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SPECIALWEALTHANDPHILANTHROPYISSUE

<< Cindy Jones, Carrie Marriott and Todd Hitt





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Washington’s most generous givers

8,);)%08,0-78 The billionaires among us

09<96=6)%0)78%8) AOL co-founder STEVECASE sells ‘Merrywood’ for $43 million

Late AOL co-founder JIMKIMSEY’s riverfront home lists for $63 million

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Daring ensembles photographed on the set of CIRQUEDUSOLEIL’s ‘Luzia’

-27-(),31)7

Power couple TRIPP and AMYDONNELLY find a place to relax on the Eastern Shore


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67 '328)287 JUNE 2018

EDITOR'SLETTER

FEATURES THEPHILANTHROPIC .........................

FYIDC INSIDER'SGUIDE&SOCIAL CALENDAR ..................................................  WHO'SNEXTJessica Stafford Davis .................. 

THEDISHDel Mar ......................................... 

Inova Schar Cancer Institute Fundraiser .....................

YGL Issue Party.................................................. Cherry Blossom Festival Celebration ..........................

POLLYWOOD

Sondheim Awards .................................................

WHITEHOUSECORRESPONDENTS' WEEKENDPARTIES ...................................  EMBASSYROW ..........................................

A Vintage Affair ...................................................

Refugees International Dinner ...............................

Honoring a Maestro.............................................

Human Rights Awards ..........................................

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BOOKTALKAmerica's Greatest Library ................  Book Parties ........................................................  Women & Wine Fundraiser..................................... CityDance Dream Gala......................................... Parties, Parties, Parties! ........................................... 

Public Citizen Gala .............................................. Kennedy Center Spring Gala ................................ 

LIFESTYLES FASHIONEDITORIALDream State ...............

HOMELIFE INSIDEHOMES Amy and Trip Donnelly's Waterfront Home .................

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY

REALESTATENEWS ................................... OPENHOUSE ..............................................

ABRIGHTFUTURELong & Foster's

OVERTHEMOON ......................................

Wes Foster and Jeff Detwiler ....................................

National Museum of Women in the Arts Gala..............

DESIGNTRENDSBold & Brassy .......................  MYWASHINGTONDorothy Kosinski................

AROUNDTOWN .........................................

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COVER: Cindy Jones, Todd Hitt and Carrie Marriott at the Ritz-Carlton, West End (Photo by Tony Powell) TOP FROM LEFT: The Donnelly family on their dock (Photo by Tony Powell); Anthony Scaramucci and Michael Avenatti at the UTA White House Correspondents' Association Dinner Pre-Party (Photo by Tony Powell); ATSUKO KUDO Dominique Pom Pom Hat ($797), atsukokudo.com. ATSUKO KUDO Opera gloves ($65), atsukokudo.com. CELINE LS drop shoulder safari shirt dress ($2,500), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5300 Wisconsin Ave., NW (202) 363-2059. ROBERTO COIN 18 Karat Gold Princess Diamond Bangle Bracelet ($5,900) Liljenquist & Beckstead, The Shops at Fairfax Square. 8700 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, Va. (703) 749-1200. Lynn and Ted Leonsis (Photo by Tony Powell). Paella Mariscos from Del Mar (Photo Courtesy).

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Virginia Coyne SENIOREDITOR

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Erica Moody Catherine Trifiletti CONTRIBUTINGEDITOR

Roland Flamini COLUMNISTSANDCONTRIBUTINGWRITERS

Janet Donovan, Steve Houk,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe PRINCIPALPHOTOGRAPHER

Tony Powell CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Joy Asico, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores, Larry French, Naku Mayo,Kyle Samperton, Erin Schaff, Jay Snap and Amanda Warden

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi SALESANDMARKETINGREPRESENTATIVE

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FOUNDER

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J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

CAPITAL GAINS

foods! Our Dish column this month highlights the incredible teamwork and symbiotic relationship of restaurateurs Maria and Fabio Trabocchi. Their new coastal Spanish restaurant Del Mar, at the Wharf draws a range of visitors who can’t seem to get enough of traditional paella, fresh cut jamon and classic gin and tonics.

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Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L

F

or the past 11 years, Flip to our fashion Washington Life has pages to step inside the set aside a substantial mystical, ethereal world of portion of its June issue to Cirque du Soleil’s “Luzia: A look into the enormous Waking Dream of Mexico.” wealth or philanthropy If you haven’t had a of those who live in the chance to see the show, it National Capital Region. is running through June This time we decided to 17 in Tysons Corner– we explore both. Although highly recommend taking there is more of a focus on the trip. the giving side this time, We crossed the we also followed through Chesapeake Bay Bridge on research begun last year and headed to historic on “super-rich” individuals Easton, Md. to photograph at the apex of the top onethis month’s Inside Homes hundredth-of-one-percent feature. Flip to the back pyramid, i.e. those with a to see Tripp and Amy net worth ranging from Donnelly’s beautiful and Nancy Bagley with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Washington Life $200 million to more than light-filled weekend abode, publisher Soroush Shehabi at the WL- sponsored ‘Come Together’ event at the $100 billion. And, yes, the where the D.C. power British Ambassador’s residence ahead of the White House Correspondents’ Dinner. list has changed — mostly couple winds down and onward and upward — from last year! entertains friends. You’ll find much of interest in our “Philanthropic 50” list, This month’s party coverage includes a six-page roundup of especially since booming stock and real estate markets have events surrounding the White House Correspondents’ Association ensured that the rich continue to give in record amounts to many dinner, including the WL-sponsored “Come Together” party at beneficiaries, including medical, educational, cultural and social the British Ambassador’s residence that brought out members welfare causes that greatly impact not only the Washington, D.C. of Congress, ambassadors, White House correspondents and top metropolitan area but the entire world. business leaders. Also inside: the Refugees International Dinner, We zeroed in on a few key individuals paying it forward and the Kennedy Center Spring Gala and the Inova Schar Cancer setting a high bar. Kiddar Capital CEO Todd Hitt, a charitable Institute dinner that raised an unprecedented $26 million in one man-about-town who is giving to many arts organizations we night. Next month, we’ll feature photos from the beautiful Phillips love, shared his views on philanthropy and on immigration Collection, Hillwood and Halcyon Awards galas. reform. Perennial event chairs Cindy Jones, who is president of the board at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and Carrie Marriott, a founder of the MS Women on the Move luncheon, talked to us about the importance of getting involved to raise awareness and critical funds. And Martha’s Table CEO Patty Stonesifer, who is overseeing the expansion of its headquarters Nancy R. Bagley to Anacostia, told us about her drive to see all children in the Editor in Chief country given the same access to opportunities, including healthy


FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington BY ERICA MOODY

Embrace the joy of reading at this second annual festival presented by the Downtown Columbia Partnership. Acclaimed authors Edwidge Danticat and Amanda Lucidon are headlining the family-friendly day of panel discussions, readings and book-related activities (including a pop-up bookstore from Politics & Prose and reading for kids) that drew more than 3,000 attendees last year. Free and open to the public, June 10, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Downtown Columbia Lakefront, dtcpartnership.com/booksinbloom.

CAPITAL PRIDE



A colorful parade, LGBTQ speed dating, an after-hours night at the African Art Museum and a Pride brunch: these are just a few of the activities you’ll find at this year’s Capital Pride weekend. The diverse lineup of activities is meant to bring people together to celebrate our differences with the theme “Elements of Us.” Many events are free and those that aren’t go to support the Capital Pride Alliance’s educational programs. June 7-10, capitalpride.org.

SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FEST Discover the culture of Catalonia, a vibrant region in northeastern Spain, at the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Hundreds of Catalan artisans, designers, musicians and cooks will be on the National Mall showcasing the creativity of their communities. Visitors will have the opportunity to participate in festival arts including constructing human towers with more than 100 people. Free and open to the public, June 27 to July 1 and July 4 to 8, festival.si.edu.

AFI DOCS FILM FEST The American Film Institute’s annual documentary film festival comes once again to Washington, D.C. venues and Silver Spring’s AFI Theater, bringing features, shorts and VR documentaries from around the world to local viewers. Over five days, more than 100 acclaimed films representing 28 countries will be shown as filmmaker-focused panels and presentations explore the nuts and bolts of filmmaking and the potential of the medium to inspire change. June 13-17, locations and ticket prices vary, afi.com.

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KINGMAN ISLAND BLUEGRASS & FOLK FESTIVAL Put on your dancing shoes for eight hours of revelry at this annual festival celebrating bluegrass, folk and the beauty of Kingman Island, a verdant oasis on the Anacostia River. Artists include Gangstagrass and The American Songster Revue (featuring Don Flemons, Guy Davis, Amythyst Kiah and more). Food trucks and drinks will be available onsite. Proceeds benefit Living Classrooms and continued maintainence of the island. VIP tickets $125, door tickets $45, advance tickets $35, kingmanislandbluegrass.info.

DC JAZZ FEST AT THE WHARF Experience the buzzing Southwest Waterfront at the 13th annual DC Jazz Festival featuring Leslie Odom Jr., Regina Carter and many others. The nonprofit group’s signature event is meant to introduce new people to the joy of jazz and will fill up three main stages for a weekend of music in the open air. June 16-17, FREE, dcjazzfest.org.

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SOCIAL CALENDAR

HI LLWOOD GALA Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens’ Fabergé Gala. Included will be an exclusive preview of the Fabergé Rediscovered exhibition highlighting the work of the famed jeweler. An exhibition preview and evening cocktails begin at 6:30 p.m., followed by a tented dinner on the Lunar Lawn at 8 p.m. Hillwood Museum; black-tie; tickets start at $500; sponsorships start at $1,000; contact Allison Kingery, 202-243-3974, akingery@hillwoodmusems.org.

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DI N E N DASH

Enjoy a food-filled night hosted by Chef José Andrés and other top chefs when 30 top District restaurants close to serve their favorite dishes and drinks. Special guest Andrew Zimmern will be there as well as other VIP guests who have yet to be announced. All proceeds will benefit World Central Kitchen. Arrive at your check- in restaurant at 6 p.m.; General admission tickets are $150;VIP are $400; contact dinendash.info.

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H AR VARD BUSINESS SCHOOL GALA

Celebrate with members of the Harvard Business School Club of Washington D.C. as they host their third annual Leadership Gala. The bill of fare includes a cocktail reception and dinner at the Four Seasons Hotel. Black-tie; tickets start at $200; contact Penny Cassidy, pcassidy@hbsdc.org.

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CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

BOOKS IN BLOOM


FYIDC | WHO’SNEXT

WHO’S NEXT

Collector and philanthropist Jessica Stafford Davis aims to change the art world with The Agora Culture. BY ERICA MOODY I PHOTO BY TONY POWELL

T

he art world is intimidating to many people. Jessica Stafford Davis left her executive post at AOL to solve that. The McLean,Va. native had always been an art lover, but it wasn’t until she started to collect that a new career path formed. In her case, frustration fueled innovation. “I found it very difficult to navigate the art world or to find artists of color that were a part of the critical discourse,” the McLean,Va. native explains.There was no welcoming, public way to get the knowledge she needed. “I met a lot of collectors who would share information, but only behind closed doors.” The art world doesn’t have to be unapproachable, she thought; a more open atmosphere might encourage budding collectors to engage. So, in 2013, Stafford Davis said goodbye to AOL and launched her web-based multi-cultural arts platform,The Agora Culture, an avenue that bridges the gap between emerging collectors and contemporary artists (both established and on the rise). Her aim is to “make art more accessible and give communities that don’t have an access point, whether that is a culturally curious person or an artist, a platform.” She began with a private reception in her home for world-renowned mixed media artist Mequitta Ahuja, connecting the recent Guggenheim Award recipient to potential patrons. Stafford Davis then co-curated her first exhibition,“Women as Color, Light and Form,” with Galerie Myrtis in Baltimore, Md. Now thousands of aspiring, intermediate and even seasoned collectors who wish to consign pieces and need help with auction house liaising or legacy planning have a place at The Agora Culture. The Agora Culture has a vibrant presence both offline and on. Stafford Davis hosts events including educational workshops, exhibitions and salons featuring artists and experts such as Sheldon Scott, Kim Sajet and Amy Sherald, whose portrait of Michelle Obama now hangs in the National Portrait Gallery. This summer Stafford Davis will be on Martha’s Vineyard for her annual Art on the Vine (August 12 - 15), a free three-day fair featuring conversations with dozens of visual artists from the African Diaspora. Art on the Vine also funds two emerging artists each summer for a fourweek residency; this year’s artists are both from the District. “We developed a residency to give artists an opportunity to continue to work on their practice,” Stafford Davis says. “Artists are such a gift to us. We need the infrastructure to help support them.” Affordable housing and spaces for artists to work will help keep them in Washington instead of leaving for another city, she says. Her parents, philanthropists Earl and Amanda Stafford, showed that giving time is as important as giving money. Stafford Davis also credits the late philanthropist and art collector Peggy Cooper Cafritz for inspiring her.“The reason I’m so focused in the art world is because of her example and her advice. She would always say, and sign her emails with ‘give until it hurts.’That has pushed me to ensure that I go above and beyond.”

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Stafford Davis was recently recognized for her work by Arena Stage at their annual gala, where she accepted the Emerging Leader award for her “passion and entrepreneurial support of the arts.” “We need art to see the world differently,” Stafford Davis says. “When you look back over time, art helps tell a story and gives you a sense of what was going on in that time and what was important.The arts are the foundation to a society.”

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FYIDC | THEDISH

MARRIAGE, WITH A SIDE OF RESTAURANTS

The dynamic Trabocchi duo balance the front and back of the house at five dining options, including their new hit coastal Spanish restaurant Del Mar. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

A

s the first restaurant to sign on to the Wharf waterfront development, Fabio and Maria Trabocchi knew Del Mar’s 13,800-square-foot space with five private dining rooms, a balcony and two patio areas set to open this summer, would be a risk. But the husband and wife restaurateurs have enjoyed such success with their other dining concepts (Fiola, Fiola Mare, Sfoglina, Casa Luca) that it was one they were willing to take. Del Mar, or “from sea” in Spanish, is also Mallorcan-born Maria’s middle name. She says this restaurant was Fabio’s gift to her, and what a gift it has been. Since its opening last October, Del Mar has become a nationally-recognized hit for its Mediterranean charm and quality seafood-inspired menu. In the two years leading up to Del Mar’s debut, the Trabocchis spared no expense or detail. Each design element of the restaurant has a story and a place, from the hand-painted tiles imported from Spain in the bathroom stalls to the staff uniforms, which Maria designed herself. Before final decisions were made, the Trabocchis washed silverware in their home dishwasher to ensure durability and personally tested seating

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PHOTO BY TONY POWELL

for comfort. With all the personal touches (Maria scoured her hometown for decor and pottery to accent the space), Del Mar is equal parts sophistication and comfort. “We always design our restaurants as we would our home,” Maria explains, emphasizing that dining at Trabocchi restaurants should be an experience. The couple spent months doing culinary research ahead of Del Mar’s opening, tasting and learning from Spanish chefs, but the most important flavor profiles were the ones that reminded Maria of her childhood on the Mediterranean. For those, she turned to her family in Mallorca to share traditional recipes, explaining that the paella, specifically, had to be just right. It wasn’t “until I could close my eyes and feel like I was in Spain” that she signed off on the shareable menu favorite, which in one iteration incorporates lobster, calamari, mussels and prawns over top bomba rice. Kitchen appliances were imported from Spain to ensure that classic dishes, like churros, come as close to the real thing as possible. On a typical day before service, Maria reviews all the reservations in the system, marking guest’s names she doesn’t recognize so that she can make a point to stop by their table to introduce herself. Additionally, she keeps an eye out for diners who appear to be splurging on a date night or special occasion and sends over Champagne. On any given day at any one of his restaurants, Fabio can be found in the kitchen orchestrating menus, which change daily, and coordinating a slew of internationallysourced food orders. In the evenings, the Trabocchis kick back with glasses of wine to recap their days and “combine notes.” Although the couple, who live in Georgetown with their two children, like to keep their personal lives private, they are fixtures on the social scene. Attending events and supporting causes, Maria says, is very important to their personal philosophy. They recently chaired the Refugees International Dinner two years in a row. “Once we can, we need to give back because [Washington] has given everything to us,” Maria remembers telling Fabio early on. “We need to create legacy.” The duo’s ability to harmoniously sync the front and back of house at their restaurants is reflective of their 18-year marriage. “There is a magic to our partnership,” Maria says, joking that all she has to do is look at Fabio for him to know exactly what she’s thinking. When they are both present during service, the staff stands a little straighter, Maria says, setting the tone and the high bar Del Mar has established, and by many’s opinion, exceeded. WHAT TO ORDER: Hand Carved 5J Jamón Ibérico ($26), Paella de Pescado y Marisco ($98) (serves 2-4) Del Mar | 791 Wharf St. SW | www. delmardc.com| (202) 525-1402 | entrees start at $30

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Where Washington Goes For

Best Ballet Training Finest collaboration of Russians and Americans continues to produce world class ballet dancers. Kirov Academy of Ballet offers academic and world-class ballet training by Russian experts. Classical Ballet faculty teaches 270 year old Vaganova methodology of St. Petersburg. Please continue to support the arts and help us celebrate our 30th anniversary by donating to the Kirov Academy of Ballet in Washington D.C. To give your support, email: friends@kabdc.org

AUDITIONS (Ages 11- 21) Please check our website for local or international auditions.Video auditions can be submitted throughout the year. On-site auditions are by appointment. SUMMER INTENSIVE (Ages 11 - 17) Washington, DC June 24 - July 29, 2018. Vaganova Method training plus a myriad of dance styles to provide a summer of diverse education. YEAR ROUND BALLET & ACADEMIC STUDIES (Ages 11-17) PRE-PROFESSIONAL DIVISION (Ages 18-21) ACADEMIC ONLY (Grades 7-12) The academic only program is designed for commuter students who are interested in a top quality private education. Alternative arts education available for those who are interested in courses other than ballet. Dates for all programs: September 3, 2018 - June 1,2019

Register at www.kirovacademydc.org


POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy| Embassy Row, Public Citizen’s Gala and more!

Patricia and JoséAndrés with NBC’s Mariana Atencio before the White House Correspondents Association dinner. (Photo by Tony Powell)

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POLLYWOOD

WHITEHOUSECORRESPONDENTS’WEEKEND

CHEERSTOJOURNALISTS

The usual parties, and a few newcomers, made for a fun and lively (albeit low-wattage) White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner weekend. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

T H U R S DAY  A P R I L   

BYTES & BYLINES [IRISH AMBASSADOR’S RESIDENCE] P H OTO S  BY  N I C K  K L E I N

Irish Amb.Kurt Jaeger and Laurette Jaeger

Eric Kuhn, John McCarthy, Susanna Quinn, Allen Gannett and Jon Steinberg

Tech-heads united for the fourth annual Bytes & Bylines party hosted by Susanna Quinn, Eric Kuhn, John McCarthy, Allen Gannett and Jon Steinberg held at the residence of the new Irish ambassador. While a jazz trio kept guests entertained on the back patio, Irish whiskey tastings kept the folks inside happily occupied. Politicos in the crowd were aplenty: Reps. Brendan Boyle, Chris Carney, Darrell Issa, Ed Royce, Sean Duffy and Ruben Gallego, but it was Toby from “The West Wing” (real name: Richard Schiff) who got the most attention.

WASHINGTON WOMEN IN JOURNALISM AWARDS [GLORIA DITTUS RESIDENCE] P H O T O S  B Y  DA N  S WA R T Z

The celebration of female journalists shattering glass ceilings felt all the more important in the year of the #MeToo movement. The event was co-hosted by public relations powerhouse Gloria Dittus (Story Partners) and Washingtonian publisher Cathy Merrill Williams, who are longtime next door neighbors and friends – Merrill Williams joked that her sons use Dittus’ pool like it’s their own. Four female journalists were recognized with Tiffany & Co. designed plaques: Cook Political Report’s Amy Walter, NPR’s Audie Cornish, Lynn Sweet of The Chicago Sun-Times and Voice of America’s Amanda Bennett. “It’s one of these jobs where you walk into rooms where no one wants to see you or hear from you and you start talking and you don’t stop.” Cornish said upon receiving her award, “and you don’t try to sleep with anyone in that room and, I think as we’ve learned in the last year, that is very confusing to people.”

Audie Cornish, Gloria Dittus, Amy Walter and Carrie Morgridge

F R I DAY  A P R I L    Susan Tolson and Charles Rivkin

Jared Kushner, Katherine Bradley, Ivanka Trump and David Bradley

Tina Tchen and Gen. James Mattis

Jeffrey McDermott, Isabel Gillies, Ashley McDermott and Peter Lattman

ATLANTIC MEDIA’S KICKOFF DINNER [DAVID AND KATHERINE BRADLEY RESIDENCE] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

Guests arrived to the Bradley’s annual kickoff dinner bright, alert and unscathed by the slew of events that followed the rest of the weekend. David Bradley, chairman of Atlantic Media and his wife Katherine welcomed a power house group, who included Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump and other administration notables like General James Mattis, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and White House counselor Kellyanne Conway. When a loud buzzing noise threatened to disrupt the intimate tented dinner off Embassy Row, Bradley joked “Just the Vice President with the chainsaw again.”

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Kellyanne Conway and Anthony Scaramucci

Paul Pelosi, Lady Darroch and Rep. Nancy Pelosi WL SPONSORED

KIDDAR CAPITAL, CRAFT AND WASHINGTON LIFE’S PRE-WHCD ‘COME TOGETHER’ FÊTE [BRITISH AMBASSADOR’S RESIDENCE] P H O T O S  B Y  T O N Y  P O W E L L  A N D  B E N  D R OZ

Washington Life was quite pleased to sponsor and co-host the “Come Together” party at the British Ambassador’s residence alongside Kiddar Capital, Craft Media and the Washington Diplomat. Partners also included Long & Foster | Christie’s International Real Estate and Children’s National Medical Center. A heavy hitting crowd of media personalities, bipartisan politicos and A-list Washingtonians convened for the British-themed bash– think “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” cocktails and samplings of Stilton cheese. Guests included House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Sen. Chris Van Hollen. There was also the non-political set including Miss Universe Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters, Grammy-winning DJ Paul Oakenfold and Anthony Scaramucci (better known as “The Mooch”). DJ Oakenfold, one of the forefathers of techno music, had the crowd reeling with his upbeat classics.

Daniel Lippman, Elizabeth Landers and Jim Acosta

Katherine Van Hollen and Sen. Chris Van Hollen

SPOTTEDSEANSPICERANDSARAHSANDERSIN CONVERSATIONAH/TOBEAFLYONTHEWALL

Giovanna and Joe Lockhart with Kathleen Biden

Chris Matthews with Therese and Fouad Talout

Rep. Don Beyer and Megan Beyer

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Innis, Todd, and Aidan Hitt

Comedian Michelle Wolf and British Amb. Sir Kim Darroch

| J U N E      | washingtonlife.com

Brian Donahue with Alan, Benjamin and Cindy Behar

Sean Spicer and Sarah Huckabee Sanders

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POLLYWOOD

WHITEHOUSECORRESPONDENTS’WEEKEND

Jessica Ditto, Hogan Gidley and Lindsay Walters Linda O’Dea and John Coplen

Lee Satterfield, Patrick Steel and Evan Ryan

Kimberly and Kenneth Cestari

KIDDARCAPITALCRAFT&WL’S PRE-WHCDPARTY CONTINUED

Danish Amb. Lars Gert Lose and Ulla Ronberg

Eric and Jeannette Stewart

Elena Solovyov and Christopher Hoey

Maria Royce and Adrienne Arsht

Cooper Hefner

Steve Clemons and Gloria Dittus

Kevin O’Leary Richard Kind and Shiri Appleby

MOTHER NATURE NETWORK’S ‘WHCD JAM’ [THE HAMILTON LIVE]

Karamo Brown

Lauren Crum, Sarah Barsaleau, Britta Halpin and Brittany Reed

P H O T O S  B Y  G E VA R  B O N H A M

CREATIVE COALITION’S ‘RIGHT TO BEAR ARTS’ BENEFIT GALA [THE MAYFLOWER HOTEL] P H O T O S  B Y  J AY  S N A P

The nonprofit group has revved up their initiatives since Trump took office and threatened to cut funding to the Endowment for the Arts. Helmed by Tim Daly, the annual event usually draws from Hollywood’s pool, but in the low-wattage spirit of the weekend, there weren’t but a sprinkling of recognizable guests like Victoria Justice, Steve Howey (“Shameless”) and Shiri Appleby (“UnREAL”). Guest sipped on Deep Eddy Congress Mules and wines from Robert Hall and listened to remarks from Creative Coalition’s CEO Robin Bronk who said “Tonight is a celebration and a reminder that the arts are a cornerstone of what makes our citizenry thrive and flourish.”

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Robin Bronk and Rep. Debbie Dingell

Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon was especially apt at the annual music event that featured the “Footloose” actor and his band the Bacon Brothers. Also in the line-up was NBC’s Lester Holt and his group The Rough Cuts. Chuck Leavell of Rolling Stones fame, who heads the Mother Nature Network event, made his rounds and jammed with the usual fervor we all know and love.

Kevin Bacon

Victoria Justice

Chuck Leavall and Lester Holt

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UNITED TALENT AGENCY’S ‘CELEBRATION OF AMERICA’S JOURNALISTS’ [FIOLA MARE] P H O T O S  B Y  T O N Y  P O W E L L

As in years past, UTA’s annual bash, hosted by celeb agent Jay Sures, Seth Oster, Rene Jones and Dan Abrams, was an entertaining mix of Washington and Hollywood types bonding over an expansive raw bar. Then there were the folks that embody the two worlds without meaning to– we’re looking directly at you Michael Avenatti (Stormy Daniel’s opposite-of-camera-shy attorney). His introduction to Trump’s counselor and confidant Kellyanne Conway made for a killer photo opp.

Ami Aronson and David Mercer Jay Sures and Kellyanne Conway

SPOTTEDSHARKTANK’SKEVINO’LEARY0AKAMRWONDERFUL1INVITING CONWAYTOSEEHIMPLAYGUITARATGYPSYSALLY’SLATE-NIGHTSHE RESPECTFULLYDECLINED/BUTWEDIDN’TTHEMANCANSHRED!

Mona Hamdy, Kimball Stroud and Maria Trabocchi

Kevin Friend, Reem Sadik and Jim Sciutto

Michelle Kosinski and Michael Avenatti

S AT U R DAY  A P R I L   Cooper Hefner and Playboy bunnies

Stephanie Ruhle, Megan Murphy and Hilary Rosen

Zach and Melissa Leonsis

Fred and Genny Ryan Miguel

GARDEN BRUNCH [BEALL-WASHINGTON HOUSE] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

The 25th annual Garden Brunch, started by Tammy Haddad, added a few new hosts this year as it returned to Mark Ein’s Beall-Washington House from Connie Milstein’s residence where it was held last year. Textbook spring weather kept crowds in fine spirits as they indulged in Design Cuisine’s extensive bloody mary bar and snatched up hanging strips of candied bacon. The event honored 19 U.S. military veterans through Wells Fargo’s home donation program and sponsor NS2 Serve’s training and hiring initiatives that provide opportunities to individuals returning from war.

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PLAYBOY’S ‘NO TIE PARTY’ [LIVING ROOM] P H O T O S  B Y  L A R R Y  F R E N C H /  G E T T Y  I M AG E S

SPOTTEDMAYORMURIELBOWSERALLSMILESMAKINGTHEROUNDS

John, April and Summer Delaney

Playboy CEO Ben Kohn, Kyle Richards and Mauricio Umansky

An army of bunnies led by the late Hugh Hefner’s son Cooper Hefner, descended on a small Washington nightclub to host Playboy’s first event surrounding WHCA Dinner. The party drew a crowd from various walks of the Washington social scene and a record number of crashers promising they had “received” the much sought-after confirmation email. Inside, a roving magician offered up card tricks, while a cartoonist drew guests’ heads on the body of a bunny and a duo of literary geniuses wrote funny poems based on your physical appearance. Fresh off his gig at the Broccoli Festival, musical artist Miguel made a surprise performance for the packed house, but his brief presence didn’t hold a candle to the live band, 45 Riots, who had the dance floor pulsing until the wee hours.

Charlie, Sally, Chloe and Mark Ein

SPOTTEDREALHOUSEWIVESOFBEVERLYHILLS’KYLERICHARDSOBLIGINGSELFIES/BUTONLY WHENSHECOULDMANTHECAMERACAN’TBLAMEHERFORKNOWINGHERANGLES!

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POLLYWOOD

WHITEHOUSECORRESPONDENTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;WEEKEND

Jack DiGioia

Omarosa Manigault Newman

DeAnn Marshall and Franco Nuschese

Amy Nathan, Howard Fineman and Barbie Allbritton

Laura Jarrett and Symone Sanders

WHCD PRE-RECEPTIONS [WASHINGTON HILTON]

Gov. Terry McAuliffe and Chris Matthews

P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

April Ryan

Chris Isham and Rep. Trey Gowdy

Ian Cameron and Dr. Susan Rice

Andrea Mitchell and Michelle Perry

Sen. Ed Markey, Vinay Mehra and Robert Allbritton

Xxxx Xxxx David McCormick, Dina Powell, David Cohen and Sen. Chris Coons

MSNBC AFTER PARTY [THE ORGANIZATION OF

Spencer Garrett,Dana Bash and Sam Feist

Don Lemon and Kathy Griffin

AMERICAN STATES] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

Unexpected rain and gusts of wind made the mostly-outdoor after party a bit of a logistical challenge, but the view of a gorgeously-lit OAS and a robust Johnnie Walker bar helped quash any feelings of discomfort.

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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg

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Olivia Nuzzi and Ryan Lizza

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MSNBC President Phil Griffin

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S U N DAY  A P R I L  

Geoff Tracy and Norah O’Donnell

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POLITICO BRUNCH

Amy Baier, Patrick Steel and Bret Baier

[THE ALLBRITTON RESIDENCE] P H OTO S  BY  TO N Y  P OW E L L

For this year’s English-themed brunch, Politico publisher Robert Allbritton and his wife Elena spared no expense. Guests snapped selfies with members of the “Queen’s guard” manning the entrance, nibbled on fish and chips and drank suds from a makeshift corner pub dubbed “The Drunken Journalist.” Massive flower displays arranged by Elena gave the outdoor tent spectacular pops of color.

Stephen Kessler and Heather Podesta

Robert and Dr. Elena Allbritton with Sally and Reince Priebus

Adrienne Elrod and Jeff Zeleny Diane Zeleny and Paul Johnson

John Legittino, Merideth Balenske and Adriana Gindlesperger

Chefs Spike Mendelsohn and Casey Thompson

Rita Cosby and Christine Warnke

Jeff Zucker

THOMSON REUTERS’ CORRESPONDENTS’ BRUNCH [HAY ADAMS HOTEL ROOF]

CNN’S ‘POLITICAL HANGOVER’ BRUNCH

P H O T O S  B Y  B E N  D R OZ

”Top Chef” alums Spike Mendelsohn and Kwame Onwuachi dazzled guests with an array of bites.

[LONGVIEW GALLERY] P H OTO S  BY  N I C K  K L E I N

“Who in the world is your party planner?” That was the first question that came to mind upon entering CNN’s extravagant “Alice in Wonderland”-themed brunch, which featured walls of greenery and live hanging flora. It turns out it was John Legittino and his team at Advoc8 who worked through the early hours of the morning to make sure everything was in tip top shape for the popular annual event. A tunnel of giant cards led guests through a “rabbit hole” to a photo station with a gold throne and giant animal topiaries.

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Jennifer Tapper, Allison Gollust and Jake Tapper

LaRhonda Burley, Sarah Flaherty and Lindsay Walters

Hasan Piker

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

A Wedding and an Open House Royal Nuptials boost ‘special relationship’ – Embassy open houses draw crowds – A Churchill comes to town

Lady Darroch, British Amb. Sir Kim Darroch, Lucy Herriott and Rep. George Holding

Guests at the British Embassy tea on the Royal Wedding day

British Ambassador Sir Kim Darroch greets National Economics Council Director Larry Kudlow and Judith Kudlow

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EMBASSY PROPOSAL At the Spanish Embassy Europe Day open house, a young man dropped on one knee and asked his girlfriend to marry him. It happened in the Moorishinspired courtyard lined with tiles imported from Seville – with hundreds of other visitors looking on. Welcome to a new Europe Day trend. By next year, there will be a dozen marriage proposals in European Union embassy salons all over Washington. Even after many years, the event involving the 28 E.U. embassies remains popular. A record 36,000 local residents lined up to watch dancing diplomats in folk costumes and to sample the culinary specialties of a dozen countries. Some embassies were inventive in advertising their country’s achievements. On display at the embassy of Denmark was a life size Wonder Woman statue made entirely from Lego pieces. Lego is manufactured in Denmark. But it wasn’t all gastronomy and self-congratulation. At the French Embassy, which this year hosted the joint Franco-German Europe Day (for the last two years the Germans were the hosts), a science booth representing both countries invited inquiries about advanced university courses in Germany and France. On offer was information about Ph.D. programs, grant programs, funding opportunities and practical advice. Nobody proposed at the British Embassy but the spotlight was on the following week’s wedding of Prince Henry of Wales (aka Prince Harry) and Ms. (not Miss) Meghan Markle, and a card writing station had been set up where visitors could send greetings to the couple. The embassy had been relaying occasional press releases from Kensington Palace, Prince Harry’s residence. One was Markle’s own brief statement announcing that her father would not be attending her wedding, and another from the palace bore the news that her future father-inlaw, Prince Charles, would walk her down the

aisle. On the wedding day, British Ambassador Sir Kim Darroch and his wife Vanessa, hosted an afternoon tea to celebrate the royal nuptuals. From a diplomatic point of view, the wedding of a member of the House of Windsor to an American was a welcome boost to the special relationship, now in need of all the boosting it can get. Darroch hinted at this in his speech as the Earl Grey flowed and the scones disappeared off the plates. “The interest, excitement, and support from Americans for the Royal Wedding has been extraordinary, demonstrating the depth of friendship, warmth and affection between our two countries,” Sir Kim said. “The British people are thrilled that Prince Harry is marrying an American.” No reference, of course, to the fact that President Donald Trump had not been invited, but then neither was any other head of state. And on the same day that Britain deliriously welcomed their new American duchess, in Trump’s America, the New York Times headline read: “In Texas school shooting, 10 dead, 10 hurt, and many unsurprised.” At the British Europe Day open house, there was no sign that, with the Brexit deadline of April 2019, this year’s open house as an E.U. mission could be its swan song. The British Embassy open house has always been among the most popular; and British Deputy Chief of Mission Michael Tatham was quoted as saying the embassy “will be doing an open house in 2019, in whatever capacity.” TAKING SIDES: The things you hear in Washington. Speaking at a White House Historical Society conference on the rebuilding of the presidential residence after British troops had set it on fire during the War of 1812, Randolph Churchill revealed that his great-grandfather Winston, Britain’s illustrious war-time prime minister, “had two ancestors who fought on the American side, against the British,” in the American Revolution.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| JUNE

2018

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P H OTOS CO URT E SY O F T H E B RI T I S H E M BAS SY

,

BY ROLAND FLAMINI


Joe Lieberman, Michael Trager, Hadassah Lieberman, Jackie Clegg Dodd, Mariella Trager and Chris Dodd Honoree Hala Al-Sarraf and Queen Noor

Hardin Lang, Domingos Fezas Vital, Portugese Amb. Isabel Fezas Vital, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Alyse Nelson

WL SPONSORED

REFUGEES INTERNATIONAL DINNER Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Eileen Shields West

Sam Waterston

ON THE WORLD STAGE: More than 400 guests attended Refugees International’s 39th annual dinner to draw attention to the increasing severity of conditions affecting more than 65 million refugees and displaced persons throughout the world while honoring three distinguished humanitarians who work to improve their living conditions and defend their rights. They were: Sen. Amy Klobuchar, who received the Congressional Leadership Award; Iraq Health Access Organization Director Hala Al-Sarraf, who accepted the Richard C. Holbrooke Award (presented by his widow Kati Marton); and Chobani Founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya, recipient of the McCall-Pierpaoli Humanitarian Award. “We all need individual heroes,” Ulukaya told the crowd. “In the streets, in the refugee camps, in the business community, every single day.”

Darya and Vali Nasr

Honoree Hamdi Ulukaya

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Colin Parfitt and Rep. Debbie Dingell

MARCH OF DIMES GOURMET GALA

Sen. Cory Gardner and Jaime Gardner with Erskine Wells

Rep. Salud Carbajal, Gina Rigby and Sen. David Perdue

National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL CONGRESSIONALCUISINE Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle put aside their differences to support the March of Dimes at its annual Gourmet Gala. Guests tasted sweet and savory bites served to them by politicians and their spouses that represented the best of their home states (Alaskan salmon from Sen. Lisa Murkowski, shrimp and grits from Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker and New England clam chowder from Rep. Joe Kennedy). Rep. Marsha Blackburn was the crowd favorite, taking home the People’s Choice award for her Nashville Hot Chicken. Rep. Linda Sánchez of California won the Healthiest Recipe award for her guacamole.

Sen. Tim Scott and Phillips Hinch

Lindsey Dickinson, Sen. Roger Wicker and Gayle Wicker

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POLLYWOOD Wai Wai Nu

Melanne Verveer, Nadia Murad and Hillary Rodham Clinton

Rumana Ahmed

Lyse Doucet WL EXCLUSIVE

Kosovo Amb. Vlora Citaku

HUMAN RIGHTS AWARDS Gaston Hall at Georgetown University | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL POWERFULWOMEN Human rights advocates inspired the Georgetown University community at an annual awards ceremony featuring Hillary Rodham Clinton, an honorary founder of the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security. Two young women who overcame personal adversity to fight for women’s rights were honored: activist Nadia Murad (a former captive of the Islamic state) and former political prisoner Wai Wai Nu, who has fought for human rights and peace in Myanmar. The BBC’s Lyse Doucet was honored with the Global Trailblazer Award for her war reporting spotlighting women and children. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Sarah Badawi and Scott Frey

Netherlands Amb. Henne Schuwer and Finland Amb. Kirsti Kauppi

Sen. Bernie Sanders Steve Skrovan, Jim Hightower, Laurie Powsner and Ben Krejci

PUBLIC CITIZEN GALA National Press Club | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ

Eunice, Sakedo, Michael Heahn and Breanne Skultety

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Takiyah and Roland Hodge

FIGHTINGFORJUSTICE The progressive advocacy organization Public Citizen honored an outspoken defender of economic justice, Sen. Bernie Sanders, with its annual Golden Boot award, which celebrates individuals who stand up to corporate greed and corruption. “Public Citizen has been there on virtually every major issue and every crisis this country has faced for decades,” Sanders told the approximately 400 guests. “You are the voice for the voiceless, you are the voice for economic, social, racial and environmental justice.” VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Bruce Hornsby and Mavis Staples (Kennedy Center photo)

Gary Sinise and Deborah Rutter

Jeff Koons and Eli Broad

Christa Schmidt and Jacqueline Mars

KENNEDY CENTER SPRING GALA The Kennedy Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Tina and Gary Mather

Annie Totah and Ryan Williams

CELEBRATINGTHEHUMANSPIRIT Legendary rhythm and blues singer (and 2016 recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors) Mavis Staples headlined the performing arts center’s signature spring event. The energetic 78-year-old was joined on stage by fellow musicians Bruce Hornsby, Alison Krauss and Neko Case, who together brought members of the audience to their feet with a rousing rendition of “I’ll Take You There.” HONORED: Philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad and actor and veterans’ activist Gary Sinise received the Award for the Human Spirit in acknowledgement of their contributions to the arts and culture. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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8,)

PHILANTHROPIC 50

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o give away money is an easy matter and in any man’s power. But to decide to whom to give it and how large and when and for what purpose and how, is neither in every man’s power nor an easy matter.” So wrote Aristotle some time around 350 B.C. In 2018, philanthropists face the same challenge. If the fundamental decision confronting givers is rooted in ancient history, much else has changed, and continues to change, in what is being called the “Golden Age of Philanthropy.” Fifty of the leading philanthropists from the greater Washington area listed below and reflect some of those changes, representing – for example - both so-called “old time charity” as opposed to more hands-on involvement with the recipient to ensure the proper use of donations and to keep close track of their impact. In the United States in the past couple of years, giving has reached unprecedented levels, marginally less in 2017 than in the previous year, but still well above levels when philanthropy was hit by the global crisis of 2008-2009. On average, greater Washington, D.C. area residents gave 3.5 percent of their income to charity and favorite causes, and, lacking the enormous wealth of New York City or Los Angeles, the area still ranked fourth in philanthropic funding nationwide. Foundations, many of them established by area families, total close to 2,000. Twenty years ago, they were in the middle hundreds. Such generous donors set an example for us all, and are listed here. Education has long been, and remains, the most popular philanthropic cause for ultra-high-net-worth Washingtonians. With college tuition fees going through the roof, and government involvement dwindling, philanthropic support for higher education, especially for lower income students, is increasingly in demand. But nation-wide, according to Giving USA 2017, the three main sectors that received philanthropic donations were: religion (32 percent), education (15 percent) and human services (12 percent). What would industrialist Andrew Carnegie, patron saint of American philanthropy, make of new philanthropic vehicles, including online platforms, donor-advised funds, LLCs and crowdfunding, driven largely by technological change? Carnegie was 65 when he turned his attention to philanthropy, and retirement age used to be the time to take up charitable giving in earnest. But as high tech pioneers have gotten rich quicker, the ultra-wealthy have started to give at younger ages. According to financial wealth experts, many new generation philanthropists don’t just give money, they seek more involvement in the decision making process with regard to how their dollars are spent. In so doing they often bypass the usual channels to their targeted causes, the foundations and funding networks, and donate directly to the cause itself.Their models for so-called “involvement philanthropy” are Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and others who

“focus on personal direction with little significant community input and accountability,” says wealth consultant and philanthropy expert Martin Levine. The other game changer in philanthropy has been the growing number of super-rich women involved with charitable ventures of every kind, but in particular those addressing issues facing women and girls. Recent research shows that at every income level women donate almost twice as much to charity as do men. “Women have resources to pay for change, to direct their own movies, to do their own research, to tell their own stories, and they are doing it in droves,” Cynthia Nimmo, president and CEO of the Women’s Funding Network told Forbes magazine. Culture is another focus area for Washington philanthropists. Every major city in Germany has its own opera house, funded by the government. But the Washington National Opera depends for its survival on the generosity of a handful of rich patrons. The U.S. government has never seen it as its role to support culture in any significant way – less so under the Trump administration, which threatens to cut off money for cultural institutions altogether. But the vision of billions of private dollars pouring into philanthropic causes also has its skeptics – not to say critics, especially when such advocacy is seeking radical change in social areas where government is also involved. Some big philanthropic campaigns question whether money is more powerful than the vote. That is why, in the early American republic, some leaders sought to outlaw philanthropy. They believed that private money with public goals would corrupt democracy. That is also why a hundred years ago, John D. Rockefeller had a hard time getting the Rockefeller Foundation’s charter approved by a wary Congress. A recent Schwab survey found that despite 60 percent of respondents saying the Washington metropolitan area is one of the most expensive in the country when it comes to cost of living, a majority of residents still view charitable giving as an essential part of their lives. There is probably no better indicator of the immense giving profile of Washingtonians than the $26 million raised in one night last month for the Inova Schar Cancer Institute. NVR President Paul Saville, his wife Linda and their 225 guests set a record in the Washington area for a single-event non-profit fundraiser. Guests at the closed-press event enjoyed a lively discussion with President George W. Bush and former White House advisor Karl Rove.The record haul helped support the opening of a highly personalized cancer research and treatment center on the 117-acre Inova Center for Personalized Health campus in Falls Church,Va--. Now that, dear reader, is the definition of philanthropy.


the philanthropic 50

John (Chip) and Sally Akridge A long-time, leading Washington real estate developer,Akridge founded and still chairs the Trust for the National Mall, which assists the chronically cash-strapped National Park Service to restore and maintain one of the capital’s major reference points. Akridge is also a trustee and leading supporter of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy. Leading by example, Akridge has turned his Eastern Shore estate into a model site for protecting wetlands and wildlife.

established herself as a leading patron of the arts and current affairs. Her $30 million gift rescued the then-floundering Carnival Center opera house/ concert hall/theater complex in Miami that now flourishes as the renamed Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts. She gave $5 million to set up the Adrienne Arsht musical theater series at the Kennedy Center (where she was once treasurer) and another $5 million to the Atlantic Council to establish the Adrienne Arsht Latin American Center.

José Andrés

sanju bansal

The tireless Michelin-starred, Spanish-born chef leads a double life. He is the owner, and principal food designer of 37 trendy, mostly high-end restaurants in Washington, Beverly Hills and elsewhere, but has also emerged as a leader in humanitarian relief, organizing large-scale food supplies to victims of natural disasters. Following the 2017 Puerto Rico hurricane,Andrés mobilized local chefs and volunteers to cook more than two million meals and deliver them to remote stricken areas that had been left without electricity, gas, clean drinking water or money – at an estimated cost of $400,000 a day.“No other single agency – not the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, nor any government entity – has fed more people freshly cooked food since the hurricane,” the NewYork Times reported. The hub of the operation was Andrés’ World Central Kitchen, a nonprofit that evolved out of his relief efforts following the Haiti earthquake in 2010. From initially providing food in devastated areas, World Central Kitchen moved to sending American and Haitian chefs to teach the islanders healthier ways of cooking, donating cookers using natural gas to small restaurants to reduce the use of coal and wood fires, and introducing new ways of fighting hunger. In May, as he received the James Beard Foundation’s Humanitarian Award, Andrés was talking of transforming his World Central Kitchen from an ad-hoc effort to a permanent, international relief organization.

An Indian immigrant who co-founded MicroStrategy, the Tysons Corner-based data analytics company, but left it in 2013 to launch Hunch Analytics, Bansal’s name is associated with large-scale philanthropy for both Indian and Washington, D.C. causes.The Bansal Foundation is a long-time supporter of WAMU/88.5,American University’s news and information radio station, the Children’s Hospital and Wolf Trap, the only National park with a cultural program.

Adrienne Arsht She once told an interviewer that she saw her philanthropic giving as a race against time. Her plan, she said, is to give away all of her money before she dies – hoping to get the timing right. Starting out with $300 million from the sale of a Miami bank, she has cheerfully and irrepressibly

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2018

david and katherine bradley Earlier this year, publisher David Bradley made news when he sold the controlling interest of Atlantic Magazine to Laurene Powell Jobs, entrepreneur and widow of Apple founder Steve Jobs. But in Washington, wife Katherine Bradley has an equally high profile as founder and chair of the CityBridge Foundation, a nonprofit with a strong emphasis on bringing about a radical shift upwards in school standards across the District. Through CityBridge Education, they have given millions to education-overhaul efforts both in the public school system and charter schools. A year ago, they announced plans to fund the renovation or opening of 25 “high quality” schools in DC where students would have every opportunity to reach high academic standards.

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Jose Andres

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Adrienne Arsht

Katherine and David Bradley

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Buffy Cafritz A bust of the French Count Antoine Boulay de la Meurthe by the celebrated early 19th century sculptor David d’Angers is on display at the National Gallery of Art in part thanks to the help of the William and Buffy Cafritz Foundation in its recent acquisition. Over time, the Washington hostess and her late husband have given millions to cultural and charitable institutions, most notably the

| washingtonlife.com Sanju Bansal

Buffy Cafritz

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SPECIAL FEATURE

JEFFBEZOS NOTYOURNATURAL PHILANTHROPIST

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hilanthropy in America is part generosity, part conscience and part tax evasion. The rags-to-riches barons of the early late 19th century – Andrew Carnegie, Henry Ford, John D. Rockefeller – created the myth-making machine of American wealth, and with it the expectation that such wealth had to be shared (tax incentives came later). That philosophy still flourishes today, which is why Jeff Bezos, the modern Croesus, recently found himself in a bit of a bind. It’s this ingrained sense of responsibility that even before the Amazon founder and Washington Post owner overtook Bill Gates as the richest man in the world — with a personal wealth of $126 billion (it frequently fluctuates based on market behavior) — Bezos was regarded as only moderately, some would say barely, philanthropic. In 2012, the Seattle Times, his hometown paper, called Amazon “a virtual no-show in hometown philanthropy.” Since then, Bezos and his family have

made philanthropic gifts of around $100 million, but that’s about one tenth of one percent of his wealth – a very small drop in the bucket. Critics have noted that Bezos, alone among the top handful of American billionaires, had not signed the Giving Pledge created by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett to commit themselves to giving away at least half of their fortunes in their lifetime. In June 2017, after refusing to answer questions from the New York Times about his philanthropy, according to the paper, Bezos tweeted his now famous “request for

TYCOONOMICS A history of the Forbes list of billionaires.

E

very year since the 1980s, Forbes magazine has listed the world’s billionaires, sometimes with cooperation from the subject, sometimes not. Here, with special reference to the greater Washington area, are some highlights from the Forbes list. 1988: Forbes listed 191 billionaires worldwide with a net worth of $338 billion. Seven of them were individuals or families in the greater Washington area, accounting for $18.7 billion. 1997: Global number of billionaires: 486. Net worth: $1.2 trillion. Four Russian oligarchs made their first appearance on the list. (By 2011, there were 79

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oligarchs listed, and Russia had the largest concentration of billionaires). 2001: The number of billionaires listed by Forbes was 1,125 for a total worth of $1.8 trillion. The list included DC resident Robert Johnson, founder of Black Entertainment Television, the first African American to make the billionaires’ list with a net worth of $1.3 billion. 2018: Billionaires world wide: 2,208. Net worth: $9.1 trillion. Jeff Bezos topped the list for first time with $112 billion net worth. Forbes lists 13 billionaires in the greater Washington area for a total worth of $56.9 billion, including Donald Trump, but not his super-rich cabinet members.

ideas” about a philanthropy strategy. Amazon, the Washington Post and Blue Origin, his aerospace company, were making a long term contribution to society, but, he wrote, “I want much of my philanthropic activity to be helping people in the here and now – short term – at the intersection of urgent need and lasting impact.” The New York Times headlined its report on the tweet: “At Last, Jeff Bezos Offers a Hint of His Philanthropic Plans.” Well, maybe. Having received more than 40,000 responses, Bezos made his first big donation in January. He gave $33 million to TheDream.US, the scholarship fund for undocumented child immigrants started by Donald Graham, his longtime friend and the former owner of the Washington Post. Graham says he reached out to Bezos after seeing the tweet. If Bezos has shaped a philanthropic strategy as a result of his tweet it has yet to emerge. The Amazon executive has shown little interest in the multi-billiondollar, save-the-world type of philanthropy practiced by Buffett, Bill and Melissa Gates and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan – and his tweet effectively says so. On the contrary, Bezos, a space dreamer from way back, has shown that his priority is the fast track development of his aerospace manufacturing and spaceflight services company, Blue Origin, “which eats up $1 billion a year.” -Roland Flamini

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the philanthropic 50

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (to give it its full title), where Buffy is an honorary trustee, the Library of Congress and the National Institute of Health as well as the Vice President’s Residence Foundation, Ford’s Theatre, the Washington Ballet, the French American Cultural Foundation and numerous Catholic causes.

Calvin and Jane Cafritz Real estate developer Calvin administers the family foundation named after his late parents, the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, which in 2017 gave $18.5 million to 409 organizations and causes. Jane Cafritz is the driving force behind the Domingo Cafritz Young Artists Program. The foundation contributed $1.2 million to Martha’s Table for a new headquarters in Ward 8 and $1 million to the National Gallery of Art to expand education programs and outreach. Among the 59 new grantees – at least for the foundation – were lesser grants to Life Asset Inc., which makes micro loans to small businesses, ScholarChips, the Anacostia Playhouse, Leveling the Playing Field and Gearin’ Up Bicycles (job training). Since 1970, when electronic record keeping was initiated, the Cafritz Foundation has given $465 million in grants to more than 950 non-profit organizations.

America Online was a long time ago for Steve Case, and he would probably be uncomfortable to hear himself labeled a “historical figure.” But future historians will look on him as one of the pivotal figures of our fast moving technological age. For Case, philanthropy has to do with helping people to fulfill their own dreams and ambitions.The Case Foundation, where he is chairman and where wife Jean (who is chair of National Geographic) is CEO, searches “across issues to identify opportunities where innovation is needed to address an urgent challenge,” according to the foundation’s website. Case is also co-founder of Revolution, a $1.3 billion, District-based venture capital firm that has so far invested in 50 or more companies, and more recently Rise of the Rest, which seeks to fund startups in the Midwest and other areas judged by Case to be overlooked by investors. A Case mantra in the past few years is, “Last year, 75 percent of venture capital went to three states, California, Massachusetts and NewYork.” Hence his bus tours in the hinterland to hand out $100,000 tranches

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2018

Susan carmel The American University’s Carmel Institute of Russian Culture and History, launched in 2015 by real estate investor and philanthropist Susan Carmel, aims to broaden student awareness of Russian life and culture by hosting concerts and funding student summer travel to St. Petersburg and Moscow. Structured as an exercise in cultural diplomacy, it also offers courses in Russian literature. It has, however, drawn criticism – even inside A.U. itself – for not speaking up about Moscow’s attempts to influence the 2016 elections and its incursions in Ukraine and Crimea. A year ago the university’s own newspaper The Eagle, called the institute’s activities controversial because it “host[s] events featuring Russian cultural figures who are supportive of Putin.”The institute has not cut back or changed its programs, sticking to its stated belief that people-to-people programs are the way to better understanding. “All you are seeing are Cold War stereotypes,” Lehrman told the paper. “How do you get young people to understand each other and work together and get along better?”

Jane and Calvin Cafritz

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Jean and Steve Case

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Courtney Clark Pastrick

Steve and Jean Case

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of seed money to would-be entrepreneurs with convincing pitches.

Contractor A. James Clark, whose Clark Construction Group built FedEx Field, the Verizon Center, the World Bank headquarters, the Canadian Embassy, 28 Metro stations and much more, died in 2015, but his gift keeps on giving through the A. James and Alice Clark Foundation. Now headed by his daughter Courtney, it made headlines with its record-breaking gift of $219 million to the University of Maryland, Clark’s alma mater. It was the largest private donation to the university by a long shot, and – for that matter – one of the most significant to any institution of higher learning anywhere. But it overshadowed the Clark Foundation’s ongoing generosity in other areas, including hospitals, schools, culture and veteran services. In March, 2018, for example, the foundation gave $5 million to the USO Pathfinder, which helps military families make the transition to civilian life.

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William Conway

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william and jane conway In the 1930s, Frank Capra would have made the movie, with James Stewart playing billionaire Bill

| washingtonlife.com Scott Pastrick and Courtney Clark Pastrick

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Betsy DeVos

Conway, one of the founding triumvirate of the Carlyle Group. But they don’t make movies like that anymore, so we have to settle for a real life story in which Conway decides – in 2012 – to give away $1 billion of his $2.8 billion personal wealth. But, to whom? Through the Washington Post, he invited public suggestions on how to create new job opportunities for the poor. More than 2,500 ideas came pouring in, overwhelming Conway – by his own admission – and fixing his mind on a more practical approach: use the money to create opportunities for people who couldn’t otherwise afford training for employment in areas where there is already a demand. Earlier gifts went to Catholic Charities, Catholic schools in the District and S.O.M.E (So Others Might Eat), but more recently the Conways’ Bedford Falls Foundation found its true philanthropic niche in the nursing profession, providing funds for scholarships at the University of Maryland’s Family Nurse Practitioner Program (more than $7 million), the University of Virginia’s nursing school ($5 million in 2018) and other schools in the Washington, D.C. area.

with a gift of $20 million to the conservative American Enterprise Institute think tank.

JACK DAVIES AND KAY KENDALL This philanthropic power couple have long supported worthy causes around town, and are not only generous with their wallet, but also their time. Over the past year they have co-chaired a number of successful high profile galas, including After Dark at THEARC and the Children’s Ball, where Monumental Sports and Entertainment (Jack is a co-owner) was also a sponsor, helping reach a new fundraising record and bringing Capital excitement to the Children’s National Medical Center’s marquee event. Jack, who has been deeply involved in Venture Philanthropy Partners since its inception, has also been a champion of the See Forever Foundation,Teach For America, and the Maya Angelou School, among many others. Kay also serves on the board of City Dance and chairs the DC Arts and Humanities Commission.

BETSY DEVOS Jack Davies and Kay Kendall

Betsy DeVos

Jean-Marie and Raul Fernandez Jean-Marie and Raul Fernandez

ALAN AND ASHLEY DABBIERE The tech millionaire and his wife first attracted attention when, newly arrived in Washington in 2006, they bought Hickory Hill, the McLean mansion owned for many years by the Robert F. Kennedy family. The Washington Post saw the purchase as a changing of the guard in Washington – a sign that the nation’s capital was being settled by “a new elite – entrepreneurs whose wealth is often amassed by doing business.”The Dabbieres soon got into the swing of things, supporting the National Brain Tumor Society (Ashley Dabbiere is a brain tumor survivor), Inova Health Foundation and the Lab School (she is on the board of trustees). In 2017, the couple gave $7 million to the LOGLIO Project to fight cancer.

DANIEL AND GAYLE D’ANIELLO he co-founder and chairman of the Carlyle Group bases his philanthropy on what he calls “the five pillars” – faith based, education, free enterprise, performing arts and mental health research. Inside Philanthropy, an organization that tracks who’s giving how much, and why, says D’Aniello’s philanthropy is “private, but increasingly stepping into the spotlight.” He recently made headlines

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Donald Trump’s billionaire philanthropist secretary of education has a long history of putting her money where her views are, which means lavishing millions to privatize public schools, supporting charter schools, and religious organizations. The Dick and Betsy DeVos Family Foundation had made sizeable contributions including to the Kennedy Center and to The American Enterprise Institute, the conservative think tank that played an advisory role in the Trump transition got $750,000 of DeVos’s money. .

RAUL AND JEAN-MARIE FERNANDEZ Chairman of ObjectVideo since 2017, Raul Fernandez is one of the 19 owners and vice-chairman of Monumental Sports and Entertainment (see the entry for Ted Leonsis for details) and an active philanthropist in the Hispanic community, mainly through the Raul and Jean-Marie Fernandez Foundation. He helped start Venture Philanthropy Partners, a group of entrepreneurs who take a novel approach to philanthropy, looking upon its support as an investment. He is also chairman of Fight for Children and the D.C. Education Fund.

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Andrew and Heather Florance

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THEPHILANTHROPIC 

THECONSCIOUSCAPITALIST Kiddar Capital founder Todd Hitt takes a strategic approach to charitable giving.

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give where I make money,” Todd Hitt states plainly, a statement you don’t hear from many philanthropists. This Northern Virginiaborn and bred businessman is not afraid to let folks know that giving back aligns with his financial aspirations. But make no mistake; he’s still as generous as they come, showing that one can use both brain and heart when deciding where to give back. It’s all part of what the Kiddar Capital founder refers to as “conscious capitalism,” a business philosophy that’s gained traction in recent years. “It’s about determining what a community truly needs where you are investing your money,” Hitt says. “You’ve got to ask yourself what’s missing. It might be infrastructure, affordable and accessible retail, it might be education. We work Kiddar Capital CEO Todd Hitt. Photo by Tony Powell. with local officials, businesses, and residents to discern where those gaps are.” of the arts locally (including Halcyon House, Hitt, who estimates that Kiddar Capital the Workhouse Arts Center, The Phillips creates 600 jobs each year, and is part of Collection, McLean Project for the Arts, the HITT Contracting family, knows that a Creative Cauldron and the Smithsonian business won’t thrive if the community around “Washington is more than just it isn’t strong. “It’s pretty simple. If you create an environment of inequality, you have a real polarized politicians. I want this long-term problem. You have the end of the city to be known as the capital American Dream.” of the free world in a wonderful When deciding where to invest (his firm way. I want it to be known as a manages $1.4 billion and Hitt pledged or gave cultural center.” more than $4 million personally in the past year), he and his team look very strategically at Magazine Ingenuity Awards, which he is specific communities and what they need. “I co-chairing this December) has another gave $100,000 to the Washington Ballet,” Hitt component to it. Hitt wants to show that says. “I’d never been to a ballet in my life, but “Washington is more than just polarized I recognize that it’s something that’s helping politicians. I want this city to be known as our city.” the capital of the free world in a wonderful “One of my pet peeves is that compassion way. I want it to be known as a cultural is constantly being measured by money center.” instead of by outcome,” Hitt says. His support Washington is his hometown, but another

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town impacted his philanthropic view at least as much — Columbia, S.C., where he spent childhood summers at a home for boys managed by his uncle. “There’s a soft spot in my heart for disenfranchised children that comes from my time at the orphanage,” he says. He has given significantly to organizations helping children. Recent donations include $750,000 to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, $50,000 to the Morgan Moses Foundation, $50,000 to the Hope Foundation, and $25,000 (the largest donation ever via Twitter at the time) to The Child & Family Network Centers. He credits his time at the orphanage for instilling in him an empathy for others, an ability to put himself in other people’s shoes and as a result, to never get angry, only “firm.” This includes putting himself in the shoes of immigrants, for as much as he says Washington shouldn’t be all about politics, Hitt himself is becoming increasingly more outspoken on immigration reform, writing opeds on topics for wide-reaching publications like the Washington Post and RealClearPolitics. And again, business needs play a part, for Hitt has said it’s been difficult to fill the quarter of a million jobs that construction companies currently need filled in the U.S. due to strict immigration policies and to lack of mobility. Americans aren’t moving for jobs anymore, and this indicates that the American Dream that propelled him and his family is dead. “People in middle America just don’t believe that the American Dream can work for them,” Hitt says. “They don’t believe their children can do better than them. I need to rebuild the thing that allowed me to end up in the place I am, so that everyone’s kids, not just mine, have greater opportunity.” - Erica Moody

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SPECIAL FEATURE

LEADERSOFTHEPACK Cindy Jones and Carrie Marriott on how chairing philanthropic events garners attention and critical funds for causes dear to their hearts.

National Museum of Women in the Arts board president Cindy Jones. WASHINGTONLIFE Why is it so important for people to get involved by chairing events? CINDYJONES I have chaired or co-chaired

over 25 successful galas and events in the D.C. area raising millions of dollars and I feel that it is one of the best ways to help a cause that you are passionate about. When you step up to chair an event, you let all of your friends and colleagues know that this is something you really care about. I have friends of all ages and my events draw a large and varied crowd, always bringing new donors to the cause. Everyone knows that I like to have fun and events I chair will be fun, are typically sold out and raise a lot of money. I never pressure friends to attend but I generate a buzz and excitement that builds up to the gala and people want to support it. It may look easy but it’s a lot of work! CARRIE MARRIOTT My husband David and I feel that we have been blessed with tremendous opportunities. By chairing events, we hope we set an example for our children that with those opportunities come great responsibilities to make the world around us a better place. We want our children to see that being philanthropic means engaging actively in the community — building partnerships and

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MS Women on the Move Luncheon co-founder Carrie Marriott. Photos by Tony Powell.

relationships with non-profits, the people they serve and local businesses and corporations brings all of us closer together. Linking groups of people together who wouldn’t ordinarily cross paths is one of the most rewarding parts of chairing events. So many people in this city give of their time and talents to improve the lives of others and that’s what we hope to accomplish as well. WL: How has your individual involvement made an impact? JONES: For the last two years as president of

the board of trustees of the National Museum of Women in the Arts and helping to chair or organize their fundraising events during this time, I have more than doubled the attendance and profits of each of these events. Our 30th anniversary gala last year raised more money than any in the history of the museum and was sold out before the invitations went out! Half of the crowd was a new and energized group of supporters to the museum. This was extremely important to the museum at this point in its history. I was glad I could help. MARRIOTT: David and I are often drawn to events because the cause has personally touched our lives. Fourteen years ago, my dear friend, Amy Knight and I co-founded

the MS Women on the Move luncheon. My mother was diagnosed with MS when I was just seven years old. Growing up with a chronically ill mother colored every facet of my life. Having a platform to raise awareness about living with MS has been a huge catalyst for change and increased impact. Our luncheon has raised over $3 million to support groundbreaking MS research and local programs and services. WL: Is it a full-time job? Or do you feel like this is a calling for you? What are the personal rewards? JONES: It certainly has felt like a full time

job for the last two years serving as President of the Board of NMWA and simultaneously helping to run all of their galas but it is extremely rewarding to know that I have made a difference. MARRIOTT: For us, working on charitable causes isn’t a job, it’s a privilege. Even though each one can take a tremendous amount of energy and time, we hope that in some small way we are making our community a more beautiful place. We are here to serve one another, love one another and lift each other up. You don’t have to chair an event to do that.

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THEPHILANTHROPIC 

ANDREW AND HEATHER FLORANCE There are times when one story is enough to establish a philanthropist’s reputation.That’s the case with the Florances’ role in the 2017 opening of the Bunny Mellon Healing Garden at the Children’s National Hospital. It began when Andrew and Heather Florance heard the touching story of a child patient expressing a last wish to go outside, and the heroic efforts of the Children’s National care staff to fulfill that wish. Andrew Florance, founder of the CoStar Group, a massive database of global real estate, and his wife Heather then decided to take on the challenge. Florance and his employees raised $2.1 million for the project, with Florance himself contributing a matching $1 million. A further $5 million came from the estate of the late Rachel “Bunny” Lambert Mellon, and the hospital roof was transformed into a garden with impressive views of the city. In true Washington fashion the garden was dedicated to the first ladies of the United States, and Melania Trump visited it recently.

EMANUEL FRIEDMAN AND KINDY FRENCH Having resigned from the Washington investment bank Friedman, Billings, Ramsey Group, Inc. following insider trading charges and a massive fine in 2005, Friedman launched EJF Capital, which he still heads. With his wife, Kindy, he set up EJF Philanthropies, now run by their daughter Simone Friedman as the firm’s articulate head of giving and impact investment. The family’s core interests include education, veterinary science, fighting wildlife trafficking, pediatric healthcare and Jewish causes.

DONALD GRAHAM The former publisher of the Washington Post and scion of the owning family until the paper was sold to Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos in 2013, Graham oversees the Phillip L. Graham Fund started by his mother, Katharine Graham, which gives $4 million to Washington-based charities every year. But two facts stand out in Graham’s philanthropic activity. (1) In 2012, Graham, then a member of the Facebook board, benefited from the company going public and pledged to donate his $46 million windfall to a couple of District charities. (2) Graham co-founded TheDream.US,

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a national scholarship fund for DREAMers, the undocumented immigrant children whose future in the United States President Trump has now made uncertain. In January, Bezos donated $33 million to TheDream.US.

WOLCOTT HENRY When underwater photographer Wolcott Henry comes up for air he is president of two Districtbased family foundations, the Henry Foundation, and the Curtis and Edith Munson Foundation, both focusing on marine conservation. Prior to that, Henry founded and chaired The Ocean Foundation. Ashore, the Munson Foundation, which in 2016 donated $1.4 million to conservation projects, supported a campaign to actually start controlled fires in Florida’s National Wildlife Refuge to remove surface debris and allow native plants to germinate.

Don Graham Donald Graham

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BOB HISAOKA A knee injury ended Hisaoka’s hopes of making the U.S. Olympic judo team, but he includes the Olympics in the 20 plus charities and causes on his philanthropic list. Also included is his support for assisting people living with cancer having lost his sister, Joan Hisaoka, to the disease. The successful auto dealer and investor is the chairman of the advisory board of the Inova Schar Cancer Institute (see Dwight Schar entry below), and sponsors an annual gala to benefit Inova and the Smith Center for Healing and the Arts, which has raised over $12 million since inception. He has also been an important benefactor to numerous other charities in the national capital region as well as the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business, most recently chairing and funding the Pitch Dingman entrepreneurial contest and The Robert G. Hisaoka Speakers Series that has brought leading businessmen and women, such as Ted Leonsis and Raul Fernandez, to the university to interact with the students.

Wolcott Henry

Bob Hisaoka

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Cathy Hughes

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Sheila Johnson

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TODD HITT Falls Church-based businessman Todd Hitt is active in encouraging the arts and the humanities in his neighborhood. Recent philanthropic initiatives include a gift of $100,000 to the Falls Church Educational Foundation to “enhance arts and humanitarian programs in Falls Church public schools,” as he put it, and $750,000 to the

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Evan and Cindy Jones

Workhouse Arts Center: Lucy Burns Museum, honoring women suffragists at the historic prison site. He also gives significantly to organizations that benefit children, such as a recent $750,000 gift to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Earlier this year, Hitt also went to devastated Puerto Rico to deliver 300 lbs of supplies to Casa Ronald McDonald and San Jorge Children’s Hospital.

CATHY HUGHES

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The founder of Radio One Inc. – now re-named Urban One – is one of the country’s wealthiest self-made African-American women (net worth: $460 million). Her network now has 68 radio stations and one television station. Most recently, the philanthropic foundation named after herself and her son Alfred C. Liggins III contributed $1 million towards the creation of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. And in 2016, Howard University, where Cathy Hughes once worked in broadcasting, renamed its School of Communications after the media executive following what the institution described as a “transformational,” multi-million-dollar gift from her foundation.

founder of jVen Capital, a company that invests in biotech research, is a board member of the Children’s National Health System and of the Children’s Research Institute.The Joneses funded a professorship in Pediatric Clinic Pharmacology at Children’s Hospital. In 2016 after serving on the board for 10 years, Cindy became president of the board of trustees of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, an institution she has actively supported for many years, frequently acting as a chairperson for the museum’s glittering annual gala. During her term as president, the museum’s events and galas have been sold out and brought in more money than in the museum’s 31 year history. She has brought in a new crowd of supporters and helped to revive attendance. In addition, Cindy serves on the Foundation Board of Children’s National Health System, the Women’s Board of the American Heart Association, the Advisory Board of the Washington Ballet, and the Women’s Committee of the Washington National Opera. Every year the Joneses support many other causes including Refugees International and Knock Out Abuse Against Women.

JEONG AND CINDY KIM SHEILA JOHNSON

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Johnson, a co-founder of Black Entertainment Television is the first African-American woman to achieve a reported net worth of $1 billion. She’s now the founder, owner and CEO of the Salamander Hotel and Spa chain. Her Sheila Johnson Fellowship has paid for more then 40 scholarships at Harvard University’s Kennedy School for students who would not otherwise have been able to afford to attend. She has made sizeable gifts to the United Negro College Fund, the Parsons School of Design and Howard University among other institutions. She serves on the boards of Parsons, the Jackie Robinson Foundation, the Tiger Woods Foundation and the University of Illinois Foundation. She is vice-chairman of the Monumental Sports and Entertainment group; and former President Obama appointed her to the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. In Middleburg, she started an annual film festival that compares favorably with the Sundance and Tribeca festivals.

At Yurie Systems Inc., which he founded, Kim pioneered a revolutionary ATM switch – no, not the automated teller machine but a device most people use but are unlikely to have heard of called the asynchronous transfer mode. In 1998, he sold Yurie to Lucent Technologies for $1 billion, of which his share was $550 million – one reason why the Korean-born immigrant can rate highly in the philanthropic world, with a strong focus on raising technology standards. His Information Technology Endowment Fund has made contributions to Johns Hopkins University ($1 million), Stanford and other schools.The reason why the University of Maryland named an engineering building after him was not because he’s an alumnus, but because in 2016 he pledged $5 million towards its construction and faculty research. Kim is one of the founding partners of Venture Philanthropy Partners, an investment organization helping youth of low-income families. He is also a minority owner of Washington’s Monumental Sports and Entertainment (See Ted Leonsis).

EVAN AND CINDY JONES When it comes to their philanthropy, these Joneses would be hard to keep up with. Evan,

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ROBERT AND ARLENE KOGOD In 2016, the Kogods signed the Giving Pledge,

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Ted and Annette Lerner

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THEPHILANTHROPIC 

WEALTH LIST

$200 million - $126 billion This is by no means a complete listing of everyone in the National Capital Region with a net worth between $200 million and $126 billion. It is meant to be a good representative profile. Some obvious candidates specifically requested anonymity for security reasons, and we respected that request. The occasional groupings of individuals under one heading â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mostly families - are, we hope, self-explanatory. Couples who have signed the Giving Pledge and those who are both identified with the wealth are listed together, regardless of which one acquired it.

Norma and Russ Ramsey

THEBILLIONAIRES Jeff BezossCJMMJPO John Franklin MarssCJMMJPO Laurene Powell JobssCJMMJPO Jacqueline MarssCJMMJPO Valerie MarssCJMMJPO Betsy DeVossCJMMJPO Lerner Family sCJMMJPO Mitchell and Emily RalessCJMMJPO Stephen BisciottisCJMMJPO B. Francis SaulsCJMMJPO Randal and Donna KirksCJMMJPO Donald TrumpsCJMMJPO Kevin PlanksCJMMJPO Daniel and Gayle Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AniellosCJMMJPO William and Jane ConwaysCJMMJPO David RubensteinsCJMMJPO Dan and Tanya SnydersCJMMJPO Linda and Vince McMahonsCJMMJPO Clark Family sCJMMJPO Stephen and Jean CasesCJMMJPO Marriott Family sCJMMJPO Theodore and Lynn LeonsissCJMMJPO Wilbur and Hilary RosssCJMMJPO Rajendra and Neera SinghsCJMMJPO Richard Fairbank sCJMMJPO Roger and Vicki SantsCJMMJPO Donald GrahamsCJMMJPO Todd Hitt sCJMMJPO Sheila JohnsonsCJMMJPO Robert and Arlene KogodsCJMMJPO Nigel and Lori MorrissCJMMJPO Dwight and Martha ScharsCJMMJPO

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Linda McMahon

Tanya Snyder, Donald Graham and Dan Snyder

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MILLION Jeong and Cindy KimsNJMMJPO Fredrick and Karen Schaufeld sNJMMJPO George and Marilyn PedersensNJMMJPO Sanju BansalsNJMMJPO Lehrman FamilysNJMMJPO Bruce and Karen Levenson sNJMMJPO Fred and Marlene MaleksNJMMJPO Steven MnuchinsNJMMJPO Ed PeskowitzsNJMMJPO Michael SaylorsNJMMJPO Cathy HughessNJMMJPO Peter and Adrienne Barris sNJMMJPO Raul and Jean-Marie FernandezsNJMMJPO Bertram and Diana FirestonesNJMMJPO Michelle FreemansNJMMJPO Neil and Marcy CohensNJMMJPO Emanuel J. Friedman and Kindy FrenchsNJMMJPO Sachiko KunosNJMMJPO Ryuji UenosNJMMJPO David and Katherine BradleysNJMMJPO Russell and Norma RamseysNJMMJPO Robert and Marion RosenthalsNJMMJPO John and Sally AkridgesNJMMJPO Jane HarmansNJMMJPO Jared KushnersNJMMJPO Sen. Mark Warner and Lisa CollissNJMMJPO Rep. John and April DelaneysNJMMJPO Robert and Elena AllbrittonsNJMMJPO Richard and Rebecca KaysNJMMJPO Don and Ann BrownsNJMMJPO Jeffrey and Mary ZientssNJMMJPO Adrienne ArshtsNJMMJPO Bernstein FamilysNJMMJPO Scott and Patrice BrickmansNJMMJPO Cafritz FamilysNJMMJPO Peterson FamilysNJMMJPO Paul and Linda SavillesNJMMJPO

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Lynn and Ted Leonsis

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Bruce Levenson

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Ann Luskey

but that decision simply formalized what they had been doing for years as one of Washington’s most prominent philanthropic couples. Kogod is former co-chairman and co-chief executive of Charles E. Smith Commercial Realty and Charles E. Smith Residential Realty Inc., one of the largest estate developers in the Washington area.The Kogods are active supporters of education, health care and the fine arts, and collectors of 20th century American art.The distinctive, glass-covered courtyard created by the prominent British architect Norman Foster that connects the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery was made possible by a $25 million contribution from the Kogods and bears their name. Robert Kogod was a member of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution until 2017. The schools they have supported range from the exclusive Sidwell Friends to the Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School (named after Arlene’s father). Over the years, they have also contributed more than $1 million to the SEED Foundation, which offers higher education to students who would not otherwise have had access to it.There are actually two Kogod theaters, one at the University of Maryland, and the Kogod Cradle, an experimental space for new plays at Arena Stage.

partner with Steve Case at Revolution.

TED AND ANNETTE LERNER “If you live, work or play in the greater Washington area, chances are you are in a Lerner building,” stated Bisnow magazine to introduce a recent interview with real estate developer Theodore Lerner, president of Lerner Enterprises and head of the family that includes son Mark D. Lerner and daughters Marla Lerner Tanenbaum and Debra Lerner Cohen. At 92,Ted Lerner is still the managing principal owner of the company that developed Wheaton Plaza, Washington Square, much of Tysons Corner and the Washington Nationals baseball team. The main source of the Lerners’ philanthropy is the Annette M. and Theodore N. Lerner Family Foundation. Its recent activity has included $5 million for a new fitness and recreation building at George Washington University, alma mater of Ted Lerner, his son and one of his daughters; Children’s National Hospital; the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum; and Jerusalem’s Hebrew University, recipient of a $10 million gift for a new stadium. Lerner Enterprises is on hold to build a new headquarters for the F.B.I. once Congress funds it.

BRUCE AND KAREN LEVENSON TED AND LYNN LEONSIS

Jacqueline Mars

As if everybody doesn’t already know, Leonsis is Washington’s “Mr. Sports” – majority owner, chairman and CEO of Monumental Sports and Entertainment (MSE), the group of prominent Washington business leaders who between them own and operate the Washington Capitals, the Wizards, the Mystics and the Capitol One Arena. MSE has its own philanthropic foundation, which Leonsis chairs, but his recent personal philanthropy has included $1.5 million to Georgetown University, his alma mater, to fund a program of student mentoring by alumni who are entrepreneurs in Washington. Leonsis recently said he has been “spending an inordinate amount of time on education and scholarship and scholarships for under-privileged and first generation [college] students” – having been one in his own Greek immigrant family. He is active with Best Buddies and DC-CAP, where he serves as chairman. The Monumental Sports Foundation is very active locally. He is also a

The businessman and former co-owner of the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks donated $75 million to start the University of Maryland’s Do Good Institute, aimed at instilling “a culture of philanthropy university-wide.” Each year, students award $10,000 to the nonprofit group they judge to have performed best. But the Levensons are heavily involved in other philanthropic initiatives in the metropolitan area. Bruce Levenson, co-founder of United Communications Group, is Washington chairman of the “I Have A Dream” Foundation, sits on the board of the Hoop Dreams Scholarship Fund, is heavily invested in the Holocaust Memorial Museum and supports other Jewish causes.And that’s just a partial list.

ANN LUSKEY Luskey’s maternal grandparents Randolph and Dorothy Kiddar had their own family foundation, but she started her own, and in 2008 pledged $1 million to Food & Friends, a District charity that supplied her father with daily meals when

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Valerie Mars

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THEPHILANTHROPIC 

he was dying of AIDS. She and her children used to volunteer in the group kitchen. Most recently she has focused on conservation and marine philanthropy.A prominent supporter of the Ocean Foundation, the African Wildlife Foundation, and the Whaleman Foundation, she makes use of her 125-foot ocean-going yacht “Sirenuse” for marine conservation operations such as tagging sharks and turtles to determine their migration routes. Luskey is also a donor and on the board of the Plastic Pollution Coalition.

MARRIOTT FAMILY The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation, led by J.W. (Bill) Marriott, Jr. and his brother Richard (Dick) Marriott, has given millions to organizations focused on healthcare, early childhood education and intervention in underserved areas. They currently fund research in the field of cell regeneration, targeting heart tissue and mitochondria in memory of Bill and Donna Marriott’s son, Stephen, who died from a rare mitochondrial disorder. Children’s National Early Childhood Innovation Network received a major gift from Bill Marriott to further their work in Wards 7 and 8.This year, the Foundation has also focused its efforts on restoration work at Washington National Cathedral to repair earthquake damage.The philanthropic spirit runs deep in the family behind the world’s largest hotel chain. Donna Marriott sits on the board of the American Heart Association, where she has helped lead the Heart Luncheon for decades. Daughter Debbie Marriott Harrison is on the board of DC CAP and a board member along with her brother David, of the family foundation. David Marriott is also the incoming vice chairman of the St. Albans School board. His wife Carrie Marriott continues to serve locally on the boards of the Washington Ballet and the Executive Committee of Children’s National Medical Center Foundation as well as Fair Chance’s advisory board. She co-founded the MS Women on the Move Luncheon, which has raised more than $3 million for multiple sclerosis research and local programs and services. Bill and Donna’s daughter-in-law Angie Marriott has chaired the National Zoo Gala and the Heart Luncheon for the American Heart Association.

JACQUELINE MARS The shorter list of Washington cultural and

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environmental organizations would be the one Jacqueline Mars, the wealthiest woman in the area, doesn’t support. Any sample of her very active philanthropy would start with her gift of $10 million to the Kennedy Center expansion project, currently underway. In 2017, a Washington National Opera gala marked her retirement as its chairman and benefactress, and you know that wasn’t just for handing out free M&M’s (a Mars Inc. product) in the opera intermissions. The list of recent recipients of Mars’ endowments and contributions includes Wolf Trap, the National Gallery of Art and the Piedmont Environmental Council. The list goes on. A horse lover, Mars is the patron saint of the United States Olympic Equestrian Team and a leading supporter of the Great Meadow Foundation and the National Sporting Library in Middleburg.

Bill and Donna Marriott

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VALERIE MARS One of four daughters of the late Forrest Mars, (Jacqueline’s brother), Valerie is currently senior vice-president for corporate development in the family firm. Like each of her three sisters, her net worth is estimated by Forbes as $5.9 billion, thanks to an inheritance from her father. She supports organizations dedicated to protecting the environment globally, including Conservation International, where she is a board member (along with actor Harrison Ford). She is also a generous patron and honorary trustee of The Open Space Institute, a nonprofit whose aim is “the improvement of people’s lives and the world we live in.”

Brenda and Mark Moore

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Milt, Carolyn and Lauren Peterson

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Kevin Plank

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BETSY MEAD In their lifetime, theater lovers Gilbert Mead, a NASA geophysicist and heir to a paper manufacturing fortune, and his astrophysicist wife Jaylee gave more than $50 million to local theaters, $35 million for the renovation of Arena Stage and lesser sums to the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage, the Studio and Woolly Mammoth theaters and the Arlington-based Signature Theater, among others. The foundation’s philanthropy, directed by their daughter Betsy and other family members, now reflects a broader range of their charitable causes and interests. In 2017, the foundation extended $1.092 million to 50 nonprofits and programs, including the Urban Alliance ($70,000), the Food Recovery Network, Collegiate Directions

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special FEATURE

and the National Museum of American Jewish Military History.

mark and brenda moore

Jimmy Reyes

Laurene Powell Jobs

Paul Saville

Mitch and Emily Rales

Alexandria, Va. entrepreneur Mark Moore attributed his recovery from two strokes in 2007 to divine intervention. He wrote movingly about his new spirituality in his book,“Stroke of Faith.” On a more practical level, the Moores established the Mark and Brenda Moore and Family Foundation in 2010 to support advances in healthcare, education, the arts and Christian Evangelism. By mid-2017, it had given $7.5 million to different causes. The hospital in Alexandria where Mark was treated was not forgotten and Inova Mount Vernon Hospital now has a new state-of-the-art patient tower. The Moores also chaired two galas that raised $4 million for the hospital. The couple are founding donors of the National Museum of African History and Culture and support the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York and the John Leland Center for Theological Studies in Arlington, Va.

milt, carolyn and LAUREN peterson Most recently, Peterson Companies, real estate developers on a grand scale, have been linked with the renascence of National Harbor, with its numerous eateries, stores and MGM casino. But the Petersons’ philanthropy was active long before that. The Peterson Family Foundation was founded in 1997 and the Petersons have funded it with more than $50 million. The foundation’s list of more than 350 supported organizations, charities, and nonprofit groups includes more than $10 million for Inova’s Life with Cancer and Peterson Breast Center at Inova Loudoun Hospital, George Mason University, Middlebury College, the Udvar-Hazy Center National Air and Space Museum Annex at Dulles International Airport and, more recently, music therapy treatment at the University of California San Francisco Children’s Hospital.

kevin plank In 2016, the founder of the Under Armour sports line donated $16 million to St. John’s College High School, his Chevy Chase alma mater, but the target of much of his philanthropy has been the city of Baltimore, site of his company headquarters. The Under Armour moisture-free, rags-to-riches story

of the mid-2000s has suffered setbacks in the past two years with a drop in sales, and Forbes magazine fixing Plank’s own net worth at $1.73 billion from its peak of almost $3 billion, but Plank’s Cupid Foundation has continued its philanthropic activity, including the Cupid Cup award to a promising start-up ($100,000 in prize money). Most recently it gave nearly half a million dollars to renovate a community recreation space in Baltimore’s inner city, partnered by ESPN, plus additional support for Baltimore’s Catholic schools.

LAURENE POWELL JOBS Few affiliations say “Washington” more distinctly than becoming a shareholder in Monumental Sports and Entertainment, the sports conglomerate founded by Ted Leonsis. So the news that Powell Jobs, billionaire widow of Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs, was acquiring a 20 percent stake in the organization qualified her for inclusion in the Philanthropic List. The acquisition will make the California-based philanthropist, entrepreneur, and founder and president of the social impact enterprise Emerson Collective the second largest owner at MSE, twentieth share-holder and third woman, the other two being vice-chairman Sheila Johnson and Michelle Freeman. When Powell Jobs approached Monumental she had already established ties to DC by acquiring a majority interest in The Atlantic magazine from its Washington owner, David Bradley.

jimmy reyes The scion of a Chicago beer distributing family, Reyes actually lives in Washington where he runs Reyes Holdings. He has worked as a volunteer for a number of foundations, including 1st Tee of Washington, an organization that helps inner city children. Reyes is currently chairman of the board of Medstar National Rehabilitation Network of Washington, D.C.,Virginia and Maryland.

MITCHELL AND EMILY RALES Any philanthropic activity by Mitchell Rales, co-founder of the Washington-based technology conglomerate Danaher Corp., and his art historian wife is dwarfed by Glenstone, their private modern art museum on their property in Montgomery County.The couple have amassed an eye-popping collection of contemporary art that Earl Powell III, director of the National Gallery of Art, calls “one

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Robert and Marian Rosenthal

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THEPHILANTHROPIC 

of the most important collections of post-war art.” Glenstone is already one of the largest private museums in existence anywhere, but by the end of 2018, it will have become five times its current size when a new $125 million extension is scheduled to be completed. Glenstone is – and will be – open five days a week and admission will be free, but reservations will be required because the Rales want to limit the number of people viewing the works at any one time to avoid overcrowding.

ROBERT AND MARIAN ROSENTHAL The Rosenthal Automotive Organization, with 17 mostly local outlets selling U.S. and foreign models, is one of the top dealerships in the country and one of the top ten privately owned companies in the area. The Rosenthals’ recent philanthropic giving matches that prominence. The list of beneficiaries includes the Children’s National Health System, the Make-a-Wish Mid-Atlantic nonprofit, The National Gallery of Art (where Bob Rosenthal is a trustee), the National Air and Space Museum, the Jewish Historical Society of Washington D.C., and the Washington Ballet.

DAVID RUBENSTEIN There are as many kinds of philanthropy as there are people. David Rubenstein may not have invented what he calls “patriotic giving” but he is currently its leading practitioner by a long shot. It began with a 1297 copy of the Magna Carta that he bought at auction in 2013 for $21.3 million and placed on permanent loan at the National Archives. That, he said, started him “buying other documents to give them to places where they can be seen.” But it’s not just historic documents. The New York Times said recently that Rubenstein “stands nearly alone in shoring up institutions generally under the purview of the federal government.” For example, he paid for half the restoration costs of the earthquake-damaged Washington Monument and has underwritten the new expansion to the Kennedy Center, now under construction. A $7 million gift to the Smithsonian helps support Bao Bao, the baby panda in the manner to which it is accustomed. Rubenstein has said he wants to give away all of his money in his lifetime. He recently said in an interview: “Most of the people that I know who have accumulated a lot of things but haven’t given away things are not that happy. The people that have given away their time, their energy,

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their ideas and their money are much happier.”

JEANNE RUESCH In 2009, Jeanne Ruesch founded the Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastronomical Cancers at the Georgetown Hospital with a seed grant of $6.75 million in honor of her late husband Otto. Although this was the Ruesch Family Foundation’s largest single gift to date, Jeanne Ruesch is also active in other philanthropic areas. As an example, she funded the Christophe Ruesch Research Center at Medstar National Rehabilitation Network.As chairman of the National Symphony Orchestra, she headed the search for a new musical director that picked Gianandrea Noseda. She is also a supporter of the Arts for the Aging program and is listed as a “donor” by Catholic Charities.

David Rubenstein

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ROGER AND VICKI SANT The Sant Ocean Hall in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History gets is name from the fact that Victoria and Roger Sant contributed $25 million to the project in 2008. Most of the couples’ considerable philanthropy, then as now, was channeled through their Summit Foundation, launched by the Sants in 1991 to support issues they believe in, primarily empowerment of women and girls, ocean conservation and sustainable cities.

Jeanne Ruesch

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Roger and Vicki Sant

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Dwight and Martha Schar

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PAUL AND LINDA SAVILLE NVR President and CEO Paul Saville and his wife Linda last month raised $26 million in one night to help support the new cancer research and treatment center at Inova. “The work of the Inova Schar Cancer Institute will give new hope to cancer patients throughout the Washington area and beyond,” Saville said.

DWIGHT AND MARTHA SCHAR The founder of the homebuilding and mortgage giant NVR Development made headlines in 2015 with his gift of $50 million to Inova Health System for a cancer research center on the Inova medical campus in Merrifield, and the Dwight and Martha Schar Cancer Institute is now up and running.This year, Schar philanthropy again focused on George Mason University. Having previously endowed a faculty chair, the Schar family foundation donated $10 million to enlarge the scope of the university’s School of Policy and Government, which now bears the Schar name.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

RAJENDRA AND NEERA SINGH

Shirley and Albert Small

The Singhs, immigrants from India, founded and own TelecomVentures, an Alexandria-based private investment firm focusing on telecommunications, network technology and related fields. They have contributed, and continue to contribute millions to institutions all over the academic map, funding professorships, scholarships and academic programs. A notable example of the latter: $8 million to fund a course on Market and Social Systems Engineering (the study of emerging network systems markets and services) at the Whiting School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, where Rajendra Singh is a trustee. Among other beneficiaries are Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maine.

ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL

Earl and Amanda Stafford

In April, the University of Virginia held a symposium on the writer Jorge Luis Borges. The venue: The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, which houses more manuscripts and material on Borges than exists in his native Argentina. Residential and commercial real estate developer Small largely underwrote the new building in 2004, and it was named after the Smalls. He also gave the library much of his own enormous collection of historic prints, manuscripts and rare books, the result of a lifelong passion. But he had enough documents, maps and memorabilia left over for a permanent exhibition on the history of the nation’s capital in the library at George Washington University, including a letter from George Washington bought at auction by Small in 2012 for $290,000. Oh, and more manuscripts for a gallery at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

EARL AND AMANDA STAFFORD Annie Totah

Earl and Amanda Stafford founded The Stafford Foundation, Inc. “on the precepts of Jesus Christ, i.e. to help others help themselves and live a life of dignity.” Since its inception, the foundation has committed more than $10 million in funding to nonprofits that focus on education, health and wellness, and mission-based support. Noteworthy among its commitments was the foundation’s People’s Inaugural Project that brought more than 400 disadvantaged men and women from across the nation to the inauguration of President Barack Obama. In collaboration with several other faith-

based organizations, the Staffords have funded the building of churches, orphanages, schools and learning centers for women and children, a business center, and missionary training centers throughout Africa. In addition, the Staffords also funded the Center for African American Media Arts in the recently opened National Museum of African American Art and Culture.They truly believe the biblical saying, “to whom much is given, much is required.”

ANNIE TOTAH Across the last two decades, Totah’s advocacy, lobbying and fundraising efforts raised more than $1.5 billion in foreign aid for Armenia, her ancestral homeland; but the small, vivacious hostess is very much a part of Washington’s social, arts and philanthropic environment.Totah is always at the center of things - well, almost always, whether it’s playing the role of auctioneer at the Washington Performing Arts annual dinner, leading the guests in serenading the exiled Empress Farah Pahlavi of Iran at a party in her honor or sponsoring a gala for Sibley Hospital (which raised $2.5 million). And if the charity is Armenian, such as the Armenian Benevolent Union, she is ready with her support and her checkbook. But also among her accomplishments is the fact that she designed and oversaw the construction of the only Sephardic synagogue in DC.

MARY AND JEFF ZIENTS By the age of 35, entrepreneur Jeff Zients was worth $149 million.Then followed two terms in the White House as Obama’s economic advisor, where he supported a free trade agreement policy now under siege by Donald Trump. He is currently president of the Cranemere Group, a holding company that acquires and develops businesses in the $200 million-to-$1 billion range. In 2003, Zients and his South African-born wife Mary (among their wedding guests was Nelson Mandela) formed the Zients Family Foundation, which supports multiple charities and nonprofits in the fields of education, conservation, children and women’s issues. Zients also co-founded the Urban Alliance Foundation, which works with corporations to provide paid internships, training and mentorships for youth from underresourced areas.

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Jeff Zients

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THEPHILANTHROPIC 

THEOPPORTUNITYADVOCATE Martha’s Table President and CEO Patty Stonesifer, former CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, on why it’s important to ‘check your privilege.’

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s a child growing up in Indiana, Sundays were food bank day for Patty Stonesifer and her family.“Empathy and responsibility were baked in,” the Martha’s Table president and CEO recalls. “I didn’t know what volunteerism was or community service was, I just knew that on Sundays we went to one of the few places that had food service, we did dishes, and if we were lucky we got to spoon out food. It was part of moving through this world — you took care of your neighbors and they would take care of you.” It’s this ingrained sense of responsibility that led Stonesifer, former CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and one of Time Magazine’s 25 most influential people, to apply for an opening at Martha’s Table five years ago, a position that is entirely volunteer. She was drawn to the nonprofit’s mission of building “a better future through healthy food, affordable clothing and quality education,” formed in 1980 by Georgetown sociology professor Veronica Maz and named for the Biblical character of Martha who opened her home to feed Jesus and his disciples.The spirit of giving without judgement is apparent to anyone who visits its 14th Street NW location. Sandwiches and snacks are laid out in plastic bags for hungry people to come in and help themselves to, no questions asked.Volunteers help Martha’s Table prepare and serve more than one million meals a year. McKenna’s Wagon, a daily mobile food truck operated by Martha’s Table, caught Stonesifer’s eye from the windows of the Gates Foundation office in McPherson Square. “It came out every day of the year to make sure people have a hot meal to sustain them,” she recalls. “It really touched something in me.” After 13 years at the Gates Foundation, Stonesifer had hired an archivist to look at the outcomes of areas they had focused on.The results were illuminating. “It was so wonderful to see the impact on children’s lives through vaccinations, the change in micro-nutrient levels, the work being done

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Patty Stonesifer

in agriculture, but one area of change had just been absolutely flat and that was child poverty and child mobility. If you’re born in a lowresource family what is the likelihood you’ll end up high-income? I’ve spent the last five years answering that question, and have learned that there is more to it than just what happens in the classroom.”

“The neighborhood where Martha’s Table is moving has a ‘five percent literacy rate by third grade and that’s just an outrage.” Nutrition, for one, plays a major factor. Fresh, healthy food should be available everywhere but simply isn’t. East of the Anacostia River, there’s “only one grocery store for 80,000 people in Ward 8,” Stonesifer says. This is one reason Martha’s Table has decided to move its headquarters and add an additional location in Anacostia this summer, with a $20 million expansion. With wealthier families moving to the 14th Street neighborhood, there is not as much need there as in other areas of the city (although the original location will remain open). Under Stonesifer’s lead, Martha’s Table partnered with Capital Area Food Bank to open Joyful Food Markets, after-school pop-

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up purveyors of fresh, healthy groceries complete with cooking classes and food prep demonstrations that are now in 39 District elementary schools, with plans to add ten more by the start of the school year. A gift from former Washington Post publisher Don Graham, who encouraged Stonesifer to “think big,” helped get it off the ground. The markets continue to build out Martha’s Table’s belief that children need to be “strong by eight” in order to succeed, Stonesifer says. “In order to be strong by eight we need three things: parents who are feeling supported and are supportive of their children; health and emotional wellness; and high-quality, traumainformed learning experiences starting at birth. They need to be strong socially, emotionally and academically.” The neighborhood where Martha’s Table is moving has a “five percent literacy rate by third grade and that’s just an outrage,” Stonesifer says, adding that it will take the whole community working together and a lot of people checking their privilege so that all children may succeed. “We have to consciously acknowledge and try to consider the role of race and class and privilege in so many pathways to opportunity.” Stonesifer concedes that many white people are uncomfortable checking their privilege because then they’ll have to admit that they didn’t make it entirely on their own. “We all want to believe that it is about personal actions and responsibility, but it’s not an accident that schools in Northwest give children more opportunity,” she says. “We all have our own narrative and we have a tendency to think about the challenges we were up against instead of the stepping stool we were standing on.” Stonesifer remains optimistic. She has a plaque over her desk that reads, “What would you do if you knew you could not fail?” With Martha’s Table on its way to expanding its reach by 40 percent in Ward 8, failure is not an option. - Erica Moody

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Annie Leibovitz, Chief Justice John Roberts and June Roberts at the National Museum of Women in the Arts Gala (Photo by Tony Powell)

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OVERTHEMOON

Racing and Chasing Hunt Country equestrians focus on show jumping and steeplechase racing before the spring season comes to a close. BY VI C KY MO O N

ashing, polo-playing And, for anyone wanting Aleco Bravo Greenberg in on that swirl, Joe Allen is carrying on the high caliber of Allen Real Estate Co. Ltd. equine tradition established by in Warrenton has a 25-acre his mother, Monica Greenberg, property known as Grandview. and his late stepfather, Hermen Just up the road from the Greenberg, at Rutledge Farm in Fauquier Springs Country Middleburg. Club, this jewel of an estate has Her men Greenberg a stone and stucco Cape Codsuccessfully raced thoroughbreds style home. and his wife won many trophies The center hall is flanked and struck a striking figure as a by a parlor and formal dining sidesaddle equestrian. Aleco’s room. An oversized family wife, Sandra, competes as an room has a stone fireplace. A amateur show jumper. large chef ’s kitchen features a Aleco is hosting “Olympic cathedral ceiling. The master Sessions” at the 128-acre suite has a sitting room, Rutledge Farm this summer.The fireplace, luxury bath and five high-performance Grand cozy porch. There are three Spring Garden Foundation in Upperville has unveiled a new version of the Prix jumping clinic series will Bunny Mellon’s Oak additional bedrooms with bronze statue of Paul Mellon’s famous racehorse Mill Reef. feature Olympic Gold Medalists bath on the second level. An Chris Kappler, Leslie Burr-Howard and Will Haven and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in-law suite with a kitchen and bath is above Simpson. The first session with McLain Ward in Richmond. the three-car garage. The entire Grandview will take place in early June. Equestrians of all The horse won 12 of his 14 races and is, complex is designed for entertaining.The $2.2 levels from across the country are welcome to of course, named after the Mill Reef Club million price includes gorgeous views of the participate. in Antigua where the Mellons maintained a Blue Ridge Mountains. There’s also a barn, a In Upperville, the Oak Spring Garden winter retreat. large pool and the ponds are stocked and ready Foundation, the private horticultural and In other horse related items, the spring for fabulous fishing. botanical research library established by the late steeplechase season is now complete. Members Bunny Mellon in 1993, has unveiled a bronze and guests from the University Club had a big replacement of the statue of Paul Mellon’s most tent at Glenwood Park for the Middleburg famous racehorse, Mill Reef.The iconic bronze Spring Races to watch Bob Kinsley’s Lyonell by sculptor John R. Skeaping originally stood win the $75,000 Temple Gwathmey Stakes in the courtyard of the Oak Spring Broodmare Race for trainer Elizabeth Voss and jockey Barn. Jack Doyle. Half of Washington turned up on The exquisite and careful touches of the a rainy afternoon at Great Meadow to catch two late, devoted philanthropists endure. jockey Kieran Norris on Zanclus win the The barn has undergone adaptive reuse for $100,000 Virginia Gold Cup for owners Sara accommodations and meeting space for visiting and Bruce Collete. artists and scholars. And, of course, the rooms Finally, Suzanne and Ted Lauer hosted are embellished with magnificent sporting art a stunning black-tie gala to honor the lady Lesley Morgan, Kevin Pearson, Sky Baab and Fern O’Brian joined Patsy Richards at the Middleburg reproduced from the Paul Mellon collections sidesaddle riders at their Tranquility Farm. And, Spring Races. at the Yale Center for British Art in New then it was on to the summer social swirl.

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COURTESY PHOTO; PHOTO BY CROWELL HADDEN

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French Amb. Gerard Araud and Honoree Annie Leibovitz

Hilary Geary Ross and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross

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PHOTOFRENZY Annie Leibovitz was at the other end of a Bill Homan great many lenses for once — aimed by fellow professionals as well as cellphone-wielding admirers — as guests arrived to honor her as the 2018 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award Gina Adams, Winton Holliday for Excellence in the Arts at the National Museum of Women in and Marlene Malek the Art’s spring gala. The longtime Vanity Fair portrait photographer was the evening’s focal point despite the presence of local luminaries including Empress Farah Pahlavi of Iran, Chief Justice John Roberts, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and billionaire candy heiress Jacqueline Mars, all of whom would no doubt be on her wish list if she hasn’t already snapped them. After a twohour cocktail party-cum-silent auction, guests dined on snow crab mousseline, boeuf Bordelaise and chocolate hazelnut Dacquoise before dancing well into the night. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Emcee Dana Bash and Spencer Garrett

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AROUNDTOWN

Up from the Ashes Helping to rebuild Rwanda with dedication and love BY DONNA SHOR

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of “Dallas” fame. He was a steely-nerved “wildcatter” who drilled for oil where none had been found before. He’d been keeping his eye on a failed well and on a hunch and a tip, he bought it for a bargain price along with surrounding ground lease. It turned out to be one of the world’s largest oil fields.Years later when H.L. was 61, Swanee was born, the youngest of his brood. The fact she was born after all the hoopla allowed her to be her own woman, which she most surely is. Her husband, the distinguished conductor Charles Ansbacher, performed with renowned international symphonies. A noted humanitarian, he also earned renown for bringing music’s healing powers to areas suffering from war’s calamities. When Swanee was halfway through writing her book, he was diagnosed with a brain tumor, and within the year was lost to her and to the many who had benefited from his work and dedication.

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in the world. Under their stewardship many national indicators are increasing. There is a higher rate of life expectancy, and the productivity is increasing for all. Because so much needed to be done, women welcomed the opportunities to learn new skills. “Show me how to make bricks” might often be heard as a path to that end. Swanee Hunt has worn many public hats including U.S. ambassador to Austria and the Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She is the founder of Women Waging Peace, which she has folded into The Institute for Inclusive Security, and labors tirelessly for women’s rights; she is a peace activist, an author, a poet and musician – all while raising three children, writing four books and overseeing her hands-on philanthropies. Swanee’s father was the legendary billionaire oil tycoon, H.L.Hunt, rumored to be the model for television’s J.R. Ewing

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South Sudanese Cabinet member Rebecca Joshua Okwaci with Swanee Hunt at the JFK Forum, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, 2012. Hunt has brought female leaders from around the globe to her Harvard course for two decades.

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n April 6, 1994 genocide broke out in the small central African nation of Rwanda. It was the culmination of an enmity begun between Rwanda’s two leading tribes — the Hutu and the Tutsi — as early as the 1300s, when the Hutu arrived to find the Tutsi already established. Power see-sawed between them for centuries, but the Hutus long held the upper hand. After 700 years, that all changed on April 6, 1994 when the Rwandan president’s plane was shot down over his home. Pandemonium was the only word for the scenes from hell that erupted as neighbor fought neighbor to the death. The carnage lasted 100 days and left 800,000 dead. An exhausted and depleted nation remained. It was up to the women to carry on, though many had suffered brutalization as an act of war. How they met the challenges is a story that has lessons for everyone, as Swanee Hunt, in her book, “Rwanda Women Rising,” tell their stories. The clean-up was massive, but women found unexpected ways to meet the challenges. A pretty 26-year-old named Aloisea Inyuma took over the logistics of removing 800,000 dead bodies from the streets. Next, the problem of 100,000 homeless and hungry children in the streets had to be dealt with. “Each One Take One” said Aloisea and the women stepped up to take the orphans into their own families. If, as happened, Tutsi families took in Hutu children and visa-versa, well, so much the better for national rebuilding and amity. Reconciliation, in fact, was urgently needed because the nation’s courts were clogged with cases involving thousands of prisoners who had been put behind bars. Hearings were set up to evaluate the situation with the aim of integrating them back into society. Sixty-four percent of Rwanda’s parliament consists of women, the highest percentage


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Karl Rove and George W. Bush

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INOVA SCHAR CANCER INSTITUTE FUNDRAISER Inova Center for Personalized Health Falls Church, Va. PHOTOSBYSEANKELLY

RECORDSHATTERING President George W. Bush and former White House advisor Karl Rove reunited to help raise $26 million for the Inova Schar Cancer Institute, setting a new record for a single-event non-profit fundraiser in the Washington, D.C. area. The dinner for 225 guests took place on the new 117-acre medical campus that was once the regional headquarters of Exxon/Mobil, and was chaired by NVR Inc. President and CEO Paul Saville and his wife Linda. In 2015, NVR founder Dwight Schar and his wife Martha made a $50 million gift to Inova, establishing the Inova Schar Cancer Institute. “This was an amazing display of what’s possible when a community comes together to support a worthwhile endeavor,” Saville said. “The work of the Inova Schar Cancer Institute will give new hope to cancer patients.” President Bush made the fight against cancer one of the priorities of his post-presidency, and the donations will help support a new highly personalized cancer research and treatment center, linking cutting-edge research to clinical treatment to give patients access to advances in genomic and precision medicine. “For the first time in history, we can say with some confidence that the war on cancer is winnable,” Bush said. “Shortening the time, accelerating discoveries between research and treatment will help us get there.”

Andrew Pfeiffer and Jessica Saville

Chet Thacker and Julie Dobson

Susan Ross, Clifford Fleming and James Grauberger

Patricia Inman, Kerry Madigan and Evelyn Madigan

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Dr. Gopal Bajaj and Dr. Rina Bansal

John Irelan and Dede Wilsey Craig and Tracy Cheifetz with Tina and Gary Mather

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William and Nicole Harlowe

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Vinoda Basnayake, DJ Biks and Devin Hoffman

James Rowe and Cannon Matthews Hogan Gidley Ashley and Matt Bronczek with Candace Ourisman WL SPONSORED

Reem Sadik and Dave Grimaldi

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST ISSUE PARTY Heist | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELLANDBENDROZ YGLCELEBRATION Under-40 movers and shakers photographed for the 2018 Washington Life “Young & the Guest List” celebrated the issue’s release at Heist in Dupont Circle with sushi and champagne. Guests at the intimate gathering, where DJ Biks manned the turntables, included Washington Redskins coaches James Rowe and Cannon Matthews, D.C. Council candidate Marcus Goodwin and White House deputy press secretaries Lindsay Walters and Hogan Gidley.

Carlie Steiner and Natalie O’Sullivan

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Yoko Sugiyama, Japanese Amb. Shinsuke Sugiyama and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross

Risaoka Takenaka, Samantha Olsen and Sayuri Ito

Bob Hisaoka and Dana Hines

CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL CELEBRATION

Fran Holuba, Suzanne Kianpour and Anastasia Dellaccio

Connie Morella and Yumi Hogan

Japanese Ambassador’s Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BLOSSOMSANDPRINCESSES As the cherry trees bloomed in his sprawling gardens, new Japanese Ambassador Shinsuke J. Sugiyama hosted a reception to mark the 2018 National Cherry Blossom Festival. NOTABLE GUESTS: Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta and Cherry Blossom Festival princesses from around the country. This spring marked the 70th anniversary of the princess program and 106 years since the mayor of Tokyo gifted the city of Washington 3,000 cherry trees as a symbol of friendship between the United States and Japan.

Antonio Alves and Jayne Visser

Chinese Amb. Cui Tiankai

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Gen. Colin Powell

Ambassador of Italy Armando Varricchio, Micaela Varricchio, Maggie Boland and Eric Schaeffer

Jim Moran, Rep. Don Beyer, Victor Shargai, Megan Beyer, Craig Pascal and Deborah Warren

SONDHEIM AWARDS

George Stevens Jr. and Susan Stroman

Embassy of Italy | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL STAGEPRESENCE A whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who roster of the Broadway world gathered for Signature Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dinner and awards ceremony to honor famed musical composer John Kander. It comes as no surprise that the eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performances were Tony-worthy: Lana Gordon and Tony Award nominee Charloe dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Amboise brought down the house with their performance of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hot Honey Ragâ&#x20AC;? from the musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicago,â&#x20AC;? and Tony- and Academy Award-winner Joel Grey surprised Kander with his iconic performance of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Willkommenâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cabaret.â&#x20AC;? VIPSAPLENTY Rep. Elise Stefanik, Ralph Nader, Tom Siestsema and Gen. Colin and Alma Powell joined the festivities.

John Kander

Rynthia Rost, Victor Barbee and Julie Kent

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Ann Goettman, Jeff Detwiler and Grace Goettman WL SPONSORED

Alicia Margolis and Kornelia Stuphan

A VINTAGE AFFAIR

Anne Polk, Blair Wittmer Giannini and Kim Trundle

Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium | PHOTOSBYGEVARBONHAM

Taryn Zimmerman, Margie Halem, Lynda Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dea and Jennifer Chow

WINEDELIGHTS For the last 21 years, the Board of Visitors of Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National has celebrated A Vintage Affair, their premier fundraiser benefiting the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Grants and Major Gift Program to help doctors, nurses and hospital staff develop and sustain cutting-edge research, innovations, treatments and patient programs. Great wines and well-matched food pairings found favor as guests considered an extensive array of silent and live auction items. Vinophiles flocked to bid on rare offerings that included a 2009 Château Margaux and Harlan Estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2007 Napa Valley Bordeaux blend, while wanderlusters couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resist a stay at Utahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famed Amangiri Resort or a private tour of the MoMa in New York City for up to 10 people. Long & Foster | Christieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Real Estate served as the eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary sponsor. HIGH FIVES Over the past five years, A Vintage Affair has raised more than $5 million to support children and families at Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National.

Karen and Don Kidwell

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| book talk

A Storied Past In ‘America’s Greatest Library,’ Library of Congress historian John Y. Cole presents 217 years of history in word and photo. BY Erica Moody

The modern reconstruction of Thomas Jefferson’s 1815 library is on exhibit in the southeast pavilion of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building.

The Great Hall of the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building as it appeared in 1904.

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obody knows the Library of Congress better than John Cole. Its first and only official historian, Cole began his tenure there as an intern 50 years ago and even wrote his graduate school dissertation about it. “I fell in love with the history of the Library of Congress right away,” he says. It’s hard not to be enamored with the grandeur of both the historic building and its vast collections — around 167 million of them on approximately 838 miles of bookshelves make it the largest library in the world. His new book, “America’s

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Author John Y. Cole

The Library of Congress’ first building of its own was completed in 1897.

Greatest Library: An Illustrated History of the Library of Congress” (GILES) traces its history since 1800. With such an erudite author one might expect the book to be rather dense, but it’s actually quite readable. Cole says it was meant to be so— in fact, he took out footnotes altogether in favor of easily digestible nuggets of information conveyed in timelines of events organized by year plus in-depth mini-stories that focus on such interesting historical aspects as “The First Presidential Library” and “Found-

ing—And Lost—Documents.” “One of the things that always knocks me over is the fact that we have such a variety of collections,” Cole says. You’ll find the original score of “Porgy and Bess,” one of only three perfect vellum copies of the Gutenberg Bible and 303 glass-plate negatives documenting early flights of Orville and Wilbur Wright, to name a few items. From maps and legal materials to movie memorabilia, “we have lots of materials about American culture,” he says. “That’s what makes us stand out.”

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| j u ne

2018

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Literary Gatherings of Note SPRINGBOOKPARTIES|PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL Dr. Sam Stopak, Dr. Mia Kogan, John Jameson and Rose McGowan

Martha Weiss, JosĂŠ AndrĂŠs, Mary Noble Ours and Josh Rosenthal

Mark Penn and Meredith Fineman

Garance Franke-Ruta and JayMolly Newton-Small Mark Riddle and Sims Jaap Scholten, Aniko Gaal Schott and Gen. Peter Zwack

David Corn and Michael Isikoff

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MICROTRENDS SQUAREDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;RUSSIAN ROULETTE: THE INSIDE STORY OF PUTINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WAR ON AMERICA AND THE ELECTION OF DONALD TRUMP â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

PENN/JACOBSONRESIDENCE

CHINACHILCANO

Friends, including actress Rose McGowan, showed up at Mark Penn and Meredith Fineman â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s book party for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Microtrends Squared.â&#x20AC;? Ten years a`er his bestselling book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Microtrends,â&#x20AC;? Penn looks to the future at the small trends that will reshape politics, business and culture. There are chapters ranging from Internet dating to the divide within the Republican party. Guests included political and media heavyweights including Robert Albrion, Evan Ryan, Steve and Jean Case, Steve Clemons and Grover Norquist.

Veteran political journalists Michael IsikoďŹ&#x20AC; and David Corn celebrated their timely political read, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Russian Roule_e: The Inside Story of Putinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s War on America and the Election of Donald Trumpâ&#x20AC;? at China Chilcano. They had much to celebrate, considering the book quickly rose to #1 on the New York Times bestseller list and has received glowing reviews. Those in a_endance included Jane Mayer, JosĂŠ AndrĂŠs, Bill Press, Sam Stein, Andrew Sullivan and Neera Tanden.

Chase Rynd, Janet Cam and John Paty Jim Pinkerton Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Eliza Graham

Thomas Graham

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;AMERICA: THE FOUNDERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; VISIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Joseph Rodota Jr.

GEORGETOWNRESIDENCE Thomas Graham Jr. believes that the Founding Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for America is where we ďŹ nd â&#x20AC;&#x153;the roots on which we will continue to build a peaceful and democratic worldâ&#x20AC;? and those who gathered in his honor certainly shared that view with regard to a country that remains a â&#x20AC;&#x153;land of immigrants, providing asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yellow Dog Democrat who ďŹ&#x201A;ew the coop and became a Republican but has now come home to roost,â&#x20AC;? Kathleen Kennedy Townsend told the crowd a`er noting the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 42 years in diplomatic service and role as a chief negotiator on arms control from 1970 to 1997.

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;THE WATERGATE: INSIDE AMERICAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST INFAMOUS ADDRESSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WATERGATEHOTEL

Judy and Peter Kovler

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Joe Rodota Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long fascination with the most notorious address in America led him to write a â&#x20AC;&#x153;biography of a building,â&#x20AC;? one he thought of as a character just as much as the people who populated it. It was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Titanic,â&#x20AC;? he concluded at his book party at â&#x20AC;&#x201D; where else â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Watergate Hotel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; noting that the six-building complex was â&#x20AC;&#x153;a marvel, ahead of its time in innovation and technology and the people who boarded were stars. The diďŹ&#x20AC;erence was that there was no steerage and no iceberg ahead and unlike the other Titanic, this one got back on its feet and had a second act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;

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Olivia Vietor, Meghan Trossen, Sad Subramanian and Donna Shafer

Dina Lyon, Angela Ertlschweiger and Beverlea Ertlschweiger

Hillary Howard, Janet Davis, Sherrie Beckstead, Felicia Matula and Barbara McDuffie

WL SPONSORED

WOMEN & WINE Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner | PHOTOSBYAMANDAWARDEN FIGHTINGBREASTCANCER “I wish everyone could learn the lessons without having to go through the disease,” said cancer survivor and Lombardi Spirit of Life Award recipient Angela Ertlschweiger at the annual Women & Wine dinner, which this year raised $625,000 for the Nina Hyde Center for Breast Cancer Research at Georgetown’s Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. The event was a celebration of life for those who have survived the disease as well as those whose lives will be saved through Georgetown’s cutting-edge research. Barbara McDuffie of Baker Tilly and Janet Davis of Brandywine Realty Trust served as co-chairs and their companies, along with Gensler, MOI, Susan Miller and Liljenquist & Beckstead provided key sponsorships.

Chelsea Heidenberger, Ami Aronson, Sara Beckstead and Karol Sheridan

Molly Decker, Dr. Lou Weiner and Maria Conttos

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Tim Shriver, Micah Tate, Kathleen Shriver and Linda Potter

Julie Farkas and Malini Jadeja Ladan Manteghi, Mori Taheripour, Ann Walker Marchant and Lisa Davis WL SPONSORED

CITYDANCE DREAM GALA Lincoln Theatre | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Arne Sorenson and Jack Davies

DANCEFORGOOD Classical, contemporary, hip-hop and tap artists led the evening at CityDance’s annual DREAM Gala, chaired by Ann Walker Marchant. Afterwards, guests joined performers for drinks, bites and bustin’ moves on the dance floor. More than $250,000 was raised to support the CityDance DREAM program, which provides tuition-free dance training integrated with academic and college support services for students from underserved communities in the District.

Kay Kendall and Barbara Liotta

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PARTIESPARTIESPARTIES

EVENTFULEVENINGS VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

DC ON THE HALF SHELL [DOCK 5 AT UNION MARKET] P H O T O S  B Y  A M A N DA  WA R D E N

Arne and Ruth Sorenson

Mollusk fans flocked to Union Market for “DC on the Half Shell” to raise money for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Partygoers enjoyed cocktails, gourmet bay cuisine, live entertainment and of course, loads of oysters. The event, chaired by Wendy & Larry Culp and Kay & David Kaufman, was emceed by former President Obama speechwriter David Litt.

Barbara Lang, Bahishta Talash Larry Culp with Gigi and Shep Miller and Marco Aguilar

Katharene Shavely and Kimball Stroud

BANSHEES & QUEENS [W HOTEL] P H O T O S  B Y  B E N  D R OZ

The most fashionable of guests from the Washington creative scene came out in full force to celebrate photographer Kate Warren’s exhibit opening in the lobby of the W Hotel. Warren’s collection of fifteen large format art pieces feature the faces and bodies of strong women, trans, queer and non-binary subjects. The works, which investigates femininity as performance, were fueled by the hateful rhetoric that surrounded the 2016 election.

Jose Sacin, Liz Sara and John Hoskinson Chef Chair Mike Friedman

TASTE OF THE NATION [NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM]

Anastasia Antoinette and Kate Warren

P H OTO  BY  R O D N EY  BA I L EY

Washington’s culinary community joined together to support No Kid Hungry at the annual Taste of the Nation benefit. Guests sampled bites from top area restaurants led by Chef Chair Mike Friedman (Red Hen, All-Purpose), Dessert Chair Tiffany MacIsaac (Buttercream Bakeshop), Mixology Chair Gina Chersevani (Buffalo and Bergen, Suburbia), and Sommelier Chair Nadine Brown (formerly Charlie Palmer Steak). An outdoor-themed bar space with a rose garden and drink stations added a springtime touch.

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Eric Kimbuende and Martin Ditto

David Gorodetski and Kate Goodall

Jose Queervo

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Marjorie Meek-Bradley

CHINESE LUNAR NEW YEAR CELEBRATION [EMBASSY OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA]

Chinese Amb. Cui Tiankai and BenjaminWu

CHEFS ON FIRE [RONALD REAGAN BUILDING AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER] P H O T O  B Y  C AT H E R I N E  D O U G L A S  M O R A N

Guests dined on small bites prepared by more than 50 chefs participating in a live auction before listening to remarks by ovarian cancer survivor Terri Gerace. Smoked & Stacked chef Marjorie Meek-Bradley was honored as the 2018 Chef on Fire by the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance, which reached its goal of raising $200,000 to send women to the Ovarian Cancer National Conference hosted this year in Washigton, D.C.

P H O T O S  B Y  N A K U  M AYO

Traditional cuisine, cultural performances and handicraft demonstrations were among the special features of the evening reception hosted by Chinese Amb. Cui Tiankai in partnership with Meridian International Center. Guests dressed in festive shades of red to celebrate the Year of the Dog.

Taylor Schilling and Uzo Aduba James Cain and Stuart Holliday

Bill and Hazel Bristow with Rep. John Lewis

WHITNEY M. YOUNG JR. MEMORIAL GALA [THE MAHMOOD RESIDENCE] P H O T O S  B Y  A M A N DA  WA R D E N                

Supporters of the Greater Washington Urban League attended the 46th annual Whitney M. Young Jr. Memorial Gala at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. Guests at the “Courage Under Fire”-themed party celebrated the League’s 80 years of service to the District with dinner, a silent auction and awards program.

Chanelle Hardy and Nicole Venable

Angela Maryland, Hannah Eason and Carolyn Goya

YOUNG ARTISTS CONCERT [EMBASSY OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION] P H O T O S  B Y  T O N Y  P O W E L L 

Countess Suzanne Tolstoy

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Susan Carmel and Russian Amb. Anatoly Antonov

There wasn’t a seat to be had at the much anticipated joint appearance by artists from the Bolshoi Theatre and the Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz young artists programs. The vast auditorium of the Russian Embassy was filled to overflowing as hundreds of guests gathered to hear talented performers sing selections from Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov as well as Strauss, Puccini, Massenet, Rossini and Verdi. The concert was followed by a lavish reception sponsored by Russophile philanthropist Susan Carmel, who duly noted her interest in introducing “a new generation to the beauty of opera, the importance of cultural sharing” at a time when bilateral relations between the two nations are notably strained. “Both countries have a rich and beautiful music heritage,” Russian Ambassador Anatoly Antonov told the crowd. “We have a lot to learn from one another in order not just to preserve, but also to multiply this heritage.”

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TAPS HONOR GUARD GALA [NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM] P H O T O S  C O U R T E S Y  O F  TA P S

Kareem Abdul-Jabar, John Carlos and Tommie Smith

Ashlyn McCain, center, recipient of the 2018 Senator Ted Stevens Leadership Award, is joined onstage by other surviving military family members

FREE EXPRESSION AWARDS [NEWSEUM] P H OTO  CO U RT E SY  O F  T H E  N EWS EU M

The annual event celebrates individuals who exhibit a passion for the freedom of speech by speaking truth to power. This year’s award recipients included Dr. John Carlos and Dr. Tommie Smith who were recognized for their protest on the medal podium at the 1968 Summer Olympics. Chairman and former publisher of The New York Times Arthur Sulzberger Jr. received a Lifetime Achievement award.

Gary Sinise with a military family

Military heroes and their families were recognized at the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) annual Honor Guard gala. Honorees included Gen. David Goldfein, William “Mac” Thornberry, Ashlyn McCain and actor Gary Sinise, who received the inaugural Guardian Angel Award for his work with the Gary Sinise Foundation. TAPS, based in Arlington, has offered support for more than 75,000 surviving family members of our fallen military and their caregivers since 1994. The day before the gala, TAPS launched the Institute for Hope and Healing at a daytime event where former “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart was honored.

POSTCLASSICAL ENSEMBLE GALA [WASHINGTON NATIONAL CATHEDRAL] P H O T O S  B Y  E V E N T  P H O T O G R A P H OFNORTHAMERICACORP

After settling into its new role as the Ensemble-inResidence of the Washington National Cathedral, the PostClassical Ensemble celebrated its first annual gala with Annie Totah serving as honorary chairwoman. Among the nearly 200 guests attending the dinner-concert were Farah Pahlavi and Armenian Amb. Grigor Hovhannissyan.

Empress Farah Pahlavi and Annie Totah

Eric, Sebastian and Susi Larsen

CINCO DE MAYO [ADRIENNE ARSHT RESIDENCE]

Elizabeth Beck and Chase Rynd

P H O T O S  B Y  DA N I E L  S C H WA R T Z

Adrienne Arsht distributes maracas

Mary Kennedy Barby Allbritton and Justice Anthony Kennedy

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Businesswoman and philanthropist Adrienne Arsht hosted a high-powered fiesta on Cinco de Mayo, complete with a taco bar, churros. margaritas and a performance by Mexican singer Vanessa Zamorra. Among those swaying to the music were the ambassadors of Mexico and Peru, Arsht’s neighbor and White House senior advisor Kellyanne Conway, Politico CEO Patrick Steel, Sen. Roy Blunt and his wife, Abby.

Va. Gov. Ralph Northam and Bettina Ring

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SMITHSONIAN CRAFT SHOW [NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM] P H O T O  C O U R T E S Y

More than 100 notable American artists chosen from approximately 1,000 applicants displayed their work at the 36th annual Smithsonian Craft Show Preview Night, an invitation-only benefit sponsored by the Smithsonian Women’s Committee. For the first time, the show had an Asian theme, recognizing that many contemporary U.S. craft artists are re-connecting American modernism to its roots in Asia. Proceeds benefited a competitive grants program to support Smithsonian research programs and exhibits.

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HOME LIFE

3RXLI;EXIVJVSRX Washington power couple Amy and Tripp Donnelly unwind at their contemporary creekside residence in Easton, Maryland. BY VIRGINIA COYNE PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

hey’re the quintessential Washington power couple – he’s the founder and CEO of REQ, a brand management marketing company whose clients include Amazon, eBay and Sweetgreen; she is a partner at the law firm Arent Fox, where she focuses on mergers, acquisitions and licensing for multimillion-dollar businesses and sports franchises, including Major League Baseball’s Tampa Bay Rays. Tripp and Amy Donnelly are also philanthropically involved with several charities, not least among them Children’s Hospital, the Washington Nationals Dream Foundation and the Sibley Hospital Foundation. When the busy duo needs a break from their taxing schedules, they (along with their seven-year-old son, Finn) retreat to their weekend home on Hunting Creek in historic Easton on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. “As soon as you cross the Bay Bridge your blood pressure just drops and you can relax,” Amy Donnelly says. “It’s so peaceful to be out here, and that’s really what we love about the area.” The Donnellys purchased the five-acre, six-bedroom property, which they’ve named “Southwind,” in 2016. They knew the area well as they’d visited friends there for years. They also knew they wanted to be on the water (Tripp grew up sailing with his father on the Bay) but were surprised to find that many of the houses for sale were traditional center hall Colonials that lacked waterfacing views. When they came across the cedar-roofed house with a contemporary, open layout and views of the creek from nearly every room, the couple was immediately smitten. The previous owners had undertaken a significant renovation of the property in the early 2000s, hiring the acclaimed Seattle-based interior designer Terry Hunziker, renowned for his collaborative approach to working with

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PREVIOUS PAGE: (clockwise from left) The office nook outside the master bedroom boasts water views; slipcovered sofas and chairs by Restoration Hardware surround the fireplace in the living room. The ceiling is maple, one of 12 different types of wood in the house; the Donnellys commissioned carpenters from the Amish Market in Easton to create a custom nine-foot waterfall sideboard. “Ipanema,” a work by Canadianborn artist Parvez Taj hangs above it. Coffee table books showcasing photographs by Tripp’s favorite photographer, Slim Aarons, sit on the tabletop. Tim Law, proprietor of home goods store American Holiday in St. Michaels, helped source the lamps and ottomans based on similar pieces Amy had seen in a magazine. THIS PAGE: (clockwise from top left) The previous owner expanded and modernized the structure originally built in 1981, to include large doors and windows facing the pool and the creek beyond it; 100-year-old pecky cypress beams were added to the dining room ceiling during the renovation. The table and chairs are by Restoration Hardware. The kitchen cabinetry was crafted locally out of nautical teak.; the den features a customdesigned sectional by interior designer Terry Hunziker. Districtbased designer Lauren Rakowsky helped accessorize the lacewood bookcases.

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builders, lighting designers, landscapers and artisans, to spearhead the project. Hunziker’s signature is simple: holistic layouts that bring the outside in. To that end, he designed large windows and doors to enhance the views and filled the house with a dozen types of wood – flawless maple ceilings, 100-year-old pecky cypress beams in the dining room, rich lacewood in the den and nautical teak in the kitchen. Tripp Donnelly says it was such attention to detail that ultimately sold them on the property. “We fell in love with the house when we learned someone before us had spent years thinking through where the dining room should be, for example, or what type of wood should be used in each room.” Most of the custom Hunziker-designed furniture was not left behind by the previous residents, save for a sectional in the den. The Donnellys wanted to mirror the original pieces and found a Restoration Hardware sofa and armchairs similar to Hunziker’s to place around the fireplace in the living room, just as the designer had done. For help with accent pieces and artwork, the couple looked to District-based designer Lauren Rakowsky; Jamie Merida, of Bountiful Interiors in Easton; and Tim Law of American Holiday in St. Michaels. Tripp Donnelly’s collection of coffee table books, including several featuring the work of Slim Aarons, known for his mid-century society photographs (many of them pool and beachside), fill the bookcases and tabletops. Much of the blue-hued artwork on the walls depicts shorelines and sailboats, further enforcing the aquatic theme. When not inside the house, the Donnellys are creating their own memories on the water – fishing with their son or boating with friends to the nearby Inn at Perry Cabin in St. Michaels for a dockside meal and a bottle (or two) of rosé.

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OPENING PAGE: Amy and Tripp Donnelly and their son Finn stand on the dock leading to Hunting Creek outside their Easton, Md. home. The Hinckley yacht behind them is part of a fleet belonging to the nearby Inn at Perry Cabin by Belmond.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

June Blooms

Merrywood sells for a record price in McLean plus a circa 1788 farmhouse in Bluemont, and a 19th century Federal in Georgetown are just a few items in the region’s blooming market BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

AOL co-founder Steve Case sold McLean’s famed Merrywood estate at  CHAINBRIDGEROAD, for a record breaking $43 million to the Saudi Arabian government, which also owns a large ambassadorial residence nearby. The 100-year-old property was a childhood home of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis when it was owned by her step-father, investment banker Hugh D. Auchincloss Jr. Other previous owners include Washington Star owner Newbold Noyes, TV and radio journalist Nancy Dickerson and her husband Wyatt, and Alan and Dianne Kay. The most recent interior of the nine-bedroom, 23,000-square-foot McLean mansion was designed by Barry Dixon, while the original landscaping was the work of Dumbarton Oaks and White House architect Beatrix Ferrand. The brick and limestone Georgian residence is discreetly positioned on seven private acres - though the original size of the estate was over 50 acres - with sweeping views of the Potomac River. Its many features include an exercise studio, indoor and outdoor pools, a tennis court, a wine cellar, a separate carriage house with indoor parking for four cars, an office and staff accommodations. TTR Sotheby’s Mark Lowham was the listing agent. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage’s Monica Boyd represented the buyer.

THE DISTRICT William Andrews sold  THSTREET NW , an exceptionally well restored four-

bedroom residence in Georgetown, for $4.4 million. The 19th-century Federal occupies a large private lot and boasts a balance of sophisticated entertaining spaces. It also features a chef ’s kitchen, abundant natural light, a Hugh Newell Jacobsen-designed library and a guest house with a full kitchen and bathroom. TTR Sotheby’s Michael Rankin was the listing agent. Washington Fine Properties’ Eileen McGrath represented the buyer.

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VIRGINIA former Oracle Corporation executive and Vijay and Anita Tanamala bought 

 co-founder of Silver Lake Group, purchased EBENEZERCHURCHROAD in Bluemont for NSTREETNW from The Lighthouse $2.52 million from Thomas Hardart. Known as LLC for $3 million. Margo Roux is Meadow Grove Farm, it is a secluded private estate a first grade teacher at Beauvoir, The on just over 180 acres. The historic 1788-built National Cathedral Elementary School. stone and stucco five-bedroom farmhouse was The four-bedroom Federal townhouse in renovated in 2009 by Neumann, Lewis, Buchanan Georgetown is over 100 years old and has Architects. The idyllic property features a 10-stall been renovated to include modern day stable, a tennis court, pool and pool house and amenities. Washington Fine Properties’ three stocked ponds. Thomas & Talbot’s Mary Nancy Taylor Bubes was the listing agent. Ann McGowan was the listing agent; Berkshire Compass’ Patrick Chauvin was the buyer’s Hathaway HomeServices PenFed Realty’s David agent. Poole represented the buyer. Margot Roux , the daughter of Dave Roux , a

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Lee and Andrea Merryman purchased  WSTREETNW in Foxhall for $3.4 million from a private LLC with the help of Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe and Christopher Leary of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties. Trish and Gerard DiRuggiero of Urban Land Company were the listing agents. This classic Colonial was completely renovated to create a true 21st century “Forever Home.” The six-bedroom, 5,600square-foot property is surrounded by parkland to enhance idyllic outdoor living with multiple patios and terraces. Posh interior features include a sparkling white gourmet kitchen, a luxurious lower level and a floating staircase.

Fred Bahrami sold his glass-walled residence at RSTREETNW , a true modern marvel, to Five Guys’ general counsel Adam Aberra for $2,965,500. Bahrami also designed and built the 28-unit condominium building Q14 on Logan Circle. The R Street property is a 6,100-square-foot Contemporary with a 1,300-square-foot roof deck boasting panoramic views. The house boasts a two-story living room with floor-to-ceiling windows, an owner’s suite with a double steam shower, a jacuzzi and heated floors. The lower level is complete with a second kitchen and three-car gated parking. Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher Leary of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties were the listing agents while Washington Fine Properties’ Daryl Judy and Kimberly Casey were the buyer’s agents.

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James and Ashley Beaty bought HOBANROADNW from Brixmor OP TRS LLC for a sale price of $3.6 million. The 1930s, six-bedroom Colonial in the upscale Foxhall neighborhood, only a short drive to Georgetown, includes nearly 7,000 square feet of living space. The classic brick four-level dwelling features handsome built-ins, a chef’s dream kitchen, a master bedroom with a fireplace and marble bath, huge terraces and a private garden with an outdoor living area. Matt McCormick of TTR Sotheby’s was the buyer’s agent. Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher Leary of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties listed the property. The Beatys recently sold RD STREETNW in Georgetown for $3.45 million to Lawrence Flanagan, the president of AARP.

MARYLAND Alan and Barbara Adler of Capitol Living Group sold  DORSETAVENUE in Bethesda to an undisclosed buyer for $4.35 million. Ekster Antiques’ Caroline Verschoor staged the property and Kara Sheehan of Washington Fine Properties represented the buyer and seller in the transaction. The European-inspired, six bedroom residence in Kenwood was built in 2017 and includes 12-foot ceilings, main and upper floor owner’s suites, a gourmet kitchen and private exterior terraces.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

PROPERTYLINES

RECORD SETTING LISTING: The McLean home of the late Jim Kimsey (AOL co-founder) has been listed for $62.5 million. The Falls, as it’s called due to being situated on the Potomac River with a direct view of the rapid falls, is a gated 3.2-acre estate that includes an architectural treasure, the Marden House guest cottage built by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1959.  CHAINBRIDGEROAD, which Kimsey built in 1999, includes 48,900 square feet of living space and features an infinity pool, a garage for 30 cars, four kitchens (one of which has an attached loading dock for catering trucks) and a wine room containing a wet bar and a champagne refrigerator. Kimsey died in 2016. TTR Sotheby’s Russell Firestone and Mark Lowham are the listing agents..

KALORAMA GEM: Bechtel senior executive Cliff Mumm is selling  BANCROFTPLACENWin Kalorama for $2.6 million. The twobedroom, two-and-a-half-bath Beaux Arts townhouse was once a ballroom for the house next door. The completely renovated in-town pied à terre boasts two fireplaces, a south facing rear garden area and a two-car garage. Washington Fine Properties’ Cynthia Howar is the listing agent.

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HOME FOR THE AGES: Real Estate broker Brian Logan listed   CHAINBRIDGEROADNW for $8.15 million. The sensational, custom 2004-built, seven-bedroom masterpiece is a private oasis equipped for major entertaining with its own full floor ballroom. The 11,000plus-square-foot mansion includes six fireplaces, semi-circular stairs, a guesthouse, an infinity pool, a catering kitchen, a two bedroom staff apartment, a fitness room, a sauna and wine cellar plus vistas of Battery Kemble Park and a four-car garage. The property is listed by Washington Fine Properties’ Cynthia Howar.

ROBERT E. LEE’S BOYHOOD HOME: The historic residence of the commander of the Confederate Army is for sale for $8.5 million. Mark and Ann Kington are selling the nationally registered Virginia landmark at   ORONOCO STREET in Old Town, a property that at one point served as the Lee-Jackson Foundation museum. It’s speculated that John Potts and his business partner, William Wilson, built the house in 1795 and played host to such distinguished guests as George and Martha Washington. The six-bedroom Federal includes over 8,000 square feet of living space and has been the subject of a detailed and complete professional restoration making it a newly functional structure in an antique and beautiful shell. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@washingtonlife.com.

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OPENHOUSE

New on the Market Luxurious properties now available for purchase. BETHESDA

 LOCHLOMONDDRIVE This custom home boasts stunning design features including a grand entrance archway; spacious living, dining, family room and library; a gourmet chef ’s kitchen; picturesque views of a private backyard; an elegant master suite and spa-inspired baths. There’s a home theater and master suite on the main level plus an elevator and a four-car garage. It’s moments to downtown Bethesda, I-495 and downtown Washinton.

CHEVYCHASE TENNYSONSTREETNW

ASKING PRICE: $2,499,000

This new construction contemporary makes up more than 6,500 square feet of living space The light-filled residence has luxurious finishes plus state of the art technology; a master suite, a roof deck, an in-law suite and a media room. Rock Creek Park and its trails are mere steps away.

LISTING AGENT: Bryce Roland, 202-302-0437, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

ASKING PRICE: $2,895,000 LISTING AGENT: Jill Schwartz, 301-7587224, Compass

DUPONTCIRCLE  MASSACHUSETTSAVENW

ASKING PRICE: $2,449,900

This property is nestled in an exclusive private enclave in the heart of the city. Flooded with natural light from a custom skylight and floor- LISTING AGENT: Richard Newton, 202-669-4467, to-ceiling windows, Penthouse #4 offers sweeping views of Dupont Washington Fine Properties Circle and Massachusetts Avenue NW. This two-level, three-bedroom, three-and-a-half bath, 2,400-square-foot residence features custom millwork, a custom chef ’s kitchen, a wood-burning fireplace and beautiful architectural details. Garage parking is included.

CLEVELANDPARK  MACOMBSTNW This Cleveland Park features six bedrooms and four full and one half baths. It has an entry foyer, a family room with large windows, a grand living room with a fireplace and a formal dining room that are perfect for entertaining, a large back deck with built-in seating, a stone patio and a raised pergola. It’s close to shopping, restaurants, a Metro station, the National Zoo and more.

ASKING PRICE: $2,350,000 LISTING AGENTS: Marjorie Dick Stuart, 240731-8079, Long & Foster | Christie’s

ALEXANDRIA

BELLERIVETERRACE Built in 1936, this magnificent waterfront home in Alexandria,Va. offers stunning private views of the Potomac River. Set on nearly two acres, this 6,400-square-foot residence features five bedrooms, three full bathrooms, a private dock and two guest houses.

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ASKING PRICE: $2,250,000 LISTING AGENT: Trebor Lefebvre, 703-627-5239, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

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HOMELIFE | LONG&FOSTER

A Bright Future Long & Foster goes national but stays true to its company values. BY ERICA MOODY

REAL [ESTATE] TALK How strong is the market now since the crash ten years ago? Jeff Detwiler: We’ve made back everything we lost in the housing downturn in terms of price values, particularly in the capital region. It’s a very robust housing market. With the government being here, although we’ve diversified economically, it’s still a wonderful support or cornerstone. Everything about this market is better than the average market but there’s a real limit in inventory, so that keeps a lid on the amount of sales. We have many more buyers than we have properties to sell.

I

magine loving your job so much that even after you technically “retire,” you come to the office a full four days a week. For Long & Foster founder Wes Foster, retirement is just not part of his vocabulary. It’s clear to see how his firm has successfully grown from a 600-square-foot office with one employee in 1968 to the third largest real estate firm in the country. The company recently celebrated big news; last September, the Chantilly, Va.-based business announced its acquisition by HomeServices of America, a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway. Foster, now chairman emeritus, says that the secret to his company’s success is simple. “Take care of people and the rest will take care of itself,” he says. “We take care of our agents.” He does this by “staying in touch, being nice to them and giving them every tool in the trade to succeed.” Foster’s focus on people has influenced president and CEO Jeff Detwiler. “I had 24 years of business experience before I got here and always valued networking and relationships,” Detwiler says, “but Wes took my acknowledgement to a different level

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of really appreciating true in-depth relationships and showing people you care.” Such care led to Long & Foster’s expansion over the years from a small northern Virginia business to the largest independent real estate company in the mid-Atlantic, with 11,000 agents and more than 230 offices in seven states and Washington, D.C. In 2007, a partnership with Christie’s gave the company a boost in the luxury real estate market and Long & Foster became the largest Christie’s affiliate in the world. Considering that the company already has a stellar reputation, what does the Berkshire Hathaway deal mean for its future? “We always wanted to be part of a national platform and now we will have that,” Detwiler says. The business model is to allow the local management team to make decisions around the brand while benefiting from an ideasharing network at the very highest levels of the 35 companies under the HomeServices umbrella. “I followed Warren Buffet for years and can’t think of anyone better to sell to than him,” Foster says. “It gives us a wonderful future.”

Are there any financial landmines on the horizon we should be aware of? Generally we’ve been underestimating the impact of hyper-low interest rates over the past few years and the impact it’ll have on the housing market. The low inventory now will continue to be a real issue because the consumer doesn’t want to give up that super low interest they achieved a few years ago. Number two is that in the shakeout we lost a lot of the trades, so new construction is not capable of taking advantage of this void and delivering enough product to fill it, so the entire country, particularly in the hottest markets like the capital region, for the next 3-4 years, is going to be starved for inventory. Are you saying folks should try to lock in their rates now? Actually what we see is that 85 percent of the outstanding mortgages have a 3.5 percent coupon or lower. And they all refinanced into these during those hyper low times. What we are also seeing right now is a lot of the cash buyers are coming back and doing cash-out refinances to take advantage of today’s interest rates before they go up. Any thoughts on the tax bill that was passed and how it might impact the market? You can define it as a headwind or a tailwind and it’s certainly not a tailwind. What’s surprising is this is probably the first time since there have been government regulation and law that is not really supportive of housing. At $750,000 for a home you’re going to start to feel the difference between the change in the tax code for this year and beyond than in previous years. And when you look at the economics, the people who want to buy a $1-2 million house are going to feel the greatest amount of impact.

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DESIGNTRENDS

Bold & Brassy Timeless metals add a sophisticated touch to simple interiors. BY ERICA MOODY

THE BARRY DIXON COLLECTION Copernicus Armillary ($3,900), Arteriors at The Washington Design Center, designcenterdc.com

LIGNE ROSET Brass bell suspension lamps (from $1,670) 2201 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-248-3112, ligne-roset-usa.com

MINOTTI The Colette armchair ($8,596), Contemporaria, 3303 Cadyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alley NW, 202-338-0193, contemporaria.com

1ST DIBS Italian contemporary fine design brass cabinet with blue green purple agate ($25,000), 1stdibs.com

CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

CRATE & BARREL Brass grid candleholder ($149), 4820 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 202-364-6100, crateandbarrel.com

JONATHAN ADLER Cheval bar cart ($1,950),1267 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-965-1416, jonathanadler.com WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| J U N E      | washingtonlife.com

WEST ELM Marble-topped pedestal coffee table--white marble/antique brass ($699),1728 14th St. NW, 202-986-2165, westelm.com

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MY WASHINGTON DOROTHYKOSINSKI Director, The Phillips Collection INTERVIEW BY VIRGINIA COYNE

s Dorothy Kosinski marks 10 years leading America’s first museum of modern art, we asked her to reflect on her tenure, share her favorite piece in the collection and let us in on her top spots in the nation’s capital.>>

MY TOP SPOTS

Dumbarton Oaks in Georgetown. The architecture and landscaping at this beautiful museum are unmatched.

Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center. There are incredible (free!) performances every day at this national treasure.

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The talent and variety seen onstage at Studio Theatre in the 14th Street corridor is truly world class.

Tryst cafes (including the one in the Phillips!) have the best coffee in town and are a great place to start the day.

THERE ARE SO MANY MUSEUMS IN WASHINGTON, MANY OF THEM FREE. WHY SHOULD PEOPLE VISIT THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION? Duncan Phillips, our founder, wanted it to be “an intimate museum combined with an experiment station.” The intimacy created by the architecture and the collection provides something special and unique to this institution—a very personal experience with the art and the house. The permanent collection is always free during the week, Tuesday through Friday. As for other entry fees, this is very personal to me. I believe strongly in the philosophy of art for all, and I work hard to eliminate barriers to access and to try to get people of different ages and income levels engaged with our institution. Ultimately, it’s not a fair comparison because we don’t receive the same federal funding that allows some of our fellow institutions to be free, so we do have to charge admission to support our work and services. IN THIS DIGITAL AGE, ARE YOU ABLE TO ATTRACT YOUNG PEOPLE? Across the country, art museums are increasingly challenged attracting visitors under the age of 30. So, this is a big priority for us and something we are working on in a few ways. Our doors are open to students with free admission all days of the week, including weekends. Additionally, we are offering free admission to everyone 30 and under this summer. This promotion is an experiment in breaking down barriers of entry to gauge response, and to gather the numbers and data that will guide our institutional decisions, so that we may

reach audiences better. We want everyone to enjoy the museum as much as we do. HOW HAS THE MUSEUM CHANGED UNDER YOUR LEADERSHIP? We have created bold and dynamic new partnerships with the University of Maryland and the Town Hall Education Arts and Recreation Center (THEARC), both of which support our goals of getting outside our walls and making art accessible to all by connecting with communities across D.C. and beyond, extending our arts, wellness and education programs to a broad range of people of all ages. I have also made it my personal responsibility to create a museum atmosphere that rises to the highest standards of accessibility and inclusivity. To do this we recently launched a museumwide diversity initiative to better serve our audience. WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE TO ACCOMPLISH? I’m delighted that in 2021 we will celebrate the museum’s centennial. My role is to ensure that we continue to flourish in the next 100 years and to make sure that we have the financial support to do that. We like to say “The Phillips Collects.” That’s an expression we use to underscore that the museum is not trapped in amber and as much as our limited resources and gifts and bequests allow, the collection continues to grow. We look forward to highlighting new acquisitions during our 100-year celebrations. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE OF ART IN THE MUSEUM AND WHY? This is a psychological trap because there are so many works that I deeply appreciate for different reasons. That said, if I had to pick one that I deeply adore it is “The Ham” by Paul Gauguin. This is a piece that is just beautifully painted, but of such a humble subject.

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CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

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Washington Life Magazine - June 2018l  

The 2018 Philanthropic 50

Washington Life Magazine - June 2018l  

The 2018 Philanthropic 50