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Chelsea Lee with Spencer and Max Ernst of SHAED

RED, WHITE & GROOVE FROM JAZZFEST TO FUNK PARADE TO A LOADED LINEUP OF SUMMER SHOWS WASHINGTON’S MUSIC SCENE ERUPTS WITH TALENT INTERVIEWS WITH FRÉDÉRIC YONNET, HERBIE HANCOCK AND JON BATISTE INSIDE HOMES: SHARON VIRTS AND SCOTT MILLER REVITALIZE THE HISTORIC SELMA MANSION IN LEESBURG, VA.


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SUMMER 2019

EDITOR'SLETTER 

Earth's Call Summit . ......................................... 

FEATURES

LIFESTYLES

THESUMMERMUSICISSUE. ....................  JazzFest ............................................................  Herbie Hancock .................................................  SHAED ..........................................................  The Funk Parade ...............................................

Nashville: Music City .........................................  Fred Yonnet .......................................................

MARKETPLACE La Cosecha ..........................  TRENDSBeach Bags, Rosé and Beauty..................  TRAVELUnder Canvas Glamping ......................  TRAVELMountain Trek Welness Retreat .............. 

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY Sasha Bruce Youthwork Benefit ..............................  Prevent Cancer Foundation's 25th Spring Gala........ 

FYIDC

Arena Stage Gala ............................................... 

SOCIALCALENDAR ...................................

HEELSONTHEGROUND ........................

Make a Wish Gala and "The Fallen" premiere.........  N Street Village Luncheon ......................................  Boys & Girls Club Spring Culinary Experience ....... 

POLLYWOOD

Washington Performing Arts Gala .......................... 

EMBASSYROW March for Gay Pride..............  National Museum of Natural History Gala .............

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC ........  Friends of AU of Afghanistan Gala ........................ 'Rocket Man' Premiere Party.................................  Celebrating ASCAP............................................  TIS Foundation Gala.......................................... 

Helen Hayes Awards After Party............................... 

Africa Day Celebration ..........................................

PARTIESPARTIESPARTIES ......................... 

McLean Project for the Arts Spring Benefit...................  Tudor Place Garden Party .......................................  Marina Orth Foundation Benefit..............................

National Building Museum Gala .............................

Great Ladies Luncheon .......................................... St. Jude Heart of Fashion........................................

Italian Cultural Society Gala ................................ 

LIFT 20th Anniversary ....................................... 

HOMELIFE

Hugh M. Hefner Awards ...................................... 

INSIDEHOMESSharon Virts and Scott Miller .......

OPENHOUSE ...............................................  REALESTATENEWS ...................................

International Spy Museum Opening .......................  Creative Coalition 'Right to Bear Arts' ................... 

14 MYWASHINGTON Arvind Manocha.................

TOP FROM LEFT: COVER: Chelsea Lee with Max and Spencer Ernst of SHAED at St. Anselm in Union Market (Photo by Tony Powell); Frederic Yonnet (Photo by Tony Powell), Sax player at the Funk Parade (Photo by Mike Landsman); Canadian Rockies at Mountain Trek (Photo Courtesy of Mountain Trek); STUDEBAKER Radio ($19.95); the veranda at Selma Mansion (Photo by Tony Powell); Analog at Hutton Hotel (Photo Courtesy of Hutton)

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee MANAGINGEDITOR

Catherine Trifiletti ASSOCIATEEDITOR

Dara Klatt CONTRIBUTINGEDITOR

Roland Flamini ASSISTANTEDITOR

Katelyn Rutt COLUMNISTSANDCONTRIBUTINGWRITERS

Janet Donovan, Steve Houk,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe PRINCIPALPHOTOGRAPHER

Tony Powell CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Joy Asico, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores, Larry French, Naku Mayo,Kyle Samperton, Erin Schaff, Jay Snap, Amanda Warden and Brian Wilson

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi SALESANDMARKETINGREPRESENTATIVE

John Arundel BOOKKEEPER

Tomeka Tolson WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

Eddie Saleh,Triposs Mihail Iliev LEGAL

Mason Hammond Drake, Akerman, LLP EDITORIALINTERNS

Lauryn Cantrell, Max Harwood, Kaitlyn Hopkins and Georgia Slater

FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CREATIVE DIRECTOR EMERITUS (*)

J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

JAM ON, D.C. WASHINGTON LIFE

‘S MUSIC

Nancy Bagley, Jon Batiste and Sunny Sumter at Jazz Fest D.C.

S

ummer is all about being outside, but nothing epitomizes the season better than being outdoors AND listening to music (preferably with a glass of rosé - we have you covered there, too). We are fortunate as Washingtonians to have a myriad of outstanding venues to do just that. From big name draws at Wolf Trap or Merriweather Post Pavilion, to emerging artists at the Anthem or 9:30 Club, options for music lovers abound. Whatever your genre of choice, we hope this issue highlighting the local scene reminds you of what a vibrant musical city we live in. Speaking of music cities, it was only natural we highlight Nashville in our travel section. Grammy-winning songwriters are around every corner, but the sumptuous hot chicken and trendy hotels make it worth pulling up your boots for a visit. Or, if you’re just hankering to escape the urban din, consider our preferred nature-centric vacations. We also offer beach bag essentials and healthy skin trends for those shore-bound travelers. No matter where you are sipping that chilled drink of choice, check out our array of parties, including the Arena Stage Gala, LIFT 20th Anniversary, McLean Project for the Arts, the Hugh Hefner Awards and the Make A Wish film premiere of “The Fallen.”

WL Art Director Matt Rippetoe playing the sax at the Funk Parade

Managing Editor Catherine Trifiletti with Fred Yonnet at Eaton Hotel

Nancy R. Bagley Editor in Chief Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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Associate Editor Dara Klatt (right) singing the Rolling Stones, with “The District’s” Katie Mullins

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FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington

Jennifer Lopez

FORTHE DANCEPARTY Celebrating her 50th birthday this summer in grand style, Jennifer Lopez is roaring through 25 North-American cities for a supersized ‘It’s My Party Tour.’ Musical acts are themed around the birthday bash, and the show sizzles with a throwback vibe and Latin rave party. JLo’s playlist intensifies by each sultry step and there’s also an encore of confetti and a white balloon drop. For this glittery spectacle, it’s best to do like she says, “Let’s Get Loud” and “Live It Up.” Wednesday, July 17, Capital One Arena, 8 p.m.,Tickets start at $49.95, ticketmaster.com.

Disney’s ‘Aladdin’ Skip the live-action adaption of Disney’s animated classic of the Middle Eastern fantasyland in movie theaters and join a magic carpet ride to the Broadway musical instead. It’s “A Whole New World” with vibrant colors, wise-cracking one-liners and that lamp that turns three wishes into infinite possibilities.Thursday, July 18 – Saturday, Sept. 7, Kennedy Center, Showings at 1:30 p.m. or 7:30 p.m., kennedy-center.com.

soulful symphony

FORSUMMERSOUL Soulful Symphony will light up the Merriweather Post Pavilion stage with two more summer performances. Founded in 2000, the 75-member orchestra with vocals blends American pop, soul, hip-hop, jazz, classical, gospel and country music.With distinctive style that its director describes as “disruptive, global, local, colorful, mobile, social, American,” the symphony aims to unite high art with popular culture and encourage audiences to consider new perspectives. July 28 and Sept. 14, Merriweather Post Pavilion, ticketmaster.com.

YOU PICK: RELAXING OR SURPRISING

Rolling Stones

Capitol Riverfront Friday Night Concert Series

FORTHEMOVESLIKEJAGGER Who else could undergo heart surgery, turn 76, and still wow audiences with that signature strut? The iconic rock band led by front man Mick Jagger gets rolling and even kicks it up a notch with their No Filter Tour. Prepare to throw out your back just watching. Wednesday, July 3, FedEx Field, 7:30 p.m., Tickets start at $99, ticketmaster.com.

Bring your blanket and picnic basket of goodies and grab a grassy spot at Yards Park on Friday nights for free live music. Whether its reggae or bluegrass, folk rock or pop, the beats and riverfront view make for a relaxing summer evening.To parents on the go: lyrics are family-friendly and a large selection of restaurants are nearby. FREE, until Aug. 30,Yards Park, capitolriverfront.org.

Backstreet Boys

Sofar Sounds

They’re BACK and worth spontaneously breaking into “I Want it That Way,” on the Metro. Take an epic trip down memory lane with Nick Carter, Kevin Richardson, Brian Littrell, A.J. McLean and Howie D. on the DNA World Tour, with new music from the album “DNA” as well as the ultimate old school hits. Friday, July 12, Capital One Arena, 8 p.m., ticketmaster.com.

Looking for a little spontaneity? Sofar Sounds is an alluring experience.They convert common spaces throughout the city into surprise performance sites.Tickets are awarded through a lottery system that is open until five days before the show or until tickets sell out.The live shows regularly comprise three acts that remain under wraps to the ticketholders until they arrive for the show. Additionally, the venue location is only emailed out one day prior to the event. Surprise! sofarsounds.com.

FORTHE‘SNOSTALGIA

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A L A D D I N P H OTO BY D E E N VA N M E E R ; C H R I S STA P L E TO N BY R E D L I G H T M A N AG E M E N T

FORTHEMAGIC


OVERHEARDINDC

HEELS ON THE GROUND Musings, sightings and news from Washington Life’s editorial team

BOOKS:

NPRTINYDESK CONCERTWINNER

Quinn Christopherson performed at NPR headquarters in May after judges crowned him winner of the fifth annual contest, which drew more than 6,000 entries. The Alaskanborn, singer-songwriter uses music to express his experience as a transgender man.

BARNS:

From Samuel Francis Smith’s “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee” to Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA,” we felt like singing with a banjo and waving our American flag all through this musical history book of America from presidential historian Jon Meacham and Grammy Award-winning musician Tim McGraw. “Songs of America” takes a look at important moments in American history and the soundtrack that reflects our nation’s soul. Flip through its pages while patriotically drinking your Pabst Blue Ribbon beer and blasting Brookes & Dunn’s “Only in America.”

BEATS:

We made a sweet, little friend at the grand opening of Tusculum Farm, a new luxury B&B in Laytonsville, Md. We chatted about the stunning views, rustically elegant event space and eye-catching artwork. By far, the best conversation of the month.

PHOTO BOMBS: BESTIES: T I N Y D E S K P H OTO BY C L AI R E H A RBAG E

EXPERT TIP: When accidentally twinning at a gala, make nd full use of that backgrou ht aig str k loo — mb bo photo t ahead and crazy smile, pu like se po or rs, ea y nn up bu JLo and show some leg. You’ll feel fabulously rascally.

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Rodger and Nicole Currie (and mystery dress twin)

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Grab your BFFs and head to Georgian restaurant Supra on 11th Street NW for an eponymously named amber wine-fueled, familystyle celebratory dinner. Feasts are led by a “tamada” or toastmaster who regales the group with stories about family, friendship and life. We raise a glass to that (and the ridiculously good food, i.e. Khinkali (soup dumplings) and Pomodorit (mussels). Food and wine are included in the $125 price.

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POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy| ASCAP “We Write the Songs,” Italian Cultural Society Gala, Africa Day Celebration, Embassy Row and more!

Patti LaBelle at the Earth’s Call Inaugural Summit in Aspen, Co. (Photo Courtesy Earth’s Call)

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Alarums and Excursions Embassies March for Gay Pride – Irish Writers Celebrated — Qatar’s Summer Parties BY ROLAND FLAMINI

A large group of diplomats and staff from the Embassy of the European Union joined other diplomatic delegations to proudly march in Washington, D.C.’s 2019 Gay Pride Parade.

ONTHEBRINK In June, a month of social activity before the torpor of another humid summer sets in, Washington was jolted by a sharp escalation of tension between the Trump administration and its number one nemesis, Iran, over the downing of an unmanned (but expensive) American reconnaissance drone. Less than 48 hours earlier, the European Union’s equivalent of a secretary of state, High Representative Federica Mogherini had been in the nation’s capital urging restraint in the face of just such Iranian provocation, but the administration’s first reaction was to strike back. With only minutes to spare, Donald Trump had a change of heart, and yanked the United States back from the brink before any damage was done. As usual with the Trump administration, the narrative got very foggy very quickly. Foreign diplomats set aside packing for their vacations to confront a situation that raised serious, nagging questions about American intentions that remained unanswered. Soon, they were wrestling with the now familiar

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challenge of explaining what was going on in Washington to their governments. JOYCEANDYEATSBut events to welcome summer also went on. June 16 is Bloomsday in Ireland, a celebration of James Joyce’s novel “Ulysees” named after Leopold Bloom, its central character. The Irish Embassy in Washington held its own Bloomsday event, as do Irish diplomatic missions worldwide, but Ambassador Daniel Mulhall tagged on his own literary hero, the poet William Butler Yeats, to the celebration. The ambassador and several selected guests read extracts that were at various times moving and humorous from the works of both Irish writers before a large audience in the garden of the Irish residence. The imaginative event paid homage to what many cherish as the finest use of the English language in a novel – in a city where English is mangled and fractured at the highest level on a daily basis. QATARIHOSTThe usually low key Embassy

April, Ambassador Meshal Bin Hamad AlThani co-hosted a big pre-dinner reception before the White House Correspondents’ annual dinner. That turned out to be a signal of things to come. In June, Al Thani held a summer garden party at the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, where two orchestras performed for the guests. And the embassy has been organizing well attended soccer-viewing sessions whenever Qatar plays in the Copa America series. Qatar is this year’s “participating guest nation” in the Hemisphere tournament. The ambassador is a member of Qatar’s ruling Al Thani family and a career diplomat who has been Qatar’s envoy in Paris, the European Union and the U.N. He is raising Qatar’s profile in Washington at a time when his country’s hostile neighbor Saudi Arabia and the Trump family are bosom buddies, and Yousef Al Otaiba, ambassador of its other Gulf antagonist, the United Arab Emirates, is a social fixture in all the right places. GAYPRIDE

Foreign diplomats were out in force at the colorful, crowded, annual Washington Gay Pride Parade. The U.K., Canada, and the E.U. had be-flagged floats. British military attachés from the three services paraded in uniform, and European Union Ambassador Stavros Lambrinidis said he was heading a mixed group from many European embassies, “to display international advocacy for the freedoms of assembly and expression, and the principles of equality and non-discrimination.” Danish Ambassador Lone Dencker Wisborg and Swedish Ambassador Karin Olofsdotter (seen above with Mr. Lambrinidis) were among those joining in.

of Qatar has become socially active lately. In

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Chase DeForest and Kirk Johnson

WL SPONSORED

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY’S LEADERSHIP CIRCLE MEMBER GALA Heather Haaga, Susan Moeller and Maria Wilhelm

Marie Carr and Faye Laing

National Museum of Natural History PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

DININGWITHDINOS: To celebrate “Deep Time,” the National Museum of Natural History’s new fossil hall, guests gathered in the massive space decorated with vibrant vegetation and projections meant to recreate life on earth 3.7 billion years ago. Many were in awe as they walked in the shadows of Earth’s earliest lifeforms, the very goal of the renovated exhibit. “People can see themselves, cultivating a deeper connection and understanding of natural history,” exhibition manager Siobhan Starrs noted. The evening concluded with a countdown to the hall’s grand opening, followed by a private tour encompassing millions of years of history told through 700 fossils. STAR OF THE SHOW: Displayed in its entirety for the first time, the towering T.rex is the centerpiece of the thoughtfully designed collection.

Jeff Reed and Robin Naughton with Jess and Sid Beaumont

Meredith Katz, Dave Koian and Sam Smith

Sarah Malka and Dieter Fenkart-Froeschl

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Kevin McDonald, Jane Lubchenco, Roger Sant and Victoria Monroe

Siobhan Starrs Rod Rosenstein and Steve Darrall

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DONO T V E N

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POLLYWOOD | HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

Dede Lea and British Amb. Sir Kim Darroch

‘ROCKETMAN’RECEPTION& SCREENING Fiola Mare/ AMC Georgetown PHOTOBYTONYPOWELL

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From shy piano prodigy to international superstar: “[The Viacom film] is clearly an exceptional piece of art, the incredible power of film to capture the essence of an era, the mood of a generation. But it’s also about the power of music for me. The songs of Elton John are a big part of the soundtrack of my life and I’m not embarrassed to admit, I knew all the words. I’m also proud to admit that I’ve got several Elton John original albums.”

HESCEN

— British Ambassador Sir Kim Darroch

Camryn Manheim

NATIONALGEOGRAPHIC EXPLORERSFESTAWARDS Lisner Auditorium George Washington University

José Andrés and Jordanian Amb. Dina Kawar

PHOTOBYPAULMORIGI/GETTYIMAGES

Make our Planet Great Again: “I am deeply concerned about the fate of our planet and all of its creatures.We are on the verge of a climate catastrophe and we cannot waste one more minute debating the validity of climate science. This is the defining issue of our generation.” — Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning actress Camryn Manheim

Hope for the Future: “Every moment of our existence depends on treating our environment with respect.We still have a chance.” — Sylvia Earle, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence

CAREGLOBALLEADERSNETWORKAWARDS HONORSJOSÉANDRÉS The United States Institute of Peace PHOTOBYBILLFITZ-PATRICK

“[World Central Kitchen] began with a very simple idea, that no man or woman should be left behind, forgotten and without a simple plate of food. Sometimes the most complicated problems have very simple solutions.When you are hungry, when you are thirsty, sometimes the only thing you have to do is this: Find the food, find the helpers, find the kitchen and start cooking. One plate of food can be the beginning of solving the big problems that we face today. ” — José Andrés

Meridith McGraw, Charles Kovatch, Nova Daly, Christina Sevilla, Antonio Olivo, Emily Lenzner, Hastie Afkhami, Daniela McInerney, Steve Rochlin, Robert Gerber, Patrick Garrigan and Kevin Rooney

‘THEGREATGATSBY’ BYPICNICTHEATRE Dumbarton House PHOTOBYDUNCANCHAPLIN

“Dressed to the nines, the brilliant and talented cast of D.C. professionals by day and thespians by night tell the beloved, romantic, yet tragic tale of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s genius take on the American Dream.” — Director Steve Rochlin

“Next time, I want to be Wolfsheim – such a great, yet nuanced and misunderstood villain.” — Steve Clemons, honored guest and feared critic

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Gen. Mike Meese and Gen. David Petraeus

Debra Carter and Ogay Irono

WL SPONSORED

FRIENDS OF AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF AFGHANISTAN GALA David Rubenstein and Dr. Kenneth Holland

The Four Seasons | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Leslie Schweitzer and Maria Schory

CELEBRATINGRESILIENCE: Friends of the American University of Afghanistan (AUAF) hosted their annual awards dinner, honoring David Rubenstein, Gen. David Petraeus, Gen. John W. Nicholson, Jr. and Samuel Naffi with honorary doctorates. Co-chaired by CNN’s Michelle Kosinski and the BBC’s Suzanne Kianpour, guests heard a stirring tribute to the importance of educational philanthropy from Rubenstein and confident encouragement from Roya Rahmani, the Islamic Republic’s first female ambassador to the United States. Tribute was also paid to major givers including Dr. Ehsan Bayat and Fatema Laya Bayat from Friends of AUAF President Kat Conlon and AUAF Founder and chair Leslie Schweitzer, who spoke of the resilience of the university after a 2016 terrorist attack killed 17 students and professors. “This university has literally risen from the rubble,” Schweitzer said. “We are in a war zone. You all have made this a success story.”

Elizabeth Avellan, Jeff Fahey and Kristi Rogers

Reggie Love, Hamad Al-Muftah and Rep. Jim Moran

Rear Adm. Susan Blumenthal and Peter Bergen

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Suzanne Kianpour and Jordan Colvin

Alexandra de Borchgrave, Margaret Whitehead and Shamim Jawad

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Susan Tolson and Charles Rivkin

Jane Harman and Sally Quinn

British Amb. Sir Kim Darroch and Mary Jordan

WL EXCLUSIVE

‘ROCKETMAN’ PREMIERE PARTY Fiola Mare and AMC Georgetown | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Greta Van Susteren, Hilary Rosen, DeDe Lea and Kathleen Buhle Biden

CELEBRATINGELTON: No one could have been better pleased to host the Washington premiere of “Rocketman,” the blockbuster biopic about Sir Elton John, than the British Ambassador. “Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to be here tonight celebrating British creative genius and eccentricity, given Elton’s sense of fashion,” Sir Kim Darroch told the V.I.P. crowd, adding that “best of all … I don’t have to talk about Brexit.” Guests sampling generous helpings of prosecco, prosciutto and parmigiano at Fiola Mare before the show had plenty of time to discuss politics and the ins and outs of the film industry (Viacom’s DeDe Lea was co-host) before heading off to the film’s rather raucous opening night at the AMC Georgetown just across the way.

Reps. Doug Lamborn, Roger Marshall and Fred Upton WL EXCLUSIVE

CELEBRATING ASCAP

Sen. Rand Paul, Jennifer Larson and Elizabeth Stafford

Divya Khosla, Sanjay Khosla, Siddhartha Khosla and Savita Khosla

The Library of Congress | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES MUSICUNITINGPEOPLE: The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) protects its members’ copyrights vigilantly and its foundation supports American music education by contributing to the ASCAP Collection at the Library of Congress. That includes co-hosting an annual “We Write the Songs” concert that always fills up the house—in this case the Jefferson Building’s Coolidge Auditorium—with senators, congressmen and other guests. This year’s show, hosted by ASCAP President Paul Williams, included headliners Charloe Caffey and Jane Wiedlin of the Go-Go’s and former Eagle Don Felder along with former “Young Rascal” Felix Cavaliere plus Andrea Martin, Kany García and Siddhartha Khosla performing some of their most famous songs. SOLONS SPOTTED: Sens. Lamar Alexander, Marsha Blackburn, John Cornyn, Mike Enzi, Shelley Moore Capito and Rand Paul plus Reps. Billy Long, Jim McGovern, Mark Meadows and Debbie Wasserman Schultz. 18

Don Felder and Annalise Glick WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Raydioo and John Wealthy

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Layli Miller (center) and her family

Flavour and Semah WL SPONSORED

TIS FOUNDATION GALA Marriott Marquis | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ

Debra Carter and Ogay Irono

WOMENATTHEFOREFRONT: Some of the region’s most powerful, inspiring female leaders took the stage to celebrate community and to be honored at the TIS Foundation’s 25th Anniversary Gala, including former Rep. Diane Edith Watson, Inglot Cosmetics COO Kenya Pierce, who received the Lifetime Achievement Award and Honorary Women in Business Award, respectively. Proceeds of the gala will be used to fund extracurricular activities for at-risk youth in the D.C. area, as well as funding higher education scholarships. Also honored were Melonie Johnson, the president and COO of MGM National Harbor, Denise Nyakeru Tshisekedi, the First Lady of the Democratic Republic of Congo and Layli Miller- Muro, founder and CEO of the Tahirih Justice Center. “These women are shining examples of women who stand at the forefront of change, who inspire and lead us, but also need us to step off the sidelines and act,” said Rep. Karen Bass, vice chair of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Andromeda Peters

Jessica Herrera Brown, Lamia Rezgui Rod Rosenstein Bourogaa and Emmanuel Irono

Donna Howard and Dr. Aminta Breaux

Rep. Karen Bass

Jerry Pierce and Kenya Pierce

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Aissata Haidara and Seynabou Diop

Gambia Amb. Dawda Fadera and Sierra Leone Amb. Sidique Abu Bakarr Wai

Jan Du Plain, Joy Gacuga and Allyson Browne McKithen

AFRICA DAY CELEBRATION Marriott Marquis | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Tanzania Amb. Wilson Masilingi and Malawi Amb. Edward Sawerengera

ACONTINENTCELEBRATES: Three major milestones were commemorated at this gala — the 56th anniversary of the founding of the Organization of African Unity, the 50th commemoration of the adoption of 1969 refugee-specific governance and the 10th anniversary of the adoption of a 2009 convention for the protection and assistance of those displaced in Africa. Guests gathered in the flag filled Marriott Marquis Ballroom to celebrate, enjoy a candlelit dinner and hear from speakers. During the evening, attendees also watched a video presentation highlighting 2019 as the year for discovering solutions to forced displacement in Africa.

Clara Brillembourg Chopivsky

WL EXCLUSIVE

ITALIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY GALA Embassy of Italy PHOTOSBYNAKUMAYO

JP Wogaman II plays for dancers Aurora Mostacci and Oscar Sanchez

Honoree Mimmo Miccolis with Annelise Brody Morani

Emanuele and Jumana Manzitti 20

Vannya Josselyn Huarca, Luigi De Luca and Francesca Casazza

Brae Blackely and Julie Kent WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

VIVAITALIA!: Supporters of Italian culture gathered to celebrate “L’Italia e la danza” and to honor Mimmo Miccolis, who performed as a dancer across three continents and is now a neoclassical and contemporary teacher and choreographer at The Washington Ballet. After a film and discussion of Miccolis’ career with the ballet’s artistic director Julie Kent in the Embassy of Italy’s auditorium, guests enjoyed the premiere performance of his “MET.AMOR.PHOSY” by company members in the reception hall before focusing on the celebration of the Scholarship Awards winners, dinner (Italian cuisine, naturalmente) and a silent auction that included trips to San Remo and Chianti and dinners at local Italian restaurants.

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Ali Kreiter, Caitlin Broadie, Chelsea Shukie and Todd Cohen

Dele Oladapo and Patrick Xantus

LIFT 20TH ANNIVERSARY

Cash Warren and Jordan Brown

Josh and Anna Knight

The Anthem | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES UPLIFTINGNIGHT: “Love is a currency and it can make you the richest person in the world,” said Allie Olson, LIFT-LA’s executive director, at the “Hope.Money.Love”-themed celebration. Founded in the District two decades ago, LIFT works to “break the cycle of poverty” and has expanded to Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III introduced Legacy Award honorees Jonathan and Jeannie Lavine and Ben and Jaclyn Harper, and thanked the guests and LIFT CEO Michelle Rhone-Collins for “believing in every single American family.” Ben Harper, a singer-songwriter who just produced a new studio album for legendary gospel singer Mavis Staples, performed at the event along with DJ Reborn. “Reaching out for help is not a condition of poverty, it’s part of the human condition,” Rhone-Collins said.

Kristen Lodal, Jon Budington, Michelle RhoneCollins, Stephen Rotella and Arlene Ford

Patrease Douglas and Dominique Burks

Jim Acosta and Theodore Boutrous Rep. Donna Shalala and George Luber

HUGH M. HEFNER AWARDS Newseum | PHOTOSBYNAKUMAYO

Scarlett Byrne, Michael O’Brien, Laura Peavey and Alex Thomas

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Christie Hefner and Cooper Hefner

PROTECTINGOURRIGHTS: Hugh Hefner’s name doesn’t typically get mentioned in conversations about constitutional rights, but the late Playboy founder’s daughter, Christie Hefner, is tackling freedom of speech issues head on through her father’s namesake foundation. At its second annual Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Awards, seven individuals were honored for their dedication to protecting citizen’s rights. Winners included attorney Theodore Boutrous, who helped CNN’s Jim Acosta regain his White House press credentials after President Trump summarily revoked them. “Almost every week we see the voices of students censored on campus, newsrooms and journalists under threat of physical assault, and the value of truth a victim of those waging partisan attacks,” Hefner remarked. “Now more than ever we should honor those who stand up for our First Amendment rights.”

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Rep. Sean Casten and Brandi Woods

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POLLYWOOD

Ellynne Davis and Henry Thedenes

James R. Clapper with Museum Executive Director Christopher P. Costa

Sen. Mark Warner with museum founders Tamar and Milton Maltz

INTERNATIONAL SPY MUSEUM OPENING International Spy Museum | PHOTOSBYIMAGELINKFORTHEINTERNATIONALSPYMUSEUM TOPSECRETAFFAIR: The International Spy Museum hosted its official ribbon-cutting and grand opening celebration at its new 140,000 square-foot location in L’Enfant Plaza, where more than 1,600 guests got an exclusive first look at the museum’s reimagined and immersive exhibits centering on how intelligence has changed the world. Founders Tamar and Milton Maltz joined Sen. Mark Warner and Mayor Muriel Bowser to cut the ribbon on the $164 million project, which relocated to the steel-and-glass building from a smaller location in Penn Quarter. Featured at the “Top Secret Affair” were spy-themed drinks, live performances from DJ Inferno and the 24 Karat Band, and a stunning view of the District skyline from a rooftop lounge. Immersive experiences gave guests an opportunity to put their spy skills to the test, pose with famous artifacts like a Revolutionary War era submarine and take photos in the mirror-filled Cyber Infinity Room.

Francesca Chambers and Nikki Schwab

Dean Norris and Tim Daly

Jacalyn Barnett, Osmond Nicholas and Wendi McLendon-Covey

CREATIVE COALITION ‘RIGHT TO BEAR ARTS’ InterContinental — The Wharf | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ

Robin Bronk 22

Reps. Dan Kildee and Suzanne Bonamici

ARTSFORALL: This star-studded evening was nothing short of powerful, as celebrities and Optune patient ambassadors (everyday artists living with a rare form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma) walked the runway together to shed light on the healing power of the arts while advocating for federal funding. Creative Coalition President Tim Daly was spotted with members of Congress and Hollywood actors including Harry Hamlin, Wendi McLendonCovey, Caterina Scoresone and Dean Norris. Dressed in special designs from Paisley & Gray, Moral Code, Tai Jewelry and Oka B, runway walkers inspired and empowered guests after a day of advocacy on Capitol Hill, where delegates urged the expansion of funding for the National Endowment for the Arts in schools and communities across the nation. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| S U M M E R      | washingtonlife.com


Jane Seymour

Mickey Hart

Colbie Caillat

Earth’s Call Global Concert

WL SPONSORED

Mitch Salzstein and Lance Gould

EARTH’S CALL SUMMIT The Aspen Institute, Aspen, Colo. | PHOTOSCOURTESYEARTH’SCALL

Fred Martin and Beverly Camhe

GIVINGHOPETOMOTHEREARTH: More than 2,000 environmentalists, CEOs and climate change scientists joined activists from all over the world to descend on Aspen for the launch of the new non-profit Earth’s Call for speeches, discussions and concerts to raise the volume on solutions for the calamitous consequences of global warming. The weekend kicked off with an all-star lineup of musicians who participated in a major benefit concert featuring Pai LaBelle, Colbie Caillat, Alan Parsons, Anthony Hamilton, Natalie Lafourcade, The Compton Kidz Club and Ladysmith Black Mambazo. “We are all taking part in this because Mother Earth is sending us distress signals that she is in trouble,” said Earth’s Call co-founder John “Spike” Buckley, a Denverbased real estate developer who pledged $50 million to the cause.

Anthony Hamilton Melati and Isabel Wisjen Spike Buckley and Roberta Baskin

The Compton Kidz Club

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| S U M M E R      | washingtonlife.com

Innovation Session Igloos

Tom Steyer and Caryl Stern

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MUSIC FEATURE

DISTRICT SOUNDS OFF The 2019 Summer Music Issue

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on Batiste. Herbie Hancock. SHAED. Snarky Puppy. Frédéric Yonnet. Reesa Reena. These are just a few of the talented musicians, singers or bands you will find in the following pages of our summer music issue.Whether newly buzz worthy or dominant for decades, their artistry, soulful rhythm and mastery of their craft are enlivening. That much could be said of the Washington music scene in general. The District has lately proved its yearning to be recognized as a vibrant music hub. For instance, Mayor Bowser’s Administration announced in June the launch of the District’s first ever music census. The initiative captures the data of those who work creatively in music — musicians, venue owners, educators, technicians— in an effort to strengthen and grow the District’s music ecosystem. “This is the kind of investment that signals to our peers and our community that we are a cultural city to be taken seriously,” said D.C. Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment Director Angie M. Gates. Then, after Labor Day this year, the $250 million arts facility, REACH, at The Kennedy Center officially opens as an “inclusive, accessible, and interactive” gathering space for performing arts in the area. But we can’t talk about inclusive music spaces without talking about go-go. Earlier this year, after a noise complaint halted a Shaw neighborhood outlet for playing the District’s signature music style, hundreds of people flooded D.C. streets playing, singing and dancing to go-go music. While the music returned to the store, the fight to preserve D.C. culture continued with the #DontMuteDC movement. Even famous D.C. rapper Wale, came back to town to support the cause. Indeed, music is a force in our city - for pride, protest and possibility for the future. Whatever your music style, from go-go to funk, jazz to electro-pop, folk to blues and more, take it in. Blast it. We all wear the flag colors when the music’s on. >>


PERSPECTIVES ON THE D.C. SCENE “I like playing for people across the world and I love D.C. It’s one of my favorite cities. Duke Ellington and a lot of my good friends are from here. It’s a great cultural hub.” – Jon Batiste, Musician “This year we quietly opened our new fantasy at Merriweather…the SkyLawns. I say quietly because we just wanted to open them and see how people take to them before we start tweaking. Over the sides of the Pavilion we used to have tarps as roofs. We replaced those with permanent concrete” – Seth Hurwitz, chairman of I.M.P., owner of the 9:30 Club and The Anthem, and operator of Merriweather Post Pavilion and Lincoln Theatre

S K Y L AW N BY J O R DA N G R O B E ; H U R W I T Z BY B E N D R OZ ; B A P T I ST E BY JAT I L I N D S AY; G R AY BY TO N Y P OW E L L ; M C F LY BY B E N D R OZ ; R U T T E R BY TO N Y P OW E L L

“D.C.’s music scene is wildly and uniquely D.C. On any given night in the summer Wolf Trap, The Anthem, and the Kennedy Center can all be sold out with very different genres represented. Live music at venues like the Hamilton, Lincoln Theatre and Jammin’ Java have so much interesting live music. Developers are changing their tune as well with an emphasis on live performances (i.e. the Wharf). We’re seeing stages and areas to experience the arts in person as part of the DNA of our neighborhoods.” – Tommy McFly, Host and Partner of “The Tommy Show starring Kelly Collis and Tommy McFLY”

“There’s a lot of really dope artists coming up from this area who also have their go-go infused and inspired music as well, but they’re doing their original records too. It’s just a really good time for the area.” – Reesa Reena, Musician

“Right now, passionate and gifted hometown musicians are drawing on Washington’s rich musical heritage to lend their voices to national dialogues around equity and social justice. I’m proud that the Kennedy Center and so many other Washington institutions create space for the diversity of opinions and limitless talent originating right here in our backyard” – Deborah Rutter, president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

“The ‘Don’t Mute DC’ track (featuring Rare Essence, Tone P., Lightshow, Noochie) is the best reflection of the local music scene today. The song embodies the internal struggle the city is facing dealing with gentrification. Even though there is room for everyone in D.C., it’s important we don’t forget how we got to this point. Hopefully, the movement sparks much needed open dialogue and positive interactions.” – Yudu Gray, Jr., House Studio CEO

VENUE MENU: 9:30 Club Gold Standard, tried and true, happy musicians = happy listeners Blues Alley Most likely to impress your date Pearl Street Warehouse Best for groups, beers and tater tots Black Cat For when you need a good head-bang Comet Ping-Pong Pizza, ping-pong and underground rock and punk Marvin When you want to jam out sans cover charge NPR’s Tiny Desk Only the lucky ones get this unique D.C. listening experience The Hamilton Live Eat, drink, sit or cut a rug. The options are all there. U Street Music Hall Where you can dance like no one’s watching Wolf Trap Fun for watching stars (both kinds)


MUSIC FEATURE | DCJAZZFEST

.SR&EXMWXI

8LI7LS[2IZIV7XSTW The acclaimed singer, composer, multi-instrumentalist, and leader of Stay Human, the house band of ‘The Late Show’ with Stephen Colbert, hits the perfect tune for DC JazzFest BY DA R A K L AT T

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ight in and night out, Jon Batiste strikes the chords to complement Stephen Colbert’s wit and banter. Batiste, however, doesn’t need TV lights and studio buzz to be captivating on his own. His career stretches beyond late-night programming, starting from his self-released first album at 17, being mentored by Wynton Marsalis while getting his Master’s degree at The Juilliard School, to jamming with Lenny Kravitz and Prince, and earning a role as artistic director at large for the National Jazz Museum in Harlem. Our editors spoke to Batiste as part of a DC JazzFest Meet the Artist Conversation. What follows has been lightly edited for length and clarity. >>

WLTELLUSABITABOUTSTAYHUMAN JB: “Stay Human” came from making connections with people

in New York, on the road and around the world. We would leave Juilliard and go down into the subway and perform for people just for fun, not asking for money. “Stay Human” is a way of saying, “we can connect.” In this world with technology and all the things that make us want to tune out, just stay connected about how much we are the same. WLANDNOWON“THELATESHOW?” JB: We’ve done over 700 shows and it feels like a well-oiled machine.

A lot of people don’t see on TV that I’m doing [a live] show for 500 people during the commercial break. So, I’ve enjoyed building the band’s muscles to the point that now we can do hundreds of songs and make up stuff on the spot. We can read each other in ways that I don’t think you get that proficient, unless you are playing with someone every day for years. WL: WHAT EFFECT DID STUDYING AT JUILLIARD HAVE ON YOUR CAREER AND YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF JAZZ? JB: I took the things that I thought connected with me. I learned

over time how to remove the ideas that didn’t. The danger of studying music as a part of everyday life is that you can lose some of your originality and some of the things that make you and your experience unique. A lot of things enhanced my experience of learning music and growing up, being 10, 11 years old in New Orleans. I try to not to change those things or discredit those things just because they weren’t orthodox.

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WLHOWWASTHEEXPERIENCERECORDING“SOULFUL”WITH ROYHARGROVE? JB Roy was a mentor of mine whom I went on the road with when I

was 21. The “Soulful” recording was in Seattle at KPLU. We went to the radio station and he wrote a song and taught us the song seconds before performing ... and that was “Soulful.”That recording happened after I played my first gig with Roy at the Vanguard in New York. A full circle moment happened recently in November. I recorded a live version of “Soulful” that’s coming out this year and it’s the “Live at the Vanguard” album.The day that we recorded “Soulful” [the live version] was the day that I found out that Roy died. It’s a bittersweet thing to record that one. WL WHAT INSPIRED THE JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT BROADWAY MUSICAL? JBJean-Michel Basquiat was a great painter; one of the most important

painters of color. I’ve been working on the Broadway musical for about a year now. The family actually contacted me directly to see if I would be interested in doing it. It was a dream that just dropped into my lap. There will be events even this year on the road to Broadway. So, stay on the lookout for that. WLHOWDOYOUTHINKMUSICCANGETUSTOTHINKDEEPER ANDPUSHUSTODOBETTER? JB Music has always been a soundtrack to different movements and

different ways of thinking that push us to be better.Thinking about things generationally, instead of thinking about things in the context of your struggle can help to inform the struggle—to help you push past and help other people to see in a way that is humanizing.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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%PP8LEX.E^^ PH OTO BY R OSA N N A F R E E D M A N

SNARKYPUPPY “Rejuvenating” is how Michael League, band leader of the threetime Grammy® Award winning jazz and funk collective Snarky Puppy, describes the kick start of summer concerts and music festivals. And Washington, D.C. specifically, he says, “has a very strong scene, a very specific sound, and because it doesn’t have the hype and attention of a city like New York, it’s able to retain its identity and evolve in a more organic way.” While based in the midst of that Big Apple hype now, the part Virginia-raised multi-instrumentalist reflects on the area saying, “I’ve loved it since I was a high school kid drinking club soda at Twins Jazz shows in the early 2000s.” Playing

a set list from the band’s new album “Immigrance” at DC JazzFest this summer, League describes the creative spark he gets from his 19-member band, and from his global travels, which included a sixweek stint in Istanbul studying Turkish and Kurdish instruments. Remarkably, the worldwide recognition the band is receiving now hasn’t hazed League’s memory of his early mentors. “The biggest influence came from my guitar teacher at Contemporary Music Center, Dan Leonard. He opened up so many doors for me in terms of learning both the guitar and music beyond my instrument.”To Mr. Leonard out in Chantilly, thank you, from all of us.

('.E^^*IWX-R4LSXSW 100+ bands, 300 artists, 40+ venues, 25 neighborhoods, 175 shows

P H OTOS BY M A DY N A DJ E , F R I TZ P H OTO G RA P H I C S , JAT I L I N D S AY A N D JAT I L I N D S AY; P H OTO BY V I T H AYA P H O N G S AVA N

Georgia Ann Muldrow

3TIRMRK2MKLX Celebrating Randy Weston

Anne Matte Iversen Etienne Charles Creole Soul

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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At the DC JazzFest Kick Off: Willard Jenkins, Conrad Kenley, Sunny Sumter and Stefon Harris

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MUSIC FEATURE |HERBIEHANCOCK

ALL ABOUT HERBIE Over the jazz legend’s stunning 60-year career, there’s just one thing that might still be daunting. BY STEVE HOUK

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mid the surfeit of summer concerts around the DMV, no one can surpass the legendary status of Herbie Hancock, whose nearly 60year career as one of the world’s greatest jazz players, composers and innovators is virtually unparalleled. Washington Life’s music writer Steve Houk caught up with Hancock as he prepared for his summer swing. >> WASHINGTONLIFEYou kick off your tour at Wolf Trap in July, what has you most excited about this run? HERBIEHANCOCK What I’m looking forward to most is that Kamasi Washington and I are doing this tour. Kamasi is someone I highly respect, he’s a great young talent and he’s putting out great music. There’s a whole fresh group of extremely talented people on the jazz scene now, and anything I can do to promote and encourage them and share with them, but also learn from them too, is a blessing. Because this is a new day, a new age, with new possibilities, new technologies, new approaches. Plus, I just love playing Wolf Trap. WL: You’re also performing at the Newport Jazz Festival this summer, marking 50 years since you first played there.What are your impressions of it today? HH: It’s still so beautiful, and of course there’s the ocean—when I was in Miles Davis’ band, he came to the show on a private boat. There’s always a sea of people and it’s very joyous, and the whole audience, rather than folding their arms and saying, ‘Okay, let’s see what you can do,’ they’re like, ‘Whatever you do, we’re going to love it.’ Everything is encouraging, which is really great. WL: Do you have a favorite D.C.-area gig that stands out? HH: Playing at the White House for President Obama on International

WL: The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, a non-profit education organization helping young musicians, was renamed the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz in January. How did that make you feel? HH: It was a huge honor, but also kind of daunting because it takes on a new kind of responsibility if my name is there. Being on the board is one thing, but if the name of the institute is mine, my head’s, heh, on the chopping block, so to speak! But, what an honor, yes. WL: In addition to your music, what makes you happiest these days? HH: Pretty much everything, but let me qualify that.The world we’re living

in now is a tough world, and there are a lot more questions that we have now that we either haven’t had in the past, or haven’t had in a long time. But if we can get through this and solve some of these issues, we will be a healthier humanity.

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| S U M M E R      | washingtonlife.com

PHOTO BY KWAKU ALSTON

Jazz Day was an unforgettable experience. But I remember one gig, playing with Richard Pryor in Georgetown, opposite each other on stage, and he was killing it. It wasn’t so much what we were doing, it was him. It was really cool.


TRIPLE THREAT The electro-pop trio SHAED is giving listeners ear candy. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I PHOTO BY TONY POWELL MAKEUP: AUDREY LEFEVRE, GLAMSQUAD HAIR:ANGELA FRENCH, GLAMSQUAD

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hen Apple Music picked up SHAED’s single “Trampoline” for its MacBook Air commercial last year, the ripple effect was real. The ethereal song shot up on music recognition app Shazam to more than one million searches and upward of 68 million listens on Spotify, ultimately solidifying the hit as “lifechanging” for Virginia native Chelsea Lee (vocals) and twin brothers Max and Spencer Ernst (vocals and production) from Silver Spring, Md. Fame came quickly to the humble group who fondly remember meeting 10 years ago and quickly clicking. Spencer and Lee married last year.This summer the inseparable trio can be found touring the festival circuit, traveling to perform for their most loyal fans in Japan and looking ahead to a homecoming at the 9:30 Club in October. >>

WHEREDIDYOURLOVEOFMUSICGROWFROM? CHELSEAWe all grew up in homes filled with music. Max and

Spencer’s mom plays guitar and taught them how to harmonize at a young age. My parents love music and were always blasting alternative ’80s, jazz, and Led Zeppelin. NOW YOU ALL LIVE AND WORK TOGETHER IN SILVER SPRING WHAT’STHATLIKE? CHELSEA It’s a dream. People can be skeptical, but we’ve been

together for so long that it’s just natural.We spend 99.9 percent of our time together and have a studio in our house, so we’re all set. THEREAREOBVIOUSCHALLENGESOFBEINGCLASSIFIED ASONEGENREHOWDOYOUTHINKOFYOURSELVES? SPENCER We’ve never thought about our music in terms of

genres.When we released “Trampoline” we didn’t think of it as an “alternative” song, but it ended up at #1 on Billboard’s alternative chart.We’d rather see our music span over multiple genres than be confined to one thing. WHATDOESYOURMUSIC-MAKINGPROCESSLOOKLIKE? MAX It typically starts with Chelsea making a delicious breakfast,

then sitting down in a room together with a piano or guitar and writing something from scratch. Then taking turns dancing around a microphone and throwing out melodies until something sticks. Then Chelsea going to her office to record some vocals while Spencer and I produce out the music on a laptop. WHEREISYOURFAVORITESPOTTOPLAYLOCALLY? MAX It’s got to be the 9:30 Club. It’s our favorite venue in the

country and where my brother and I met Chelsea for the first time. To be headlining there on October 10—a decade after we met —is very special. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Chelsea Lee with Max and Spencer29 Ernst


I’m trying to break all the barriers, bridge all the gaps between CD collections and vinyl collections I’ve grown up listen

MUSIC FEATURE | DCFUNKPARADE

An open mic and U Street dive bar grad, Reesa Renee cheers on the noise in the city she loves BY DA R A K L AT T

REESA RENEE describes her sound and her style as “funky” and “eclectic,” then hypothetically poses, “if Jill Scott and Pharrell [Williams] had a baby and Chuck Brown was the godfather, that would be me.” The soulful District-raised and based singer and songwriter who performed this year at the Funk Parade alongside other artists such as the Chuck Brown Band, Michelle Blackwell and YahZarah & Wes Felton, put out her first album “Reelease,” in 2012, and has been on the rise of the local music scene ever since. Her new album “Time Flies” is due out later this summer. “I like to call the music I’m about to release ‘tantrum music’ if you will,” she explains. In other words, audience members can “dance it out, jump it out, or scream it out … sing the lyrics with me and kind of vibe and have that whole moment of release.” Along with the music, her penchant for local, independent clothing designers and mod-meets-streetcomfort-cool filtered photos on Instagram have attracted a following of nearly 20K. Insert three fire emojis and comments like “You look so dope!” and “loving that ’fro” here. As she says, “I’ve got nothing but love my whole career, it keeps me going and inspired and motivated to continue to be myself.”

P H OTO C R E D I T S : ( T H I S PAG E ) S H AU G H N CO O P E R ; ( N E XT PAG E ) : ( TO P ) DA N E L L E H A N K I N S A N D YA S M I N H O L M A N , Y P O S E I M AG E S ; ( M I D D L E ) AYO D E L E M A S O N , O H S N A P S AYO A N D M I L E S C A RT E R ; ( B OT TO M ) : G E N N A BY RD P H OTO G RA P H Y A ND O L A K AS U M U

STREET FUNK


p listening to and create this kind of gumbo of influences,” DCFUNKPARADE

Tashara

MUSIC ART

EMBRACINGTHESPECTACLEANDPOP-UPPLAYOFTHEFUNKPARADE

“There were pop up street performances and dance parties going on in alleys all throughout the neighborhood. There were people from all over the city dancing on every corner. It brought a huge smile to my face and reminded me how important it is to create that canvas that artists can then contribute to.” — Chris Naoum, co-founder of the Funk Parade

Marta Zewdu “Seeing the streets shutdown and watching people eagerly gather along T Street, Vermont and U Street was a really special sight. The contrasting images of police sirens, people happily descending onto the iconic Funk Parade route, while the dark clouds settled over the region, was an oddly cool aesthetic. It was beautiful.” — Jeffrey Tribble, executive director of Musicanship, the producer of the Funk Parade

P H OTO CAPT I O N H E RE

Eastern High School | S U M M E R      | washingtonlife.com “Blue & White” Marching Machine

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Future Band DC’s emcee EY

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MUSIC FEATURE | TRAVEL

+IXXMR¸/MGO] 1YWMG'MX] Size up Nashville’s trendy Art Deco hotels, burgeoning culinary scene, slick retail shops and creative music spaces. BY DA R A K L AT T

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,

armonies, beats and string-accompanied lyrics buzz all around Nashville—from bluegrass, country and folk to rock, pop and R&B. Wherever those Lucchese boots take you, from the 12 South neighborhood to Hillsboro to Germantown, there’s a song lyric and twangy sound in the air to get you grooving, eating, relaxing and shopping. Boutique hotels offer chic country spunk while bustling restaurants blend hipster personality with delicious Southern fare. Retail shops vaunt vintage leather jackets and instrument-inspired home accents. Plus, on any given night, an incredible Grammy-winning songwriter could be performing off the beaten track for the price of one Tennessee whiskey on the rocks. It’s like Lil Nas X says, grab your “cowboy hat from Gucci/ Wrangler on my booty” and “ride ‘til you can’t no more” in Music City. There’s lots to cover. >>  HOTELS The Hutton (1808 West End Ave) Designed with Nashville’s creative culture in mind, the Hutton blends elegance and serenity with special touches that include brass trumpet lamps, a record library and songwriters’ spaces. ($399 and up) 21C Museum Hotel (221 2nd Avenue North) Blocks from Broadway, this re-imagined historic building boasts a 10,500-square- foot contemporary art museum. ($349 and up)

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Holston House (118 7th Ave N) A modernized Art Deco hotel by Hyatt with leather and velvet décor,and a rooftop pool and bar to take in the skyline. ($359 and up) MUSIC

The Listening Room Café (618 4th Ave S) While the Bluebird Café usually gets the hype, this intimate hot spot in the “sobro” district attracts talented singers and songwriters—from fresh upand-coming artists to hit-making veterans. City Winery (609 Lafayette St) Similar to the franchise location in Washiongton, D.C., the Nashville venue values live music as much as its in-house winemaking facility and makes for a great date night spot. Analog (1808 West End Ave) Set on the grounds of the Hutton Hotel (see previous entry), this relaxed 300-person venue offers high-design interiors, a Bose sound system and a hand-crafted cocktail menu. RESTAURANTS

Acme Feed & Seed (101 Broadway) This big, multilevel casual venue offers burgers downstairs, sushi upstairs, plus a rooftop patio. Pinewood Social (33 Peabody St.) Overlooking the Cumberland River, this trolley barn space includes a coffee bar, vintage bowling

alley and private karaoke rooms and simple but sophisticated food. Loveless Cafe (8400 TN-100) Drive outside of town for this Southern cafe with quaint country charm and savor the biscuits and fresh brewed sweet tea. SPICYEATS

Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint (multiple locations) On a mission to spread a “Whole Hog” gospel across the South, Martin’s smokes a whole hog each day for good ol’ down home BBQ. Hattie B’s (multiple locations) Every single local (*Every. Single. One.) will steer you here for a hot chicken sandwich, which ranges in spice level from “hot!” to “shut the cluck up.” DON’TMISS

12 South neighborhood—a walkable neighborhood chock full of bakeries, bars, retail and more. Visit Urban Grub, the Lebanese bistro Epice, SavantVintage, Reese Witherspoon’s Draper James boutique and White’s Mercantile. At The Gulch & Hillsboro Village, check out Biscuit Love, Fido coffeehouse, Jeni’s Ice Cream plus Two Old Hippies (for clothing, instruments and home accents;) and Kristin Cavallar i’s Uncommon James jewelry boutique.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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A POCKET FULL OF HARMONICAS

FREDERICYONNET

International phenom Frédéric Yonnet brings his dynamic instrument to younger generations. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I PHOTO BY TONY POWELL

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f music is transportation, then Frédéric Yonnet is in the business of transcendence. That is what the accomplished harmonica player teaches young people whom he has hosted at workshops and masterclasses around the country. Music, he says, should be approached as a journey, not an objective.The goal is for students to take the harmonica, which he gifts them after each session, and make it their own.Yonnet has strived to push his own limits since he first picked up the instrument as a boy growing up in France. His initial attraction to the drums eventually gave way to a curiosity about the small music maker and its ability to produce a versatile range of sounds – from piano notes to percussion beats and, even a human voice. The more time Yonnet spent practicing harmonica, the stronger his relationship with it grew and the more unbounded he felt by its traditional sounds. Decades later, the world-renowned artist hopes to ignite the same passion and interest in younger generations. “I’m trying to break all the barriers, bridge all the gaps between CD collections and vinyl collections I’ve grown up listening to and create this kind of gumbo of influences,” Yonnet says of his music. This eclectic approach has allowed him to reach a wide range of audiences across the globe through live shows and studio recordings that span from original songs to covers of pop artists like Childish Gambino and Ed Sheeran.Yonnet recognizes a powerful symbiosis that happens at his concerts when he can have conversations with the audience – “an exchange of energy and vibes,” as he explains it. At the core of the “discussion” is improvisation, spontaneity and an ability to stay plugged into listeners.“We don’t have any repetition,” he says. “Nothing is boring because everything is created in the moment. It lives and it dies as it appears, which is the beauty of it.” Improv is also at the core of the famously elusive Juke JointsYonnet hosts alongside his friend, comedian Dave Chappelle.The pop-up events take place in a massive space, sometimes a barn, with little advanced notice to the public. Once inside, guests are required to lock up their cell phones for the evening and encouraged to be present.Yonnet calls it one giant party. Yonnet’s collaborations with music legends, including touring stints with Prince and Stevie Wonder, are testament to his dynamic artistry. Playing next to the greats taught him how to stay on his toes and be a better musician overall. He tries to impart the same open-mindedness to the various musicians who perform alongside him. “I am more inclined to [play with] someone who’s willing to be uncomfortable and thrive from it,” he says. “Sometimes being uncomfortable in an environment gives you opportunity.” Magic happens in those unplanned moments. So, just how deep does the charming harmonicist’s connection with the instrument go? As a child, Yonnet was plagued by asthma, constantly trying to catch his breath during sports practices, always keeping an inhaler within arm’s reach. Once the harmonica came into his life, he overcame his respiratory condition by playing 10 to 12 hours a day. “Now the inhaler is gone and my pockets are full of harmonicas,” he says with a laugh.

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LIFESTYLES

¡VIVA LA COSECHA! EDENSBRINGSLATINCULTURE TOUNIONMARKET

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olistic market concepts are hardly new on the scene (Mario Batali has several Eatalys and José Andrés just opened Mercado Little Spain at Hudson Yards in Manhattan), but few high-profile projects have gone beyond already well-represented European cultures in the U.S. mainstream. As Jodie McLean, CEO of national real estate developer EDENS, points out Latin Americans are the fastest growing population in our country, so why not highlight their rich and vibrant cultures? Her words hold special weight considering the current political climate surrounding immigration.

CHRISTIAN IRABIEN AMPARO FONDITA The Mexican-born chef is bringing his family’s traditions from Chihuahua, Veracruz and Guerrero to the modern restaurant named after his mother and grandmother. “It serves as the perfect platform for me to not only present, and share the food I crave with my guests,” Irabien says, “but also as a hub for Mexican culture and identity. We look to create a welcoming table for all.” 34

DANIELLA SENIOR SERENATA + ZUMO Colada Shop founder Senior will serve juice and toast by day (Zumo) and dynamic cocktails by night (Serenata) as a way to show off what Latin America does best, she says. ALL ABOUT THE RUM: “We have such incredible rums in the Dominican Republic ... I can’t wait to showcase them in a way that highlights their beautiful and unique qualities.”

IRIS VERONICA JIMENEZ LA CASITA The traditional pupuseria will be a reflection of Jimenez’s family’s roots in the local food scene. The fast casual haunt will pay homage to Salvadoran street food using traditional ingredients. Additionally, diners can expect a cultural nod to Salvadoran hospitality, which includes an “inviting atmosphere, good food and personalized customer service to ensure that our space always feels like home,” Jimenez says. W A S H I N G T O N L I F E | A P R I L     | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO CA PT I O N H E R E

BYCATHERINETRIFILETTI|PHOTOBYTONYPOWELL MAKEUP AISHACADMUSHAIR KATRINAMOORE GLAMSQUAD SHOTATLACOSECHA’SCONSTRUCTIONSITE  THST NE


Enter La Cosecha. Slated to open in early September, the massive market boasts an impressive roster of restaurants and retailers representing an array Spanish-speaking countries. The 20,000-square-foot space will be anchored by a communal plaza, which will host live dance and music performances open to the public. At the crux of the endeavor is community engagement, says McLean. A percentage of sales will go toward the newly-formed La Cosecha Foundation, which among other Latin American causes, will benefit the Carlos Rosario School, a learning center providing immigrants with technical skills.

P H OTO CAPT I O N H E RE

JUAN MANUEL BARRIENTOS ELCIELO The popular fine dining restaurant originating from Colombia is taking on its fifth act—second in the U.S.—-under the watchful eye of Barrientos (known casually as “Juan Ma”). His Colombian locations are consistently recognized as Top 50 restaurants in the Latin Americas. Unlike other locations which have tasting menus, Washington, D.C. will have an à la carte menu engaging diners’ five senses while pulling inspiration from Colombia’s great variety of fruits, plant species and climates. W A S H I N G T O N L I F E | A P R I L     | washingtonlife.com

MARIO AND GIUSEPPE LANZONE THE PERUVIAN BROTHERS From trucks to bricks, this brother duo from Lima has been operating six local food trucks for three years. In addition to their normal menu, the fast casual veterans will be serving up two new items in their first permanent space: Rotisserie Chicken and Pisco Sours. DON’T SKIP: the brothers’ most popular sandwich Pan con Chicharrón– freshly baked French bread topped with a hearty portion of fried pork loin served on a bed of sweet potato slices with a signature Criolla sauce. “This sandwich is an iconic Peruvian staple and for good reason,” they tell us.

CAROLINA FURUKRONA NOVA BOSSA This fashion and lifestyle shop will be full of artisan Latin American brands from Furukrona’s native Brazil and beyond. Her hope is that the shop will help break stereotypes and promote the sophisticated side of Latin American style. “Latin America is quite frankly the coolest design destination in the world today,” Furukrona says, “and we are excited to engage in a bit of cultural diplomacy while also offering unique and exclusive products through our story.” 35


LIFESTYLES |BEACHACCESSORIES

FILUHATS ($575) Mauritius raffia-blend sun hat (Barneys.com)

HERMES ($1,350) Cotton “Zig Zag” beach bag. (Hermes.com/us)

7IEW8LI(E] WITH THESE CHIC BEACH BAG ESSENTIALS

STUDEBAKER ($19.29) Break free from streaming and tune in to some good ‘ol fashioned AM/FM with this retro fabulous portable radio. Sound too extreme? You can still play music from other devices using the built-in auxiliary input jack. (Best Buy, 3100 14th St. NW)

EMILIO PUCCI Vivara print terrycloth beach towel ($925) (Emiliopucci.com/en-us)

Whether jetting off to the Bay of Biscay beach in the French resort town of Biarritz or immersing yourself in an open-air jeep drive to Rehoboth Beach, escape to the seaside with these beach essentials. We’ve got everything you need to stylishly soak up some Vitamin D and breath in that glorious ocean air. BY DA R A K L AT T

MAR Y SOL ($39) “Mia” woven straw pouch. (Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, Md.)

RAY-BAN ($178.00) Round Gradient Metal Sunglasses (ray-ban.com) S’WELL ($35) Calacatta gold insulated water bottle (swellbottle.com)

BONAI ($39.99) High-speed portable charger allows for device boosting,in case you want to see the work requests you’re about to ignore. (amazon.com)

FRESH SUGAR ($24) Lip treatment sunscreen SPF 15 (sephora.com)

GRAYMALIN ($125) Dream of Italy – the Almafi Coast, Capri or Portofino – from wherever you are with this signed collector’s edition book that shines a unique eye on the country’s coasts, beaches and landscapes. Bellissimo. (graymalin.com)

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FREE PEOPLE ($8) Hampton’s scrunchie (freepeople.com)

SUN BUM ($9.99) Hypoallergenic after-sun aloe gel (ulta.com) WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

SUPERGOOP! ($19-48) Everyday sunscreen broad spectrum SPF 50 (Nordstrom Fashion Centre at Pentagon City)

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ROSÉALLDAY

NOWRONGWAYTOROSÉ The pink wine made a literal splash in glasses across the country (and world) a few years back and the drinking trend has shown no sign of slowing down. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

EAT YOURWINE

Sugarfina Rosé All Day Bears According to the brand’s website, upon release these alcoholic gummy bears imported from Germany once had a waitlist of 18,000 – proof that good things happen when wine and candy comingle. ($20); sugarfina.com

ADOZENROSÉS

Flowers Rosé When a couple of our favorite PR mavens around town sent us a case of the crisp and balanced Pinot Noir blend from Sonoma County, the gift-giving bar was raised dramatically. ($384/box); flowerswinery.com STAYCLASSY

KEEPUPWITHTHEJONES’ A EXPERIENCE

DRINKLOCAL

Whaley’s Rosé Garden Instagrammers have continuously flocked to the popular al fresco haunt at Navy Yard for its photogenic vignettes and all star lineup of 11 rosés by the bottle ($38-$58). 301 Water Street, NW

Early Mountain 2018 Rosé A passion project of AOL co-founder Steve Case and his wife Jean, who helms operations, this Virginia winery and its bright and floral pink estategrown blend is one to watch. ($25); earlymountain.org

E A M O N N M C C O R M AC K /G E T T Y I M AG E S F O R B O DVÁ R H O U S E O F R O S É S

Bodvár House of Rosés If you like to be up on what’s hot, get hip to this boutique wine label, which hosted several parties at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival earlier this year. Swedish owner Bodvár Hafström is credited with founding the official National Rosé Day (second Saturday of June). bodvarrose.com WE’LLHAVE WHATSHE’SHAVING

ALARGEGLASSOFROSÉ BYTHEBOTTLE

Usual Rosé Summer Set The cooler-friendly 6.3 ounce bottles filled with a refreshing mix of Syrah, Sangiovese and Malbec grapes from Santa Barbara, Calif. are ideal picnic additions. Plus, three monthly shipments of 18 bottles (54 total) come with surprise gratis swag. ($384); usualwines.com

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Château d’Esclans Whispering Angel Rosé Cher drinks this pale French wine, which has become the world’s most popular bottle, according to Nielsen. Should we go on? ($21); totalwine.com

Dom Pérignon x Officina Officina just announced that Dom Pérignon will be taking over its rooftop terrace this summer. Guests can take advantage of the partnership with special deals including one on DP’s 2006 vintage Rosé. 1120 Maine Ave., SW IFYOU NEEDSOMETHING STRONGER

Codigo 1530 Rosa Tequila Blanco tequila rested in Napa Cabernet French White Oak barrels for a month make for a stiff treat. ($69); codigo1530. com

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LIFESTYLES

HERECOMESTHESUN How to achieve glowing skin this summer. B Y K AT E LY N R U T T

FORGETDRY DEHYDRATEDSKINThis summer is all about sun protection, radiance and that perfect, sunkissed gleam. From facials to on-the-go solutions and expert advice, we’ve got you covered with everything you need to achieve a just-got-back-from-vacation glow for the entire summer. >>  HYDRATION

Bluemercury | M-61 Vitablast C Serum Pads | $38 | Bluemercury.com Created by Marla Beck, founder of Bluemercury, these single-use serum pads combine convenience with luxurious radiance and hydration. Formulated with hyaluronic acid, peptides and vitamins B5, C and E, the pads are a staple for glowing summer skin.

SHOPNATURALREMEDIES

Veer & Wander Apothecary 1260 5th St. NE | Veerandwander.com Newly opened in the Union Market District, this shop is the perfect place to browse non-toxic beauty brands like Ayuna, Goop and Olaplex. The apothecary is the second of its kind, with roots in San Francisco. Inside guests can shop, test curated products or apply a face mask while lounging in the “beauty den” with a glass of herbal sparkling water.

ALUXURIOUSFACIALEXPERIENCE

Sarah Akram Skincare | $135-$350 125 S Fairfax St. Alexandria, Va. Sarahakram.com Get celebrity treatment without having to travel to New York or Los Angeles. Sarah Akram Skincare offers a range of services which have been praised by A-List clients including Chelsea Handler. We recommend the SA Luxury Treatment, which incorporates cutting-edge technology like LED Therapy and Sonophoresis, among others, to strengthen tired muscles and create a luminous glow in just 90 minutes.

ON-THE-GOSOLUTION

Lululemon | Sweat Reset Face Moisturizer | $48 | Basic Balm | $14 | Lululemon.com Lululemon has recently expanded from its popular athleisure wear to offer a new onthe-go selfcare line that is perfect postworkout. Included in the line is a face moisturizer formulated to clean and reduce redness, as well as a buttery lip balm that restores hydration.

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MONTHLYMAINTENANCE

Glo30 Facial Subscription / Glo30.com / $79-$299 per month Rooted in the concept of consistency, this membership allows customers to book a customized facial treatment every 30 days. Running short on time? Each treatment takes an hour or less, making it the ideal choice for a busy summer schedule.

EXPERTADVICE Noëlle S. Sherber, M.D., F.A.A.D. Sherber + Rad | 1101 15th St. NW | Sherberandrad.com “All skin types should look for broad-spectrum coverage with at least SPF30. Oily skin types often benefit from oil-free or oil-absorbing sunscreens. Dry skin types may be best suited by creamy formulations and sensitive skin types may fare best with 100 percent mineral sunscreens. Those with skin that can change from dry to oily due to the Washington, D.C. area’s dramatic weather shifts may like lightweight hydrating formulations.”

*Oily: Jan Marini Antioxidant Daily Face Protectant SPF33 | $51

*Dry: La Mer The Reparative Face Sun Lotion Broad Spectrum SPF30 $135

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

*Sensitive: Alastin HydraTint Pro Mineral Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF36 $55

*Changing Skin: Troiareuke Acsen U.V. Protector Essence SPF50 PA+++ | $55

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LUXURYTRAVEL

STAY OUTSIDE IN STYLE Under Canvas’ nine eco-friendly glamping retreats are gateways to the country’s most stunning landscapes. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

I

P H OTOS CO U RT E SY

nspired by the United States’ impressive network of National Parks, married couple Sarah and Jake Dusek decided to build elevated campsites outside of Uncle Sam’s cherished land for groups looking to connect with the outdoors without having to rough it. With nine camps and ambitious plans for growth over the next year, the glamping company (glam + camping, for those not already in the know) has become a popular option for families, couples and friends who value the natural world as much as basic luxuries. Unlike other campsites, these canvas-made structural marvels have en suite bathrooms with running water (warm shower, check), plush beds and rustic chic aesthetics that can raise any visit to vacation status. Tent amenities aside, preserving surrounding landscapes at each location is of paramount importance, which is why “intentional inconveniences,” like sink faucets that turn off automatically and compostable plates, are an integral part of visitors’ stays. Such considerations have been taken to ensure Under Canvas’ environmental footprint stays small—camps use 87 percent less water than a boutique hotel of comparable size and between 84 and 100 percent less electricity. By 2021, their goal is to be a zero-waste operation. The Duseks think of themselves as the “godparents of glamping,” having concocted the idea 10 years ago, when Jake, a Montana native, and Sarah, U.K. born, wanted to create a place that celebrated nature in a balanced way, while suiting both of their preferences for experiencing the outdoors. Under Canvas provided a way to reconcile their styles and achieve a happy medium that also reflects a growing number of Under Canvas’ loyal guests, including several A-list celebrities. Each campsite varies in size and character based on location, but a few key features exist throughout, including a concierge desk where guests can schedule park excursions and activities; a café serving breakfast, lunch and dinner; and daily housekeeping services. Whether it’s morning yoga or time spent around the campfire roasting s’mores, the Duseks hope individuals will mix and mingle. Consider a lack of Wifi access their nudge to look away from the screens and out at America’s most treasured landscapes.

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The Stargazer tent allows guests to look up at the night sky from the comfort of their beds. Rooms are equipped with wood burning stoves for cool nights CAMP LOCATIONS: (SBOE$BOZPOs;JPOs.PBCs:FMMPXTUPOFs.PVOU3VTINPSF (MBDJFSs5VDTPOs(SFBU4NPLZ.PVOUBJOTs:PTFNJUF DPNJOHTPPO

Prices vary based on site and season ($189 - $240/ night) undercanvas.com

Don’t forget to look up, camps have minimal light pollution making for epic stargazing

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LIFESTYLES | MOUNTAINTREK

BACKTO BASICS Mountain Trek’s holisitic approach to self-care challenges the mind and body for an unforgettable week-long, off-the-grid experience in British Columbia.

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elf-care is often the first thing on the chopping block amid life’s daily grind where friends, family and work always seem to win out. At a week-long wellness retreat in British Columbia called Mountain Trek, the goal is to put some much needed focus and energy back on the neglected self. The reclamation of personal vitality (or as the kids say “living your best life”) starts with five pillars upon which the program is based: fitness, sleep hygiene, nutrition, stress mangement and detoxification. The 6-day immersion relies on biology and nature so fitness fads, trending diets and exotic detoxification methods get checked at the door. “Most people are coming in to get back on track,” Mountain Trek director and lead guide Kirkland Shave says. “Our job is to give the educational, holistic view that really it’s all about hormones, which are all about lifestyle choices. The more we can come back to living an ideal, optimal Circadian day, then our hormones will come back into alignment.” With the help of incredibly supportive guides, and basic needs accounted for (i.e. daily meals, laundry and housekeeping), guests are left with no choice but to look inward at themselves and outward at the stunning world around them. >>

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THESCENE

So, what does six days in the Canadian Rockies look like? The program is highly regimented, a prescription that founders have continuously refined over the years to change the body from a catabolic to an anabolic state (inactive to active, essentially). No alcohol, sugar or caffeine and minimal screen time all contribute to the selfrehabilitation process. With a cozy living room as its anchor, the cabin feels like a home and the other guests (up to 15) and guides leading your group soon feel like family. Outside by the fire pit or in

BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

the outdoor hot tub is where you will want to spend most of your free time gazing out over the Kootenay River to the towering mountains in the distance.The property also has a yoga and exercise studio, a sauna, a steam room and a cold plunge. STRUCTUREDSCHEDULE

The engine that drives change during a stay at MT is the elimination of “decision fatigue.” By offering relatively little free time, the program is meant to eradicate the stress of monotonous daily obligations. Following the

The cabin at Mountain Trek is meant to make visitors feel like they are at home

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I M AG E S CO U RT E SY O F MO U N TA I N T RE K

Hikers are split into four groups based on fitness levels


Mountain Trek’s app offers guests a number of take-home recipes

“I come here for my future self,” a MT program alum says.

Hiking packs, poles and water bladders are provided to guests upon arrival

The program uses Nordic Fitness Trekking methods, which engage 90 percent of the body’s muscles

All meals are organic and locally sourced

Circadian rhythm, guests rise and retire with the sun the way hunter gatherers did before electricity. All meals are sugar and starch free, organic and carefully portioned to encourage hormone rebalancing and weight loss (1,200 calories for females; 1,400 for males). Each day begins at 6 a.m. with yoga and breakfast followed by a four-hour guided hiking excursion along various scenic trails in the Kootenay and Purcell Mountain ranges. Back at the cabin, rest is accompanied by guide-led educational seminars centered on the program’s core principles. Just when you think your body can’t handle any more action, you surprise yourself with a post-dinner “fat flush” cardio work out session. After an evening massage, bed soon beckons. GUARANTEEDRESULTS

body fat and body fat mass on arrival, MT’s resident nutritionist is able to highlight their tangible results before departure. Although the rigorous routine is enormously challenging both mentally and physically, the hardest part is leaving. Just knowing that old habits and negative triggers are waiting for you back home is daunting. Harder still is the idea that Mountain Trek’s nature-filled utopia is not compatible with the real world. For that reason, the program does not ask you to change your life, but to simply take one or two small habits with you. Whether it be turning off your phone two hours before bed or eating dinner an hour earlier, Shave reminds each guest that baby steps matter. “Health is a journey, it’s not a pill. It’s not one diet or one exercise,” he says. “It’s a long pilgrimage back to our best self.”

Besides the joy that comes with being in nature and unplugging from the stresses of everyday life, Mountain Trek promises the gift of results through weight loss and muscle gain. By measuring each guest’s weight,

Mountain Trek now offers an East coast program in the Carolinas and international trips throughout the year; $5,400 per week, all inclusive. Packages include three evening massages; mountaintrek.org.

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FIVEPATHWAYS&FIVE TAKEAWAYSFROMMOUNTAIN TREK’SGUIDEBOOK STRESSMANAGEMENT20 minutes immersed in

nature is all it takes to reduce stress by lowering levels of cortisol (a.k.a. the stress hormone). SLEEPHYGIENE If our hormones don’t receive

enough rest time to balance, not only does our stress hormone cortisol cause us to store fat, but our appetite increases. NUTRITIONEat breakfast within 30 minutes after getting out of bed to jump start metabolism; snack every three hours during the day; eat 2/3 of your meals within the first nine hours of the day. DETOXIFICATION A cold shower (or a cold plunge) can improve the circulatory system by redistributing blood throughout the body. Water, fiber, sweat, massage, breath and greens are all helpful elimination resources.

FITNESSStrength training builds the muscles we need to burn calories and cardio activities create the energy demands that will convert fat into fuel. Both are integral to weight loss.

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y st﹒judefashionshow﹐nstreetvillageluncheon﹐liftanniversaryandmore!

Amy Baier, Cindy Jones and Lorraine Wallace at the Great Ladies Luncheon (Photo by Tony Powell)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Andrew and Leslie Cockburn with Tommy Bruce Georgie Warner and Christopher Addison

Buffy Cafritz, Ann Jordan, Carolyn Peachey and Elizabeth Stevens

SASHA BRUCE YOUTHWORK BENEFIT National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Lee Satterfield, Kankunda Klingenberg and Patrick Steel

Jonathan Capehart and Ben Chang

Betty Ann Tanner, Amra Fazlic, Laila Abdurahimova, Shaista Mahnood and Anita Dahinden

HELPINGHOMELESSTEENS: The annual Sasha Bruce Youthworks (SBY) benefit is an event that has favored by its Old Guard supporters ever since the shelter for homeless local youth was founded by Deborah Shore in 1974 with subsequent financial support from the late Washington grande dame Evangeline Bruce. This year’s event was a departure from the norm due to its move to the vast National Building Museum (instead of an embassy residence), the addition of a keynote address (District Attorney General Karl Racine speaking about institutional racism) and a performance by local soprano/songwriter Cecily. Proceeds from the event helped support the new Lukey Kaempfner Transformation Project to help youth who have participated in SBY projects apply to, attend and remain in college with funding for counseling, books, laptops, bedding and other expenses.

Margaret Nealon, Peter Sullivan, Robert Mejia and Mary Johnson

Mitsou Ly and Christy Buranaamorn

PREVENT CANCER FOUNDATION’S 25TH ANNUAL SPRING GALA National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYVITHAYAPHONGSAVAN POSTCARDPERFECT: Saluting Swiss tradition in a “Postcard Perfect”– themed event, the honorary event chairman, Swiss Ambassador Martin Dahinden, referenced the “many talented researchers of Swiss universities and the Swiss pharmaceutical and medical companies” in his country’s contribution towards combating cancer. On the American side, Senators Bill Cassidy and Mazie Hirono were honored as 2019 Cancer Champions for their leadership in cancer prevention and working to expand funding for biomedical research and limiting youth access to tobacco. Carolyn Aldigé, the foundation’s founder and CEO, noted that the disease is a bipartisan issue, and that “we must work together in order to stop cancer before it starts.” The event raised more than $1.5 million for prevention research and community outreach programs. 44

Alison Jones and Carolyn Aldigé

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Meg Michiels and Mark Markowski

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Barbara Hawthorn, Marcia Dyson and Bershan Shaw

Kathleen Turner

WL SPONSORED

ARENA STAGE GALA Arena Stage | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL THATSIGNATURERASP: The legendary film and stage actress Kathleen Turner has never had a problem finding something to say in that lusty, gravely voice. With a distinguished career that spans immortalizing Jessica Rabbit, getting Peggy Sue zapped in a time warp, and slaying in “Serial Mom,” she is a confident and powerful storyteller, both on and off the stage or film set. So it was appropriate that the woman behind the cabaret act “Finding My Voice” headlined Arena Stage’s 2019 Gala, and belted out tunes such as “Sweet Kentucky Ham,” while regaling guests with life tales. But there’s more. She also presented the Beth Newburger Schwartz Award to Nina Totenberg, in recognition of her ground-breaking reporting in the broadcast world and her continual support of the arts. Totenberg was the first radio journalist to receive the 1998 Sol Taishoff Award for Excellence in Broadcasting from the National Press Foundation. Lindsey Briain Collins, an oil acrylic painter, was also honored with the Emerging Leader Award. The Gala supports Arena Stage’s award-winning artistic productions and community engagement programs.

George Vradenburg and Diane Rehm

R. Lucia Riddle

Molly Smith, Lindsey Brittain Collins and Nina Totenberg Jim Gale and Lisa Barry Rep. Jim Moran, Annie Totah and Beth Newburger Schwartz

Arlene and Robert Kogod

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Rod Rosenstein

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Tom, Addy and Stacey Flint

EVENING OF WISHES

Azam Mirza and Joy Kingsley-Ibeh, Wish Kid Lucia Smith, Isoke Salaam and Nick Elefante

Ronald Reagan Building | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Mike Manatos and Laura Evans

Lexy and Iver Kessler

Queenie Plater

TRANSFORMINGLIVES ONEWISHATATIME: Since 1980 the Make-A-Wish Foundation has made critically ill children’s dreams become reality. At the Mid-Atlantic chapter’s annual benefit, supporters gathered for silent and live auctions and an afterparty to celebrate its important mission. “Wish Kids” roamed the event, speaking to guests about how their lives had been transformed by the experience. Nitin, whose wish was to be a Wizards player, said “Make-A-Wish’s positive impact on my recovery is the reason that I stand before you today talking about the importance and positivity this organization brings towards the lives of young kids battling critical illnesses. I can tell you firsthand not only how important wishes are, but how vital the timing of a wish can be.”

The cast of “The Fallen”

MAKE-A-WISH FILM PREMIERE ‘THE FALLEN’ Uptown Theater | PHOTOSCOURTESYOFMAKE-A-WISH DREAMSONTHEBIGSCREEN: While he battled leukemia at Children’s National Medical Center, 10-yearold patient Mason Bronner put his imagination to work creating a world of characters and stories. Then he got his wish: producing and directing his own movie. His super story called “The Fallen” came to life thanks to the Make-A-Wish Mid-Atlantic Chapter. For its 10,000th wish granted, local supporters brought together about 150 District-area professionals in the filmmaking industry, raising nearly $1 million to cover the short film, production and world premiere. “I didn’t even think. I just launched into action,” said Abigail Tannebaum Sharon, founder and creative director at Real Pictures, who served as the film’s producer. At the Uptown Theater, Bronner stepped on to the red carpet in his suit and top hat to an excited, screaming crowd—many in superhero capes—holding signs saying “Happy Wish Day.” In a Q&A session afterward, the fledgling Steven Spielberg admitted, “It was crazy and really cool to see all the super heroes I made in real life.” As for his short cameo? “I think I’m going to rest my acting career,” he said. 46

Mason Bronner

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Erika Martin Bolden and Cathy Hughes

Daphne Jarvis, Hillary Baltimore and Pinkie Mayfield Laura Evans, Maggie O’Neill, Andrea Rinaldi and Jen Gage

wl sponsored

N STREET EMPOWERMENT LUNCHEON The Ritz-Carlton, Washington | PHOTOS BY Tony Powell VOICES OF THE VILLAGE: Nearly 400 boosters and ambassadors of N Street Village convened for their upbeat annual Empowerment Luncheon to raise awareness of women’s health, poverty and homelessness issues in Washington, D.C. N Street Village is the largest provider for women experiencing homelessness within the city, welcoming nearly 2,000 women every year. “Today, we aren’t giving charity, we are doing justice,” said N Street Village CEO, Schroeder Stribling, welcoming the crowd and connecting the involvement of attendees to the greater call for equity and dignity for all. The event, co-chaired by Jacqui Michel and Andrea Rinaldi, awarded media mogul Cathy Hughes with the 2019 Village Leadership Award and honored Village resident and alumna, Petrina Thomas. “We’re all recovering from something,” Petrina shared at the end of her story. “We have to stick together.”

Trish Yan and Jonathan Taylor

Ruth Sorenson, Schroeder Stribling and Peter Shields

Viyas Sundaram wl sponsored

Harold and Nancy Zirkin with Gabrielle Webster

Boys & Girls Club Spring Culinary Experience event

Ashley and Matt Goodspeed

Métier | PHOTOS BY Tony Powell

Minnie Annan and Wendy Frosh WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| summer

2019

Barrels for Boys & Girls: At the Boys & Girls Club’s inaugural Spring Culinary Experience Event, the crowd was a mix of longtime supporters and newcomers; for the latter it was a way to get introduced to the important results-driven work of the national organization which serves children and teens across 4,600 locations daily. Gourmet cuisine from chef Eric Ziebold, including roasted chicken with mustard sorbet, was paired with rare bourbons from Pappy Van Winkle and finely aged wines from two supporters’ private collections. Viyas Sundaram, a selfproclaimed foodie on the BGCA Board of Trustees, spearheaded the culinary-driven fundraising initiative. The group, he said, has given more than 4.7 million children a physically and emotionally safe place to go after school and over the summer. CHEERS!: The silent auction, featuring a 16-year-old bourbon from the Van Winkle family reserve, raked in $47,000. 

| washingtonlife.com

Eric Ziebold 47


Virginia Johnson, Nina Totenberg and David Reinesl

Glenn Howard

WASHINGTON PERFORMING ARTS GALA National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Therrell Smith

Megan Beck and Kathryn Pellegrino

Melissa Victor, Awa Sal Secka, Ashley Buster and Jocelyn Isaac

Robert and Barbara Liotta

SIZZLEANDSWING: When you’re attending a party for one of the most established performing arts institutions in America, you can expect an event with entertainers who know how to nail their performances. At its annual gala to supports arts education initiatives, Washington Performing Arts demonstrated its prowess in connecting the District-area community to artists, starting with the effervescent Children of the Gospel Choir, led by director Michele Fowlin. Emcee Tamara Tunie (of CBS’s “As the World Turns”) acted as both entertainer and motivator for the silent and live auction bidding while the Ben Patterson Jazz Orchestra paid tribute to jazz legend Hazel Scott with its rendition of “Idyll.” Capping the night were singer/actor Stephen Sco Wormley and jazz artist Veronica Swift, with DJ Dimmy energizing post-dinner dancing.

Brandi Lavigne, Skye Lindberg, Samantha Schneider and Lauren McMillen

Emma Jaster, Mark Jaster and Sabrina Mandell

HELEN HAYES AWARDS AFTER PARTY The Anthem | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL “ANYTHINGGOES:” When a high-octane farce about mobsters, bankers and lovers crossing the ocean on a transatlantic liner grand slams to take home four Helen Hayes awards while competing with approximately 200 other eligible productions in the region, you know it’s going to be a lively and entertaining after party. With Arena Stage and 1st Stage taking the top total nods, the glam crowd jammed the dance floor to also celebrate “Gloria,” “Girlfriend,” “Dave,” “The Wiz” and “Wolves” (to mention just a few of the other award recipients). Celebrants left the party with one tune on repeat: “When grandmama whose age is eighty / In night clubs is getting matey with gigolo’s /Anything Goes.” 48

Scott Abernethy, Katelyn Manfre, Anna DiGiovanni, Sara Dabney Tisdale and Rachael Montgomery

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Brad and Callie Nierenberg, Dr. Lily Talakoub, Pouyan Lotfi and Elizabeth and Alex Smith Barbara Hawthorn

Mark and Sarah Kimsey

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McLEAN PROJECT FOR THE ARTS SPRING BENEFIT Kimsey Family Residence, McLean | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Russell Firestone and Mark Lowham

Teri Galvez and Susan Pillsbury

Sanjeev and Bela Aggarwal with Jacqueline and Alex Henry

SOIRĂ&#x2030;EFORTHEARTS: With a gala that sold out online in 62 minutes, McLean Project for the Artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; spring fundraiser lived up to its reputation, raising nearly half a million dollars for the non-profit group with a mission to exhibit works by emerging and established artists from the Mid-Atlantic region. Co-chaired by Barbara Hawthorn, Bela Aggarwal and Jacqueline Henry, and hosted by Mark and Sarah Kimsey, more than 450 guests appeared somewhat awestruck by the stunning Potomac River estate of the late AOL co-founder Jim Kimsey, now listed with TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for $62.5 million, the most expensive listing in the Washington area. SPOTTED: Washington Redskins fresh faced quarterback Alex Smith and his wife Elizabeth.

Tudor Place Executive Director Mark Hudson, event co-chairwomen Beth Clifton and Whitney Rosenthal, Beverly Jost and J. Bruce Whelihan

Betsy Edgeworth with Michael and Lizzie Cantacuzene

WL EXCLUSIVE

TUDOR PLACE GARDEN PARTY Tudor Place | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Debbie, Braxton and Rachel Moncure WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

URBANMANOR: Georgetownersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Old Guard Georgetowners, that isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dream of missing Tudor Placeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden party, a spring ritual where they can always count on seeing longtime neighbors (and the right sort of new ones) as ladies promenade in picture hats, Prohibition-era jazz fills the air and a delicious buffet is served under a grand marquee. The 27th annual event, co-hosted by Beth Clion and Whitney Rosenthal, honored benefactor and former board member J. Bruce Whelihan while raising funds to support operations, education programs and preservation of the historic house and its 5.5-acre landscape.

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T.J. Holland and Daniel V. Dowd 49


Bobbi Smith and Judy Woodruff

Gene Giannini, Bo Blair, and Blair Giannini

Maureen Orth

MARINA ORTH FOUNDATION BENEFIT Maureen Orth Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Linda Potter and Caroline Croft with Mariella and Michael Trager

GRINGOS&MARIACHIS: Cinco de Mayo celebrations kicked off early at the 7th annual Marina Orth Foundation Benefit with aguardiente mojitos, live music and festive décor. The evening commemorated the organization’s work in Colombia and success in bringing S.T.E.M. education and other learning opportunities there as well as its recent first-place win at the worldwide RoboRAVE competition. Guests enjoyed Latin festivities, rhumba dancing and more, all while supporting the nearly 5,000 children helped by the foundation.

Joanne Leong and Bridgette Dussman

Maureen Dowd

Joshua Johnson and Rupert Allman

NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM GALA National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Swiss Amb. Martin Dahinden and Anita Dahinden, Gudrun Waldner and Austrian Amb. Wolfgang Waldner

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Tony Williams

BUILDITANDTHEYWILLCOME: One National Building Museum honoree owns, operates, develops, and/or invests in nearly 18 million square feet in the Washington, D.C. region, including “amenity rich” residential buildings. The other honoree creates and preserves affordable housing, committing to “long-term affordability.” Both JBG SMITH and Washington Housing Initiative were recognized for their contribution to reimagining the future with transformative development. Emceed by National Public Radio’s “1A” host, Joshua Johnson, the event attracted event developers, architects, lenders, investors, engineers and brokers in the Washington business community who donned garden party attire and then hit the after party for live music, late night snacks and dancing until midnight. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Michela Gallagher, Marc and Elise Lefkowitz and Dr. Howard Fillit

T.J. and Lauren Oshie Sally Ein, Charlie Lefkowitz and Katie Dwyer

GREAT LADIES LUNCHEON

Christie Weiss and Annie Boutin King

The Ritz-Carlton, Washington | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL ELEGANTAFFAIR: The Ritz-Carlton was filled with spring hues as nearly 500 guests from the worlds of fashion, media, science, sports and philanthropy enjoyed a gourmet lunch and runway show featuring designs from Carolina Herrera New York. The day marked the ninth annual event of its kind, raising nearly $600,000 for the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation and its work to prevent and discover a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Event headliners included sports broadcaster and event host Lindsay Czarniak and Washington Capitals hockey player and Stanley Cup winner T.J. Oshie, who was honored for his work to advance awareness of Alzheimer’s disease after his father was diagnosed in 2012. Dr. Michela Gallagher, a Johns Hopkins professor and founder of AgeneBio (a new drug that has the potential to slow the cognitive impairment caused by Alzheimer’s disease), was also honored at the luncheon.

Amy Bischoff, Lisa D’Angelo and Barnette Holston

Jeanne Ruesch

Wes Gordon

Eun Yang Kate Michael

ST. JUDE HEART OF FASHION CityCenterDC | PHOTOSBYKIPPBURGOYNE

Sarah Asterbadi and Terri Carr WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Heather Shaw Menis, Stef Woods and April Jones Firoozabadi

CAROLINAFORACAUSE: Philanthropists and fashion lovers joined forces to support the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and its work to aid children and families impacted by childhood cancer. Guests converged in CityCenterDC’s open-air Central Plaza to enjoy cocktails and a special runway show by CH Carolina Hererra featuring the Spring/Summer 2019 collection (an array of vibrant colors and unique prints). This year marked the 12th annual gathering of its kind and its proceeds contributed to the more than $750,000 raised since its inception. 51


PARTIES PARTIES PARTIES

INCASEYOUMISSEDIT VOX FIVE YEAR ANNIVERSARY [THE LINE HOTEL DC] P H O T O  B Y  B E N  D R OZ

“It doesn’t feel like five years,” said Melissa Bell, publisher of Vox Media and co-founder of Vox.com at the digital media group’s fifth anniversary celebration. “Some days it feels like 50 years, other days it feels like two weeks.” Ezra Klein said it bluntly, “we survived.” He continued, “nothing is guaranteed in this business unlike many others, so that’s meaningful to me.” Notable guests included Susan Rice, Ian Cameron, Mike Allen and Sally Quinn among others.

Melissa Bell and Ezra Klein

HMSHOST FOUNDATION’S CHEF’S TABLE [DOCK 5 AT UNION MARKET] P H OTO S  CO U RT E SY  O F  H M S H O ST

HMSHost Foundation brought nearly 20 celebrity chefs from across North America together in Washington, D.C., for its second annual Chef’s Table Dinner, where guests enjoyed a multi-course gourmet meal and entertainment from magic illusionist David Kwong. The event raised $270,000 for HMSHost Foundation’s mission to fight poverty through food, shelter, education and workforce development.

Susan Feniger

LAFAYETTE 148 OPENING [TYSONS GALLERIA] P H O T O S  B Y  V I T H AYA  P H O N G S AVA N A N D  G E T T Y  I M AG E S

A powerhouse host committee joined Deirdre Quinn, CEO and co-founder of women’s fashion brand Lafayette 148 New York, to help welcome its first stand-alone store in the Washington region to Tysons Galleria. In addition to bites, sips and beautiful wares, the event celebrated Lafayette 148’s #UnordinaryWomen campaign, which honors trailblazing females impacting their surrounding communities. Ten percent of sales from the evening were donated to She’s the First, a non-profit group that supports girls’ education causes around the world.

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Hilary Rosen, Anita McBride and April Ryan

Kathleen Buhle Biden, Deirdre Quinn and Tipper Gore

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BREAST CANCER ALLIANCE LUNCH [HAY-ADAMS HOTEL] P H O T O S  B Y  R O D N E Y C H O I C E /A N N I E WAT T C O M

Trish Shannon, Sharon Dillard, Lisa Walsh and Yonni Wattenmaker

Colette Pike, Linda Courie and Justine Weissenborn

Eleni Tousimis and Alexandra Villard de Borchgrave

At the “Take Action Against Breast Cancer” medical symposium and luncheon, the Breast Cancer Alliance assembled a panel featuring leaders in the field discussing new advances in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. The event aimed to build awareness of the Alliance’s partnership efforts with local institutions that support underserved women’s breast health needs.

DIPLOMACY AND FASHION [DEAN ACHESON HALL, STATE DEPARTMENT] P H OTO  BY  M I C H A E L  A   G R O S S

The Associates of the American Foreign Service Worldwide (AAFSW) in collaboration with -, Du Plain Global Enterprises and Indira Gumarova, a Czech Republic fashion consultant, hosted a fashion show featuring up-and-coming designers from around the world. More than 350 guests, including many from the diplomatic community, flanked the runway to experience a wide range of globally-influenced styles.

Isin Ludlow, Evelyn Brooks, Mrs. Prabha Bhattara, Indira Gumarova, Marie Royce, Dr. Joanna Athanasopoulos Owen, and Sheila Switzer

INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION EVENT [JAPANESE AMBASSADOR’S RESIDENCE] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

As part of its Tech-in-Gov salon series, the Institute for Education (IFE) hosted an offthe-record conversation entitled, “Artificial Intelligence and Governments,” featuring high-ranking Japanese officials who spoke on the topic. IFE CEO/Founder Kathy Kemper helped moderate a Q&A session with former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff ending the evening with a toast: “In the run-up to next month’s G20, which Tokyo will be hosting, the governments of Japan and the United States have taken critical leadership positions in spotlighting the importance of AI and identifying opportunities for them to collaborate.”

Japanese Amb. Shinsuke Sugiyama, Krya Phillips and John Roberts WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandmywashington

6IMRZIRXMRK 7IPQE Sharon Virts and Scott Miller embarked on a two year project to renovate an abandoned historic property in Leesburg, Va. only to find they were not alone on their journey. BYCATHERINE TRIFILETTI PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

he expression “if these walls could talk” takes on special meaning at Selma Estate in Leesburg,Va. Built in 1810 and reeconstructed in 1902 after a fire, the property changed hands from former U.S. Senator (and General) Armistead Mason, a descendant of George Mason, to the Beverely family during the Civil War, to a successful grain importer and then to a banker over the years. Most recently, from the 1970s to 1999 it was used as a wedding venue before being sold to a foreign investor who never made good on his plans to turn the house into a business retreat center. Before Sharon Virts and Scott Miller became fascinated with Selma’s rich history, it sat neglected for decades, used only recreationally by local teenagers for parties and séances. “The house was sad, but it had good karma,” Virts says, recalling her impression after walking through the decrepit structure for the first time. Sprawling over 50 acres, the 19,000-square-foot white house stands in stark contrast to its surrounding bucolic landscape. Drivers who catch a glimpse of the stately mansion often stop short to stare at its powerful hilltop presence. The name Selma comes from translations of James McPherson 16th century works (in Gaelic it means “highest place, beautiful view”). It had an impact on Virts, a Leesburg native, and Miller, her husband, when they happened across Facebook photos depicting the rundown property’s dire state. “I couldn’t sleep for a few days, it just tore at me,” says Virts, who remembers admiring the house as a child. “Finally I said ‘we’re going to go out and buy this house.’” The couple sprang into action, tracking down the owner in Germany and enlisting help from Loudoun County officials and friends to gently nudge the investor that his property was in violation of several codes, which could result in thousands of dollars worth of penalties if

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PREVIOUS PAGE: (clockwise from left) An original Camille Pissarro painting hangs in the powder room next to a toilet designed by Cheryl Wagner made of hand-carved pink onyx. The couple jokes it is “Pissarro in the pisser;” Dining room walls are covered in silk, hand painted watercolor Gracie paper custommade to match the curtains. They hand-selected the fabric after visiting the Fortuny factory in Venice and designed the rest of the room around it. They snagged the 1900-made table with mahogany inlays for $700 at auction; The drawing room’s pink plaster ceiling is inspired by the Greenbrier. The 1920s auction-bought chandelier had to be restored. The curtains were custom-made in India. The owners implemented an ellipse plaster design on the ceiling based on one originally laid out in architectural drawings but never completed. They enlisted local artisan specializing in plaster Ronald Layman of Ron Layman Studios to do the meticulous work by hand. THIS PAGE: (clockwise from top left) Selma mansion before and after the restoration; The morning room is where the couple start their day with coffee and tea. The palm-covered chairs served as the starting point for its design; Virts flipped through hundreds of fabrics to find something to match them. The chandelier is sourced from London and the rest of the furniture was pieced together from auctions. The rug is by Arhaus, the wallpaper by Thibaut.

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not properly settled. Needless to say, it didn’t take the two parties long to agree on sale terms in early 2016. Steps one and two of the daunting revitalization endeavor was stabilizing the structure and establishing historical accuracy for restoration. The couple hired Wylie Cooke, an architect out of Norfolk specializing in historical preservation, and got to work replacing outdated electrical and plumbing systems. All the while they were serving as their own general contractors, wrangling subcontractors and more than 60 construction workers on any given day.Virts, a former business owner, proudly took on her new role as “project manager” while Miller utilized his engineering background to help with ductwork and the like. They point out countless structural details, all with their own stories of challenges that materialized throughout the course of the two-year, $5 million project. With restoration efforts underway, Virts and Miller tackled the decor room by room, staying highly organized with binders filled with fabric swatches, magazine clippings, artist renderings and even the original architectural drawings, which they were able to track down in Richmond. “I’m not a designer, that’s not what I do,” Virts says, “but I know what looks good and feels good to us.” Two interior designers whose strategies didn’t align with their vision were let go in the process. Approaching such a grand space required ample research and endless hours of treasure hunting for vintage pieces at auctions that would fit its traditional bones, including the acquisition of the home’s 42 chandeliers. “There is this nice balance of old and new,” Miller says of their ability to incorporate brightly colored modern art pieces from their previous residence. Using old architectural blueprints as their guide, the couple stayed true to the original intention of each

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OPENING PAGE: Sharon Virts and Scott Miller with their three yellow labs.

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HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

room (i.e. smoking, billiard and drawing rooms) and anchored spaces with ideas inspired by their travels. From the backyard koi ponds mimicking the Inn at Little Washington to the poolhouse fresco influenced by the Roman bathes in Pompei, every facet of the house is extremely personal to the passionate duo. “We’re going to get sued by all these people,” Miller jokes of their eclectic variety of muses. Early in the process, Virts and Miller began casually sharing Selma’s restoration experience online—originally to appease a built-in audience of 6,000 brides who wanted to keep up with their beloved wedding venue’s reincarnation. Eventually, through word of mouth, the undertaking took on a life of its own and now boasts more than 70,000 followers on its Selma Mansion Rebirth Facebook page. They hired a full time photographer to document updates and keep up with the enthusiasm of their loyal fandom. The pair cut no corners to maintain the structure’s history and integrity, even if that meant seeking out specialized masons from Jamestown to repair brick from the oldest part of the house. They became so entrenched in the stories that Virts is publishing her first historical fiction novel, “Masque of Honor,” about a duel that left one of the property owners dead. “It’s got a spirit, you can feel it,” Virts says of her house. She references supernatural experiences—doors mysteriously opening to let the dogs out, and on one occasion Virts feeling a hand on her shoulder. With the thoughtful care and energy they have put into the estate’s rebirth, it is no wonder that the lingering spirits are happy to have them. In an effort to share the treasured historic space with community, the philanthropic couple will continue to host events free of charge for charities and causes they support. “That’s what the house is for,” Virts says matter of factly. “The house spoke to us,” she says “It told us what it wanted.” THIS PAGE: (clockwise from left) Miller spends most of his time in the library, which was once a screened-in porch. A massive slab of granite from East West Marble Company in Chantilly required special engineering for installation. It mimics the creek behind the house that runs into the Potomac River. The mantle was constructed from a pecan tree that fell at Mt. Vernon. Hidden behind the shelves is a secret door that leads to Virts’ office; The entryway’s 14-

foot ceilings make it an ideal hub for hosting. Flower arrangements are by House of Redman; The large scale mural in the service kitchen was painted by Maria Morga based on a design from shards of a plate unearthed outside; The main kitchen once served as slave quarters. Heart pine cabinetry is by Wagner’s Custom Cabinets; The blue-accented “bunny room” is one of the home’s seven bedrooms. It features vintage chairs and a Murano chandelier.


OPENHOUSE

Open House Sky-rise District living or waterfront luxury on the shore

FOGGYBOTTOM

NEWHAMPSHIREAVENUE]NW^ 

ASKING PRICE: $2,975,000 LISTING AGENT: Daniel Heider, 703 785 7820, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

This modern residence at The Watergate South features a light-filled floor plan with over 3,200 square feet of interior living space. Offering waterfront views of the Potomac River, the two bedroom, three bath condominium residence also boasts luxury amenities including dark hardwood floors and a gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances as well as two parking spaces.

EASTERNSHORE  SAINTMICHAELSROAD]EASTON]MD

ASKING PRICE: $15.5 million

Qualities of grace and authenticity are at the heart of the design of this magnificent waterfront estate. Located between the towns of St. Michael’s and Easton, Maryland, on approximately 36 acres, the property prioritizes sweeping views, as well as outdoor living areas and lovely furnishings. The main residence is sited at the end of a long, private drive while adjacent to the residence are separate carriage and guest houses.

LISTING AGENTS: Lori Leasure, 240-498-1884; Doc Keane, 202-441-2343 or Marc Bertinelli, 202-657-9000. Washington Fine Properties



ANNAPOLIS SOUTHACTONPLACE

ASKING PRICE: $5,750,000



Acton Hall, one of the most historic homes in LISTING AGENT: Annapolis, is located on the waterfront overlooking Karen Hubble Bisbee, Spa Creek. The house was built circa 1770 and was 410.321.1411, karen@ renovated in 1981. All of the outstanding millwork hubblebisbee.com, Long and original elements were preserved, while the latest & Foster | Christie’s amenities were added. Lush grounds encompass a pool with terraced lawns leading down to a boathouse and custom dock.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Leading Ladies Noted businesswomen Debra Lee and Jacki Nemerov sell lavish, multi-million dollar homes. BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

MK Real Estate LLC bought CEO and Chairman of Black Entertainment Television Debra Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former abode at WOODLANDDRIVE NW for $8.75 million. Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spectacular contemporary overlooking Rock Creek Park was built and designed in 2010 by Marshall Moya. The uber modern Massachusetts Avenue Heights residence is truly one of a kind with amenities that include a space age-esque wine cellar, a 20-foot high great room, a state-of-the art media room, a pristine eight car garage, a saltwater infinity pool and a guest suite. The property was once the setting for a $40,000-a-plate fundraiser for President Barack Obama. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Marilyn Charity was the listing agent and TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s represented the buyer.

THE DISTRICT Washington Post op-ed columnist E.J. Dionne and his wife Mary sold  ALBEMARLESTREETNW for $2.3 million to Timothy Bodner and Erin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill . Located in much sought after Cleveland Park, the expansive five-bedroom, Italianatestyle residence boasts almost 5,000 square feet of living space on three finished levels. The property includes a chef â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen with a butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pantry, private outdoor spaces including a patio with a built- in fountain and a gated driveway with a two car garage. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International

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formal dining room, a library, a rear stone terrace and a spacious lower level with a media room and a wine cellar. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kara Sheehan was the listing MARYLAND agent and Long & Fosterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Karen Kuchins Michael McNamara sold  HIGHLAND was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent. DRIVE in Chevy Chase for $3.595 million to Dr. Corey Van Hove and her husband VIRGINIA Jeffrey Hove , the head of the Tax Treaty, Tom DePasquale sold BV Potomac LLC Transfer Pricing and Financial Transactions   SOUTHDOWN ROAD in Alexandria Division for the Organization for Economic for $4.6 million. The cedar shake, waterfront Co-operation and Development. The grand, Nantucket-style property was built in 2003 six-bedroom Kenwood abode was built in with no detail overlooked. The six-bedroom 1938 and offers a large gourmet kitchen, a residence boasts over 11,000 square feet of Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kevin Friend represented the seller. David DeSantis, also of TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty, represented the buyer.

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Former Ralph Lauren Corporation president and chief operating officer Jacki Nemerov sold   STSTREETNW along with her husband, Neal (a retired aerospace executive), to an undisclosed buyer for $4.875 million. The Nemerovs purchased the house in 2015 from David Barnhart and Kevin Ford for $4.25 million. The detached brick, fivebedroom Colonial was built in 1980 and is prominently located in the heart of Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Village with windows looking into the gardens of historic Tudor Place. The house has been extensively renovated to include Nanz hardware, Waterworks baths and a custom Boffi kitchen. The meticulously maintained grounds are lush with mature plantings surrounding a pool and an outdoor dining area. Nancy Taylor Bubes of Washington Fine Properties represented the seller. Long & Fosterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Coplen was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

Scott and Diane Bassett sold PSTREETNW for $3,548,333 with the help of TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s listing agents Patrice Angle and Michael Rankin. The detached Federal residence in Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Village was expanded and renovated by Muse Architects and Glass Construction. It features an open formal living and dining room, a butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pantry, a gourmet kitchen that opens to the large family room, a luxurious master suite with a well-appointed bath, an expansive walk-in closet, and four additional bedrooms. There is a lower level recreation room, abundant storage space, an attractive flagstone terrace for outdoor dining and entertaining, a well-manicured garden and garage parking. McEnearney Associates Inc.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sandra McMaster represented the buyer.

interior living space along with a 300-foot dock and a heated pool. Inside, the house features a gourmet kitchen, posh living spaces with expansive Potomac River views, a luxe home theater, a home gym and even a nautical crowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tower lookout. Janet Price with McEnearney Associates Inc. was the listing agent. Long & Fosterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chris White was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

  GEORGETOWN PIKE in McLean

fetched $5.5 million when the Maple Hill Estate, an undeveloped 3.75-acre plot of land around the corner from historic Hickory Hill (formerly the home of Robert and Ethel Kennedy) was sold by a private LLC to George Philip Stephenson , a philanthropist and chairman of the Freedom Group. A private, gated entrance introduces the property, which features old growth specimen trees including the namesake Sugar Maple, 70-year-old hand-laid stone paths along the perimeter of the estate, now designated as a Virginia Bird Sanctuary. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark Lowham represented both sides in the transaction.

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 LOUGHBOROROADNW sold for $3.9 million when Michael and Alice Leiter purchased the seven-bedroom Spring Valley residence from attorney James Langdon. Mr. Langdon is a partner in the Akin Gump law firm. The brick Georgian was built in 1951. Mr. Leiter is the former director of the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center in both the Bush and Obama administrations and Mrs. Leiter is a freelance writer. The house features a stunning three-level custom staircase with an inlaid compass rose wood floor in the front foyer, a lower level family room, ample outdoor entertaining spaces and a garden overlooking Rockwood Park. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cynthia Howar was the listing agent. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Michael Rankin was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

PROPERTYLINES

IF THESE WALLS COULD TALK: The historic residence at PSTREETNW in Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Village is now listed for sale for $7.495 million. The property, dating to 1790, was once the site of art and literary gatherings in the 1940s attended by such notables as writer Sinclair Lewis and actress Elinor Glyn. In 1947, Cornelius Bretsch purchased it with his wife, Princess Emina Tousson, of Egypt. While the couple were living there, guests included royalty and other international VIPs. Other notable owners include tire heiress Elizabeth Firestone and her husband Charles Willis and Barbara Smith Herzberg in the 1980s. Former AOL Executive Michael Connors and his wife Julia are selling the five-bedroom, seven-bathroom Beaux Arts mansion, which has been renovated from top to bottom. The house includes a double living room with 11-foot ceilings, a walled private garden including a pool and manicured terraces and a three-bay garage with guest quarters above. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; James Peva is the listing agent. RICH HISTORY IN EMBASSY ROW: Watauga Properties is selling the George Wallace William Hanger House in Embassy Row for $5.495 million. Hanger was a mediator for the Federal Board of Mediation and Conciliation.  MASSACHUSETTSAVENUENW, built in 1908, was meticulously restored to include designer finishes on all five levels of the 6,700-square-foot brick townhouse. There is an elevator that services all floors and an attached heated garage with a heated driveway. This residence encompasses generous entertaining spaces, opulent millwork and significant lighting upgrades. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kimberly Casey and Daryl Judy are the listing agents.

FORMER CONSULATE:   TRACYPLACENW in Kalorama has a new price of $4.95 million. Tom and Maggie Sheedy restored the 1914 Georgian Revival abode as a private residence after purchasing it in 2013 from the Republic of Portugal, which had used it as a military attachĂŠ office. Designer Lauren Liess assisted in decorating the six-bedroom house boasting custom hardwood floors, honed marble surfaces, a wood-paneled library, two laundry rooms and a sunny kitchen with an adjacent sunroom leading to a private patio and garden. Long and Foster Chevy Chase Circleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Benjamin Tessler is the listing agent.

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EMBLEMATIC TUDOR: Dana Landry and William F.X. Moody listed  NDSTREETNW in Massachusetts Avenue Heights for $6.2 million. The 1930s brick and stone Norman Tudor is located on a half acre of magnificent grounds overlooking Normanstone Park and features many updates throughout more than 8,000 square feet of living space, including a new professionally designed chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sub-Zero & Wolf kitchen. The six-bedroom residence boasts seven fireplaces, a wine cellar, a catering kitchen and one of the largest residential swimming pools (42â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;) in the District. Washington Fine Properties HRL Partners listed the house. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@washingtonlife.com.

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MY WASHINGTON

ARVINDMANOCHA President and CEO, Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts

MY TOP SPOTS

Restaurant 2941 is the whole package: incredible food, impressive surroundings, fantastic art and professional service. It never disappoints.

The Peacock Room in the Freer Gallery is where I destress. There are so many layers of intricate beauty in one space, it clears the mind taking it all in.

It’s hard not to have a good time with friends at Nellie’s Sports Bar. A great vibe is the most important quality of any bar.

The Jefferson Memorial is my favorite site for grandeur but especially for the Southern inscriptions, which are timeless.

Most Sundays my husband and I are at Amma, in Vienna, for a most tasty and unpretentious South Indian brunch. 66

I like to take all visitors to the Udvar Hazy Museum. Seeing a space shuttle in person is an unforgettable experience.

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olf Trap kicked off its summer season with a lineup spanning from Sting and the Beach Boys to Jennifer Hudson and Kacey Musgraves. In his sixth year at the helm of this foundation for the performing arts, Arvind Manocha is focused on continuing to make Wolf Trap an inclusive part of the community. Growing up in Ohio, with limited access to the arts, Manocha reveals his go-to’s in the District when he slips away from the 117acre park. >>

HOW HAVE YOU WORKED TO ENTICE A DIVERSE AUDIENCE THROUGH MUSIC? My team and I are constantly thinking about inclusion, diversity and authenticity. Our summer venue is quite literally owned by the community; it belongs to everyone. It’s important that everyone sees themselves at Wolf Trap. The beauty of being in the world of the performing arts is that we have the arts to help make those connections. So, it comes via thinking broadly about who is on stage and how we can continually expand that universe.

YOU’VE DESCRIBED WOLF TRAP AS A “SUMMER TRADITION” FOR MANY. HOW DO YOU GET PEOPLE TO COME OUT AND KEEP COMING BACK? The biggest drivers are the artists we are fortunate to welcome to our stage. But what motivates people to return year after year is that we really work hard at creating a holistic experience. Coming to Wolf Trap is a bit like a “choose your own adventure” book: you can plan your visit just around the concert experience, or you can come early and hike the trails and enjoy the 100 acres of green space.You can pack a picnic or grab dinner at our restaurant or concessions stands. I think that when people see Wolf Trap as an experience, and not just a destination, it creates a bond that lasts for years.

WHAT ARTISTS/BANDS ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF BRINGING TO PERFORM? There are so many, really. Robyn and Royksopp were unforgettable. Sufjan Stevens a few years ago was breathtaking. The beauty of this kind of work is that there is no shortage of jawdropping musical moments.

EXPLAIN FIRST-TIMERS’ REACTIONS TO WOLF TRAP. It’s always a treat to talk to someone on their first visit. The incredible bucolic setting, beautifully maintained by the National Park Service, is always surprising to newcomers. And when they see the Filene Center, with its incredibly contemporary architecture, they get an immediate sense that the place was built with an artist’s sensibility. It’s not faceless or anodyne; it’s lovingly crafted to welcome artists and music lovers. The fact that you can bring in your own food and wine is also an eye-opener. Where else can you curate your own dining experience and also cut down on expenses?

YOU HAVE BEEN AT WOLF TRAP FOR SIX YEARS. WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST ACCOMPLISHMENT? Redefining and broadening the Wolf Trap community of artists and patrons was high on my list of priorities when I first moved here. Since then we’ve seen growth in concert attendance and in our philanthropic base. Our education programs have also expanded dramatically. Metrics like these are really most important because they are indicators of our ability to fulfill our mission and also have national impact. WHAT IS ON THE HORIZON FOR THE ORGANIZATION? Continuing to diversify and grow and make new connections is always a priority. We’re approaching our 50th anniversary season and we are working very hard behind the scenes to make sure that milestone is celebrated in the most exciting ways possible. TELL US ABOUT YOUR MOST MEMORABLE BEHIND THE SCENES MOMENT. The most memorable are the ones you can never talk about.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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P H OTO CO U RT E SY O F WO L F T RAP; TO P S P OT P H OTOS V I A W I K I M E D I A CO M M O NS

I N T E RV I E W BY DA R A K L AT T


Profile for Washington Life Magazine

Washington Life Magazine - Summer 2019