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Members of College Assessment Council, 2013-2014 Dr. Teresa Ray-Connell, Dental Faculty, Chair Johnny McMoy, College Dean, Advisor Dr. Mary Barnes, English Faculty Carrie Bentley, Transitional Faculty Connie Briehn, Biology Faculty Dr. Suhana Chikatla, Instructional Designer Cheri!Grimmett, Computer Science Faculty Todd Hardman, Program Coordinator, Engineering Deborah Hoover, Chair, Nursing Sharon Hoover, Success Coach/Advisor Allen Keener, OTA Faculty Gail Ledbetter, Speech Faculty Jennifer Malcolm, Recruiter Renee Quick, Chair, Mathematics Dr. Rebecca Reeves, Chair, Social Sciences Jeremy Smith, Program Coordinator, Collision Repair

Academic Support and Student Development Outcomes Assessment 2012-2015

Wallace State Community College—Hanceville

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Rev. 3.14.14 Introduction

Wallace State Community College is committed to planning and assessment practices that reflect the dictates of the principles of accreditation of its primary accrediting authority, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. To this end, the college supports a program of institutional planning and assessment that represents a cycle of identifying intended outcomes, assessment measures and schedules, recording actual results, and developing and implementing plans for improvement based on these results. Decision-making is informed by an optimal analysis of institutional data, environmental scanning, and best practices. The college’s planning and assessment program is broad-based and collaborative. Specifically, the college’s assessment and planning efforts are guided by its institutional mission, vision, and Five-Year Strategic Plan (adopted 9.17.12, following the expiration of its previous five-year plan). The theme of the new strategic plan, Readiness3, provides a framework for the academic, student development, and administrative programs and services offered by the institution. The college annually publishes an Academic Program Outcomes Assessment (APOA) and Assessment Plan for Academic Support and Student Development (ASSD). This document, the ASSD, addresses planning and assessment for each of the college’s Academic Support, Student Development and Administrative programs and services. It is divided into two major sections, Administrative Support Services and Academic and Student Support Services. For each functional unit, practitioners have identified outcomes specific to their functional unit. Each unit’s planning and assessment work is arranged in five columns: • • • • •

Unit goals Intended Outcomes Assessment Measures (with a schedule for completion) Actual Results Analysis and Use of Results.

Each section concludes with a summative program review. Supporting documentation is referenced in the ASSD to an Appendices bound separately. All goals and outcomes are aligned with the Mission, Vision, and strategic directives included in the Five-Year Strategic Plan. Strategic Priority Two, for example, reflects the college’s commitment to the success of every student:

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To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success. Many of the identified outcomes delineated in the ASSD do not require non-operational funding. However, all functional units have access to a foundational budgeting process that is linked to unit outcomes. The academic year 2012-2013 marks the thirteenth year of annual budget hearings for discretionary spending, presided over by the college’s Administrative Council, a body comprised of ex officio and elected representatives of administrators, faculty, and staff. It culminates in the submittal of prioritized funding recommendations to the president for consideration for inclusion in the budget presented annually to the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education. Planning and assessment processes are guided by the Office of the College Dean, the Executive Cabinet, and a standing committee, the Assessment Council. The Assessment Council is chaired by a senior faculty member and its membership represents faculty, administration, and staff.

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Table of Contents

Administrative and Support Services Office of College Dean

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Information Technology

14

Management Information Services

20

Office of Institutional Research

25

Campus Security

30

Fiscal Management

35

Bookstore

43

Auxiliary Services

47

Office of Dean of Applied Technologies

50

Institutional Outreach

57

Office of Dean of Instruction

63

Extended Day

71

Institutional Advancement

77

Human Resources

83

Physical Plant

88

Office of the President

94

Marketing and Public Relations

103

Office of Dean of Health Science

110

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Office of Executive Vice President

117

Academic and Student Services Department of E-Learning

126

Library

139

Athletics

145

Adult Education

152

Transitional Programs

156

Office of Special Populations

162

Advising Center

166

Admissions and Records

170

Enrollment Management

173

Office of Financial Aid

178

Trio Programs

182

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Office of the College Dean Purpose Statement: The purpose of the Office of the College Dean is to guide the college in its strategic and operational planning and assessment and to ensure that the college remains in compliance with the dictates of accreditation and accepted professional practices. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the Office of the College Dean have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To coordinate and provide support for the strategic planning process

Intended Outcomes The Office of the College Dean in concert with other members of the Executive Leadership will ensure that the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan guide the development and improvement of the college’s programs and services.

Assessment Criteria The Executive Cabinet will conduct an annual review of the currency and efficacy of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan and make written recommendations for improvement (spring annually)

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Assessment Results The development of new vision statement and Five-Year Strategic Plan began with an employee task force attending an off-campus planning retreat in March, 2012. The new vision statement and strategic plan were distributed to all employees. Final adoption occurred with Cabinet approval on 9.17.12. The most recent review of the college’s mission statement by Administrative Council occurred on 7.10.13 and 7.18.13. The presidential cabinet approved a modification of the previous mission

Use of Results The most significant results of the development of the mission statement, vision statement, and Five-Year Strategic Plan were widespread distribution of more than 2,000 copies throughout the region (also accessible on the college’s website), and the adoption by the Administrative Council of formal performance indicators to guide the college in measuring the degree to which the vision, mission, and strategic plan are achieved.

To coordinate, guide, and maintain a comprehensive program of campus-wide planning and assessment

The Office will monitor and guide the development of a comprehensive planning and assessment process that is focused on institutional effectiveness.

The Assessment Committee will conduct an annual review of the unit planning and assessment process and make written recommendations for improvement (spring annually).

To guide compliance with applicable accreditation entities

The Office will maintain a master schedule of accreditation activities and guide compliance.

The Office will develop, maintain, and publish a schedule of accreditation dates and activities (published summer annually).

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statement on adopted slight changes in previous mission statement, subject to approval of State Board. The Assessment Committee approved the improved planning and assessment model without recommendations in stages. Approved program review template on 3.7.13. Approved APOA 5.9.13. ASSD approved 7.22.13.

The SACS liaison developed and distributed a timetable (with assignments) in April 2013 for the college’s completion of the SACS Compliance Certification. An accreditation master schedule was completed 6.27.13 for Health Sciences.

As a result of the Assessment Committee review and approval of planning and assessment framework, programs have a comprehensive framework of analysis that is consistent with new vision statement and Five-Year Strategic Plan. APOA and ASSD represent significant improvement over previous framework. As a result of the publication of the SACS master schedule, accreditation assignments were distributed equitably across campus and facilitated central collection of data and analysis. The Health accreditation schedule facilitated administrative

planning and scheduling. The office was heavily involved in the development of the 150page SPE for NLN accreditation, encompassing more than 150 assessment measures. The next Master Accreditation Schedule published will include Applied Technologies and the Academic Division.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

80% of employees surveyed will report agreement that the office provided appropriate accreditation support and guidance (spring annually). The College Dean will attend a minimum of four professional development activities that promote the realization of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan (12-13 AY and

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92% of employees reported satisfaction that the Office provided appropriate support.

Attended more than 26 local and external professional development activities. Activities included attendance of the SACS annual meeting in Orlando, the Pearsonsponsored leadership

As a result of analysis, the office has committed to earlier intervention. Process has been facilitated by development of new master schedule. These professional development activities enhanced the office’s efforts to move the college forward in the areas of planning and assessment. The ATD meetings, for example, added breadth and depth

annually).

roundtable in Dallas, Achieving the Dream national meetings in Dallas, Portland OR, and Anaheim, and the AAC&U annual meeting on General Education Assessment in Burlington VT. Presenter at the AACC meeting in San Francisco.

to the college’s efforts to improve engagement at the portals of entry, in developmental student success, and through a new model of Learning Communities. The AAC&U meeting contributed greatly to the development of a multiyear strategy for assessing the college’s General Education competencies.

The College Dean will review individually the professional development plans of his divisional employees for efficacy and utility (FY 2012 and annually).

The College Dean met individually with every divisional employee over a period of four months to review professional records for 2011-2012 and plans for 2012-2013. (Review also included discussion of career plans and value and efficacy of FiveYear Strategic Plan.)

As a result of these oneon-one meetings, the directors reported that employee morale improved. Directors also reported that employee interest in and support of the Five-Year Plan increased. Example of comments from directors: “After your meetings with them, I received nothing but positive comments…I think this is valuable as it shows…that there is

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To engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects a commitment to growth and possibility

The Office will engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects both a local and global commitment to growth and possibility.

The College Dean will maintain membership in a minimum of two professional and/or service organizations (FY 2012 and annually).

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The College Dean was an active member of the Existing Business and Industry Committee of the Chamber of Commerce and a member of the Board of Directors of the Cullman Rotary Club.

genuine concern over their professional life and their continued development.� As a result of participation in community organizations, community involvement in institutional strategy was enhanced. Rotary members, for example, attended a public hearing in support of the college’s NLN accreditation efforts. Rotary and Chamber members actively participated in the college’s annual review of its Career/Technical programs.

Analysis and Planning: Office of College Dean Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

• • • • • •

Recruited Research Coordinator/Administrative Assistant Served as Co-Leader of Achieving the Dream, focused on themes of improving service at first points of entry, improving developmental outcomes, and implementing new model of Learning Communities (sample minutes, Attachment 1.1) Facilitated development of new Five-Year Strategic Plan (approved 9.17.12) Guided production of annual Perkins Report on Career/Technical programs Served as observer on SACS On-Site Review Committee Presenter at annual meeting of American Association of Community Colleges in San Francisco Facilitated development of new Five-Year Diversity Plan (approved 3.4.13, Attachment 1.2) Chaired 2012-13 budget hearings (Memo to President, Attachment 1.3)

A professional development record is attached (Attachment 1.4). The College Dean was appointed in November 2011, and has served at the college for two years (Vita, Attachment 1.5). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the College Dean presents oral and written reports on division (sample, Attachment 1.6). The office includes the following fulltime positions: • • •

College Dean Administrative Assistant/Research Coordinator Research Coordinator

The College Dean served on the following committees: • • • • • • •

Executive Cabinet Administrative Council, Chair Carl Perkins Steering Committee, Chair Banner Reporting Committee, Chair Assessment Committee, Cabinet Liaison QEP Development Team, Cabinet Liaison Professional Development Committee, Cabinet Liaison

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Action Items for Office of College Dean from Executive Planning Retreat

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Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices. Action Items: • Attend a minimum of two professional development activities that specifically target overcoming barriers to success at entry • Promote links among community needs and the college’s programs and services through membership in service organizations, such as Rotary Club, CRMC Community Outreach Committee, and Chamber of Commerce • Provide technology support for expansion of 24/7 services to facilitate successful entry • Provide research and data to support innovation and effectiveness Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success Action Items: • Translate ATD goals for Transitional Program into specific action plans (e.g., disseminating information on Compass exam through website, career coaches, and other mediums • Provide ATD and other data sets to facilitate decision-making and strategy • Continue to promote Banner as a tool to drive decision-making and strategy • Assist with a minimum of two professional development opportunities for Transitional faculty and staff (ATD, NADE) Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment Action Items: • Increase Career/Technical online course offerings by 10% YOY (also strengthen and streamline approval and review process) • Increase participation in Budget Hearing process by 10% YOY (also improve and streamline process) • Add aggressive professional development and advisory committee requirements to 13-14 APOA (as we did in 12-13) • Draft assessment measures for career exploration artifact in QEP Success Course

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Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning Action Items: • Increase budget hearing participation by 10% YOY (also streamline and improve process) • Conduct a minimum of one Lunch and Learn or P/D session on budget process (with Dean Morgan) • Promote links among community needs and the college’s programs and services through membership in service organizations, such as Rotary Club, CRMC Community Outreach Committee, and Chamber of Commerce • Add aggressive professional development and advisory committee requirements to 13-14 APOA (as we did in 12-13) Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness Action items: • Issue monthly enrollment reports (began doing this in 12-13 AY) • Continue to review and improve data collection points in APOA and ASSD Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the college’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries Action Items: • Increase Academic online course offerings by 10% YOY (also strengthen and streamline approval and review process as well as requisite infrastructure) • Attend a minimum of one professional development activity that addresses expansion of online offerings (e.g. tour of USNH) • Promote diversity and its integration into other campus initiatives and plans (Five-Year Strategic Plan, Campus Read, Learning Communities, Roadmap I, QEP, Five-Year Diversity Plan, ATD, Learning Communities)

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Information Technology Department Mission: To provide students and employees with outstanding service, support, and reliability for all technological needs anytime and anywhere in the world. Furthermore, the IT Department will stay abreast of new and innovative technologies to provide a better online and classroom experience for students and faculty. To achieve this mission, the personnel of the E-Learning Department have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To develop and maintain a technical infrastructure to deliver management information and administrative services in a timely and secure manner.

Intended Outcomes The IT Department will maintain, expand, and upgrade the campus technology infrastructure to ensure the timely and secure delivery of information and services.

Assessment Criteria The IT Department will certify to College Dean the completion of wiring upgrades in 100% of renovated buildings to CAT 6 standard to support Gigabit+ for desktops (spring 2013).

Assessment Results The Director of IT confirmed the completion of wiring to CAT 6 standards in JBC, Cosmetology, Welding, and Business Education.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, the department hired an additional part-time employee to better manage demands of this initiative for 12-13 and 13-14. To better gauge employee technology needs, a focus group or survey will be administered in 13-14. Two representatives have been asked by the College Dean to attend Lean Six Sigma training.

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the college’s communication networks (email,

94% of employees reported that the communication networks were adequate for their use.

As a result of analysis, the department has undertaken a series of equipment upgrades, including EMC VNX

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Internet) (12-13 AY and annually).

To provide timely responses and resolutions to help desk support requests

The IT Department will maintain and widen the scope of the help desk software to enhance response and to provide more guidance to end users regarding software functionality.

The Technology Plan will be reviewed and approved by the Technology Committee, with the review results and any recommendations submitted to the presidential cabinet (spring 2012 and annually). 80% of employees surveyed will report satisfaction with help desk technology and response (spring 2013 and annually).

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disk storage array for email and the replacement and upgrade of web filter. To improve service response, the department is adding another technician in 13-14. At the end of the academic year, the plan was still in progress.

Deferred to 13-14.

79% of employees reported that the college has an adequately defined program for maintaining software that is consistent with current technology. 75% reported satisfaction with level of customer service.

As a result of analysis, the department has begun work on a process work flow modeled after the principles of The EMyth, in which processes work like those in a franchise. The model is based on service vectors in which each IT technician has

responsibility for a specified area and meets with area stakeholders on a predetermined cycle. 80% of employees will report satisfaction with the efficiency of the IT department (12-13 AY and annually).

To provide a reliable and redundant server infrastructure that will meet or exceed all performance needs

The IT Department will provide a reliable and redundant server infrastructure that meets or exceeds all performance needs.

A minimum of two professional development sessions will be offered on the features of the help desk software (13-14 AY and annually). The Technology Committee will conduct an annual review of the reliability and performance of the server infrastructure and submit the results of the review and any recommendations to the

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71% of employees reported satisfaction with the efficiency of the IT department.

To improve employee satisfaction rates, the department is adding additional IT staff in 1314 in addition to development and implementation of new service model.

2013-2014

2013-2014

While the review has been moved to 13-14, the department has not implemented redundancy as targeted. Current performance meets accepted industry standards.

To meet the redundancy standard, the department has identified another hard disk array (EMC) for acquisition and implementation in 1314.

presidential cabinet (spring 2013 and annually). To install and maintain a wireless infrastructure capable of handling current needs as well as adaptability for future expansion when required

The IT Department will install and maintain wireless infrastructure capable of handling present and future needs.

To install and maintain a reliable and feature-rich phone system to support campus programs and services

The IT Department will install and maintain a phone system that satisfactorily supports campus programs and services.

The Technology Committee will conduct an annual review of the reliability and performance of wireless infrastructure and submit the results of the review and any recommendations to the presidential cabinet (spring 2013 and annually). 80% of employees surveyed will report satisfaction with the operation and maintenance of the campus telephone system (spring 2013 and every two years).

The Technology Committee review has been deferred to 13-14. Internal review reveals that the infrastructure is functional but not exceptional.

To improve wireless service, the department is implementing a new system in 13-14 with more power and more access points. A schedule for forty new or refitted access points for 13-14 is under development.

94% of employees reported that the communication networks were adequate for their use. However, phone system is old and support options are limited.

To improve the telephone system, the IT staff are replacing the existing Cisco system in 13-14 with TrixBox solution that will support new protocols, has a modern GUI, integrates with Outlook, and provides fax service.

The Technology Committee will conduct an annual review of the reliability and

The Technology Committee review has been deferred to 13-14.

Review deferred to 1314. Planned system upgrades are described above.

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performance of the campus telephone system and submit the results of the review and any recommendations to the presidential cabinet (spring 2013 and annually).

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Analysis and Planning: Information Technology Department Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Obtained more efficient, more responsive Server Rack System to address cooling and fire suppression issues Completed communication infrastructure for new $20M Life Sciences Building, which included nine simulation labs Successfully provided IT support for all academic and student support units

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 2.1 and 2.2). The Director of Information Technology was appointed to this position in 2009, serving as Director of IT for 4 years, and employed at the college for a total of 14 years (Vita, Attachment 2.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • • •

Director of Information Technology Computer Specialist IT Technician IT Assistant/Media Technician Computer Lab Assistant

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • • • • •

Banner Reporting Committee Information Technology Security Committee Diversity Committee Technology Committee QEP Development Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

Complete development and implementation of new vector-driven model for departmental processes and protocols Hire and integrate into workflow two additional technicians

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Management Information Systems Mission: To provide management of integrated information systems and to provide high-quality support and assistance to students, faculty, and administration. To achieve this mission, the personnel of the Management Information Systems Department have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To provide fully integrated, web-based infrastructure to support the college’s administrative processes.

Intended Outcomes The Office will provide fully integrated, webbased infrastructure that optimally supports the college’s administrative processes.

Assessment Criteria The Banner Implementation Team will conduct a review each semester of the effectiveness and efficacy of the computer infrastructure in support of the college’s administrative services (each fall and spring semester).

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Assessment Results The Banner Implementation Team, comprised of representatives of frontline services, met a minimum of once each semester to review the effectiveness and efficacy of the system. A second committee, the Banner Reporting Committee, met more than four times in 12-13 to review the effectiveness and identification of reports generated by Banner or Argos to promote efficiency in workflow and operations.

Use of Results To improve the value and utility of the system, a rigorous schedule of internal and external training was established and implemented. The college also hosted a workshop conducted by Ellucian, a third-party vendor, on improving workflow and processes to maximize the use of Banner as a tool to improve the delivery of products and services.

To manage user access to administrative processes within the IS framework.

To provide adequate safeguards and back-up to maintain system integrity.

The Office will manage and secure user access to administrative processes within the IS framework.

80% of employees surveyed will report satisfaction with Banner training and its applications in the routine performance of administrative duties (2012 AY and annually).

This survey item has been deferred to 13-14. However, extensive training occurred in 1213 as the Banner system went live for the first time in the transition from Access.

80% of employees surveyed will report satisfaction with the timeliness and security of user access to the IS framework (12-13 AY and annually).

95% of employees reported agreement that appropriate security measures are used to protect the integrity of administrative systems.

To improve the utility and responsiveness of Banner, focus has shifted in 13-14 to communication between support staff and endusers through regular meetings of the Banner Implementation Team and the Banner Reporting Committee. To improve the security and integrity of the IS framework, the MIS staff is implementing periodic vulnerability scans.

2013-2014

2013-2014

The MIS Director has produced a comprehensive Back-up Policy/Procedure that ensures the availability of back-up in the event

To ensure that the college’s senior staff are aware of safeguards for backing up systems and documentation, the MIS Director has scheduled a

An audit conducted by the Technology Committee will confirm access security (2013 AY and every two years). The Office will provide An annual report on the and maintain appropriate back-up/security safeguards and back-up protocols for the MIS protocols to ensure will be submitted to and system integrity. reviewed by the presidential cabinet (12-

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13 AY and annually).

To ensure that the MIS is supported by appropriate user and management professional development

The Office will implement a program of MIS professional development that ensures effective access to and use of MIS infrastructure and applications.

The Office will provide a minimum of six workshops on effective MIS access and use (1213 AY and annually).

100% of MIS employees will attend a minimum of six MIS-specific professional development activities (2012 AY and annually)

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of disruption. These provisions ensure that critical areas such as Student Services and Records are preserved and resumed promptly following disruption or compromise. The Office facilitated or arranged more than twenty Banner training workshops during the 12-13 AY.

briefing addressing a comprehensive disaster recovery scenario as part of evaluation of database failure, application failure, and complete disaster recovery at alternative site. To improve the efficacy of training, workshops are scheduled as additional Banner modules are added and/or updated. In addition, a new “work order� system is being implemented in 13-14 and regular meetings have been scheduled between the Director of E-Learning and senior Student Services administrators.

100% of MIS employees attended multiple professional development activities, including ALBUG Conferences in Orange Beach, AL, addressing

As a result of these activities, MIS staff better positioned to transition college from Legacy infrastructure (prior to 2011) to Banner. Banner system

Argos, Workflow, SQL, went live in 2012. Duplicate-Record Cleanup. Other activities addressed the implementation and maintenance of Banner Self-Service, Evisions, Banner Document Management System, Operational Data Store, and Luminis as well as webinars on Achieving the Dream Data Collection and Red Hat Linux.

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Analysis and Planning: Management Information Systems Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Completed Banner project implementation for all functional areas Completed all self-service options available to students, faculty, and employees Implemented priority registration to prevent congestion during registration and to allow students closer to completion the opportunity to register for classes needed

The Back-up Policy and Procedure is attached (Attachment 3.1). Sample Banner training schedules are attached (Attachments 3.2). A professional development record for the Director of MIS is attached (Attachment 3.3). The Director of MIS was appointed to this position in 1998, serving as Director of MIS for 15 years, and employed at the college for a total of 23 years (Vita, Attachment 3.4). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: •

Director of MIS

The Director of MIS served on the following committees: • • • • • •

Banner Implementation Team, Chair Banner Reporting Committee Information Technology Security Committee, Chair Technology Committee Alabama Community College Consortium Alabama Community College Information Services Association

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

Enhance MIS skills through comprehensive program of professional development and association with Alabama Banner User’s Group and Alabama Community College Information Services Association Complete Banner Workflow for scheduling processes in key functional areas Review and update as required the college’s Infrastructure Contingency Plan (This is the overall plan to recover data in the event of a disaster. The Back-Up Policy and Procedure is part of the Contingency Plan.)

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Office of Institutional Research Mission: The mission of the Office of Institutional Research is to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret institutional data to support planning, policy development, and decision-making in fulfillment of the college’s goal to provide a dynamic, learning-centered, caring, and technically advanced environment of excellence. To achieve this mission, the office is committed to the following unit goals and performance measures: Unit Goals To provide relevant institutional information to employees, government agencies, and community stakeholders.

Intended Outcomes The Office will complete all internal and external institutional reports in an accurate, comprehensive, and timely manner.

Assessment Criteria 100% of all internal and external reports and appropriate studies will be completed on or before the institutional deadline with a high degree of accuracy (1213 AY and annually).

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Assessment Results Of 14 major reports on submittal log, 93% were submitted on time. Difficulties were encountered with institutional data, most related to Banner conversion from Legacy system.

Use of Results To improve this result, the Office of the College Dean has added a second full-time researcher with IR experience. In addition, a number of professional development activities were completed in 12-13 to improve skills, including work on Master’s degree in College Student Development at the University of West Alabama and attendance of data workshops associated with Achieving the Dream in Anaheim. Progress in Banner conversion will also improve this

outcome.

To initiate and perform research relevant to institutional decisionmaking and policy development.

Institutional decisionmaking and policy development will be largely data-driven.

The Office will produce and display an institutional enrollment snapshot each semester on the college’s Planning and Assessment website (1213 AY and annually).

The demographic snapshots have been posted regularly on the college website since 2004. The IR Office has begun emailing monthly enrollment updates to all employees.

As a result of these actions, demographic information is readily available for decisionmaking and information for all campus constituencies.

The Assessment Committee will conduct an annual review of the utility and relevance of information and data provided (12-13 AY and annually).

The Assessment Committee reviewed the management and protocols of the IR department at a regularly scheduled meeting on 7.22.13. The Committee noted the volume of program outcome data used to complete the APOA for faculty. No recommendations were made by the committee.

To improve this result, a second full-time researcher was added to department. Researchers gained valuable experience in 12-13 after 100% turnover occurred in Office of College Dean in March, 2012. Repeat Assessment Committee review in spring 2014.

80% of employees will report that appropriate and relevant information is shared within the college so that decisionmakers have access to

This specific item was deferred to the 13-14 employee survey. However, 92% of employees agreed that the Office of Planning

To improve this result, the college’s Administrative Council adopted core measures of effectiveness in July 2013, which will guide

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accurate and current information on which to base decisions (12-13 AY and every two years).

To maintain skills commensurate with best practices and research standards and expectations.

The Office will develop and maintain skills necessary to meet the expectations and workplace demands of contemporary institutional research.

An ad hoc committee appointed by the College Dean and comprised of administration, faculty, and staff representatives will conduct an annual review of the overall quality and utility of research provided to guide institutional decision-making (13-14 AY and every two years). The Research Coordinator(s) will maintain a minimum of one professional membership or affiliation (12-13 AY and annually).

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and Research provides appropriate accreditation support.

data collection in 13-14. In addition, a benefit of the college’s participation in the national Achieving the Dream initiative is the receipt of extensive institutional data sets.

2013-2014

2013-2014

The Research Coordinator is a member of the Alabama Association for Institutional Research (ALAIR) and the Alabama Banner User Group (ALBUG).

As a result of these memberships, the research office staff became more aware of statewide resources available for institutional reporting and enhanced knowledge of processes and protocols associated

with Banner implementation and use. The Research Coordinator(s) will attend a minimum of five research-specific professional development activities or events (12-13 AY and annually).

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The Researchers have attended more than 25 professional development activities, including the annual meeting of ACCA, ALAIR, Perkins workshops in Montgomery, ATD in Anaheim, CA, IPEDS keyholder training in Washington, and the national Benchmarking Conference in Overland Park, KS.

As a result of these activities, the researchers gained a greater understanding of key state reporting requirements, including IPEDS, Perkins, and Gainful Employment. Activities promoted personal and professional growth as practitioners. Many activities were related to Banner conversion and implementation.

Analysis and Planning: Office of Institutional Research Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Attended National Benchmarking Institute in Kansas City in preparation for active institutional participation in 13-14 Participated in AACC Voluntary Framework of Accountability initiative to improve institutional reporting and accountability Successfully uploaded and released data sets associated with national Achieving the Dream initiative

A sample monthly enrollment snapshot is attached as Attachment 4.1. Professional development records for research staff are attached (Attachments 4.2 and 4.3). The Research Coordinator was appointed to this position in 2012, serving for 1.5 years, and employed at the college for a total of 3 years (Vita, Attachment 4.4). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Research Coordinator Research Assistant

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • • • • •

QEP Development Team Assessment Council Calendar Committee Policy and Procedure Committee Banner Reporting Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

Complete major state and federal reports a minimum of two weeks prior to due date with no errors or follow-up Provide all annual program data associated with the APOA on or before May 31

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Campus Security Mission: The mission of Campus Security is to maintain a peaceful, safe learning environment through services marked by professionalism, commitment to the mission of the college, and proactive adherence to sound law enforcement and safety protocols and best practices. To achieve this mission, the Office is committed to the following unit goals and measures of performance: Unit Goals To provide services that contribute to the preservation of life, the protection of property, and the safety of the campus community

Intended Outcomes The Safety and Security (Campus Police) Department will ensure the safety and security of the college’s faculty, staff, and students as well as its property, plant, and equipment through the development of a comprehensive safety program that includes monitoring, supervising, evaluating, and documenting departmental and campus-wide performance.

Assessment Criteria The Campus Safety and Security Plan will be reviewed and approved by the Safety and Security Committee and the Presidential Cabinet (12-13 AY and every three years).

Assessment Results A major revision and update of the Campus Safety and Security Plan was begun in 12-13 but not completed.

Use of Results To commit the resources necessary to complete the plan, the college recruited and oriented five new positions to staff the college’s first full-time campus police department. Review has been rescheduled for spring 2014.

80% of employees surveyed will report agreement that the campus represents a safe and secure environment (12-13 AY and every two years).

86% of employees reported awareness of the college’s comprehensive safety and security plan. Only 75% reported familiarity with their individual responsibility in the event of an emergency.

To improve these results, many changes have been implemented. Campus Police will provide training to building emergency coordinators on their roles and responsibilities in emergencies. A briefing for all employees has been

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prepared for presentation at Convocation in August 2013 and the department has targeted instructor-level certifications to teach and educate employees on current methodologies and strategies for active shooter response and other types of emergencies. 80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with campus safety and security (1213 AY and annually).

89% of students reported satisfaction with campus safety and security on 2013 student survey.

The Office will conduct a minimum of one educational safety program for students

The Office conducted 8 programs or briefings to students. Representatives spoke to dorm

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To improve these results, Campus Police have developed a number of quick reference response information for employees and students in the form of pamphlets, posters, website information, and email instructions on prescribed actions in the event of an emergency. To improve this outcome, Campus Police has developed the quick

(12-13 AY and annually).

residents, athletes, and many program student assemblies. Distributed “Active Shooter” video campus wide.

The Office will conduct a minimum of one educational safety program for employees (12-13 AY and annually).

The Office conducted four safety and security programs or briefings for employees, including distribution of “Active Shooter” video in response to Newtown shootings and three briefings at employee assemblies.

100% of mandated state and federal reports will be submitted accurately and on or before the institutional deadline (12-13 AY and

100% of all required state and federal reports, including compliance with Cleary Act, were submitted in a timely and efficient manner

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response information for disseminating information described above in addition to present and future professional development that is focused on best practices when emergencies occur on a campus. The dorm briefings and other student programs will be repeated in 13-14 To enhance the safety of the campus environment, the Office will continue the safety briefings. The office will continue to incorporate the Alabama Homeland Security Virtual Alabama School Safety System into the college’s overall safety plan. To sustain this result, the department has improved its staffing and record-keeping. Now that the department is

To enhance awareness of best practices and innovation in providing programs and services addressing campus safety and security

The Campus Security staff will engage in selected professional development activities that reflect best practices, innovation, and good stewardship.

annually).

without follow-up inquiries.

Representatives of the department will attend a minimum of three professional development activities that address contemporary collegiate safety and security issues and best practices (12-13 AY and annually).

Representatives of the department attended fourteen documented professional development activities, many resulting in the award of CEUs. Topics addressed included legal topics and liability management in law enforcement, leadership, counter-terrorism, crime reporting policies and procedures, and AISO training.

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fully staffed specific personnel have been designated to ensure that all state and federal monthly and annual reports are completed accurately and in a timely manner. As a result of these activities, the office has become more knowledgeable about compliance with Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) policies and protocols, interrogation and intervention techniques, and responding to active shooter and other campus emergencies. For each professional development activity completed, the staff member submits a report on its benefit and a copy of any certificate or credential awarded.

Analysis and Planning: Campus Security Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Implemented the college’s first police department (recognized by the state of Alabama as a law enforcement agency) Employed appropriate number of law enforcement officers to provide 24/7 police presence on campus Two campus police officers became certified instructors in Active Shooter Response

A sample safety brochure is provided (Attachment 5.1). Representative professional development records are attached (Attachments 5.2 and 5.3). The Chief of Campus Police was appointed to this position in May, 2012, serving for 2 years, with a total of 27 years in law enforcement (Vita, Attachment 5.4). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • •

Chief, Campus Police Lieutenant Certified Law Enforcement Officers (5) Security Officer

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • •

Institutional Health, Safety, and Security Committee Behavioral Evaluation and Threat Assessment Team

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

Perform building evacuation drills a minimum of once each fall and spring semesters Increase visibility of emergency-related information for students and employees

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Fiscal Management Mission: The mission of the Fiscal Management Office is to provide quality financial and business services that facilitate the achievement of the college’s mission. To achieve this mission, the office is committed to the following goals and performance measures: Unit Goals To ensure the provision of quality accounting, budgeting, financial reporting, and procurement for the college

Intended Outcomes The Office will provide leadership in the areas of accounting, budgeting, financial reporting, and procurement services in accordance with statutory requirements, generally accepted accounting principles, and sound business practices.

Assessment Criteria 100% of budget supervisors will submit budget reviews and approvals annually (1213 AY and annually).

Assessment Results 100% of budget supervisors submitted budget reviews and approvals as a preliminary step in preparing and submitting institutional budget for 2012-13 academic year. Conducted lunch and learn with College Dean on budget process for Nursing faculty and staff in preparation for equipping new simulation lab/move into new Nursing Building.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, and using Nursing as a model, plans have been made to promote a better understanding of budget process through more small meetings with groups of employees.

The annual budget and the annual financial statements due to the Department of Postsecondary Education will be

100% of annual budget and financial statements were submitted to DPE in a timely and accurate manner with only routine follow-ups.

As a result of submitting budgetary and financial statements in a timely manner, the college has continued to be in compliance with DPE

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submitted on or before the institutional due date (12-13 AY and annually). The Office will conduct quarterly departmental reviews to discuss unit issues and fiscal improvement (13-14 AY and annually).

To assist students with financial needs and to provide a customer-

The Office will provide proactive financial assistance in a courteous

protocols and has been able to fund institutional operations efficiently and without interruption.

2013-2014

2013-2014

Revenue generation, profit and loss statements, fund balances, and investments in the context of need analysis and current and future trends will be reviewed annually by the President and her designees for strategic planning purposes (1213 AY and annually).

The Dean of Finance and Administration met regularly with the president to analyze financial statements, investments, budgets, and operational and discretionary spending. All financial reports were reviewed and approved by the president before submittal.

80% of graduating students will report satisfaction with the

85% of graduating students reported satisfaction with the

As a result of analysis, the Dean of Finance and Administration has added a personal subscription to the Chronicle of Higher Education and has committed to attending a minimum of one professional development activity focused primarily on responding proactively to current and future trends impacting the institutional landscape. To improve graduating student satisfaction rates, the office has increased

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friendly atmosphere while adhering to all regulatory requirements regarding student accounts and student aid

and friendly manner, while ensuring compliance with all regulatory requirements regarding student accounts and student aid.

services of the Fiscal Management Office/Cashier’s Office (12-13 AY and every two years).

quality of service provided by the Business Office.

staffing and made customer service an area of special emphasis.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the quality of financial information and assistance (12-13 AY and every two years).

79% of students reported satisfaction with the quality of the Business Office services. 86% reported satisfaction with the level of customer service.

To improve student satisfaction rates, the office has transitioned to a new computer system that offers a more efficient and studentfriendly medium for the dissemination of student information electronically.

Annual audits conducted by the Alabama Department of Examiners of Public Accounts and other applicable agencies will certify that the Office is in full compliance with regulatory state and federal policies and procedures regarding student accounts and student aid (12-13 AY and annually).

Three separate audits were conducted by the Alabama Department of Public Examiners or other entities during the 12-13 AY with no findings.

While the department received no findings, auditors made suggestions for process and operational improvement. To this end, the department implemented several changes in departmental protocols. The office now requires, for example, that manual student account adjustments be reviewed

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and approved by management. Also, Accounts Receivable allowances are more accurately reported. To improve business operations, the department implemented several organizational and functional changes, promoting the AP Clerk to Operations Accountant and hiring a new AP Clerk. To improve operations, the department has also continued with Banner implementation and integration among the financial and reporting modules and platforms. To enhance awareness of best practices and innovation in providing financial programs and services

The Fiscal Management Office will engage in selected professional development activities that reflect best practices, innovation, and good stewardship.

Representatives of the department will attend a minimum of six professional development activities that address contemporary collegiate fiscal administration and best practices (12-13 AY

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Representatives of the department attended more than twenty professional development activities in 12-13, many associated with Banner implementation and use. Activities included

As a result of these activities, particularly the many hours of Banner training, enabled the staff to transition from the legacy system to Banner in a manner that ensured efficient and continuous Business

and annually).

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attendance of the ACSFMA spring 2013 meeting in Guntersville and SACS Orientation in Atlanta.

Office functions and to perform timely and accurate fiscal reporting for state and federal agencies.

Analysis and Planning: Fiscal Management Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • • •

Implementation and testing of Banner finance modules Completed all federal and state audits with only one finding Managed $50M operational budget Successfully resolved $12M in storm damage claims associated with April 2011 tornado

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 6.1 and 6.2). The Dean of Finance and Administration was appointed in 2012, has served for 2 years and has been employed at the college for 9 years (Vita, Attachment 6.3). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Dean of Finance and Administration presents oral and written reports on the division (sample, Attachment 6.4). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • • • • • • • •

Dean of Finance and Administration Operations Accountants (2) Administrative Assistant Accounts Payable/Payroll Accountant (2) Restricted Funds Accountant Accounts Payable Clerk Cashier Accounts Receivable/Billing Clerk (PT) Accounts Receivable Clerk Inventory Clerk (PT)

Representatives of the division served on the following committees: • • • • • • • • •

Executive Cabinet Administrative Council Carl Perkins Steering Committee Personnel Handbook Committee QEP Development Team Scholarship Committee Banner Reporting Committee Banner Leads Team Technology Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14:

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Action Items for Dean of Finance and Administration from Executive Planning Retreat Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices. -Fiscal Management plans to support the “Be One of Us” Honor Code through a variety of intentional methods, including: • • • •

Recognition from management of positive actions taken by staff that exhibit desired behavior. Staff meetings communicating expectations of customer service, attitude, and desired environment. Training of how to “accompany” the student to the next stage or person in the process; taking ownership of the students’ needs. Staff training to reinforce the One Stop mentality of servicing students as opposed to sending them to multiple offices/people.

-Fiscal Management will seek technological solutions to enable a 24/7 online global population through various methods, including: • • •

Electronic billing and links to student accounts for typical financial-related information Timely response to after-hour emails and voicemails Seeking solutions for electronic deposit of student refunds as opposed to mailing checks

Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success -Fiscal Management will seek to provide an easy-to-understand method of educating students on the practical principles of financial management as they relate to student success. Students are more likely to succeed in the classroom if they are not facing financial stress. Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning

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-Fiscal Management will offer department level budgeting and purchasing workshops to enhance faculty and staff’s understanding of funding opportunities, efficient use of operational budgets, and opportunities for leveraging purchases by coordinating with other departments with similar needs (for example technical divisions sharing a technical piece of equipment instead of all buying their own). Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness -Fiscal Management will promote this culture by ensuring all financial transactions and reporting is compliant with current laws and regulations from various governing agencies; -Fiscal Management will routinely review budgeted funds against actual expenditures to ensure plans are meeting objectives. -Fiscal Management will provide clear and accurate financial reporting to governing agencies, management, and stakeholders to promote transparency and trust. -Fiscal Management will analyze financial results and future trends to promote improved use of assets as it relates to the strategic plan.

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Bookstore Mission: The mission of the college bookstore is to serve the campus community of Wallace State Community College by providing a variety of services to support and enhance the quality of campus life for students, faculty, staff, and alumni while maintaining fiscally sound business practices. To achieve this mission, the bookstore is committed to the following unit goals and performance measures: Unit Goals To provide textbooks and supplies to support the college in its academic, health, and technical programs

Intended Outcomes The Bookstore will manage the identification, acquisition, and sale of textbooks, supplies, and other items necessary to support the academic programs of the college.

Assessment Criteria 80% of students will report satisfaction with the campus bookstore (12-13 AY and every two years).

Assessment Results 86% of students reported satisfaction with the Bookstore. 90% reported satisfaction with level of customer service.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, the staff have made several changes. To make the Bookstore more welcoming, for example, the staff has begun offering free coffee in mornings. Apparel has also been upgraded to make it more appealing to students and other customers.

80% of graduating students will report satisfaction with the campus bookstore (1213 AY and every two years).

This item was omitted on the 2013 graduate survey.

Question to be added in 2014.

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To provide merchandised that enhances the collegiate environment

The Bookstore will provide non-academic merchandise that enhances the college environment.

To enhance awareness of best practices and innovation in providing Bookstore services

The Bookstore staff will engage in selected professional development activities that reflect best practices, innovation, and good stewardship.

Revenue generation, profit, and fund balance will be reviewed annually by the president and her designees for strategic planning purposes (AY 13-14 and every two years). 80% of students will report satisfaction with the non-academic merchandise offered (12-13 AY and every two years).

Representatives of the department will attend a minimum of one professional development activity that address contemporary collegiate bookstore administration and best practices (12-13 AY and annually).

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2013-2013

2013-2014

No question on the 1213 student survey dealt specifically with nonacademic merchandise. 86% reported satisfaction with the Bookstore overall.

To improve collegiate merchandising quality and appeal, organizational change made in responsibility for merchandising. Sales can be tracked in 13-14 through Banner. A question on merchandise has been added to the 2014 student survey. As a result of these activities, staff enhanced soft skills in customer service and in office programs and services, as well as technical and operational skills in implementing Bannercompatible management software.

100% of Bookstore staff attended seven or more professional development activities, including workshops on handling irate students, document formatting, office etiquette, stress management, and MBS training in accounts payable and secured

rentals. (One employee reported 20 separate activities.) To develop an efficient and user-friendly method for students to purchase textbooks and supplies via the Internet

The Bookstore will develop an efficient and user-friendly portal accessible via the Internet that enables students to purchase textbooks and supplies.

The Bookstore will complete by 12/2014 an Internet portal for the purchase of textbooks and supplies (13-14 AY). 80% of students will report satisfaction with Internet portal for the purchase of textbooks and supplies (13-14 AY and every two years).

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2013-2014

2013-2014

2013-2014

2013-2014

Analysis and Planning: Bookstore Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

Increased annual net profit 66% by reducing expenses Implemented book rental program

Representative professional development records are attached (Attachments 7.1 and 7.2). The Manager of the Bookstore was appointed to this position in 2006, serving for 7 years, and employed at the college for a total of 8 years (Vita, Attachment 7.3). The Bookstore includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • •

Auxiliary Director/Bookstore Manager Assistant Bookstore Manager Bookstore Clerk-3 positions Part-Time/As-Needed Clerk-3 positions

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • • • • • • • • • •

Common Read Committee Human Resources Committee QEP Committee Professional Development Committee Policy and Procedure Committee Administrative Council SACSCOC Committee Sick Leave Bank Committee Social Committee Selection Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

Complete the implementation of the e-commerce website Expand selection of rental book titles Implement Service Desk Plus to track emails, orders, and inquiries.

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Auxiliary Services Mission: The mission of the Auxiliary Services Department is to provide quality goods, services, and strategic business partnerships to the campus community that will enhance the overall experience of students, faculty, and staff. To achieve this mission, the department is committed to the following goals and performance measures: Unit Goals To provide faculty, staff, and student transportation for approved travel

To provide well maintained, student-

Intended Outcomes The Auxiliary Services department will maintain campus vehicles, provide bus drivers, and schedule fleet dispatch to facilitate safe and timely travel for faculty, staff, and students.

The Auxiliary Services Department will provide

Assessment Criteria 80% of employees surveyed will report satisfaction with the quality of transportation services (12-13 AY and every two years).

Assessment Results 84% of employees reported satisfaction with college’s transportation services.

Use of Results To improve this service, the department is searching for other options for washing vehicles while current wash bay is being utilized by Zero RPM in the business incubation program.

An audit by an ad hoc committee chaired by the Chair of Institutional Health, Safety, and Security Committee or his designee of the routine service records of fleet vehicles will reflect proper and timely maintenance (12-13 AY and every two years). 80% of students surveyed will report

An audit by an ad hoc committee chaired by the Director of Safety and Security revealed no findings. Documentation of regular and appropriate servicing demonstrated high level of performance regarding routine and preventive maintenance. A comprehensive dormitory student survey

Repeat audit in 15-16 AY.

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Review results in 20132014.

friendly on-campus housing for fulltime students

a safe living environment that promotes positive academic progress and that enhances the overall quality of campus life.

satisfaction regarding the quality of campus housing services (12-13 AY and every two years).

To provide superior vending and concession services to students, employees, and community visitors

The Auxiliary Services Department will efficiently operate vending machines and provide concession services for athletic events.

Revenue generation, profits, and fund balances will be reviewed annually by the president and designees for strategic planning purposes (1213 AY and every two years). An unannounced inspection by an ad hoc committee chaired by the Chair of Institutional Health, Safety, and Security Committee or his designee of the five highest traffic vending service areas will demonstrate clean and efficient service. (12-13 AY and annually).

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was developed by the Office of the College Dean and approved by the Dean of Administrative and Financial Services for distribution in October 2013. 2013-2014

2013-2014

While the inspection has been deferred to 13-14, the five highest revenue vending sites have been identified (Bevill, Diesel/Welding, Biology, Nursing, and Machine Shop).

Inspection deferred to 13-14 AY.

Analysis and Planning: Auxiliary Services Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Hired highly qualified part-time bus driver for campus transportation needs Began renovation of men’s dormitories Replaced all bedding in men’s dormitories

Representative professional development records are attached (Attachments 8.1 and 8.2). The Manager of the Bookstore/Auxiliary Services was appointed to this position in 2006, serving for 7 years, and employed at the college for a total of 8 years (Vita, Attachment 8.3). Auxiliary Services includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • • • • •

Auxiliary Director/Bookstore Manager Auxiliary Assistant Auxiliary Secretary Vending Housekeeping/Concessions Bus Driver (PT) Concessions Worker (PT)

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • • • • •

Human Resources Committee Sick Leave Bank Committee Safety and Security Committee Professional Development Committee Social Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

Purchase new bus Complete remodeling of men’s dormitories Successfully contract new café space to qualified vendor

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Office of the Dean of Applied Technologies Mission: The purpose of the Office of the Dean of Applied Technologies is to plan and coordinate all aspects of the instructional programs included in the Applied Technologies Division. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the Office of the Dean of Applied Technologies have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To coordinate and provide support to each program in the Applied Technologies Division

Intended Outcomes The Office of the Dean of Applied Technologies will lead the technical faculty within the division in the achievement of instructional objectives, monitor progress, and ensure that programmatic and regional accreditation criteria and standards are met.

Assessment Criteria In coordination with the Office of the College Dean, 100% of instructional units in division will satisfactorily complete comprehensive program reviews encompassing student learning and program outcomes, including professional development and other standard measures of program effectiveness (12-13 AY and annually).

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Assessment Results 100% of instructional units completed comprehensive program reviews, encompassing both student learning and program outcomes. These reviews are documented in the institutional Academic Program Outcomes Assessment, 2012-2015.

Use of Results Many benefits have been realized as a result of the implementation of a new comprehensive planning and assessment model. Each unit has documented specific curricular and cocurricular changes that resulted from its planning and assessment activities. The standardization of program outcomes has brought a consistent and uniform perspective to professional development, job placement, advisory committees, and other dimensions of program effectiveness. Consistent

high standards of documentation have facilitated the identification and prioritization of specific budgetary needs in each unit. 100% of regularly scheduled accreditation reviews were satisfactorily completed. Reviews were completed during 12-13 AY for Industrial Electronics, Drafting, HVAC, and Welding. Diesel Mechanics completed and received accreditation in March, 2012, and Culinary Arts in August 2011. The Dean of Applied The Dean of Applied Technologies will attend Technologies attended a minimum of four more than ten professional professional development activities development activities, that promote the including SACSCOC in realization of the Dallas, ACCA in college’s mission, Birmingham, IOA in vision, and strategic plan Orange Beach, and 100% of applicable programs will successfully complete regularly scheduled accreditation review by external accrediting entities (12-13 AY and annually).

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

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As a result of successful accreditation efforts, programmatic improvement occurred endemic to external reviews. In addition, the college is able to continue to market applied technology programs as fully accredited where applicable.

As a result of these activities, the Office has become more aware of best practices in program administration and development. Workshops at SACSCOC, for example, were

To engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects a commitment to growth and possibility

The Office will engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects both a local and global commitment to growth and possibility.

(12-13 AY and annually).

AACC WDI in San Diego. The Dean completed the Alabama Community College Leadership Academy. The Administrative Assistant to Dean the college’s nominee for the Chancellor’s Award for outstanding performance.

particularly valuable on the national completion agenda and its associated practices.

The Dean of Applied Technologies will maintain membership in a minimum of two professional and/or service organizations (12-13 AY and annually).

The Dean of Applied Technologies maintained memberships in the following organizations: Alabama Instructional Officers Association (IOA), American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), and the National Council of Workforce Education (NCWE).

As a result of participation in professional and community organizations, involvement in institutional and programmatic strategy was enhanced. Chairmanship of Career/Technical Strategic Action Team, for example, facilitated collaboration and communication about trends shaping applied technology professions and local needs and

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expectations for graduates.

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Analysis and Planning: Office of Dean of Applied Technologies Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

• • • •

Received approval for an Associate of Applied Science in Engineering Technology Received approval for short term certificates in Engineering Technology with options of Architectural Engineering Technology, Building Construction Management, Mechanical/Civil Engineering Technology, and Building Construction Received approval for an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology with an option in Agriculture Production, Welding, HVAC, Automotive Service Technology, Collision Repair or Diesel Mechanics Received approval for a short term certificate in Injection Molding Developed and published a technical recruiting brochure Developed an industrial maintenance apprenticeship with REHAU

A professional development record is attached (Attachment 9.1). The Dean of Applied Technologies was appointed in October 2011, and has served more than two years. He has been employed at the college for 5 years (Vita, Attachment 9.2). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Dean of Applied Technologies presents oral and written reports on the division (sample, Attachment 9.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Dean of Applied Technologies Administrative Assistant to the Dean

The Dean of Instruction served on the following committees: • • • • •

Administrative Council Carl Perkins Steering Committee Leadership WSCC QEP Committee Green Team Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices.

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1. Develop a common curriculum flow chart among all the technical programs for course progression and create a common format for syllabi and advisor checklists. 2. Update/upgrade technical program websites on MyWallaceState.

Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success 1. Continue and expand our dual enrollment opportunities in career and technical programs to promote post-secondary persistence, retention, and completion.

Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment

1. Develop internships for each technical program. 2. Broaden/update advisory committee memberships to include local industry leaders who will communicate the current industry needs.

Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning

1. Develop a 5 year strategic plan for the technical division and each program individually.

Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness

1. Develop and expand the student learning outcome (SLOs) for each technical program to include relevant and measurable skill sets.

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Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the college’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries

1. Develop/expand the course content presented on Blackboard to include lecture material and recordings.

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Institutional Outreach (Continuing Education) The purpose of the Office of Institutional Outreach is to provide programs, events, and services that improve or enhance workforce preparedness and the overall quality of life for community stakeholders. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the Office of Institutional Outreach have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To provide short-term non-credit certificates that enhance workforce skills in response to specific employment opportunities.

Intended Outcomes The Office of Institutional Outreach will provide short-term, non-credit training and instruction that enhances employment opportunities.

Assessment Criteria An ad hoc committee chaired by the Director of Institutional Outreach will conduct an annual review of the present and future training needs of local and regional business and industry (each spring semester).

Assessment Results The committee was formed in 12-13 AY. Initial meeting scheduled for January 2014.

Use of Results First meeting scheduled for January 2014.

80% of students in programs offering an industry credential will achieve a passing score on the first attempt on the industry certification examination (each semester).

Tracking pass rates has been problematic because testers routinely provide the results directly to the student.

To improve tracking, beginning in 13-14, permission forms are being signed by students to allow test results to be sent to college.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the quality and

Evaluations were reviewed spring 2013 for five randomly

As a result of analysis, request sent to Director of Marketing and Public

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To provide programs and services that enhance lifelong learning

The Office of Institutional Outreach will offer programs and services that enhance lifelong learning.

comprehensiveness of the instructional program offering (each semester).

selected courses. 100% of respondents reported satisfaction in each course across multiple metrics. Despite high ratings, CDL students offered recommendations on improving practice conditions and locating program information online.

Relations to relocate and repackage CDL program information on institutional website. Links have been modified to make information more accessible and userfriendly. In addition, a new truck for CDL instructional use has been purchased. A larger lot is under discussion.

The Office will offer a minimum of ten programs that address “quality of life” dimensions of learning (each fall and spring semester).

The college offered more than twenty “quality of life” programs spring 2013 in such areas as genealogy, digital photography, yoga, Spanish, and ballroom dancing. Approximately 350 students participated.

To continue to offer a broad spectrum of such programs, the Office actively solicits instructors for marketable programs. To increase market presence, Office staff expanded by the recruitment of full-time administrative assistant. Office represented on Chamber of Commerce Existing Business and Industry Committee and Cullman Area Workforce Solutions

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(CAWS). The college makes hundreds of programs available through a commercial supplier, Ed2go. 80% of students will report satisfaction with the breadth and range of programs and services offered to enhance lifelong learning (each semester).

To engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects a commitment to growth and possibility

The Office will engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects both a local and global commitment to growth and possibility.

The Dean of Institutional Outreach will maintain membership in a minimum of two professional and/or service organizations (12-13 AY and annually).

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Course evaluations were reviewed from four randomly selected courses offered fall or spring during the 12-13 AY. 100% of respondents reported satisfaction across multiple metrics. The Dean of Institutional Outreach is a member of the Existing Business and Industry Committee of the Cullman County Chamber of Commerce and CAWS.

To sustain these results, the Office monitors course evaluations closely. Beginning Fall 2013, letters of appreciation sent to instructional staff at the end of successful courses. As a result of participation in community organizations, community involvement in institutional strategy was enhanced. Involvement at the Chamber, for example, allows the Office to disseminate information on continuing education programs to the business and professional community, which in turn offers suggestions

for courses. To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

The Dean of Institutional Outreach will attend a minimum of three professional development activities that promote the realization of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan (12-13 AY and annually).

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The Dean of Institutional Outreach attended multiple professional development activities, including monthly training in diverse facets of workforce development sponsored by the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education. Also received training in leadership development conducted by the Leadership Institute in Columbus, GA.

As a result of these activities, skills as manager and practitioners enhanced. Particularly valuable was sales training in selling services to different personality types, identifying workforce skills gaps, mining for untapped training opportunities, time management, marketing for business growth, sales call protocols, and fulfillment models.

Analysis and Planning: Office of Institutional Outreach Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

Offered more than 100 courses related to workforce development/employment (samples attached as Attachments 10.1) Offered more than 200 courses related to lifelong learning/quality of life (samples attached as Attachments 10.2)

Professional Development activities included: • Alabama Workforce Development Professional Certificate of Participation for 12month professional development program (Certificate, Attachment 10.3) • Leadership Training Workshops facilitated by Kelvin Redd from the Leadership Institute in Columbus, Georgia • Defibrillator training The Dean of Institutional Outreach was appointed in 2007, serving 6 years in this position, and employed by the college for 23 years (Vita, Attachment 10.4). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Dean of Institutional Outreach presents oral and written reports on assigned responsibilities (sample, Attachment 10.5). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Dean of Institutional Outreach Administrative Assistant to the Dean

The Dean of Institutional Outreach served on the following committees: • • • • • •

Administrative Council Diversity Committee (Cabinet Liaison) Catalog Committee Graduation Committee Social Committee Benevolent Fund Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: •

Increase number of CE/TBI courses by 20% o Offer more online programs and courses by securing third party providers similar to Ed2go o Develop modular courses in smaller, specific content areas extracted from existing credit courses o Develop pathways for non-credit students to move to credit courses o Develop more CE opportunities by working with technical and health faculty (Attachment 8) 61

o Continue to test viable health program options Increase enrollment by 5% in TBI and 15% in CE/CEU o Implement online course schedule publication by semester o Improve website content o Increase email marketing capacity by implementing Constant Contact through CE department o Acquire new online TBI third-party providers Increase satisfaction rates to 90% for campus events o Develop standard event evaluation form o Improve communication through Event Coordinator training o Improve image of department through raising dress standards Expand CDL enrollment by 15% o Recruit personnel for evening/weekend CDL program o Secure training lot to meet new testing requirements

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Office of Dean of Academic Affairs The purpose of the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs is to abide by the college’s strategic plan in promoting teaching excellence within the college, to facilitate faculty training for purposeful student learning, and to ensure that the college remains in compliance with the dictates of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education and SACSCOC and other accreditation entities. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To coordinate and provide appropriate professional development opportunities to academic faculty

Intended Outcomes The Office will ensure that faculty undertake appropriate professional development to ensure that the college’s academic programs remain responsive to stakeholder expectations in terms of currency, breadth of coverage, and efficacy.

Assessment Criteria 80% of academic faculty will attend a minimum of two professional development activities in an academic year, including one that is discipline-specific (data compiled each summer semester).

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Assessment Results 100% of academic faculty reported a minimum of two professional development activities. For programs of study with a terminal degree or certificate, professional development summaries are included in the APOA as a standard program assessment measure. Summaries also appear in the APOA for General Educationrelated student learning competencies. Although widespread documented activities in use of resources and teaching pedagogy, discipline-

Use of Results As a result of analysis, discipline-specific activities have become an area of special focus. Chairs have been notified that this is an evaluative item on performance appraisals. Specific benefits of professional development are documented throughout the APOA. The office updated the faculty evaluation form to better assess faculty performance as teachers and practitioners.

To promote excellence and equivalence in distance education

The Office will ensure that distance education offerings meet a standard of excellence and equivalence.

100% of online courses are reviewed by faculty for rigor and content (each semester).

The college will increase by 10% the number of degrees offered totally online.

To engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects a commitment to growth and possibility

The Office will engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects both a local and global commitment to growth and possibility.

The Dean of Academic Affairs will maintain membership in a minimum of two professional and/or service organizations (12-13 AY and annually).

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specific activities were consistently weak. 100% of online courses have been evaluated through a collaborative review process prior to offering. Courses are evaluated at the end of each semester through normal review process, including student evaluations specific to distance learning.

The college offered four online degrees in both the 10-11 and 11-12 academic years.

As a result of analysis, the review protocols have been modified for the 13-14 AY. A new protocol has been developed that features the Quality Matters rubric and responsibility for rigor and content shared by program chairs and a faculty review committee.

As a result of strategic planning and desire to increase online presence, online degrees offered will increase 33% (4 to 6) in 13-14 AY. College added online generic AA and AS degrees. The Dean of Academic As a result of Affairs is a member of participation in the Board of Directors of community and Cullman Parks and professional Recreation and the organizations, the dean Cullman Aquatics board, received immediate and a member of the information on Cullman Parks and community updates and

Recreation Foundation and the Instructional Officers Association of Alabama.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

planning activities within the community at large as well as input into organizational and policy development in instruction throughout the state. The Dean of Academic The Dean of Instruction As a result of these Affairs will attend a attended multiple activities, general minimum of three professional education competencies professional development activities, have been strengthened development activities including the AAC&U across divisions, a that promote the Conference on General diversity assessment has realization of the Education Assessment at been added to Learning college’s mission, the University of Communities, additional vision, and strategic plan Vermont, SACS in instructional resources (12-13 AY and Dallas, Achieving the have been added for annually). Dream in Anaheim, and student use, and changes the Learning and in developmental Reading Conference in education have occurred Boston. (e.g., examination of feedback from other colleges on examination of Compass cut scores, Compass test preparation ideas, online orientation, an expansion of Learning Community offerings, and the acquisition of new software to better serve

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To provide academic support to promote student achievement and reduce barriers to student success

To promote student success through

The Office will provide academic support programs and services that promote student achievement and reduce barriers to student success.

The Office will promote students success through

incoming students. As a result of analysis, the recommendation on the hiring of the additional SLA tutors was adopted and implemented for the 1314 AY. The second recommendation on enhancing the publicizing of the SLA tutoring services was also adopted and implemented.

An ad hoc committee chaired by the College Dean or a Division Chair will conduct an annual review of the academic support programs and services and submit any recommendations for improvement to the Dean of Instruction (each spring semester).

Faculty reviewed these programs and services and recommended an additional SLA (Structured Learning Assistance) tutor for computer science and an additional tutor for developmental English. In order to enhance publicizing SLA tutor availability, faculty recommended increasing marketing through information on course syllabi, in person by instructors during classes, and on individual instructor websites.

80% of students utilizing student support programs and services will report satisfaction with their value and efficacy (each spring semester). Retention among firsttime, fulltime students

Survey response too low Repeat survey in 13-14 for significance. AY and ensure larger Documented 239 student sample population. sessions in fall 12 and 271 spring 13.

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The Office chose to focus on a major

Faculty will check fall-to spring retention rates

enhanced student engagement in the First Year Gateway Program, particularly for students who are underprepared or members of special populations.

the development and administration of a FirstYear Gateway Program that reflects evidencebased intervention strategies and Best Practices.

participating in one or more FYG programs or services will increase 10% YOY (12-13 AY and annually).

Graduation rates among first-time, fulltime students participating in one or more FYGP programs or services will increase 10% YOY (13-14 AY and annually).

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component of the FYG program, Learning Communities. A new model was implemented for the 13-14 AY with approximately 30 faculty participating.

against control population when Learning Communities begin in Fall, 2013.

2013-2014

2013-2014

Analysis and Planning: Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • • • • • • • • • •

Revised academic syllabi requirements Assisted with offering of college’s first MOOC (Attachment 11.1) Hosted professional development on flipped learning and teaching in Digital Age (Agenda example, Attachment 11.2) Assisted with development of online orientation Assisted with development of new “Salerno” model of Learning Communities that enlisted more than thirty faculty and 600 students (starting with zero) (Learning Communities brochure, Attachment 11.3) Developed manual for Dual Enrollment (Attachment 11.4) Hosted community summit on Dual Enrollment and Fast-Track (Agenda, Attachment 11.5) Developed new faculty evaluation form (Attachment 11.6) Guided academic faculty professional development consistent with mission and Five-Year Strategic Plan Expanded SLA tutoring Proposed online AA and AS degrees (Attachment 11.7)

A professional development record is attached (Attachment 11.8). The Dean of Instruction was appointed as interim dean in August, 2012, previously serving as Chair, English and Speech (Vita, Attachment 11.9). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Dean of Instruction presents oral and written reports on academic division (sample, Attachment 11.10). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Dean of Instruction Administrative Assistant to the Dean

The Dean of Instruction served on the following committees: • • • • • • •

Administrative Council Carl Perkins Steering Committee First-Year Gateway Committee, Cabinet Liaison Professional Development Committee, Cabinet Liaison Common Read Committee, Cabinet Liaison Achieving the Dream Implementation Team, co-leader Cultural Arts Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14:

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Action Items for Dean of Instruction from Executive Planning Retreat Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices Meet with Director of Marketing to develop honor code and method of orientation for new and existing employees (integrate into Teaching/Learning Academy) Promote and increase College programs/services within the community by participating in service organizations Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build selfesteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success Continue to examine best practices and integrate professional development opportunities for faculty Include segment in Teaching/Learning Academy as well as a research project based upon best practices Require a minimum of one infield professional development activity from all faculty Provide a minimum of one professional development for Academic faculty based upon best practices and most effective methods of student engagement Stress the importance of Advisory Committees and ensure they are utilized by programs Require eight hours of volunteer work in the Advising Center as well as two programs dedicated to advising as part of the Teaching/Learning Academy Require all faculty to participate in ORI as well as Lions’ Pride Begin college awareness earlier through FT and DE with stronger partnerships with K12 Plan a definite course of action for all students visiting the Testing Center (better COMPASS prep) Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the College’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment Offer more professional development in discipline-specific areas as well as best practices and technology Continue to expand online offerings and streamline certification process to ensure quality and accuracy 69

Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning Strategically identify needs for both development and resources in Academic Division Expand business and industry contacts through various programs and utilize Advisory Committees more fully Promote cohesion among college units by communicating better and offering more opportunities for all divisions to provide programs and services together (learning communities, Freshman/Faculty Lunches, Professional Development opportunities, etc.) Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness Establish regular cycle of requesting and receiving institutional reports among all departments Utilize all performance metrics available more fully Promote better communication through meetings and updates (department chair meeting, faculty meetings, committee chair meetings, etc.) Continue to support and assess faculty (revised instrument stressing important aspects) Being open and accountable Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the College’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries Expand online offerings (especially in the sciences) as well as programs Improve technology use for all classes and programs through Professional Development training and individual work Expand cross-disciplinary opportunities through the Common Read, Learning Communities, Freshman/Faculty Lunch, and Diversity Committee activities

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Office of Extended Day The purpose of the Office of Extended Day is to plan and coordinate academic and student services in order to provide students with a safe evening environment that promotes learning. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the Office of Extended Day have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To provide access for evening students to appropriate academic, advising, and support programs and services

Intended Outcomes The Office will facilitate evening student access to appropriate academic, advising, and support programs and services

Assessment Criteria 80% of evening students surveyed will report satisfaction with access to academic, advising, and support programs and services provided (12-13 AY and annually).

The quality, schedule, and range of evening programs and services will be reviewed annually by the Enrollment Management Committee and recommendations will be forwarded to the Dean of Academic Affairs and the Executive Vice

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Assessment Results Data was collected on student perceptions regarding student programs and services, but evening students were not differentiated.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, a survey instrument specifically addressing evening students was developed by the Director of Extended Day and the College Dean for implementation Fall Semester 2013.

2013-2014

2013-2014

To participate in collegewide planning to ensure that evening programs and services are regularly analyzed for utility and efficacy

The Director of Extended Programs will ensure that evening programs and services are represented in strategic discussions by the college’s leadership team.

President (13-14 AY and annually). 80% of the regularly scheduled meetings of the presidential cabinet will include representation by the Director of Evening Programs (12-13 AY and annually).

To coordinate academic, technical, financial, and business services after normal business hours

The Office of Extended Day will ensure that all evening programs and services are adequately coordinated to promote learning and engagement. The Office of Extended Day will promote inclusion and engagement for evening

80% of evening employees surveyed will report satisfaction with the coordination of evening programs and services (13-14 AY and annually). 50% of evening students will report attending at least one campus activity (12-13 AY and

To promote inclusion and engagement for evening students in campus activities

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Unless providentially hindered, the Director of Extended Day attends all cabinet meetings as a representative of Evening programs and services. Presents written and oral reports on issues and activities at cabinet meetings as set agenda item.

As part of analysis, the Director of Extended Day met with the college dean and approved a student survey specifically for evening students to be administered Fall Semester 2013. Agreed that improvement can be made on informing evening students of campus activities. Have added new initiative to speak to evening classes to stress commitment to holistic college experience.

2013-2014

2013-2014

This data was not collected in 12-13.

As a result of analysis, a survey instrument was developed specifically for evening students to

students in campus activities.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

annually).

be administered for the first time spring semester 2014.

80% of evening students attending evening activities will report satisfaction with quality and learning opportunity (12-13 AY and annually).

This item did not appear on the 2013 student survey.

The Director of the Office of Extended Day will attend a minimum of one professional development activity that promotes student engagement, diversity, or broad-based student services (12-13 AY and annually).

The Director of the Office of Extended Day attended more than ten professional development activities, including those focused on assisting evening students with financial aid and other services.

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As a result of analysis, the office committed to targeting evening classes early fall semester 2013 with direct information about student activities available. These same classes will be surveyed at the end of fall semester. As a result of these activities, Director better able to assist evening students with navigating college programs and services. State and federal tax courses, for example, enhanced knowledge of financial aid processes and protocols.

Analysis and Planning: Office of Extended Day

Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Assisted with development of student and employee surveys that specifically target extended day students and personnel (Attachments 12.1 and 12.2) Began mini-terms targeting evening Career/Technical students to allow them to complete earlier and to meet contact-hour requirements for financial aid Began off-hour testing services for evening students (this accommodation made it easier for students to meet testing requirements and meet graduation requirements)

A professional development record is attached (Attachment 12.3). The Director of Extended Day has served in this position for 13 years (Vita, Attachment 12.4). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Director of Extended Day presents oral and written reports on extended day activities (sample, Attachment 12.5). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Director Adjunct evening and weekend instructional staff

The Director of Extended Day served on the following committees: • • • •

Presidential Cabinet Social Committee Graduation Committee Healthy Campus Initiative Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Action Items for Director of Evening Programs from Executive Planning Retreat Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices.  Develop brochures for evening technical and academic classes that will focus on identifying evening career programs for nontraditional students and working families.

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 Explore the prospect of using social media (e.g., Facebook) as an avenue to promote and illustrate career opportunities for evening students.  Continue to build a good rapport with evening adjunct faculty and review how to maintain and recruit exceptional adjunct faculty. Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success  Provide extended hours for testing of evening students where testing is required before registering for classes or graduation, e.g., Compass Testing and Work Keys Testing.  Survey for evening students to assess their concerns and promote awareness of evening programs.

Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to success in the millennial workplace environment.  Provide business and industry with brochures about evening classes for their employees and encourage ideas from business and industry on what courses would benefit their employees.  Ensure through surveys that evening students are receiving satisfactory advising that will help eliminate obstacles and enable the evening students to reach their goals and be successful in their career choice.

Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning  Encourage adjunct evening technical instructors to advance their education goals, assist them with scholarship applications, and assist them with student academic advising.

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 Provide adjunct instructors with online professional development classes.

Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness  Provide adjunct instructors with feedback from student evaluations and provide reports regarding adjunct performance. Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the college’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries.  Utilize adjunct faculty for online offerings.  Continue to investigate how new technology can enhance student learning and improve instruction.

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Office of Institutional Advancement The purpose of the Office of Institutional Advancement is to facilitate, develop, and administer multiple strategies of resource acquisition to support a culture of learning. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the Office of Institutional Advancement have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To administer all phases of the college’s fundraising activities through intentional development, planning, execution, and evaluation as well as serving an official liaison role between the institution and the WSCC Foundation, applicable community organizations, and the WSCC Alumni Association.

Intended Outcomes The Office of Institutional Advancement will maximize fundraising and related engagement activities among the WSCC Foundation, applicable community organizations, and the WSCC Alumni Association.

Assessment Criteria Development (nongrant) funds will increase 10% YOY (1213 AY and annually).

Assessment Results Foundation funds increased 24% YOY, from $1,769,361 to $2,201,827.

Use of Results To improve these results, Advancement Office is focusing more in 13-14 on donor cultivation, planned giving initiatives, and preparing for a capital campaign.

100% of internal and external audits of the WSCC Foundation and WWCC Alumni Association will have no findings (13-14 AY and every three years).

The Foundation and Alumni Association are audited every three years. The next audits are scheduled for 13-14. The Foundation and Alumni Association have never had an audit exception.

To ensure positive audit results, Foundation and Alumni Association have employees with much experience in accounts management as well as managerial supervision from director and boards.

Minutes will document a minimum of two meetings of the Alumni

The boards of the Foundation and Alumni Association held regular

To improve the efficacy, effectiveness, and engagement of board

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Association and WSCC Foundation boards (1213 AY and annually).

quarterly minuted meetings.

members, the Advancement Office has kept members heavily involved in key organizational events, such as the Student Investment Luncheon, which raised over $200K for scholarships, and the annual Little Black Dress Charity Bash.

A minimum of two fundraising events will be held in each academic year (12-13 AY and annually).

Two major fundraising events were held in 1213, the annual Student Investment Luncheon and the Little Black Dress Charity Bash.

To improve on both the amounts raised and the efficacy of the events, several modifications have occurred: The Office will begin marketing tables for the luncheon earlier in 1314, and controls have been put in place at the Gala to limit alcohol consumption and to place more emphasis on the desired outcome of event: changing the lives of students who face barriers to completion and progression.

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To develop and manage grant opportunities to optimally support the mission of the institution

The Advancement Office will maximize grant opportunities in support of the mission of the college

Membership in the WSCC Alumni Association will increase 5% YOY (12-13 AY and annually).

While membership declined slightly for 1213, the number of lifetime memberships increased.

A minimum of four new grants will be developed and submitted (12-13 AY and annually).

Nine new grant applications/proposals were developed and submitted in the 12-13 AY.

100% of grants audited by state and federal agencies and other entities will return no audit findings (12-13 AY and annually).

100% of grants undergoing state and/or federal audits in 12-13 received no audit findings.

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To increase membership, Advancement staff have reviewed membership trends and is focusing more on increasing the lifetime memberships. Staff are aided in this effort by the strategic use of Raiser’s Edge software. As a result of analysis, the Advancement Office has linked new grant initiatives more closely to institutional needs. The Office has focused, for example, on equipment and resources associated with the new Nursing and Life Sciences Building, opening January 2014. To sustain these results, Advancement Staff continue to maintain upto-date bulletins and announcements, including Edgar, regarding management and accounting protocols

and procedures. The Office works closely with a designated grants accountant in the Business Office. 100% of EOY and other mandated reports will be submitted on or before the date due (12-13 AY and annually).

To manage the college’s scholarship program in a professional manner that facilitates student success and reflects standard business practices and good stewardship

The Advancement Office will manage the institutional and foundation scholarship awards in a manner that promotes student success and reflects standard business protocols and good

An ad hoc review committee chaired by the College Dean or Executive Vice President will review the award process and protocols and present written recommendations to the

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100% of grant proposals developed by the Office were submitted on or before the due date.

To sustain this result, the Advancement staff has developed written timelines for major submittals. Because of the difficulty of coordinating completion of projects involving other partners and/or consortiums, the staff has committed to practice of holding more meetings in-person at a central location to ensure continued timely submittals.

2013-2014

2013-2014

stewardship.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

Director of Advancement (20132014 and every two years). The staff of the Advancement Office will attend a minimum of ten professional development activities that promote student engagement, diversity, or broad-based student services (12-13 AY and annually).

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Staff attended more than thirty professional activities, including the Inside Track New Coach training in Nashville, Imodules Implementation Training for Foundations in Kansas City, and the CRD National Conference in Washington, DC as well as many local sessions designed to enhance knowledge and use of Banner and Razor’s Edge software.

As a result of these activities, staff greatly enhanced management and accountability skills for administering and managing coaching, foundation, and alumni affairs. Of particular value were the training sessions on Inside Track Coaching in Nashville, attended by six members of staff.

Analysis and Planning: Office of Institutional Advancement Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Increased annual funding return by $160,000 Increased overall assets of the Future Foundation by almost $500,000 Successfully maintained continuing grants for a continuing resource support total of $4,895,439.

Sample professional development records for departmental staff are attached (Attachments 13.1 and 13.2). The Director of Institutional Advancement has served in her current position for 11 years, appointed in 2002, and has been employed at WSCC for 22 years (Vita, Attachment 13.3). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Director of Institutional Advancement presents oral and written reports on the department (sample, Attachment 13.4). The office includes the following full-time and part-time positions: • • • • • •

Director of Advancement Project Assistant Special Projects Coordinator Donor Relations Coordinator Success Coaching Coordinator Success Coaches: Success, Graduation, and Career (8)

Representatives of the Advancement Office served on the following committees: • • • • • •

Administrative Council Carl Perkins Steering Committee Graduation Committee Campus Read Committee Professional Development Committee Achieving the Dream

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

To develop and utilize performance metrics for donations, alumni membership, and grants (ROI, funded ration) To develop and utilize performance metrics for evidence-based decisions impacting enrollment, retention, and completion as a result of couching and other interventions

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Human Resources Mission: To maintain an organizational architecture that supports learning, promotes employee success, and is fully compliant with the policies and protocols of the Department of Postsecondary Education and institutional accreditation entities. To achieve this mission, the Human Resources Office is committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below:

Unit Goals To provide an infrastructure that fosters the advancement and retention of qualified individuals

Intended Outcomes The College will provide structure and resources for the continued growth and advancement of its employees.

Assessment Criteria 80% of employees surveyed will report agreement that the organizational structure is effective and conducive to fulfilling the mission of the college (12-13 AY and every two years).

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Assessment Results 94% of employees reported agreement that the college adequately met the needs of the community. 63% of employees reported agreement that instructional support programs were adequately staffed.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, the college has continued to make organizational adjustments in response to changing needs. The college transitioned, for example, to an innovative hybrid department for student life/success coaching to improve retention and graduation rates. To address the need for early engagement in the college’s programs and services, a new Director of Dual Enrollment was created and filled. To make more efficient use of instructional support personnel, the college has transitioned to Banner to increase productivity and effectiveness. A question

more specifically addressing the role of the organizational structure has been added to the survey prepared for administration in 2014.

To provide a framework that supports a work environment conducive to equitable treatment, positive reinforcement, and recognition of employee contribution

The College will maintain an institutional culture characterized by equitable treatment, positive reinforcement, and recognition of employee contribution.

80% of employees surveyed will report agreement that the College provides and supports opportunities for professional development (11-12 AY and every two years).

70% of employees reported satisfaction with the college’s professional development program.

80% of faculty surveyed will report agreement that the College rewards effective/innovative teaching (12-13 AY and every two years).

This item was omitted from the 12-13 faculty survey. However, the college maintains an active Master Teacher Program, which culminates in an allday retreat.

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As a result of analysis, extensive changes implemented in professional development. The standing committee underwent significant changes in leadership and membership. New protocols and procedures for requesting on-campus opportunities were implemented. All-day retreats were continued around themes, such as elearning resources and flipped learning. As a result of analysis, the college has strengthened the process for selecting Master Teachers, assigning responsibility for recommendations to the college’s Recognition Committee under new leadership. Revised selection criteria will be developed in the 13-14

AY. 80% of faculty surveyed will report agreement that the College rewards effective/innovative community service (12-13 AY and every two years).

An audit by members of the Enrollment Management Committee will demonstrate that 100% of employee evaluations are conducted annually and filed in institutionally designated secure locations (13-14 AY and annually).

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88% of faculty reported agreement that college had procedures for the fair assignment of faculty responsibilities in the area of Community Service for positions on community committees and boards on which the institution placed representatives. To encourage volunteerism, community service is a criterion for the Chancellor’s awards and other opportunities. On employee survey, 130/143 or 91% reported participating in one or more community service activities.

As a result of analysis, faculty and administrators have increased presence on community boards and committees for 13-14 AY over 12-13. Representatives of the college now serve on boards of such entities as Cullman County Parks and Recreation, Rotary, Cullman City School System, and the Chamber of Commerce. Key tenet of new Five-Year Strategic Plan is to seek “ways to enhance the learning partnership for a broad community of participants.�

2013-2014

2013-2014

100% of full-time HR employees will attend a minimum of two HRspecific professional development activities or events (12-13 AY and annually).

To ensure compliance with the dictates of the governing body and applicable accreditation entities

The College will ensure compliance with the policies and protocols of the governing body and applicable accreditation entities.

The HR Department will have no audit findings or accreditation recommendations (12-13 AY and annually).

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100% of HR fulltime employees attended multiple professional activities, including annual professional meetings such as that for the state’s Human Resources Association in Orange Beach, AL, and training sessions related to the implementation and use of the HR Banner modules.

As a result of these activities, HR staff have enhanced operational skills and broadened awareness of FERPA, diversity, and other overarching dimensions of the college’s programs and services. As a result of the extensive Banner training, for example, the staff has been able to meet all deadlines associated with state and federal reporting with no findings. Representation at the Diversity Workshop in Montgomery sponsored by the Department of Postsecondary Education enhanced awareness of workplace issues related to diverse populations. The HR Department To improve the underwent several audits in department’s ability to 12-13 with no findings. appropriately process and The appropriate handling maintain records on of faculty credentials and personnel, the office added documentation were to additional staff reviewed by NLN, members, one fulltime and Medical Assisting, and one part-time. Health Information Technology.

Analysis and Planning: Human Resources Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: •

• •

Managed hiring associated with new positions created in response to institutional needs and mission (example of new position, Director of Dual Enrollment/FastTrack, Attachment 14.1, Registrar/Records and Admissions Coordinator, Attachment 14.2) Modified professional development request protocols (New Request Form, Attachment 14.3) HR processes and documentation audited without findings (Example, letter from NLN, Attachment 14.4)

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 14.5, 14.6) The Director of HR was appointed in September 2001 and has been employed by the college for 15 years (Vita, Attachment 14.7). The office includes the following full-time and part-time positions: • • •

Director of Human Resources Human Resources Assistant Human Resources Clerk

The Director of Human Resources served on the following committees: • • • • •

Professional Development Committee Schedule E Advancement Committee Personnel Handbook Committee Diversity Committee Human Resources Association Postsecondary Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

Ensure that all performance evaluations are completed and filed appropriately. Ensure through self-audit that personnel files include current job descriptions

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Department of Physical Plant Mission: To oversee campus construction as well as to provide efficient and effective preventive and corrective maintenance to buildings, grounds, and equipment in order to promote a clean, safe, comfortable, and accessible environment conducive to learning. To achieve this mission, the Department of Physical Plant is committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below: Unit Goals To coordinate all construction in the most efficient and costeffective manner and ensure timely completion of all projects

Intended Outcomes All campus construction will be completed in an optimal, efficient, and cost-effective manner.

Assessment Criteria The Director of Physical Plant or his designees will attend all regularly scheduled construction OAC meetings and monitor the college’s Computerized Maintenance Management System software

To ensure that all equipment utilized meets or exceeds all state and federal codes and regulations and that all scheduled and preventive maintenance

The Department will ensure that all equipment utilized on campus meets or exceeds state and federal codes and specifications and that all scheduled

The Department will publish a Maintenance Management Plan that details routine, scheduled, and preventive maintenance for all major items of

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Assessment Results 100% of regularly scheduled OAC meetings were attended by the Director of Physical Plant or his designee to monitor milestones in project completion (including change orders). Site inspections for all capital projects were performed on a weekly basis. Site visits are documented through the lists of attendees at OAC meetings. The Maintenance Management Plan is published each Fall Semester and is updated throughout the academic year. Work orders are generated through the

Use of Results As a result of analysis, the office shares project work schedules with the applicable dean, which strengthens coordination of work and occupancy.

As a result of analysis, the Ashcom maintenance software is being implemented and utilized to ensure proper observation of work order requests and

is executed in a timely and efficient manner

and preventive maintenance is executed in a timely and efficient manner.

equipment.

department’s Computerized Maintenance Management System software.

An audit by the Dean of 2013-2014 Financial Services, the Restricted Funds Accountant, and the Director of Campus Safety and Security of the Maintenance Management Plan and representative executed work orders will demonstrate that routine, scheduled, and preventive maintenance activities are accomplished in a timely and efficient manner (each summer semester). To offer a clean and controlled climate for faculty, staff, and students

The Department will maintain a comfortable climate for faculty, staff, and students that is

80% of students will report satisfaction with the campus facilities (12-13 AY and

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On the spring 2013 student survey, 86% reported satisfaction with the classroom

completion of preventive maintenance on the scheduled cycle. This product will create the database that the Maintenance Management Plan is drawn from.

2013-2014

In analysis, the staff of the department noted that many projects undertaken as a result of

conducive to learning.

annually).

facilities and 88% reported satisfaction with the upkeep of the campus.

tornado damage in 2011 were still not complete at the time of the survey. A significant new construction project, the Health Science Life Science Building, is under construction, necessitating changes in parking and traffic patterns. The staff noted that these projects will be largely completed by spring semester 2014. In response to student comments, the department is requesting additional personnel and has increased the frequency for mowing and other routine lawn maintenance.

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the campus facilities (12-13 AY and annually).

83% of employees reported agreement that the institution provided adequate physical facilities.

Many issues related to space will be resolved with the completion and occupancy of the new Health Science Life Science Building. Minor renovations are targeted for various campus

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To maintain a comprehensive and accurate inventory control system

The department will ensure that a comprehensive and accurate inventory control system for equipment is developed and maintained to ensure efficient and effective college operations.

The college will have no audit findings in the area of inventory maintenance and control (12-13 AY and annually).

An audit was conducted in October 2013 by a state auditor and no findings were reported.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

Representatives of the Department of Physical Plant will attend a minimum of three professional development activities that promote optimal utilization of institutional resources, that promote a physical environment conducive to learning, and that reflects principles of good stewardship and best practices (12-13 AY and annually).

Representatives of the department attended more than six professional development activities, including the completion of SNCS-PM WEB Construction Management Software Training and attendance of a Facilities Workshop for facility managers sponsored by the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education.

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facilities in 13-14. To improve inventory tracking and management, the department has ordered scanners and scan-able labels to increase efficiency.

As a result of these activities, staff enhanced management and supervisory skills associated with the college’s PPE. The CMS training, for example, included pay applications, change order management, and reporting.

Analysis and Planning: Department of Physical Plant Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: •

• •

Supervised/managed the following capital projects: o Construction of new Health Science Life Sciences Building (scheduled for completion 2/14) (Rendering, Attachment 15.1) o Remodeling of James C. Bailey Center (Exterior and Interior) o Library re-roof o Renovation of Business Education Building o Roof replacement on Computer Science Building o Roof repairs on Student Center o Sewer renovation o Installation of sidewalks (DOT Project, Phase II) Regularly attended construction management meetings with contractors, subcontractors, and government officials (Examples of Attendee Lists, Attachments 15.2 and 15.3) Acquired and implemented Ashcom maintenance software to more efficiently track work orders through utilization of more user-friendly database (Descriptive Brochure, Attachment 15.4)

Samples of professional development records are attached (Attachments 15.5 and 15.6). The Director of Physical Plant was appointed in 2005, serving at WSCC for 9 years (Vita, Attachment 15.7). The department includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Director of Physical Plant Assistant Director of Physical Plant Secretary Inventory Controller HVAC technician Electrician Locksmith Plumber Carpenter Painter Maintenance Technicians (6) Custodians (7)

Unit Goals for 2013-14: •

Clear remaining punch list items for new Health Science Life Sciences Building

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• •

Increase staffing levels to include employment of additional technicians: HVAC, electrician, skilled maintenance workers, general maintenance workers, and custodial supervisor. Upgrade equipment to include 2 vans (ordered), 2 serviced trucks

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Office of the President Mission: The purpose of the Office of the President is to provide leadership for advancement of the college mission and vision, to provide effective educational administrative and fiscal leadership, to provide leadership for maintaining an adequate physical plant, and to ensure that the college’s organizational structure is adequately and effectively staffed. To achieve this mission, the Office is committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below: Unit Goals To provide leadership that ensures efficient, effective, and responsive institutional programs and services

Intended Outcomes The Office of the President will ensure that the college’s programs and services remain relevant and responsive to the needs of students, employees, and stakeholders and that plans and protocols are amended when necessary in the context of evolving social, technological, educational, and demographic conditions.

Assessment Criteria The President and Administrative Council will conduct an annual review of the currency and efficacy of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan and make written recommendations for improvement (spring annually).

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Assessment Results The development of new vision statement and Five-Year Strategic Plan began with an employee task force attending an off-campus planning retreat in March, 2012. The new vision statement and strategic plan were distributed to all employees. Final adoption occurred with Cabinet approval on 9.17.12. The most recent review of the college’s mission statement by Administrative Council occurred on 7.10.13 and 7.18.13. Council adopted slight changes in previous mission statement, subject to

Use of Results The most significant results of the development of the mission statement, vision statement, and Five-Year Strategic Plan were widespread distribution of more than 2,000 copies throughout the region (also accessible on the college’s website), and the adoption by the Administrative Council of formal performance indicators to guide the college in measuring the degree to which the vision, mission, and strategic plan are achieved. Many programs and services

To effectively administer institutional

The Office will exercise responsibility for final

approval of State Board.

were expanded, including the establishment of a OneStop Center for Student Services, strong investment in Career/Technical programs, and the construction of a $20M Health Science and Life Science Center with regional conferencing capacity.

80% of employees will report awareness of a fully operationalized Five-Year Strategic Plan (12-13 AY and annually).

88% of employees surveyed reported awareness of college’s recently adopted FiveYear Strategic Plan. 91% of employees reported agreement that the college’s planning process is effective.

The President will review and modify as

All state and federal reports were reviewed

To increase awareness of the strategic plan, president has continued to promote it and encourage campus dialog on ways to achieve and operationalize its strategic directives and goals. The president featured the plan and its evolution and efficacy, for example, as part of convocation fall semester 2013. To maintain a high standard of accuracy and

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policies, procedures, and plans.

review, approval, effective use of institutional plans and reports.

To promote and maintain an educational environment that promotes learning

The college’s facilities and other resources will be developed and managed in a manner that maximizes broadbased participation and the strategic deployment of the institution’s

required to ensure accuracy and comprehensiveness the federal IPEDS reports, the Facility Master Plan, the Safety and Security Plan, the Policy Manual, Perkins budgets and master plan, accreditation reports, and other key institutional documents and reports (12-13 AY and annually).

comprehensiveness in the administration of the college’s institutional plans and reports, the president has continued to utilize broad-based collaboration on the efficacy of plans and reports in achievement of the college’s mission. To maximize the value of the college’s Perkins allocations and plans, for example, the three academic deans each gave a presentation on 1.13.14 to the presidential cabinet on specific programmatic ways to expand the college’s career/technical offerings. The President will guide 2012-2013 marked the To sustain this with the assistance of the thirteenth consecutive institutional best senior leadership team a year that the college held practice, the budget budgetary process that budget hearings marked hearing process ensures that by transparency, high continues to improve. discretionary spending is levels of participation, The president has transparent, and mission-driven. The continued a practice that participatory, and related hearings are presided begin in the 12-13 AY to

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and approved by the president prior to submittal. Critical reports included federal IPEDS reports, the Facility Master Plan, the Perkins budgets and operational plan, the annual budget, and official accreditation reports and documents. The president also reviews all major internal institutional documents, such as the Safety and Security Plan and the Academic Program Outcomes Assessment (APOA).

deployment of its personnel, property, plant, and equipment.

to the fulfillment of the over by the college’s institutional mission (12- Administrative Council, 13 AY and annually). a body comprised of ex officio and elected representatives of administration, faculty, and staff. Budget proposals can originate from any functional unit. The process culminates in the submittal of prioritized recommendations to the president for consideration in the preparation of the college’s annual budget to the state Department of Postsecondary Education.

begin budget hearings with a public review by the Administrative Council of the value and efficacy of approved allocations in the previous year by the particular units affected. Members of both the outgoing and incoming Administrative Council are included. As a result of strategic analysis, the president has continued to promote the diversification of income streams through planned giving, fundraising, and the pursuit of state and federal grants.

The president’s office facilitated and sponsored multiple professional development activities designed to promote synergy, leadership, and effectiveness among the members of the college’s senior leadership team. Regular

As a result of these activities, the synergy and cohesiveness of the college’s senior leadership team has increased. These factors led, for example, to the production of individual action plans based on the results of deliberations

The Office will facilitate a minimum of two

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professional development activities specifically designed to promote synergy, leadership, and effectiveness among the members of the college’s senior leadership team (12-13 AY and annually).

cabinet workshops were facilitated by an outside consultant from the Servant Leadership Institute in Columbus, GA, for example, to promote teamwork and synergy. An executive planning retreat was held most recently 7.2223.13, which included SWOT analysis of each of the six strategic priorities of the recently adopted Five-Year Strategic Plan.

during the executive planning retreat. To continue these efforts; the president’s office has contracted with the Servant Leadership Institute to continue the leadership development workshops in the 13-14 AY.

80% of employees surveyed will report satisfaction with the college’s strategic deployment of resources (12-13 AY and annually).

82% of employees reported agreement that the institution provides sufficient funds for the operation of the college’s academic programs.

To improve these rates, the president has continued to diversify revenue streams, seeking to achieve more equitable funding from state government and aggressively seeking additional funding through planned giving, donations, grants, and other sources. The college’s annual budget hearings continue to

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inform spending and investment in instructional resources.

To effectively represent the college to institutional constituencies and foster positive, synergistic partnerships with key institutional stakeholders

The President will participate fully in relevant community, state, regional, national, and international organizations and will serve as the official representative of the college at meetings of

80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with the college’s physical environment/culture and educational resources (12-13 AY and annually).

86% of students reported agreement that the atmosphere or culture of the college promotes the achievement of educational goals. 89% reported satisfaction with the appearance of the college. 86% reported satisfaction with the instructional equipment available at the college.

The President will maintain active membership in a minimum of four local, regional, or national organizations (12-13 AY and annually).

The president served as an active member of eleven local, regional, or national organizations, including the Economic Development Association of Alabama, the Business Council of Alabama, Community

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To improve these student satisfaction rates, the president is promoting a culture of learning through the strategic priorities and goals of the college’s current Five-Year Strategic Plan. The physical facilities continue to be improved and upgraded as funds allow. Breaking ground in the 13-14 AY on a $25M Health Science Life Science building that will house nursing and biology. As a result of these activities, developed stronger networks of partners in education, community service, and economic development. Through stronger connections with legislators and industry,

local, state, and regional entities.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

Colleges of Appalachia, and the American Association of Community Colleges.

for example, prospects increased for new Business Incubation Center.

The President will serve on a minimum of two local, state, or regional boards (12-13 AY and annually).

The president serves on numerous boards, including the Alabama Board of Nursing, the Dean’s Advisory Board for the University of Alabama-Birmingham School of Health Professions, and as a Commissioner and Executive Council Board member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (2008-2013).

Board memberships strengthened strategic partnerships with key decision-makers in government, education, and business and industry.

The President and members of office staff will attend a minimum of six professional development activities that promote the realization of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan

The President participated in multiple professional development activities, including attending the Harvard University Seminar for Experienced Presidents in Cambridge, MA, the

As a result of these activities, knowledge of high impact practices and strategies at executive levels of leadership was enhanced. Skills learned from executive leadership conferences

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(12-13 AY and annually).

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Achieving the Dream annual conference in Anaheim, CA, and the SACS annual and summer meetings.

such as the Harvard Seminar increased the efficacy of on-campus executive leadership workshops for senior staff.

Analysis and Planning: Office of the President Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

Arranged leadership development workshops for executive cabinet using external consultant Engaged campus community in three major national initiatives, Achieving the Dream, AAC&U Roadmap Project, and the AAC&U General Education Assessment Academy

A professional development record is attached (Attachment 16.1). The President was appointed in August 2003, and has served at the college for eleven years (Vita, Attachment 16.2). The office includes the following fulltime positions: • • •

President Executive Assistant Administrative Assistant

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

To continue to diversify revenue streams to maximize institutional support of the college’s programs and services in support of the institutional mission and FiveYear Strategic Plan To continue to optimally develop a synergistic and incisive executive leadership team through regular leadership training and workshops To maximize the utility and efficacy of major campus initiatives, including Achieving the Dream, the AAC&U Roadmap Project, and the National Higher Education Benchmarking Project.

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Marketing and Public Relations Mission: The purpose of the Marketing and Public Relations Office is to enhance the image of the college, provide publicity and information, and serve as a liaison to the community. To achieve this mission, the Office is committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below: Unit Goals To promote the college and its programs and services through diverse multimedia avenues

Intended Outcomes The Marketing and Public Relations Office will optimally and effectively promote the college and its programs and services to students, employees, and community stakeholders.

Assessment Criteria A marketing and public relations advisory committee comprised of business and industry practitioners will review the quality, range, and effectiveness of the college’s public relations and marketing efforts, including the college website (12-13 AY and every two years).

Assessment Results The committee was established for the first time, representing a broad spectrum of college and community stakeholders and practitioners. First meeting scheduled for 13/14.

Use of Results First meeting scheduled for 13/14.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the effectiveness and range of the marketing and advertising of its programs and services (12-13 AY and annually).

85% reported satisfaction with the marketing of career/technical programs.

The office has collaboratively produced a brochure highlighting the college’s career/technical programs. The establishment of a new Marketing Advisory Committee will improve effectiveness. To

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improve efficiency and coverage, the office has filled a full-time position that had been vacant for two years. 80% of students will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of the college website (12-13 AY and annually).

86% of students reported As a result of analysis, satisfaction with the the college website has college website. undergone complete restructuring.

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the effectiveness and range of the marketing and advertising of its programs and services (12-13 AY and annually).

83% of employees reported satisfaction with the college’s advertising program. 93% agreed that campus publications accurately described the institution.

As a result of analysis, the college launched a new “Be One of Us� marketing campaign that included web presence, print media, commercials, and billboards.

This item was not specifically addressed in the 12-13 employee survey.

As a result of analysis, the college website has undergone complete restructuring.

The Burrow Museum hosted exhibitions of the Works Progress

Because of the success of these events, the Office has aggressively

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of the college website (12-13 AY and annually). To enhance campus and The Office will develop The Office will schedule community outreach and manage fine arts and and manage a minimum through rotating displays other events to broaden of two themed museum

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and events

To effectively represent the college to institutional constituencies and foster positive, synergistic partnerships with key institutional stakeholders

campus and community engagement.

The Office will engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects both a local and global commitment to growth and possibility.

exhibits (12-13 AY and annually).

Administration under the Roosevelt Administration (under the aegis of a grant awarded by the Alabama Legislature), frescoes by Jurgen Tarrasch, and several local artists.

The Office will schedule and manage a minimum of three Museumsponsored cultural events for students, employees, and community stakeholders (12-13 AY and annually).

The Museum sponsored an international film festival (3 films in 1213) and participated in the college’s Arts in April events.

The Director of Marketing and Public Relations will maintain active membership in a minimum of one local or regional organization (12-13 AY and annually).

The Director of Marketing and Public Relations is a member of the Board of Directors of the Cullman Chamber of Commerce and the National Council of Marketing and Public Relations.

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scheduled similar exhibitions for 13-14 AY. The addition of a full-time staff member has helped with publicity of exhibitions. As a result of analysis, the Office has scheduled similar events for the 1314 AY. The addition of a full-time staff member has helped with publicity of exhibitions. To better measure student and community response, the Office will survey attendees at a minimum of two events in 13-14. As a result of participation in community organizations, community involvement in institutional strategy and marketing was enhanced. Membership on the Board of the Chamber, for example, enhances reciprocal

awareness of community and campus events. Membership in the National Council on Marketing and Public Relations provides networking and idea exchange across multiple dimensions of marketing and publicity. To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

Representatives of the office will attend a minimum of four professional development activities that promote the realization of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan (12-13 AY and annually).

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Representatives of the office attended multiple professional development activities, including the National Council on Marketing and Public Relations national and regional marketing conferences, the ACCA Public Relations Association Conference, and the AACC Legislative Advocacy Seminar.

These professional development activities enhanced the office’s efforts to move the college forward in the areas of marketing and public relations. The NCMPR meetings, for example, added breadth and depth to the department’s efforts to improve engagement through social media, in crisis communications, and in videography techniques. The Advocacy Seminar introduced best practices for communicating college priorities to key stakeholders.

Analysis and Planning: Marketing and Public Relations Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • • • •

Established marketing advisory committee Planned and executed 3 Museum-sponsored programs for students, employees, and community stakeholders Director named 2012 Communicator of the Year for ACCSPRA and NCMPR, District 2 Director elected to the NCMPR national board of directors Department won 17 awards for communications and marketing

A professional development record for the Director of Marketing and Public Relations is attached (Attachment 17.1). The Director of Marketing and Public Relations was appointed 2000, and has served in this position for 14 years (Vita, Attachment 17.2). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Director presents oral and written reports on the department’s goals and activities (sample, Attachment 17.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • • •

Director of Marketing and Public Relations Museum Director Multimedia Technician Staff Writer Communication and Marketing Coordinator

The Director of Marketing and Public Relations served on the following committees: • • • • • •

Administrative Council Diversity Committee Catalog Committee New Employee Orientation Visioning Team Alabama Community College Marketing/Re-branding Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices. Action Items:

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• • • •

Develop Honor Code for slogan, “Be One of Us” Develop targeted recruitment and outreach for particular populations (e.g., Hispanic, older students, etc.) based on performance metrics Reevaluate and revise communications (website, social media, etc.) to support global, online, and 24/7 populations Redefine/reassert marketing role in collaborative plan for all outreach groups (flowchart showing employee responses and responsibilities) to integrate services and programs more readily

Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success Action Items: • Explore and enlist new and improved methods for reaching students for purposes of communicating college services • Start college “awareness” earlier with students and parents • Develop and utilize performance metrics for evidence-based decisions Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment Action Items: • Promote expanded options for learning (e.g., hybrid, online, Tegrity, competencebased learning, on-demand learning) • Develop brand identity for continuing education and market same. Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning Action Items: • Cross-train museum employees in funding acquisition, including grant writing and donor cultivation) • Develop in concert with advancement a consistent “message” regarding funding • Brand e-learning apart from “traditional” marketing of programs and services • Develop materials and relationships to support business and industry partnerships • Promote cohesion between marketing and other college units

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Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness Action items: • Establish regular cycle of requesting and reviewing enrollment trends and other demographic information • Establish and utilize performance metrics and dashboards • Promote better communication among functional units and stakeholders Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the college’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries Action Items: • Expand international outreach • Use museum and marketing to promote cultural activities • Increase rate of student success stories produced

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Office of the Dean of Health Science Mission: The purpose of the Office of the Dean of Health Science is to plan and coordinate all aspects of instructional programs included in the Health Science Division. To achieve this mission, the personnel of the Office of the Dean of Health Science are committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To coordinate instruction and services and to provide support for each program in the Health Science Division

Intended Outcomes The Office of the Dean of Health Science with assistance from the Office of the College Dean will guide the Health Science faculty in the achievement of instructional objectives, monitor progress, and ensure that programmatic and national accreditation criteria and standards are met.

Assessment Criteria 100% of instructional units in the division will satisfactorily complete comprehensive program reviews encompassing student learning and program outcomes, including professional development and other standard measures of program effectiveness (12-13 AY and annually).

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Assessment Results 100% of instructional units completed comprehensive program reviews, encompassing both student learning and program outcomes. These reviews are documented in the institutional Academic Program Outcomes Assessment, 2012-2015.

Use of Results Many benefits have been realized as a result of the implementation of a new comprehensive planning and assessment model. Each unit has documented specific curricular and cocurricular changes that resulted from its planning and assessment activities. The standardization of program outcomes has brought a consistent and uniform perspective to professional development, job placement, advisory committees, and other dimensions of program effectiveness. Consistent

high standards of documentation have facilitated the identification and prioritization of specific budgetary needs in each unit.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the college’s institutional mission, vision, and strategic

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness, good stewardship, and best

100% of applicable units will successfully complete regularly scheduled accreditation review by external accrediting entities (1213 AY and annually).

100% of regularly scheduled accreditation reviews were satisfactorily completed. Reviews were completed during 12-13 AY for Nursing, Y, and Z.

The Dean of Health Science will attend a minimum of three professional development events that promote the realization of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan (12-13 AY and

The Dean of Health Science attended more than ten professional development activities, including SACSCOC in Orlando, ACCA in Birmingham, and Instructional Officers Conference in Orange

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As a result of successful accreditation efforts, programmatic improvement occurred endemic to external reviews. The Nursing Programs, for example, submitted more than 400 pages of accreditation documentation. In addition, the college is able to continue to market health programs as fully accredited. As a result of these activities, the Office has become more aware of best practices in program administration and development. Workshops at SACSCOC, for example, focused on

plan.

practices.

annually).

Beach, AL.

To engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects a commitment to growth and possibility.

The Office will engage campus and community stakeholders in a learning partnership that reflects both a local and global commitment to growth and possibility.

The Dean of Health Science will maintain membership in a minimum of two professional and/or service organizations (12-13 AY and annually).

The Dean of Health Science maintained memberships in five organizations: American Society of Clinical Pathologists, Cullman County Health Coalition, the Alabama Instructional Officers Association, and the Alabama Health Science Advisory Committee.

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contemporary legal issues in higher education and on comprehensive approaches to student persistence and retention. As a result of participation in community organizations, community involvement in institutional and programmatic strategy was enhanced. Membership in Cullman County Health Coalition, for example, facilitated collaboration and communication about trends shaping healthcare professions and local needs and expectations for graduates.

Analysis and Planning: Office of Dean of Health Science Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

• • •

Worked with College Dean to complete comprehensive program reviews for all Health programs (see APOA, 12-13, 13-14) Successfully completed accreditation, reaccreditation, or reaffirmation for the following programs: o Nursing (sample summary, NLN, Attachment 18.1) o Medical Assisting o Pharmacy Technology Worked collaboratively with faculty and administration on design and use of new Health Science Life Sciences Building (architectural rendering, Attachment 18.2) Launched Health Matters Newsletter Launched website for clinical coordinators

A professional development record for the Dean of Health Science is attached (Attachment 18.3). The Dean of Health Science Instruction was appointed to this position in 2010, serving for 4 years (Vita, Attachment 18.4). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Dean of Health Science presents oral and written reports on academic division (sample, Attachment 18.5). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Dean of Health Science Administrative Assistant to the Dean

The Dean of Instruction served on the following committees: • •

Administrative Council Carl Perkins Steering Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Action Items for Dean of Health Science from Executive Planning Retreat Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices. Action Items: •

Develop Honor Code for slogan, “Be One of Us” 113

Develop personnel orientation to meaning of honor code for new and existing employees • Develop targeted recruitment and outreach for particular populations (e.g., Hispanic, older students, etc.) • Developing and utilizing performance metrics • Serve 24/7 online global population 24/7 through no-stop services and seamless entry (e.g., extended hours at Lion Central and consider strategically utilizing technology and outsourcing) • Collaborative plan for all outreach groups (flowchart showing employee responses and responsibilities) to integrate services and programs more readily Health Science Division will target HOSA high school students for on-line courses (HIT, Pharm Tech, PSG). Also dual enrollment students will be targeted for BOOST certificate courses. Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success Action Items: • • • •

Explore and translate “Best Practices” from pilot to scale Reinvent advising to include a roadmap for developmental students Start college “awareness” earlier with students and parents Develop and utilize performance metrics for evidence-based decisions (e.g., 1/3 of all students testing into developmental classes never enroll) HS division will target high school students through engagement with both the HOSA group and dual enrolled BOOST group as describe above. Also, involve the program directors with tracking student attrition and identifying barriers to program completion. Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment Action Items: • •

Improve discipline-specific professional development Expand options for learning (e.g., hybrid, online, Tegrity, competence-based learning, on-demand learning)

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• Expand facilities for career/technical programs • Expand continuing education offerings HS division will continue to offer and expand the offerings of program specific professional development and continuing education to include the new Simulation Center. Additional certificate options are being proposed for students currently enrolled in DI, RPT, and Sonography programs as well as additional certificate options (CNA, phleb, & cardiac) through BOOST grant. The new PD in the Child Development Program will be converting to a hybrid/on-line format to appeal to the working student. Also, we’re investigating conversion of the DAT program to an online/hybrid offering. Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning Action Items: • • • • • • •

Strategically identify and promote programmatic/faculty visionary development regarding future resources Cross-train employees in funding acquisition (i.e., expand base of fundraising efforts beyond Development Office personnel) Unify around consistent “message” regarding funding Expand e-learning (consider branding apart from “traditional” marketing of programs and services) Expand job/workforce development through the small business incubator and partnerships Expand business and industry contacts Promote cohesion among college units: e.g., marketing and advertising, students services, academic and technical programs

The Health Science division will continue involvement in Cullman Health Coalition, Birmingham Region Nursing Association, Deans & Directors, Health Science Advisory Committee, and other discipline specific groups to stay abreast of current issues in health care. Continue to educate program directors on fiscal accountability for their particular program. Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness Action items: •

Establish regular cycle of requesting and reviewing institutional reports 115

• • • •

Establish and utilize performance metrics and dashboards Promote better communication among functional units and stakeholders Continue to provide empowering and insightful planning and assessment support for faculty Be accountable

HS division will continue the maintenance of program review and student/program learning outcomes that has been established and utilize the data obtained to make good decisions for both their students and program based on that data.

Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the college’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries Action Items: • • •

Strategically expand online offerings Utilize technology to personalize (customize) online classes and programs Expand cross-disciplinary opportunities

HS division will expand on-line/hybrid opportunities in CHD and DAT. The Simulation Center will be utilized for both cross-division simulation experiences as well as professional development opportunities for the community.

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Office of the Executive Vice President Mission: To provide quality leadership that supports empowering learning outcomes To achieve this mission, the Office of the Executive Vice President is committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To optimally manage institutional resources in a manner that reflects the college’s mission, good stewardship, and best practices.

Intended Outcomes The Office will guide mentor employees through the process of resource identification, acquisition, and implementation in a manner that reflects the institutional mission, good stewardship, and best practices.

Assessment Criteria 100% of units will complete an analysis and production of unit budgets that reflect the institutional mission, good stewardship, and best practices (each spring semester).

Assessment Results 100% of units completed an analysis and production of unit budgets. All budgets ended year within designated budgetary limits.

Use of Results To sustain these results, the Office has continued to discuss the budgetary process and protocols with unit directors, requesting that they remain mindful of principles of good stewardship. Directors have been referred to budget hearing process for supplemental funding.

To provide leadership that empowers Student Services administration and staff to develop and implement programs and services that reduce barriers to student success.

The Office will guide the development and implementation of programs and services that reduce barriers to student success.

100% of assigned units will produce unit plans that reflect a commitment to student success and completion (each spring semester).

100% of assigned functional units produced unit plans that reflected a commitment to student success and completion.

As a result of planning and analysis, one critical new initiative was launched, the establishment of a centralized One-Stop center (“Lion Central�) for serving students more efficiently and

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effective. 80% of employees will report that a culture has been created in which innovation is encouraged (each spring semester).

89% of employees reported agreement that a culture has been created in which innovation is encouraged.

To sustain these results, the Division has introduced multiple innovations during the 12-13 AY, including the implementation and use of “Who’s Next?� software to increase efficiency at Lion Central and the introduction of a centralized phone number and email address for student inquiries.

The Executive Vice President will regularly report to the Executive Leadership Team issues related to student success and completion (monthly).

The Executive Vice President presents written and oral reports at each cabinet meeting. The reporting template encompasses committee reports, program/departmental initiatives and updates, policy development, and special events and student activities.

To improve the efficacy of these presentations, summaries of professional development activities has been added, demonstrating links to present and future institutional programs and services.

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To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

100% of student grade and disciplinary appeals will be completed in a timely and efficient manner and in accordance with all institutional policies and protocols (each semester).

100% of student grade and disciplinary appeals were processed in a timely and efficient manner and in accordance with all institutional policies and protocols.

To sustain these results, the office has continued to maintain accurate logs of student appeals and to remain consistent in the rendering of decisions.

The Executive Vice President will attend a minimum of four professional development activities that promote the realization of the college’s mission, vision, and strategic plan (12-13 AY and annually).

The Executive Vice President attended multiple professional development activities, including the SACS annual meeting in Orlando and the annual meeting of the Alabama Community College Association in Birmingham (served on Executive Committee for past four years).

These professional development activities enhanced the office’s efforts to move the college forward in the areas of planning and assessment. Service on Executive Committee of ACCA, for example, facilitated networking with senior leaders at peer institutions, promoting sharing of management strategies and best practices.

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Analysis and Planning: Office of the Executive Vice President Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Served as officer in Alabama Instructional Officers Association Opened Lion Central (“One Stop” Center for student services) in January 2013, leading initiatives to increase efficiency and quality of customer service Women’s softball team won state and national championships

A professional development record is attached (Attachment 19.1). The Executive Vice President was appointed to present position in 2011, and has been employed at the college for 26 years (Vita, Attachment 19.2). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Executive Vice President presents oral and written reports on Student Services Division (sample, Attachment 19.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Executive Vice President Administrative Assistant to the Executive Vice President

The Executive Vice President served on the following committees: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Administrative Council Executive Cabinet Admissions/Financial Aid Committee, Liaison Advising Committee, Liaison Americans with Disabilities Committee, Liaison Beta Team, Liaison Calendar Committee, Liaison Curriculum Committee, Liaison Enrollment Management Task Force, Liaison Human Resources Committee, Liaison Judicial Affairs Committee, Liaison Leadership Wallace State, Liaison Policy and Procedures Committee, Liaison Scholarship Committee, Liaison

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Action Items for Executive Vice President from Executive Planning Retreat

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Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices. Action Items: •

Develop targeted recruitment and outreach for particular populations (e.g., Hispanic, older students, etc.) o Recruiting at Senior Centers, such as Cullman County Commission. Forging partnerships for classes, credit and non-credit with senior population o Utilizing programs, such as First United Methodist Church Hispanic Ministry, for contacts for recruiting. Meet with Yenny Laney, director, to distribute flyers and attend meetings to advertise college opportunities Developing and utilizing performance metrics o Registration comparisons from date-to-date, and semester-to-semester are currently used. Also divisional enrollment is tracked. Program enrollment is tracked through instructional areas Serve 24/7 online global population 24/7 through no-stop services and seamless entry (e.g., extended hours at Lion Central and consider strategically utilizing technology and outsourcing) o Lion’s Pride PowerPoint is now available on WSCC website through advising. Consider adding video of future sessions; however, monitor this for timeliness of information. Orientation 101 is available online and ORI 103 and WKO 101 can be added to our offerings. Lion Central has hours of 730AM to 600PM Monday through Wednesday, 730A M to 430PM on Thursday and 730AM to 200PM on Friday. These could be extended during the registration periods to include 2 extra hours per day. Registration services are 24/7 through Self-Serve Banner. Payments can also be accepted 24/7. Consider outsourcing for FA questions or advising questions 24/7. Although these areas can be emailed directly or through main new Lion Central email address, they may not receive immediate feedback as currently set up. Collaborative plan for all outreach groups (flowchart showing employee responses and responsibilities) to integrate services and programs more readily

Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build self-esteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success Action Items: 121

• •

Explore and translate “Best Practices” from pilot to scale Reinvent advising to include a roadmap for developmental students o Conduct advisor training for all faculty demonstrating new cutoffs for COMPASS that includes grey area and explanation of benefit of such. Provide support person for developmental staff to have centralized area for records and stats on all students. Create flowchart handout for process of developmental student to include COMPASS, decision zone, courses, tutoring, resources, and progression to college-level coursework. Start college “awareness” earlier with students and parents o Piggy banks for every newborn at CRMC. “The best gift you can give your child, a college education.” Distribute coloring books depicting WSCC to elementary children. Continue to support Career Coaches for middle and high school students. Continue to support Talent Search and recruiting as well to make WSCC presence known. Support workplaces, churches, fairs, expos, and senior centers by making presentations and sending materials on credit and non-credit offerings. Develop and utilize performance metrics for evidence-based decisions (e.g., 1/3 of all students testing into developmental classes never enroll) o By close of Mini I, ascertain number of students each semester that COMPASS tested and did not enroll. Group this by transitional and college-ready. o By close of Mini I, run grade disbursements from previous semester in all classes o Each day, run Argos report of DDs, WCs, and WSs. Contact all students that WS. Investigate all DDs after drop/add period. Monitor WCs by course.

Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment

Action Items: •

Improve discipline-specific professional development o Banner training is now being scheduled and will be continued. This, however, has been provided within departments of student services as a 122

• • •

sharing of information to improve efficiency and consistency. Banner processes such as modifications, new updates, planning for the future, etc. needs to be addressed/conducted by administrative software staff. Expand options for learning (e.g., hybrid, online, Tegrity, competence-based learning, on-demand learning) Expand facilities for career/technical programs Expand continuing education offerings

Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning Action Items: • • • • • • •

Strategically identify and promote programmatic/faculty visionary development regarding future resources Cross-train employees in funding acquisition (i.e., expand base of fundraising efforts beyond Development Office personnel) Unify around consistent “message” regarding funding Expand e-learning (consider branding apart from “traditional” marketing of programs and services) Expand job/workforce development through the small business incubator and partnerships Expand business and industry contacts Promote cohesion among college units: e.g., marketing and advertising, students services, academic and technical programs o Utilizing Banner’s wait-listing feature could enhance enrollment knowledge in the technical and academic divisions. By knowing how many additional students are interested in obtaining a course, decisions can be made concerning opting additional sections to meet demands. o Staff wearing similar t-shirts depicting slogans such as “Be One of Us,” particularly during peak times and events. o Faculty could serve in Lion Central—advising during peak times as was done years ago before ACTION Center opened. o Advisor training should additionally be scheduled through Lion Central Advising area. o Faculty can be included in Banner training. o Faculty and staff can participate in Lion’s Pride and Orientation classes. o Short presentations can be made during faculty meetings to represent student services issues, such as change of grades by using forms through deans, incompletes, or grade appeals.

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o Banner processes such as utilizing an ID card to clock in and clock out of technical division, with this attendance then feeding to Blackboard and then this feeding to attendance verification. Following this, Blackboard grades feeding to Banner grade reporting.

Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness Action items: •

•

Establish regular cycle of requesting and reviewing institutional reports o Daily Argos reports on previous day’s activity concerning withdrawals or delete/drops o By mid-term, grade reports from previous term o By mid-term, COMPASS reports divided into developmental and collegeready. o By mid-term, report on number of first-time freshmen not completing orientation course in first semester. (Can contact and suggest second miniterm if information were known.) o 80% completion report by mid-term of each semester so that Graduation coaches can contact and track. o Continuing education registration report available daily, just as credit registration is through the Argos dashboard. o By first month of term, access students who applied vs registered and contact those who did not register o Track high school students who declared WSCC majors, such as welding, with career coaches and then ascertain matriculation once high school student graduates. o Ascertain number of grade changes by instructor and department from previous semester by first month of new semester. o Track students who lose financial aid to see if they re-enroll within one year after losing aid. o Compare grades of students and GPAs in needed coursework to passage of board licensing in health division to see if a correlation exists. Establish and utilize performance metrics and dashboards o Reporting as listed above and with additional types can help staff to better anticipate areas to address and benchmarks, such as the number of graduates, the number of students to re-connect with, to sign up for orientation, to contact for enrollment, etc.

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• •

Promote better communication among functional units and stakeholders o Who’s Next software provides greater opportunity to provide notes from one staff member to another concerning a student so that work is not duplicated and item saved for student, as well as increasing efficiency for students by guaranteeing who is available at any given time. o Lion Central email is now answered by all staff on rotating basis and can be shared with others, so therefore makes responding to students more efficient and consistent. o Phone messages for Voicemail need to all say the same thing in similar areas. Scripts can be written and phones addressed accordingly This needs to be synchronized with switchboard as well. o Letters to students need to be consistent. o Communication points with students need to be standardized and consistent. Examples can be: Letter/email sent at request for information, at application, at documents complete stage, at 80% completion point, at graduation and post-graduation. o Encourage faculty and staff to attend Banner PD, Advising workshops, and attend Lion’s Pride and/or orientation (particularly the one- and twoday events). o Develop FAQ page to answer questions on website and have available as a handout. Continue to provide empowering and insightful planning and assessment support for faculty Be accountable o Every area of student services

Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the college’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries Action Items: • • •

Strategically expand online offerings Utilize technology to personalize (customize) online classes and programs Expand cross-disciplinary opportunities

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E-Learning Department Purpose: The purpose of the E-Learning Department is to design and develop e-learning courses and activities to achieve expanded learning opportunities for students and other stakeholders, and to support the college’s e-learning infrastructure through technical support, direct and online student and faculty assistance, and a comprehensive program of e-learning professional development. To achieve this purpose, the personnel of the E-Learning Department have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To direct the development and growth of the college’s distance learning program

Intended Outcomes The college will strategically manage the development and growth of distance learning programs and ensure compliance with all related accreditation standards.

Assessment Criteria The department will publish a Distance Learning Faculty Guidebook to guide and mentor faculty in the optimal development and management of the distance learning instructional platform (12-13 AY and annually).

Assessment Results The Distance Learning Handbook was revised and published in the 1213 AY, representing the seventh edition.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, the Distance Learning staff have noted the need for further revision as the department transitions to a new assessment model, Quality Matters.

The Distance Learning Handbook will be reviewed and approved by the Assessment Committee (12-13 AY and every two years).

The latest edition has been reviewed by the College Dean and recommendations returned to the Director. Because the department is transitioning to a new assessment model, the review by the

As a result of the review by the College Dean, more than sixty suggestions have been incorporated. Review by full Assessment Committee deferred to 13-14.

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Assessment Committee has been re-scheduled for the 13-14 AY The department will document the growth and current state of the distance learning program, including adequacy of physical and financial resources and infrastructure, with a program status report submitted to the Executive Cabinet (1213 AY and annually).

The e-Learning Committee will conduct an annual review of the

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On 6.10.13 the Director of E-Learning provided a comprehensive overview of the present and future of distance education at the college, including adequacy of physical and financial resources and infrastructure, and overall status report on program. Director reported satisfaction with present refurbished facilities and software products provided, including software associated with recording studio. President approved report but requested rigorous review of equivalence.

As a result of analysis, investigation of equivalence assigned to faculty-led committee with research parameters established jointly by College Dean, Dean of Instruction, and Director of E-Learning.

2013-2014

2013-2014

To collaborate with faculty on the design and development of distance learning courses.

The Department will proactively and collaboratively assist faculty with the design and development of distance learning courses.

college’s compliance with all distance learning accreditation standards (13-14 AY and each spring semester). 80% of faculty surveyed will report satisfaction with the level of collaboration in the design and development of distance learning courses (12-13 AY and annually).

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While no question on the 12-13 faculty survey dealt specifically with distance learning, 82% of faculty indicated agreement that the primary responsibility for the educational program at the college resides with the faculty.

As a result of analysis, several changes have been made. Responsibility for content and rigor has been reallocated explicitly to the academic chairs with oversight by the Dean of Instruction. For directreport program chairs, a three-member committee has been established to review online content and rigor, two of which are faculty and the third an instructional designer. The department has participated in the creation of a committee to evaluate equivalence. The college is transitioning to the evaluative rubric developed by Quality

Matters. A specific question on this issue has been added to the 13-14 faculty survey. To ensure that there is a sufficient number of faculty qualified to develop, design, and teach distance learning courses, the department will certify faculty proficient in Distance Learning course development and management and publish a roster of faculty thus certified (12-13 AY and annually).

The department publishes each semester a roster of faculty qualified to teach a particular course. The report is a comprehensive status report that also indicates to the deans the proposals that are in processing. Faculty readiness is measured against a modified version of the CSUChico Rubric for Online Course Evaluation.

As a result of this process, instructional deans are aware of faculty clearance to teach online courses in advance of the deadline for faculty teaching rosters. Faculty involvement in the approval process has been increased through the establishment of a committee to evaluate rigor and content against new Quality Matters Rubric.

To ensure the continued creation and integration of multimedia and 3D technologies into distance learning courses, the department will develop a minimum of fifty learning objects

During the 12-13 AY, the department developed more than 140 3D objects for integration into both online and traditional/hybrid courses.

Although the number of objects far exceeded the benchmark, the department is focusing more on faculty perceptions of quality and efficacy in 13-14. A faculty focus group

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(12-13 AY and annually). To implement quality standards for distance education courses

The college will consistently assess the quality and effectiveness of its distance learning courses and use the results for continuous program improvement.

Data collected by the Office of Institutional Research and analysis by the faculty review committee will demonstrate equivalence with traditional classes in terms of retention and learning outcomes (1213 AY and annually).

An equivalence study has been commissioned under the leadership of a faculty member. The study was in progress at the close of the 12-13 AY.

The department will develop clear criteria for the evaluation of faculty teaching distance education courses and incorporate criteria in Distance Learning Faculty Guidebook (1213 AY and updated

During the 12-13 AY, the department employed a clear evaluative process with a modified version of the CSU-Chico Rubric for Online Course Evaluation.

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comprising all degrees of use is scheduled for March 2014. While the results will be finalized in the 2013-14 academic year, two changes have been made. First, the review of equivalence has been expanded to include additional faculty as well as a curriculum designer. Secondly, responsibility for the content and rigor has been explicitly assigned to the academic division chairs. A threeperson committee will perform this oversight role for direct report program chairs. As a result of analysis, the college has transitioned to the evaluation process, rubric employed by Quality Matters (QM). QM consultants have already conducted the first of several all-day

every two years).

training sessions for faculty. The department is also developing collaboratively short curriculum for mentoring faculty through course development process.

80% of students surveyed (in both first third and last third of courses) will report satisfaction with the quality of online courses as compared to traditional courses (1213 AY and annually).

While this specific question did not appear on the annual student survey or on individual course evaluations in 1213, 97% (1,758/1,821) of students taking an online course reported that they would consider taking an online course again.

As a result of analysis, the evaluation of distance learning in terms of content and rigor has been refocused and moved to academic chairs and the facultyled review committee. The shift to the Quality Matters rubric for development and evaluation addresses student satisfaction issues.

80% of students surveyed (in both first third and last third of courses) will report satisfaction with online library access to support distance learning course

While this specific item did not appear on the annual student survey or on individual course evaluations in 12-13, 97% (1,758/1821) of students taking an online

As a result of analysis, the department has added library links to the learning management system within Blackboard as well as partnering more with the

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delivery (12-13 AY and every two years).

course reported that they would consider taking an online course again.

LRC in developing educational materials

80% of students surveyed (in both first third and last third of courses) will report satisfaction with Blackboard as an instructional platform (12-13 AY and annually).

While no question dealt specifically with Blackboard, 86% reported satisfaction with the instructional equipment available. However, two negative comments were posted about Blackboard’s functionality and reliability. These were sent by IR to e-Learning staff for consideration.

As a result of discussion and analysis, the department has begun an initiative to increase uptime and reliability of the LMS platform. The department tripled the number of application servers. Even though usage has increased by six times, the department has seen noticeable drop in complaints since initiative began. The department now routinely monitors the load on servers.

The department will develop and document protocols to ensure that the security of confidential student information is maintained in the conduct of assessments and in the dissemination

The confidentiality of student records is ensured in the protocols prescribed in the “Privacy of Information” section of the Technology Use Policy approved by the Policy and Procedures

The college’s Technology Use Policy is scheduled for its next review in March, 2014.

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of results (12-13 AY and Committee on annually). November 3, 2011, and the Presidential Cabinet June 4, 2012.

To identify and investigate emerging technologies for instruction and support for online offerings and services

The department will proactively identify and investigate emerging instructional technologies related to online offerings and services

The department will develop and document procedures to ensure that advertising, recruiting, and admissions information related to online offerings accurately represent the programs, requirements, and services available to students (12-13 AY and annually).

The department has put in place an annual review process through the establishment of a review committee comprised of the Director of e-Learning, the College Dean, the Director of IR, the Director of Marketing and Public Relations, the Dean of Instruction, and three faculty members, one from each academic division.

The newly formed review committee has been scheduled to meet in March 2014. To ensure continued protections, review policy again in spring, 2015.

Representatives of the department will attend a minimum of two external professional development events that address present and emergent instructional and related service technologies (12-13 AY

100% of staff attended multiple professional development activities, addressing the optimal use of instructional technologies, particularly on developing and maintaining the

As a result of these activities, the staff were better able to position the college to move forward with more online and hybrid offerings and course enhancements. The workshop on the use of

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and annually).

college’s online presence.

the Quality Matters online assessment rubric, for example, represented a major assessment change for the college’s online programs.

80% of E-Learning staff surveyed will report satisfaction with their exposure to emergent instructional and related service technologies.

While 75% of the ELearning staff reported some degree of satisfaction with their exposure to emergent instructional and related service technologies, all pointed out areas that could be strengthened. Comments such as, “I consider myself extremely privileged to have access to mindblowing, state-of-the-art hardware and software,” were common.

As a result of analysis, the e-Learning staff have been provided with a broader range of targeted professional development opportunities. One employee, for example, has been approved to attend training in stereoscopic 3D filmmaking in San Diego in workshops addressing such topics as translating 2D ideas into working 3D images, and balancing convergence, parallax, and io to achieve comfortable 3D images. To respond to a staff request for more insulated work space, the department has reallocated work space in the Advanced

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Visualization Center.

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Analysis and Planning: E-Learning Department Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Created a process by which all sections of all courses within the college have a Blackboard section available. (This resulted in a dramatic increase in the use of Blackboard and facilitated a few additional improvements for the college As a result of all courses having sections available on Blackboard, staff implemented across-the-board evaluations within Blackboard using a product called EvaluationKit. This greatly increased response rates for surveys Assisted an instructor in the creation and management of the college’s first MOOC (Syllabus, Attachment 20.1)

A Blackboard log-in page with a link to the library is Attachment 20.2. A professional development record is attached (Attachment 20.3). The Director of E-Learning was appointed as Director of eLearning in January 2007, serving at the college for 8 years (Vita, Attachment 20.4). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Director of E-Learning presents oral and written reports on division (sample, Attachment 20.5. The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • •

Director or E-Learning Instructional Designer / Trainer (2) Graphic and Modeling Designer (2) Secretary

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • • • • • •

Administrative Council (elected) Executive Cabinet E-Learning Committee Information Technology Security Committee QEP Team Technology Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Action Items for Director of E-Learning from Executive Planning Retreat Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices 136

Meet with Director of Marketing to continue development of online marketing and promotional materials especially as college continues to develop and increase online offerings. Increase technology support to 24x7 for all aspects of the college to enhance entrance and student support throughout their career at Wallace State Community College. Provide increased presence of the department’s work for support through the use of FAQs, videos, how-tos and sample courses within the Learning Management Systems. Strategic Priority Two: To enhance student success through multi-dimensional programs and intentionality of services that improve preparedness, build selfesteem, and remove barriers to academic and personal success Require a minimum of one professional development offering from all aspects of the eLearning department to foster innovation in both the traditional and online course offerings Continue to research best practices and continue to integrate these best practices into departmental offerings Continue to strengthen and promote orientation courses to technologies offered by the department Continue to integrate technologies to a point that students and staff will have a single sign-on for all electronic services at Wallace State Community College. Promote and expand offerings of certifications offered through the department on technologies as well as educational theory Strategic Priority Three: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the College’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment Increase offerings of professional development as well as record all professional development activities offered in the department for later repeated viewing Continue to expand online offerings and streamline certification process to ensure quality and accuracy Strategic Priority Four: To develop multiple strategies of resources acquisition to support a culture of learning Strategically identify needs for both development and resources in the eLearning department

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Promote collaboration and communication among all divisions to facilitate a community of educational partners using technologies available to support those instructors who are online as well as traditional Strategic Priority Five: To hold as a foundational principle that the dynamics of change will be grounded in a culture of evidence marked by integrity, accountability, and a belief in a continuous cycle of institutional effectiveness Establish a set of reports that show the level of engagement in all online offerings from both a faculty and student perspective Create reports that help predict success and failure to allow department to proactively address potential problems at the earliest point in time Continue to support and increase faculty access to department resources Being open and accountable Strategic Priority Six: To establish transformational learning opportunities within, across, and beyond the College’s curriculum that prepare participants to lead successful and fulfilling lives without boundaries Expand online offerings in the technical and science areas, including access to and incorporation of 3D learning objects and simulations Improve technology use for all classes and programs through Professional Development training and individual work Incorporate synchronous learning technologies into the online and traditional courses to facilitate better communication and community

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Library Mission: To provide facilities, services, and instructional resources that are conducive to a positive learning environment for students, employees, and community stakeholders. To achieve this mission, the personnel of the Management Information Systems Department have identified the following outcomes as measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To promote an environment conducive to learning

Intended Outcomes The library will provide for an optimal milieu for the enhancement of learning through the effective use of facilities, technology, and equipment.

Assessment Criteria The Resources Committee will conduct an annual review of library facilities, instructional resources, and the learning environment (12-13 AY and annually).

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Assessment Results The Resources Committee deferred a comprehensive review to 13-14, but reviewed and approved a major revision of the Collection Development Policy on 4.17.13. The revised policy was approved by the Executive Cabinet on 5.20.13.

Use of Results As a result of the adoption of the new policy, the library staff prepared status reports on the academic collections by program and/or discipline and began meetings with each program chair to evaluate the adequacy of the resources available to support each program. With the exception of Health Sciences (deferred due to transition to new facilities), all collection reviews were completed by early fall 2013. The reviews completed were comprehensive, involving the sharing of

critical information on the resources necessary to support the college’s programs. Library staff provided a compendium of available resources, and faculty shared needed collection updates. 80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with the resources available in the library 12-13 AY and annually).

83% of students reported satisfaction with resources available in library.

To improve this outcome, library staff have restructured the library website to make finding resources easier for students. Also, published lists of new books and materials in a monthly newsletter.

80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with the level of customer service (12-13 AY and annually).

91% of students reported satisfaction with level of customer service received.

To improve customer services rates, library staff have instituted weekly “Help� sessions for patrons on research, using available databases, using the electronic catalog, using Microsoft, etc. The availability of these sessions is published on

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To ensure optimal electronic access to information and services

The library will provide online access to information and resources commensurate with best practices and good stewardship.

80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with access to online resources and services (FY 2012 and annually).

84% of student reported satisfaction with electronic information access in the library.

80% of faculty surveyed will report satisfaction with access to online resources and services (FY 2012 and annually).

94% of faculty surveyed reported that the library services were adequate to support the educational programs of the college. 91% reported that the instructional resources of the library were

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a large poster near the Main Circulation Desk. Staff also reviewed library layout and made changes to make patrons more comfortable by creating more collaborative spaces and a less institutional environment. To improve access to online materials, staff have added electronic books to catalog for first time. Staff also reviewed new databases for college’s collections, many resulting from recommendations from program reviews by faculty. As a result of analysis, library staff have modified several operations and protocols to improve faculty satisfaction rates. In addition to preparing a program guide for each program, staff have

adequate to support “my own particular academic area.”

80% of community users surveyed will report 2013-2014 satisfaction with access to online resources and services (13-14 AY and annually).

To enhance the information literacy skills of users

The library staff will guide the development of collegiate mastery of research methodology, including the use of appropriate technology.

The library staff will issue a minimum of three “Lib Guides,” online tutorials in the effective use of library resources for student use in research and inquiry

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2013-2014

attended multiple professional development activities to enhance service to faculty through electronic portals, such as attendance of the Alabama Library Association Annual Meeting and the Libraries eResource and Emerging Technologies Summit at Mississippi State University. To improve satisfaction rates for community users, the college has continued to update its genealogy collection and databases as genealogy is the most frequently requested area of community use. 2013-2014

To enhance awareness of best practices and innovation in providing library programs and services

The library staff will engage in selected professional development activities that reflect best practices, innovation, and good stewardship.

(13-14 AY and annually). 100% of fulltime staff will complete a minimum of two areaspecific professional development activities (12-13 AY and annually).

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100% of fulltime library staff reported a minimum of seven professional development activities. Cumulatively, the four staff members reported more than 70 activities, most specifically addressing library management and operations and associated skills. Activities included the Libraries E-Resource and Emerging Technology Summit in Starkville, MS, the Southeastern Florida Library Information Network Conference, and the annual meeting of the Alabama Library Association.

As a result of these activities, the skills of the library staff were greatly enhanced particularly in the area of e-access. As a result of direct training from vendors on cataloguing and services to patrons on genealogical/archival research, for example, staff improved services in both technical and public service areas. Use of Sky River, a cataloging database, improved service by automating what was formerly a manual process.

Analysis and Planning: Library Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • • •

Added electronic books to library catalog Began a comprehensive weeding/catalog/inventory project to ensure that all materials were correctly listed in catalog and that redundant or unsuitable materials were removed Developed and implemented new Collection Development Policy to guide the maintenance and efficacy of collections Began comprehensive review of discipline and/or program-specific collections in collaboration with faculty

Sample professional development records for library staff are attached (Attachments 21.1 and 21.2). The Library Director was appointed to this position in 2010, serving as Director for 3 years, and employed at the college for a total of 17 years (Vita, Attachment 21.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • •

Library Director Full-time Library Assistants (3) Part-time staff in Archives (2) Adjunct librarians for evening coverage (3)

Representatives of the department served on the following committees: • • • • • •

Resources Committee, Chair QEP Development Team Common Read Committee Green Team Policy and Procedures Committee Technology Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

Complete consultations with all academic departments and/or disciplines to establish adequacy of collections in accordance with approved Collection Development Policy Complete the weeding/catalog project to ensure all resources available in online catalog Complete library instruction/use page for departments through Blackboard as a result of collection reviews by faculty

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Athletics Mission: To provide successful, nationally competitive athletic programs that enhance campus life and promote positive community involvement, and to provide student athletes with quality educational and athletic opportunities To achieve this mission, the Athletic Department is committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below: Unit Goals To facilitate and promote athletic teams that are regionally and nationally competitive

Intended Outcomes The college’s athletic programs will be competitive on conference, state, and national levels.

Assessment Criteria All programs will achieve a winning percentage of 60%; any program not achieving this benchmark will produce a written plan for improvement to be submitted and reviewed by Athletic Director and Executive Vice President (12-13 AY and annually).

Assessment Results The college’s athletic teams achieved the following winning percentages: • Volleyball 84% • Soccer 87% • Basketball (M) 56% • Basketball (W) 70% • Baseball 57% • Softball (82%) • Golf (7th place, national tournament)

Use of Results After analysis, Athletic staff noted that all teams were competitive on state and regional levels and no improvement plans were required.

100% of reports required by athletic conference and other regulatory entities will be submitted in a timely and accurate manner (12-13 AY and annually).

100% of reports required by athletic conference or other regulatory entities were submitted in a timely manner with no follow-up requests. Reports included Equity in Athletics Report and NJCAA Eligibility reports.

After analysis, staff noted that all reports are expected and routine for personnel currently in place. No changes in requirements are anticipated for the 13-14 AY.

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To promote athletic programs that proactively engage students, employees, and community stakeholders

The Athletic Department will actively promote its programs and services through campus and community media to maximize campus and community engagement.

80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with the college’s athletic events (12-13 AY and annually).

No question on student activities on the 2013 student survey dealt exclusively with athletics; however 71% of respondents reported attending at least one athletic, social, or cultural event with 81% reporting satisfaction with quality of student activities and 79% with the variety.

To improve student satisfaction, athletic department staff have increased promotion of events by having pep rallies, increasing campus event signage, and increasing announcements through campus communication media.

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the college’s athletic events (12-13 AY and annually).

No question on athletics specifically; 76% reported satisfaction with the quality of extracurricular activities provided to students.

To improve employee satisfaction with athletic events, athletic department staff have increased promotion of events by having pep rallies, increasing campus event signage, and increasing announcements through campus communication media. Question has been added to 13-14 AY employee survey.

The college will

The college sponsored

After analysis of results,

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annually sponsor a minimum of three athletic events specifically targeting community populations (12-13 AY and annually).

To create an academic and athletic environment for student athletes characterized by curricular and extracurricular excellence

The Athletic Department will promote an academic and athletic environment for athletes that reflect excellence in all dimensions of student performance.

90% of athletic participants will meet or exceed published standards of academic performance (currently cumulative 1.75 for first season, 2.0 for second GPA) (12-13 AY and annually).

90% of athletic participants will complete the academic year without infractions due to random drug testing (12-13 AY and annually).

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multiple events, including three major ones: the NW Regional Alabama HS AA Basketball Tournament, the Alabama HS AA 1A to 6A State Cheerleading Competition, and the State NJCAA volleyball and men’s and women’s state basketball tournaments. 100% of athletic teams exceeded GPA goals. Four teams were named NJCAA Academic Team of the Year in Alabama Region. The women’s softball team finished 5th nationally in team GPA. Seven athletes received individual NJCAA academic recognition.

athletic staff noted high degree of community engagement and coverage in local media. The staff have committed to continued high visibility, including intentionality in website announcements.

96% (75/78) of random drug screenings were passed successfully.

To sustain these results, staff have added in depth review of Student Handbook at athletic orientations and have continued “Heads Up” awareness program.

To improve the academic performance of athletes, staff have arranged targeted study hall opportunities and specialized tutoring.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the college’s institutional mission and vision

The Athletic Department will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

Athletic injuries incurred in competition will decrease 2% YOY (1213 AY only).

During the 12-13 AY, 43 documented athletic injuries occurred, a 19% reduction from the previous year. Staff noted that improvements in quality of playing fields contributed to improvement of results. Coaches also implemented pre-season workout and strengthening programs to reduce injuries.

To reduce student athletic injuries, staff have implemented several program improvements. They have improved the conditions of playing fields (better turf), earlier injury detection and intervention through trainer referrals, more frequent equipment inspections, and increasing warmup/stretching regimens.

100% of the Athletic Department staff will attend a minimum of three professional development activities that promote success in competitive endeavors, strengthen student success in curricular and extracurricular activities, or promote an atmosphere of engagement for students, employees, and community stakeholders

100% of athletic coaches and staff attended professional development activities targeting athletic success as well as administrative management of programs through Banner budgetary modules of instruction. All coaches completed AED training for emergency preparedness as well as sport-specific training provided once

As a result of these activities, particular improvement has been achieved in scheduling and planning within budgetary constraints and coaching staff is better prepared for emergency interventions for athletes.

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(12-13 AY and annually).

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annually by the ACCC.

Analysis and Planning: Athletics In 2012-2013, all of the Wallace State athletic teams met or exceeded the 60% winning percentage threshold with the exception of Men’s Basketball and Baseball. Of particular note are the following accomplishments: • • • • •

Volleyball Soccer Men’s Basketball Women’s Basketball Softball

In Golf

Won state, competed in nationals Advanced to semi-finals of region Finished 4th in state tournament Runner-up in state tournament Won state and national championship (News Release, Attachment 22.1) 7th place in national tournament Student won tournament medal; won individual national tournament

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 22.2 and 22.3). The Athletic Director was appointed in 2009, has served in this position for 5 years, and has been employed by the college for 23 years (Vita, Attachment 22.4). The office includes the following full-time and part-time positions: • • • • • •

Athletic Director Administrative Assistant/Athletic Coordinator Head Coaches (4) Assistant Coaches (4) Golf Coach/Physical Education Instructor Physical Education Instructor (2)

Representatives of the Athletic Department serve on the following committees: • • • • • • • • •

Judicial Affairs Committee Social Committee Admissions/Financial Aid Committee Infection Control Committee Green Team Committee Institutional Health, Safety, and Security Committee Beta Team (Behavioral Evaluation and Threat Assessment Team) College Assessment Council Scholarship Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: •

Continue to compete at highest state and regional level in all sports endeavors

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• •

Transition department out of men’s soccer as sport is discontinued Maintain equipment and facilities at highest level to optimize performance and reduce injuries

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Adult Education Mission: To provide basic academic instruction for individuals who have discontinued public education or may be seeking to improve academic skills in order to gain employment or enroll in higher education. To achieve this mission, the Adult Education Program is committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below: Unit Goals To provide accessible, comprehensive academic instruction to Adult Education constituencies

Intended Outcomes The Adult Education Program in partnership with public service entities and other nonprofit agencies will provide accessible academic instruction to Adult Education constituencies.

Assessment Criteria The Adult Education program will provide, operate, and manage a minimum of two instructional sites in each of four target counties (data collected each spring).

Assessment Results During the 2012-2013 program year (July 1— June 30), the program provided instruction at 17 instructional sites: Blount: 4 Cullman: 9 Morgan: 2 Winston: 2

Use of Results As a result of analysis, minor modifications have been made to sites. In Blount County, for example, moved one site to larger classroom facility. Two Cullman sites also moved to larger facility providers.

The number of students enrolled in sponsored adult education programs will increase 3% YOY (data collected each spring).

The number of students enrolled in sponsored adult education programs increased 5% YOY (693 to 731).

As a result of analysis, the program has increased marketing to two annual campaigns. To increase visibility, the staff has participated in more community events (8 in 2012-13). Staff have committed to continued representation at non-profit service provider meetings.

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To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and continuous contribution to the realization of the program’s mission

The Adult Education Program will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

The number of GED completions will increase by 2% YOY (data collected each spring).

The number of GED completions decreased 1.2% YOY.

As a result of analysis, several program modifications have occurred. Staff have initiated a comprehensive review of academic progression process, class hours offered per site, and more effective use of online supplemental instruction. To better monitor student perceptions, staff have committed to increased surveying to assist in earlier interventions for students encountering barriers.

Representatives of the Adult Education Program will attend a minimum of three professional development activities that promote student success and access to academic instruction in fulfillment of the program’s mission to its

100% of Adult Education staff completed a minimum of ten hours of approved professional development during the 12-13 AY. Activities included attendance at state and national Adult Education conferences, regional instructional

As a result of these activities, all employees became TABE (Test for Basic Education) certified. Professional development increased proficiency in the use of targeted instructional design; student placement based on intake assessment; and

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Adult Education constituency (data collected each spring).

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design workshops, and visits with Adult Education leaders in other states. The average number of hours of professional development hours per employee was 27.

continual college/career readiness advising throughout the student’s enrollment.

Analysis and Planning: Adult Education Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Provided instruction at seventeen sites Increased marketing efforts to increase enrollment (Sample brochure, Attachment 23.1) Conducted GED Graduation Ceremony, featuring 275 graduates and approximately 520 attendees (Program, Attachment 23.2)

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 23.3). The Director of Adult Education was hired April 2006, and has been employed at the college for 10 years (Vita, Attachment 23.4). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • • • •

Director of Adult Education Instruction Coordinator Data Entry and Testing Specialist Career Counselors Instructors IT Staff

The Director of Adult Education served in the following organizations and committees: • • • • • • • • • •

President, Alabama Adult Education Directors’ Association Alabama Association for Public Continuing and Adult Education Department of Postsecondary / Adult Education Division Professional Development Committee Leadership Wallace State Team Wallace State E-Learning Committee Wallace State Technology Committee Cullman County Career Technical Advisory Committee Blount County Teacher Training for Core Curriculum Panelist Cullman County Community Service Provider Team Cullman Area Workforce Solutions Charter Member (CAWS)

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

Increase program enrollment by 10% Increase number of academic advancements by 5% Provide access to technology for all class sites

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Transitional Learning Mission: The Transitional Program will provide a comprehensive learning environment that promotes holistic pathways to personalized goal attainment. To achieve this mission, the Transitional Program faculty and staff are committed to the unit goals and performance measures listed below: Unit Goals To provide an environment that facilitates the holistic growth of transitional students

Intended Outcomes The Transitional Program will provide a learning environment conducive to holistic transitional learning.

Assessment Criteria 100% of transitional faculty and staff will report satisfaction with transitional classrooms, offices, labs, and instructional resources (12-13 AY and annually).

100% of transitional students surveyed will report satisfaction with transitional classrooms, labs, and instructional resources (13-14 AY and annually). To facilitate transitional

The Transitional

The Transitional faculty

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Assessment Results Transitional staff have reported need for additional computer lab space and computer upgrades. The need for additional space has been discussed with the Dean of Instruction and College Dean, who referred staff to budget hearing process beginning spring 2014.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, staff have prepared proposal for 2014 budget hearings. Staff have been approved to attend NADE in March 2014 to evaluate options and best practices in terms of both facilities and resources.

2013-2014

2013-2014

entry and exit in a manner that maximizes opportunities for the pursuit of an academic credential.

Program will facilitate program entry and exit in order to optimize the attainment of an academic credential.

and staff will prepare a comprehensive plan for reducing barriers to student success at program entry and exit (13-14 AY and updated every two years).

2013-2014

The plan will be reviewed by the First2013-2014 Year Gateway Committee and recommendations submitted to Transitional faculty and staff (13-14 AY and every two years). To enhance student learning by addressing academic preparedness and coordinating the development of general and discipline-specific learning strategies.

The program faculty and staff will enhance student learning by coordinating the development of general and discipline-specific learning strategies.

The percentage of transitional students successfully completing developmental courses will increase 5% YOY (data collected each spring semester).

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The percentage of transitional students successfully completing developmental courses decreased two percentage points from 70% fall 2011 to 68% fall 2012.

2013-2014

2013-2014

As a result of analysis, the TL staff have implemented a number of initiatives to improve completion rates, including extensive professional development to evaluate developmental models used by other institutions, largely through the college’s participation in

Achieving the Dream and attendance of the NADE annual conference. To improve completion rates, for example, the TL staff have prepared a proposal for the 2014 budget hearings for expanding the capacity of student labs. The TL staff have also begun working with ATD coaches to guide improvement. The percentage of transitional students successfully exiting development courses and achieving a passing grade in the gateway course on the first attempt will increase 5% YOY (data collected each spring semester).

25% of a cohort of students successfully completing one or more

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The percentage of transitional students successfully exiting developmental courses and achieving a passing grade in the gateway course on the first attempt increased from 53% fall 2011 to 57% fall 2012, an increase of four percentage points.

To improve this outcome, in addition to the professional development referenced above, the college has supplemented the SLA tutors available for assistance in gateway courses and are participating in a pilot in the 13-14 AY to have selected developmental classes participate in Learning Communities.

15% of the fall 2010

To improve this

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective and efficacious

The Transitional Program will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional

developmental courses will earn a degree or certificate within 36 months of initial enrollment (data collected each spring semester).

cohort earned a certificate or degree within 36 months of initial enrollment.

outcome, the role of the graduation coaches and TL mentors have been enhanced through the college’s transition from using its life and graduation coaches strictly for Career/Technical students to broader student populations, including developmental students.

15% of a cohort of students successfully completing two or more developmental courses will earn a degree or certificate within 36 months of initial enrollment (data collected each spring semester).

10% of fall 2010 cohort earned a certificate or degree within 36 months of initial enrollment.

In addition to the changes above, the college has begun exploring the use of predictive analytics to accurately target specific populations, including developmental students, for group-specific interventions.

Representatives of the Transitional Program will attend a minimum of three professional development activities that promote transitional

Representatives of the department attended multiple professional development activities, including attending the National Association for

As a result of these activities, plans have been developed for expansion of student labs, enhancement of self-paced instruction,

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developmental learning

development that is characterized by effectiveness and good stewardship.

student success and completion (data collected each spring).

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Developmental Education (NADE) in Denver.

and expansion of institutional interventions for students just below the Compass cut score. Representatives are attending NADE and the national Achieving the Dream Annual Meeting in the 13-14 AY.

Analysis and Planning: Transitional Learning Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Developed and implemented online orientation for students taking Compass placement exam. 100% of fulltime staff attended NADE in Denver, CO (trip reports, Attachment 24.1). Continued to work through ATD coaches and peer institutions to explore innovation and best practices in Developmental Education

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 24.2). The Director of Transitional Learning was hired in 2009, and has been employed at the college for more than 20 years (Vita, Attachment 24.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Director of Transitional Studies Transitional Faculty (2)

Representatives of the Transitional Learning Department served in the following organizations and committees: • • • • • •

QEP Development Team Common Read Committee Diversity Committee First-Year Gateway Committee Policy and Procedure Committee Social Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • • •

Accelerate pathways to gateway courses and completion for Transitional Students by piloting broader interpretations of cut scores Continue active participation in Achieving the Dream and its emphasis on improving developmental outcomes Expand and update transitional labs to better accommodate student needs Pilot developmental participation in Learning Communities to enhance student engagement and improve retention and completion rates

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Office of Special Populations Mission: The Office of Special Populations strives to provide a quality and caring learning environment that allows students with disabilities to be fully engaged in an educational partnership that facilitates their individual educational endeavors. To achieve this mission, the Office of Special Populations is committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To provide services to students with disabilities that facilitate their individual educational endeavors

Intended Outcomes The Office will provide services to students with disabilities that reflect a strong commitment to student success and persistence.

Assessment Criteria 100% of eligible students requesting assistance will receive assistance that is consistent with the provisions of 504/ADAA (data collected each fall semester).

Assessment Results 100% of eligible students requesting assistance received assistance in accordance with all 504/ADAA guidelines.

Use of Results To sustain these results, staff continues to complete professional development and training in updates and modifications to federal guidelines.

80% of faculty with designated ADAdocumented students will report satisfaction with the quality and comprehensiveness of the services of the Office of Special Populations (12-13 AY and every two years).

Faculty evaluated the effectiveness of the office across eight dimensions, including overall effectiveness. 98% reported agreement that the office responded promptly to requests for services 87% of faculty rated the overall quality of service as 8/10 or higher. Student satisfaction with

As a result of analysis, staff have committed to continued professional development to ensure that coordination with students and faculty remains compliant with all federal regulations and protocols.

80% of students

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As a result of analysis,

receiving assistance will report satisfaction with quality and timeliness of assistance (12-13 AY and every two years).

the Office was measured across 14 dimensions. 96% of students reported satisfaction with confidentiality, 95% helpfulness, 96% friendliness, and 96% knowledge of regulations and ability to address questions.

staff have committed to continued professional development to ensure that coordination with students and faculty remains compliant with all federal regulations and protocols.

The Office will have no ADA accommodation appeals (12-13 AY and annually).

The appeal log in the Office of the Executive Vice President shows that there were no ADA accommodation appeals.

To sustain these results, staff has continued to work closely with faculty and staff in adhering to all federal and institutional protocols. As a result of these training programs, faculty and staff awareness was increased in both knowledge of the legal procedures and protocols associated with ADA, as well as sensitivity in addressing the special needs of students with disabilities. As a result of these

To provide or facilitate training for faculty and staff in ADA issues and practices that promote student success

The Office will provide training and guidance for faculty and staff that promotes student success and ensures institutional compliance with all ADA mandates and protocols.

The Office will provide a minimum of four training sessions for faculty and staff on institutional compliance with all ADA mandates and protocols (12-13 AY and annually).

The Office conducted multiple training sessions for faculty and staff. In addition, personnel answered faculty and staff ADA compliance queries on an ongoing basis.

To develop a congruent

The Office will develop

Representatives of the

Representatives of the

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and selective program of professional development that promotes effective service to students with disabilities.

and maintain a program of professional development for disability services that is characterized by effectiveness, good stewardship, and best practices.

Office will attend a minimum of two professional development activities that promote success and persistence for students with disabilities and/or that enhance institutional compliance with ADA procedures and protocols (12-13 AY and annually).

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office attended more than twelve professional development activities directly related to special populations, including attending the 2012 Appreciative Advising Institute in Columbia, SC, the UWF Law Conference, and the AL AHEAD Disability Conference in Montgomery.

activities, staff have remained current on federal guidelines and protocols. Director has targeted attendance of national conference in the 13-14 AY.

Analysis and Planning: Office of Special Populations Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • • •

Certified as an Appreciative Advisor by the Office of Appreciative Education at the University of South Carolina After creating disability-friendly HIS 202I course, developed and taught workshop to aid faculty with ideas for incorporating disability-friendly online courses Received high satisfaction scores on faculty and student surveys Implemented protocol for military veterans to received red, white, and blue honor cords at graduation

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 25.1). The Director of Special Populations was appointed in 2003, and has been employed at the college for 18 years (Vita, Attachment 25.2). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: •

Director of Special Populations

The Director of Special Populations served in the following organizations and committees: • • • • •

ADA Committee Scholarship Committee First-Year Gateway Committee Institutional Health, Safety and Security Committee Enrollment Management Task Force

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • • •

Purchase cost-effective software system to better house data concerning students with disabilities Attend one national conference Assist returning students with disabilities with completion of financial aid to increase retention rates Designate a specific IT technician for aiding in assistive technology issues

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Advising Center Mission: The purpose of the Advising Center is to offer programs and services that provide guidance and knowledge to assist students in the development of an educational plan consistent with their academic and career goals. To achieve this mission, the Advising Center is committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To provide advising services that give students the requisite information to promote achievement of their academic and career goals

Intended Outcomes The Advising Center will provide students with information that facilitates the successful navigation of personal, academic, and career goals.

Assessment Criteria 80% of students surveyed will report satisfaction with their academic advising (1213 AY and annually).

Assessment Results 84% of students reported satisfaction with the services of the Advising Office.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, staff have implemented more follow-up processes with advisees to discuss difficulties throughout the semester and have offered more workshops for students in such areas as transfer assistance.

To provide orientation offerings that promote student success

The Center will provide orientation offerings that promote personal and academic student success.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the value and efficacy of their ORI 101orientation class (12-13 AY and annually).

Orientation students were surveyed across multiple dimensions. 63% reported that the orientation course helped improve academic performance/grades in other courses (37% reported rated the assistance as “Not Sure�

To improve the depth, comprehensiveness, utility, and efficacy of orientation, the college is transitioning to a semester-long success course that will feature e-portfolio development and career explorations.

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or “Definitely Not.”

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective advising services to students.

The Center will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that is characterized by effectiveness, good stewardship, and best practices.

80% of students attending the Lion’s Pride information sessions will report satisfaction with their value and efficacy (1213 AY and annually).

79% of students reported satisfaction with Lion’s Pride information sessions.

Representatives of the Office will attend a minimum of two professional development activities that promote student success and persistence (12-13 AY and annually).

Representatives of the department attended more than fourteen professional development activities specifically addressing counseling, advising, and student engagement. Activities included session on Banner implementation and use and Prior Learning Assessment Workshop at WS; sessions on apps for education, flipped classrooms, and eportfolio applications at e-Learning Retreat, and

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As a result of analysis, staff have made one major change, and that is to stress more than previously the critical need for students to see their assigned advisor to review programs of study and other academic progression issues. As a result of these activities, staff have been able to more efficiently manage and track student contacts through introduction of advising modules in Banner and have enhanced skills associated with new eCompass for nonexempt students. Discipline-specific activities have been targeted for the 13-14 AY.

consultations with other practitioners at Shelton State and Chattahoochee Valley.

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Analysis and Planning: Advising Center Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Advised approximately 1,200 students on academic and career choices Continued to provide intrusive career counseling focused on administering and interpreting the Strong Interest Inventory (College Edition) Had more than 14,000 documented student contacts in calendar year 2012

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 26.1). The Director of Student Development was appointed 2003, and has been employed at the college for 22 years (Vita, Attachment 26.2). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • •

Director of Advising Center (vacant) Director of Student Development Advisor (2) Administrative Assistant

The Director and staff of the Advising Center are represented on the following committees: • • • • •

Curriculum Committee QEP Beta Team (Behavioral Evaluation and Threat Assessment Team) Green Team Judicial Affairs

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

To transition students with undeclared majors into specific programs of study To meet student needs, particularly those for new students, across broad spectrum of services

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Admissions and Records Mission: To facilitate the process of student achievement of their educational goals, including the registration process, requesting transcripts, transfer credit, etc., and to keep student records secure. To achieve this mission, the Admissions Office is committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To ensure that students records are utilized and maintained in a manner commensurate with the provisions of federal law and best practices.

To provide courteous and effective customer service to students, employees, and community stakeholders

Intended Outcomes The Admissions Office will ensure that all student records are utilized and maintained in a secure and confidential manner and that the office complies with all federal mandates and protocols. The Office will provide a level of customer service that reflects the highest standards of quality, efficiency, courtesy, and effectiveness.

Assessment Criteria 100% of Admissions staff will complete annual FERPA training on current federal law and protocols (annually and as needed).

Assessment Results 100% of Admissions staff completed FERPA training on current federal law and protocols.

Use of Results As a result of training, staff has continued to remain current on mandated federal protocols regarding student confidentiality.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the quality and efficiency of customer service (12-13 AY and annually).

85% of students reported satisfaction with the quality of Admissions services.

To improve student satisfaction rates, the office has participated in the development and implementation of the centralized One-Stop Center, Lion Central. To increase efficiency, have implemented central phone number, email address, and “Who’s Next� software.

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To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to students

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to students.

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the quality and efficiency of customer service (12-13 AY and annually). Representatives of the Office will attend a minimum of four professional development activities that promote effective, courteous, and efficient service to students (1213 AY and annually).

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2013-2014

2013-2014

Representatives of the Office attended multiple professional development activities, including training in Banner implementation and use (e.g., Filebound and BDMS), utilization of TerraDotta (enrollment management) software, and attendance of the regional meeting of NAFSA.

As a result of these activities, office increased efficiency associated with management and use of Banner admissions modules. Increased knowledge of best practices through networking with other state and regional practitioners.

Analysis and Planning: Admissions and Records Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

Integrated into new centralized “One Stop” Center (Lion Central) for student inquiries. Integrated centralized email and phone numbers into departmental protocols

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 27.1 and 27.2). The Director of Admissions/Registrar was appointed in 2013, and has been employed at the college for less than one year (Vita, Attachment 27.3). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • •

Registrar/Records and Admissions Coordinator Enrollment Clerk (5) Enrollment Clerk (PT) (1)

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

To continue to increase efficiency through the use of “Who’s Next” software and other tools and methodologies To continue to provide the highest quality of customer service

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Enrollment Management: Recruiting, Student Activities, and Career Coaches Mission: To promote the college to prospective students in secondary schools and the surrounding communities through recruiting efforts. To enhance the educational experience by providing activities that promote school involvement, interaction with peers and college personnel, and personal growth and development. To provide career assessment, exploration, planning, and soft skills training and development through the Career Coaches Program To achieve this mission, Enrollment Management is committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness:

Unit Goals To promote foundational knowledge and understanding of local employment needs and trends as a context for student development and planning

Intended Outcomes The Office of Enrollment Management will promote foundational knowledge of local employment needs and trends that contextualize student career and academic planning.

Assessment Criteria Representatives of the Office will attend a minimum of two community events that strengthen awareness of local and/or regional employment needs and trends (12-13 AY and annually).

Assessment Results Representatives of the Office attended multiple community events that strengthened awareness of local and/or regional employment needs and trends, including a visit to a session of the Alabama legislature and membership on the Education Committee of the Cullman County Chamber of Commerce.

Use of Results As a result of these activities, awareness of the congruency between the college’s strategic plans and the needs of students and other community stakeholders was increased. Plans have been made to increase community presence in 13-14 AY.

To promote the college’s programs and services through recruitment strategies that maximize student success and engagement

The Office will promote the college’s programs and services through comprehensive recruitment strategies and maximize student

100% of high schools in the defined service area will be visited a minimum of two times by representatives of the college (12-13AY and

100% of high schools in the immediate service area were visited a minimum of two times by representatives of the college. Promotional and

As a result of analysis, the department has continued discussion on ways to target specific populations of prospective students.

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success and engagement. annually).

To provide career coaching that empowers students to pursue personal and career

The Office will provide career coaching that will empower students to pursue personal and

enrollment information was disseminated.

The college is exploring the use of predictive analytics for use in the 13-14 AY.

Representatives of the college will attend a minimum of five college fairs (12-13 AY and annually).

Representatives of the department represented the institution at five college fairs in the 12-13 AY.

As a result of analysis, the college continues to improve visibility at fairs. Staff noted continued trend to increasing online exploration of colleges by prospective students.

80% of employees will report satisfaction with the college’s recruitment of traditional and nontraditional students (1213 AY and annually).

82% of employees reported satisfaction with the college’s recruitment of both traditional and nontraditional students.

Representatives of the department will document more than 600 individual contacts with

Representatives of the department recorded more than 1,000 individual contacts with

As a result of analysis, the college continues to explore use of predictive analytics to target specific populations of prospective students. Associate Dean is attending ATD conference in Orlando in 13-14 AY, where use of advanced analytics is topic of multiple presentations. As a result of analysis, the college will continue to promote high quantity, high quality

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opportunities through college attendance

career opportunities through the portal of college attendance.

secondary students (1213 AY and annually). 80% of high school students surveyed will report satisfaction with value and efficacy of career coaching (12-13 AY and annually).

secondary students, exploring multiple avenues of inquiry related to college entry and attendance, career exploration, and programs of study.

contacts with secondary students in multiple dimensions of college entry and attendance, career exploration, and programs of study.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to prospective and current students

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to current and prospective students.

Representatives of the Office will attend a minimum of four professional development activities that promote effective, courteous, and efficient service to current and prospective students (1213 AY and annually).

Representatives of the department reported more than twenty professional development activities, including extensive training in implementation and use of Banner Enrollment Management modules and workshops with workflow process consultant.

As a result of these activities, efficiency and customer service enhanced, largely through extensive training in Banner enrollment management modules. Two representatives have registered for national Achieving the Dream Conference in 2014 in Orlando.

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Analysis and Planning: Office of Enrollment Management Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Improved enrollment management efficiency through implementation of centralized One-Stop Center, Lion Central Implemented “Who’s Next” software to improve efficiency and customer service Integrated Achieving the Dream initiatives to improve portals of entry

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 28.1 and 28.2). The Assistant Dean of Enrollment Management was appointed to present position in 2012, and has been employed at the college for 21 years (Vita, Attachment 28.3). At all regularly scheduled cabinet meetings, the Associate Dean presents oral and written reports on Enrollment Management (sample, Attachment 28.4). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • •

Associate Dean of Enrollment Management All staff of Admissions, Recruiting, and Financial Aid (28)

Representatives of the division served on the following committees: • • • • • • • • • •

Executive Cabinet Advising Committee Banner Reporting Committee Banner Leadership Team Enrollment Management Task Force First-Year Gateway Committee Graduation Committee Green Team Institutional Health, Safety, and Security Committee QEP Development Team

Unit Goals for 2013-14: Action Items for Assistant Dean of Enrollment Management from Executive Planning Retreat Strategic Priority One: To strengthen portals of entry, including recruiting, outreach, and marketing, and points of entry, such as physical and electronic contacts, through innovative and effective methods and practices. Action Items:

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Develop targeted recruitment and outreach for particular populations (e.g., Hispanic, older students, etc.) o Recruiting at Senior Centers, such as Cullman County Commission. Forging partnerships for classes, credit and non-credit with senior population o Utilizing programs, such as First United Methodist Church Hispanic Ministry, for contacts for recruiting. Meet with Yenny Laney, director, to distribute flyers and attend meetings to advertise college opportunities Developing and utilizing performance metrics o Registration comparisons from date-to-date, and semester-to-semester are currently used. Also divisional enrollment is tracked. Program enrollment is tracked through instructional areas Serve 24/7 online global population 24/7 through no-stop services and seamless entry (e.g., extended hours at Lion Central and consider strategically utilizing technology and outsourcing) o Lion’s Pride PowerPoint is now available on WSCC website through advising. Consider adding video of future sessions; however, monitor this for timeliness of information. Orientation 101 is available online and ORI 103 and WKO 101 can be added to our offerings. Lion Central has hours of 730AM to 600PM Monday through Wednesday, 730A M to 430PM on Thursday and 730AM to 200PM on Friday. These could be extended during the registration periods to include 2 extra hours per day. Registration services are 24/7 through Self-Serve Banner. Payments can also be accepted 24/7. Consider outsourcing for FA questions or advising questions 24/7. Although these areas can be emailed directly or through main new Lion Central email address, they may not receive immediate feedback as currently set up. Collaborative plan for all outreach groups (flowchart showing employee responses and responsibilities) to integrate services and programs more readily

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Office of Financial Aid Mission: The purpose of the Financial Aid Office is to assist students in supplementing their funds for college expenses to achieve their educational objectives To achieve this mission, the Office of Financial Aid is committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness: Unit Goals To disseminate financial aid information that reduces barriers to student success

Intended Outcomes The Office will reduce barriers to student success by disseminating financial information that is accurate and preemptive.

Assessment Criteria The office will produce a minimum of six financial aid presentations and/or workshops to prospective and current students (12-13 AY and annually).

To provide financial aid information and services in a courteous and efficient manner

The Office will provide financial aid services and information that is commensurate with the highest standards of efficiency and customer service.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the financial aid services (12-13 AY and annually).

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Assessment Results The office conducted multiple financial aid presentations to prospective students. Enrolled students are counseled routinely through the new OneStop Center, Lion Central.

Use of Results As a result of analysis, two significant changes have been implemented, the use of the “Who’s Next” software to more efficiently process financial aid questions at the first point of contact and the creation of financial aid labs, where groups of students can be coached in the navigation of the institutional and federal websites. 75% of students reported To improve student satisfaction with the satisfaction rates, staff financial aid counseling have implemented the received. software and labs mentioned above. In addition, staff created “FAFSA Days” to expedite receipt of this

critical information earlier in application process.

To provide programs and services that meet or exceed all statutory protocols and standards

The Office will meet or exceed all regulatory protocols and standards in a timely and efficient manner.

80% of students will report satisfaction with the level of customer service of the Financial Aid Office (12-13 AY and annually).

75% of students reported satisfaction with the level of customer service received.

100% of audits by state and federal agencies will be completed with no audit exceptions (12-13 AY and annually).

The college received no audit findings for the five years previous to the 12-13 AY. No federal audits were completed in 12-13. In the state audit, two findings were filed, both related to the reconciliation of student records, largely as a result of difficulties associated with the college’s transition from a Legacy data system to Banner.

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To improve customer service satisfaction rates, staff have implemented a central phone number and central email address. Wait times have been decreased through additional staff training and the implementation of the One-Stop Center. To improve these results, staff have continued to pursue professional development through attending such meetings as the Alabama Student Financial Aid Conference in Orange Beach and numerous webinars related to state and federal regulatory updates. To reduce errors and increase efficiency, the office has continued to receive training in the

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to prospective and current students

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to current and prospective students.

implementation of Financial Aid modules of Banner. Representatives of the Representatives of the As a result of Office will attend a Office reported more professional minimum of four than fifty professional development activities, professional development activities. staff improved in development activities Many addressed state knowledge, customer that promote effective, and federal regulatory service, and efficiency. courteous, and efficient changes, management of The annual conference service to current and student accounts, and the for Financial Aid staff in prospective students (12- implementation and use Orange Beach, for 13 AY and annually). of Banner financial aid example, greatly modules. enhanced regulatory and management practices and provided networking opportunities with other community college practitioners.

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Analysis and Planning: Office of Financial Aid Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • • •

Completed majority of Banner conversion and implementation Improved efficiency through creation of One-Stop Center, Lion Central Improved customer service through implementation and use of “Who’s Next” software, financial aid labs, and FAFSA days

Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 29.1). The Director of Financial Aid was appointed in 2005, has been employed at the college for 9 years, and has 14 years in the field (Vita, Attachment 29.2). The office includes the following fulltime and part-time positions: • • • •

Director of Financial Aid Program Specialists (2) Clerks (4) Clerk (part-time) (1)

The Director and staff of the Office of Financial Aid are represented on the following committees: • • • • •

Banner Reporting Committee Banner Leadership Team Enrollment Management Task Force Policy and Procedure Committee Scholarship Committee

Unit Goals for 2013-14: • •

To continue to maintain high standard for management and documentation in accordance with all state and federal regulatory protocols and best practices To continue to emphasize the importance of quality customer service

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Trio Programs Mission: To help designated populations overcome barriers to personal and academic success and progression through intentional interventions To achieve this mission, the administration and staff of the Wallace State Trio Programs are committed to the following outcomes and measures of unit effectiveness:

Unit Goals To promote student success for qualifying first-generation college students who face financial and other barriers to academic progression (SSS)

Intended Outcomes The Office of Student Support Services will promote student success for qualifying firstgeneration college students through a range of support services.

Assessment Criteria The Office of Student Support Services will develop files for a minimum of 200 (funding target in approved DOE grant) students that document interventions prescribed by federal guidelines and best practices (data collected each spring).

Assessment Results The staff of the Office of Student Support Services developed files for 202 students during the 12-13 AY.

To promote and facilitate college matriculation for qualifying high school students (TS)

The Talent Search Office will promote and facilitate college matriculation for qualifying high school students through mentoring, advising, and

The Talent Search Office will develop portfolios for 874 (funding target in approved DOE grant) that document interventions prescribed

The Talent Search staff developed portfolios for 874 students that document interventions and activities prescribed by federal guidelines and best practices.

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Use of Results As a result of analysis, the staff have made improvements to achieve the grant’s goal of student retention and completion. Staff have increased the number and range of campus and community events and all advisors have received “Appreciative Advising” certification from the University of South Carolina. As a result of analysis, the staff have made improvements to achieve the grant’s goal of student retention and completion. The number of events have been

other support services.

by federal guidelines and best practices (data collected each spring).

To provide programs and services that meet or exceed all statutory protocols and standards

The Office will meet or exceed all regulatory protocols and standards in a timely and efficient manner.

100% of federal reports will be completed on time and without followup (12-13 AY and annually).

100% of mandated federal reports were submitted on or before the due date with no follow-up.

To develop a congruent and selective program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to students and community stakeholders

The Office will ensure the development and maintenance of a comprehensive program of professional development that promotes effective, courteous, and efficient service to students and community stakeholders.

Representatives of the Office will attend a minimum of two professional development activities that promote effective, courteous, and efficient service to current and prospective students (1213 AY and annually).

Representatives of each office reported multiple professional development activities that address both administration and management of federal programs and student engagement.

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increased, staff meetings have changed from periodic to regular (bimonthly) and more emphasis has been placed on academic improvement with more interventions and tutoring. To sustain this result, the Trio staffs have integrated milestones into programmatic calendars and operational plans. As a result of these activities, administrative skills have been increased as well as achieving a higher level of student engagement. The achievement of the Appreciative Advising certification from the University of South Carolina, for example, let to more comprehensive advising partnerships.

Analysis and Planning: Trio Programs Significant Accomplishments for 2012-2013: • •

Exceeded goal for students served with comprehensive interventions to reduce barriers to student success (SSS) Continued high-level engagement for target population with increased event scheduling, management, and execution (TS)

A report card submitted to the US Department of Education for Student Support Services is attached (Attachment 30.1). A sample advising syllabus is attached as Attachment 30.2. Sample Talent Search letter and brochure are attached as Attachments 30.3 and 30.4. Sample professional development records are attached (Attachments 30.5 and 30.6). The Director of Student Support Services was appointed in 2006, and has been employed at the college for 18 years (Vita, Attachment 30.7). The Director of Talent Search was appointed 2006, and has been employed at the college for 17 years (Vita, Attachment 30.8). The offices include the following positions: • • • •

Director of Student Support Services Advisor Tutorial Lab Coordinator/Advisor Secretary

• • • •

Director of Talent Search Advisor (2) Advisor/Tutoring Coordinator Secretary

The directors and staff of the Trio Programs are represented on the following committees: • • • • • • •

ADA Committee Scholarship Committee First-Year Gateway Committee Institutional Health, Safety, and Security Committee Enrollment Management Task Force Awards Committee Social Committee

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Unit Goals for 2013-14: • • •

To continue to foster interpersonal growth through engagement in a variety of workshops, cultural events, and community service projects To continue to assist students in recognizing the parallels between educational pursuits and career endeavors To continue to assist students with the development of relationships with other professionals that may help them to succeed academically and professionally

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Assessment Plan for Academic Support and Student Development 2012-2015