and the smell of car exhaust succumbs to the sweet smell of wood chips and oak. The quaint quarters at Arterra (“art of the land”) are the life’s work of husband-and-wife-team Jason Murray and Sandy Gray-Murray, who set out to capture the essence of Virginia’s terroir (land) in an honest way. As many other Virginia vineyards have adapted French winemaking styles, Arterra has stayed true to its roots, quite literally. Jason operates a Native Yeast Fermentation process derived naturally from the fruit’s skin, and opts for aging in older neutral wood barrels that don’t define the wine’s character. Working under the premise of authenticity, Murray forgoes additives to wholly “embrace the character of the fruits.” The tasting room also houses Sandy’s artwork (Hawkmoth Arts) which gives nod to the wine making process. “We’re making what Virginia is,” Jason says.

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VISIT: Family friendly, tastings are four pours for $10 or six for $15. Visit arterrawines.com.

GREENHILLVINEYARDS 23595 Winery Lane Middleburg, Va. MUST SIP: Blanc de Blancs ($39) Owner David Greenhill, who purchased the property in 2013, works with Burgundynative Sébastien Marquet using Old World techniques to produce a wide selection of grape varietals (Bordeaux and Burgundy style, French American hybrid, and other European grapes like Riesling). Their wine made a splash in 2016 when bottles of the Blanc de Blancs (Chardonnay-based sparkling wine) appeared in Oscar swag bags alongside $200,000 in other goods and gifts. In addition to a sleek, newly revamped tasting room, Wine Club Members have access to a private upper level lounge and a historic club house on the estate. Be sure to check Greenhill’s calendar for offbeat wine activities like Vineyasa Yoga. VISIT: Visit greenhillvineyards.com

LET’SNOTFORGETDC DISTRICTWINERY

SLATERRUNVINEYARDS 1500 Crenshaw Rd, Upperville, Va. MUST SIP: Roots ($50) and Monbazillac ($22) Family comes first at Slater Run, where farm, land and community are the core principles upon which the vineyard was established. After years of urban living, owner Kiernan Slater Patusky returned to a plot of land in Upperville that her family has owned for over 300 years. With the intention of maintaining their agricultural tradition, she and her husband Christopher began harvesting grapes in 2010, enlisting vineyard consultant Lucie Morton and French winemaker Katell Griaud ahead of their first vintage in 2014. Griaud brought with her an exquisite family recipe for Monbazillac, a balanced dessert wine that undergoes extensive freezing and pressing. They plan to expand their current 12 acres of vines, which include Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and two Bordeaux style blends, so that bottles are eventually 100 percent estate grown. VISIT: Private tours, tastings and events by appointment. Contact (540)-592-3042. Slater Run also has a tasting room in downtown Upperville in addition to its on-site tasting room.

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VIRGINIAWINE BYTHENUMBERS

264 Wineries Rank in U.S. Wine Grape Production: 5th (following California, etc.)

386 vineyards that span over 3,446 acres

$747.1 million

economic impact to Virginia

385 Water St. SE MUST SIP: Pinot Noir Reserve ($45) Look no further than the Navy Yard to get your bespoke wine fix.The team behind the urban winery movement recently set up their third outpost (the first outside of New York) in a custom 17,000-square-foot space that includes the winery itself, a restaurant (Ana), a tasting bar and event space overlooking the Anacostia River. Grape shipments from California, Oregon, New York and soon Virginia, give winemaker Conor McCormack ultimate flexibility when blending.There are 15 wines currently being poured ranging from skin contact Riesling to Old Vine Zinfandel. D.C.- specific varietals will start releasing in spring.The goal behind the concept is to make wine more approachable to the average person. “The cool thing about this setting is that we can showcase the winemaking process,” McCormack says. He also emphasizes that there are no stupid questions – novices welcome. VISIT: Tastings are five pours for $10. Visit districtwinery.com.

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MY WASHINGTON DCMAYORMURIELBOWSER INTERVIEW BY VIRGINIA COYNE

I enjoy going for walks through Rock Creek Park anytime of the year.

I recommend that everyone living in or visiting D.C. go to the National Museum of African American History and Culture – it tells an important story.

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Whenever I’m over by Ben’s Chili Bowl, I love stopping in to chat with residents and visitors.

The Panorama Room,a facility used for parties and receptions in Anacostia, has some of the most breathtaking views of the city imaginable.

culture and entertainment that make it easy to attract and retain employees.

WHICH INITIATIVES ARE MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU? My team and I work every day to expand opportunities and improve day-to-day quality of life for residents in all eight wards. Any initiative that helps us reach that goal – and those initiatives can look different for different residents – is our priority.The good thing is that I have a team of really smart and passionate people working with me, so we don’t have to focus on just one or two issues.We can simultaneously focus on ending homelessness, producing and preserving affordable housing, accelerating school reform and expanding access to child care, and filling potholes.

ONE OF THE BIGGEST COMPLAINTS PEOPLE HAVE ABOUT THE CITY IS THE STATE OF THE ROADS. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN DOING TO IMPROVE THEM? In a thriving city like Washington, D.C., residents and visitors should expect roads that are in good condition. Many residents are already aware of Potholepalooza and Alleypalooza. In 2017 alone, through historic investments in our roads, we completed 21 miles of local paving and nearly nine miles of federal and NHS paving. Next year, we have plans to improve 23 additional miles of roadway.

YOU’RE SPEARHEADING AN EFFORT TO BRING AMAZON’S NEW HEADQUARTERS HERE. HOW IMPORTANT IS IT TO HAVE COMPANIES GRAVITATE TO THE DISTRICT? Washington, D.C. is experiencing an incredible renaissance, and companies are recognizing the great things going on in our city. In just the past year, Apple,Yelp, and FiscalNote all announced plans to either expand to or stay in Washington, and we expect to see this trend continue. Our city has a thriving tech scene, easy access to brilliant people and top universities, and the types of

YOU’VE BEEN A BIG ADVOCATE FOR TECH COMPANIES, CORRECT? Technology is here to stay, and we want to ensure that Washington, D.C. remains a city that embraces innovation and change. Today, the District is at the forefront of the tech movement, and as we grow, we are being intentional about fostering a more inclusive environment so that all our residents benefit from the jobs and opportunity in the tech sector.This year, Forbes ranked D.C. the number one city for women in tech, and we didn’t get there by chance; we got there by being intentional about the programs and policies we support and invest in, and we will continue to make those investments.

YOU RECENTLY ANNOUNCED YOUR BID FOR A SECOND TERM. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE YOUR LEGACY TO BE? Our city has never been stronger than it is today, but we need to continue closing the gaps between those who are benefiting from the growth and change and those who are able to witness it but not participate in it. I want to be remembered for building a city that gave more Washingtonians the opportunity to participate in our prosperity. I want the story of Washington, D.C. to be one of prosperity and inclusivity – a renaissance that brings everyone along.

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P O RT R A I T O F M AYO R B OW S E R BY K H A L I D N A J I - A L L A H ; R O C K C R E E K PA R K A N D B E N ’S C H I L I B OW L H OTOS VI A W I K I M E D I A CO M M O N S ; . P H OTO O F T H E N AT I O N A L M U S E U M O F A F R I CA N A M E RI CA N H I SO RY A N D CU LT U R E CO U RT E SY S M I T H SO N I A N .

MY TOP SPOTS

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE THE BIGGEST ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF YOUR TERM AS MAYOR? I ran for office to give more Washingtonians a fair shot at pathways to the middle class.That fair shot equation is a simple one: good-paying jobs plus quality, affordable housing equals a thriving middle class in D.C.We have a lot more work to do, but over the past three years, my administration has been able to champion and sign legislation to increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour, build workforce development programs that match the needs of both residents and District businesses, and make historic investments in affordable housing. In addition, today, our city is the safest it’s been in over a decade and we continue to have the fastest improving urban school district in the country.


Profile for Washington Life Magazine

Washington Life Magazine - November 2017  

The Tech Issue

Washington Life Magazine - November 2017  

The Tech Issue