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STUDENT AFFAIRS 2010-2011 Annual Report

From the Vice President for Student Affairs Maryellen Gilroy, Ed.D. Dear Colleagues, Students, Parents, and Friends of Siena College, I am pleased to present to you the 2010-2011

modeled this summer to support the peda-

the Office of Students with Disabilities has

Annual Report for the Division of Student

gogy of the “teacher passion” model.

allowed for a group of high school seniors

Affairs. To meet the ever changing reporting and

with special learning needs to take college level courses on our campus. This program

This past year, we have addressed two chal-

compliance requirements in student life, a

lenges:

how to operationalize the College’s

dedicated position, Student Affairs Compli-

Strategic Plan, “Living Our Traditions, 2011-

ance Officer was developed. The purpose of

2016” and how to continue to be responsive to

this position is to identify and evaluate our

the changing needs of our students and higher

programs and projects to ensure compliance

education. Both of these challenges required

with both College policy, as well as state and

us to develop high impact educational practices

local law, to provide internal audits as part of

that engage student learning outside of the

regulatory and reporting requirements, and to

classroom. This process has involved continu-

serve as part of our practice of ensuring excel-

This annual report is meant to share with you

ous assessment of our practices (mediocrity or

lence.

the accomplishments of the past year. Our

“business as usual” is not the norm in the Division), as well as creative and innovative think-

Part of Siena’s mission and history has in-

ing. Let me share with you some outcomes of

volved responding to the educational needs of

this process.

men and women in the armed services upon their return from active duty. A special initia-

When the problem of dedicated space for the

tive within the College was developed to coor-

First Year Seminar course was presented, the

dinate transitional issues and support services

Department of Residential Life viewed this chal-

for the increasing number of veterans attend-

lenge as an opportunity to truly engage student

ing Siena.

learning within the residence areas. As a re-

played a crucial role in this initiative.

The Division of Student Affairs

sult, 40 sections of this course are being held in Padua and Hennepin Halls, and in the Sarazen

After several years of planning, a partnership

Student Union. These “classrooms” were re-

between the North Colonie School District and

provides these high school students with opportunities to enhance their academic skills, improve their self-esteem, and interact with age appropriate peers in a college setting.

We hope that this endeavor will

serve as a transformative experience for our students.

initiatives have been recognized both nationally, for example our members of the Division are regularly invited to present at national and regional conferences, and here at the College. Dr. Shannon O’Neill was recognized as the 2010 administrator of the year and to provide you with goals for the upcoming year. Our annual report process allows us to reflect constructively upon what we have done well and to welcome the challenges and opportunities to do better.


Division of Student Affairs

Our Mission in Student Affairs Maryellen Gilroy, Ed.D. Vice President for Student Affairs Michael Papadopoulos ‘82 Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/ Director of Public Safety John Felio Dean of Students John Bebb Associate Dean of Students

The Division of Student Affairs at Siena College affirms the unique worth of each student and offers support to attain self-understanding and academic success. Through various services

Joy Galarneau, Ph.D. Associate Dean of Students

the staff cultivates an environment that integrates the values and teachings of St. Francis

John Dierna

and St. Clare of Assisi to enhance and support student learning and development and to

Director, Campus Programs and Student

prepare graduates for lives of discernment, civic engagement and professional growth. Our

Activities

Franciscan Catholic values serve as a lens through which to view the world, our way of being

Wallace Bzdell, Ed.D.

in relationship with each other and where the potential of each student is affirmed.

Director, Center for Counseling and Student Development

The framework for Student Life programs and activities reflect four values and are the essence of how we advocate for a climate of mutual respect and individual responsibility in the Siena College community: A student-centered philosophy. We are committed to advocating for student needs and

Carrie Hogan, MS, ANP Director, Health Services Kathleen Brannock, J.D. Director, Residential Life

concerns, and keep this at the core of our work as we create a just and peaceable environment for individuals to develop as scholars and leaders. An appreciation for differences. We strive to provide opportunities that expose students to different viewpoints, attitudes and beliefs to open their minds. These are critical as we ad-

Oscar Mayorga Director, Damietta Cross -Cultural Center Shannon O’Neill, Ph.D. Director, Sr. Thea Bowman Center for Women

vocate for a community of respect and individual responsibility. Michael Kelly

A belief in teamwork. We work together with all members of the College community for

Director, Services for Students with

the common good of students reflective of the relational nature of a Franciscan community.

Disabilities

A reverence and respect for religious and spiritual belief and practice. As members of a Franciscan Catholic college, we strive to support all students in their journeys of faith; to

Jeanne Obermayer Student Affairs Compliance Officer

encourage students to express their faith in prayer, liturgy and service with others; and to

Heather Burdo

work toward putting faith into action for the betterment of the world around us.

Director, Conference and Event Services


What our students say about their engagement and our staff‌ Results from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment* : 89% of student responders reported actively working to further social justice (n=255) 94% of student responders reported demonstrating respect for others’ differences (n=266) 93% of student responders reported actively working towards a more inclusive community (n=267) 94% of student responders reported making ethical decisions in personal situations (n=273) 89% of student responders reported making connections between intellectual and spiritual life (n=259) Results from the Siena College Health Survey**: 79% of Siena students reported that student life staff works on behalf of students to support their endeavors as scholars and leaders (n=706) 75% of Siena students reported that student life staff works effectively with other areas of the campus to solve problems and create solutions for students (n=665) 79% of Siena students reported that student life staff provides opportunities to be exposed to different attitudes, beliefs and experiences (n=709) 74% of Siena students reported that student life staff facilitates opportunities for students to express their faith through formal and informal experience regardless of their religious or spiritual beliefs (n=662)

*Data from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment, administered spring 2011, a representative sample from across all four class year (n=295).

Percentages are for students

who indicated quite a bit or some on a three point scale for these questions. **Data from the Siena College Health Survey, fall 2010, a representative sample of students across all four class years (n=1187). Percentages are for students who indicated they strongly agreed or agreed on a scale of five choices ranging from strongly agreed to no opinion for these questions


Highlights

Dean of Students Office What We Do The mission of the Dean of Students Office is to serve as a central campus resource, assist students in the management of issues or concerns, and aid in the achievement of personal and academic success. Through a variety of direct interventions and services, students are supported in ways that enable them to reach their academic and personal goals while balancing the rights and responsibilities of a learning community. We:

Educate students in the area of community standards, health and safety protocols and Code of Conduct procedures

utilizing trained student leaders and advocates.

Serve as an initial point of reference for students and parents who have questions, concerns and suggestions about their campus experience.

Oversee “You Told Us...,” a social norms approach to address the misperception and reduce the prevalence of high-risk drinking and other high-risk behaviors.

Serve as a liaison between students, faculty, staff and administrators to solve problems, assist with individual or group crisis management, navigate various campus procedures, and serve as an advocate for students.

Oversee Residential Life, Campus Programs and Student Activities and Conference Services.

Assisted over 133 students with medical leaves of absence and engaged 1,593 students in mission-based conversations during the student conduct process.

Created the first parent newsletter in the fall semester; designed to provide parents with general college updates, resources and talking points for transitional issues students may be facing.

Researched, developed or updated several policies including Human Rights policies/procedures community welfare based on new legislation and best practices.

Assessment Results

Goals

84% of Siena student responders reported that Siena consistently enforces

 Initiate a full review of our alcohol education and pre-

the underage drinking law (n=925)* 92% of Siena student responders reported that they have a responsibility to contribute to the well being of other students (n=1181)* 89% of Siena student responders reported that they were treated with respect throughout the review of their student conduct case (n=242)** 72% of Siena student responders reported they think more about the consequences of their actions than before their involvement with the student conduct process (n=239)** *Data from the Siena College Health Survey, fall 2010, a representative sample of students across all four class years (n=1187). Percentages are for students who indicated they strongly agreed or agreed on a scale of five choices ranging from strongly agreed to no opinion for these questions.

vention efforts and develop strategies to improve the College’s existing intervention practices.

 Demonstrate a 10% increase from 2010-2011 in cases assigned to the Student Conduct Review Board (utilizing student’s peers and faculty to educate/uphold community standards of conduct).

 Develop and implement an assessment tool for services (in addition to students involved in the student conduct process) provided by the Dean’s Office.


Highlights The Residential Hall Association (RHA)

Office of Residential Life What We Do The mission of the Office of Residential Life is to assist students to live the College’s Franciscan and Catholic mission within the residence halls by emphasizing community and the value of relationships, personal and group accountability, mutual respect and a sense of cooperation and sharing. We:

Cultivate conditions that enhance academic and social learning opportunities within the residence halls.

Develop and implement activities and programs that focus on social, academic, service and faith/spiritual experiences.

Foster a safe and healthy living environment on campus.

Encourage students to get involved with and provide leadership opportunities for residential activities such as serving as a Resident Assistant or on the Residential Hall Association executive board and hall councils.

Resident Assistants plan and deliver programs for residential students throughout the academic year. These programs cover topics related to health and wellness, social, exploration, community service, faith/spirituality, academics and multicultural awareness.

Assessment Results 79% of Siena student responders reported that they were aware of the Residence Hall Association (RHA) as an organization that provides programs and advocates for residential students (n=291)* 64% of Siena student responders reported that RHA provides communications and programming that are of interest to them (n=291)* 84% of Siena residential student responders reported that they felt their Resident Assistant promoted the Franciscan and Catholic values that Siena is founded upon (n=2118)** 88% of Siena residential student responders reported that their RA was a positive role model in their wing/floor/building (n=2118)** *Data from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment, administered spring 2011, a representative sample from across all four class year (n=295). Percentages are for students who indicated quite a bit or some on a three point scale for these questions. ** Data from the Resident Assistant Performance Evaluation, Fall 2010 (n=2118)

served its first academic year as a student organization advised by the Office of Residential Life. RHA was formed with the mission to act as a governing student body; to serve as the official liaison between the residential students at Siena College with Siena College staff and administration; to strive to make Siena’s residence halls and townhouses a desirable community; to be the official voice of Siena’s residential students; and to serve as a programming organization within residential communities. RHA introduced the CORE initiative (Community, Opportunity, Responsibility, Enrichment) and successfully programmed service, social, awareness and campus-wide events including Project Linus, Safety Awareness, Vandalism Awareness, Rez Hall Rumbles (residence hall competitions) and Siena’s Amazing Race. RHA worked closely with Residential Life to address facilities concerns and collaborated with Senate and SEB on programming. On January 17, 2011 RHA, Senate and SEB held their first joint retreat. The Residential Life staff opened the New Residence Hall in August, 2010. This 264 bed hall features double occupancy rooms with private baths, multiple study lounges on each floor in the residential areas, the Massry Commons – a dining facility, as well as a fitness center, meeting space, business center and computer lab, classroom space, and media and game lounges. The Residential Life staff hosted the NEACUHO RD2B conference at Siena’s campus on February 12, 2011. Over 60 attendees from 14 colleges and universities visited campus and learned about the Residence Director’s position, including five students from Siena.

Goals  Review the Housing Selection process, in collaboration with RHA, to assess, evaluate and streamline housing selection.

 Restructure Resident Assistant programming model to focus on the department and division's missions and to include greater collaboration with other departments and offices.

 Enhance the visibility and understanding of RHA as a student organization throughout the campus.

 Survey residential students in fall, 2011 through the ACUHO-I/ EBI survey and develop action plans based on the survey results.


Highlights

 Through a collaborative effort with the Office of Residential Life and the Damietta Cross Cultural Center, a joint leader training was planned and implemented for student leaders throughout the division of Student Affairs. Focusing on the development of individual leadership styles and stressing the importance of integrating love, humility, and caring into our community, the use of Franciscan narratives helped make connections between leadership and the Franciscan tradition.

 The fifth annual Siena Leadership Institute conference, entitled “Everyday L.I.F.E. (Leadership in Familiar Experiences)” was the most well attended conference in the program’s history. The 160 student participants representing all class years were witness to a keynote presentation offered by Colonel Arthur J. Athens, Director of the Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership, and closing remarks by Fr. Kevin Mullen, OFM, President of Siena College. Concurrent workshops offered by Siena College students, ROTC, faculty and administration presented issues including “Effective Leadership Through Awareness of Personality Types”, “Taking the Lead in Combining Your Service and Academics”, “Women and Leadership”, and “Strategies for Bringing out the Leader Within”.

Office of Campus Programs and Student Activities What We Do The mission of the Office of Campus Programs and Student Activities is to provide diverse and balanced intellectual, cultural, and social programs that encourage student learning and leadership development outside the classroom. We:

 Provide students with opportunities for community engagement and leadership development through social, intellectual, spiritual and service-oriented programs from the moment each arrives on campus

(new student orientation) through the final days leading to commencement.

 Work with students, student organizations, faculty and staff to provide programming for the campus community.

 Supervise the administration of student activities fees for the Student Events Board and over 70 student clubs and organizations.

Assessment Results

 Completed the establishment of benchmark data through the use of the Student Activities EBI survey. This data helped to determine baseline measures of program objectives and effective utilization of fiscal resources.

Goals

82% of student responders reported active membership in one or more campus club or organization (n=270)*

83% of student responders reported that campus activities provide opportunities to assume leadership roles on campus (n=261)*

93% of student responders reported attending one or more campus activity in any given month (n=268)*

Implement comprehensive club advisor training, and continue to offer year-round training opportunities for this population.

Partner with the Student Senate to create and implement a comprehensive club leader institute to discuss all aspects of programming, funding, planning and risk assessment.

51% of student responders reported having utilized the free weekend shuttle service throughout the academic year (n=294)* 91% of incoming student respondents found the UPeers web site helpful in keeping on task throughout the summer months, and preparing for entering Siena (n=214)** 92% of incoming student respondents reported an increased understanding of the Franciscan Tradition and heritage at Siena as a result of Opening Week programming (n=198)** *Data from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment, administered spring 2011, a representative sample from across all four class year (n=295). Percentages are for students who indicated quite a bit or some on a three point scale for these questions. ** Data from the Qaultrics Opening Week Survey, fall 2010, sample from all new students (n=214)

Utilize data collected via the Student Activities EBI survey to help review current practices, and implement recommend actions.


Highlights  Increased access control and CCTV systems which enhanced campus security and investigative capabilities. New megapixel CCTV cameras were installed in several parking lots and exterior locations, as well as the interior of numerous academic buildings and the New Residence Hall.

 Procured a new digital alarm receiver and printer that will allow for better surveillance and monitoring of fire safety systems and alarms on campus.

Office of Public Safety What We Do

 Conducted six table-top exercises

The mission of the Office of Public Safety is to promote and maintain a safe campus environment, grounded in our Franciscan and Catholic Identity, where the respect and dignity of all individuals is maintained in order to allow our community to experience academic, professional and personal success, and the College to succeed in its educational mission. We:

 Provide a safe campus environment that

 Focus on crime prevention and investiga-

enforcement agencies whenever necessary.

tion, safety education, emergency preparedness and response.

fosters individual responsibility and consideration for others.

with Public Safety staff and well as two table-top exercises with the College Emergency Operations Team which included participation from the Town of Colonie emergency responders.

 Conducted training for 245 members of the Siena community in the areas of CPR/AED, Defensive Driving and Rape Aggression Defense.

 Provide various safety awareness programs and trainings for students and the Siena College community.

 Two Public Safety officers successfully

 Coordinate with local and federal law

Assessment Results 91 % of Siena student responders reported that Public Safety adequately communicated community alerts (n=295)*

completed the Bike Patrol Course thus increasing the number of qualified bike patrol officers to five.

Goals  Execute a minimum of three exercises to test and train staff on our emergency systems.

 Integrate a radar in our operations to decrease speeding on campus 81% of Siena student responders reported awareness of Public Safety offering educational classes (n=295)*

and improve vehicle safety.

 Institutionalize the Liaison Program to improve our relationship with students and staff.

98% of Siena student responders reported that they received notification of an emergency incident on campus (n=155)** *Data from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment, administered spring 2011, a representative sample from across all four class years (n=295). Percentages are for students who indicated quite a bit or some on a three point scale for these questions. **Data from the 2010 CORE survey, a representative sample of all four class years (n=155)

 Improve lighting on campus to enhance the safety of the campus.


Highlights  Conducted a disabilities presentation to the School of Business during the fall 2010 semester.

 Coordinated training for the Division of Student Affairs, faculty, students and parents on working with individuals with Asperger Syndrome.

 Worked in coordination with the North Colonie School District and the Siena community to implement the College Transition Program that commenced in September 2011.

Office of Services for Student with Disabilities What We Do The mission of the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities is to provide programs and services designed to support and encourage students with disabilities as well as support the overall mission of Siena College in its Franciscan and Catholic tradition. We:

 Are an office grounded in the philosophy based on empowerment, self advocacy and independence in working with our disabled student population.

 Responsible for coordinating meet-

 Function as a coordinator of activities, poli-

ings with the Department of Veterans Affairs to address the overall needs of student veterans at Siena College.

cies and procedures that affect students with disabilities under the ADA and Section 504.

 Proctored over 500 examinations for

 Serve as the designated coordinator of the

 Achieved a student retention rate of

student veterans transition program providing outreach both within the campus community and community agencies on behalf of student veterans as well as mentorship opportunities.

96% of those enrolled through the office. 95% of those enrolled met or exceeded the academic requirements expected from Academic Affairs.

students and faculty during the 2010 -2011 academic year.

 Liaison to the campus for the North Colonie College Based Transition Program.

Assessment Results 68% of Siena student responders reported that the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities is helpful in providing reasonable accommodations (n=608)* 69% of Siena student responders reported that the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities advocates for equal access to all campus programs (n=615)* 90% of Siena student responders reported that the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities was effective in meeting their needs considering experience, use of services and contact with the office (n=51)** 86% of Siena student responders reported that they would recommend the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities to a student with a disability (n=51)** *Data from the Siena College Health Survey, fall 2010, a representative sample of students across all four class years (n=1187). Percentages are for students who indicated they strongly agreed or agreed on a scale of five choices ranging from strongly agreed to no opinion for these questions. ** Data from the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities 2010-2011 internal satisfaction survey.

Goals

 Facilitate full compliance with all ADA/Section 504 requirements and rights for students with disabilities on our campus.

 Continue to serve and enhance the visibility of the Transition Coordinator for student veterans both within our community and with outside agencies in particular, the Department of Veterans Affairs.

 Continue to serve as a liaison to our community for the implementation of the North Colonie College Based Transition Program.


Highlights  Created Siena I-tunes site and developed/uploaded relaxation exercise for students, faculty and staff.

 Provided staff in-service on college students with Asperger Syndrome with the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities.

 Underwent staffing changes within the department without interruption of services that included over 100 hours of outreach and the provision of 80 workshops/trainings.

Center for Counseling and Student Development What We Do The Center for Counseling and Student Development (CCSD) strives to help students cope more effectively with personal, emotional and situational barriers to learning We:

 Provide counseling services for enrolled students and secondarily offering psycho-educational programming and consultations to the campus community

 Improve students’ adjustment to unavoidable stress.

 Contribute to their personal growth and development by providing psychological support and guidance.

Assessment Results 70% of Siena student responders reported that they would use Center for Counseling and Student Development services if feeling highly stressed or overwhelmed (n=892)*

Goals  Offer biofeedback for students starting in the fall semester and use this service as a means for outreach with the Athletic Department.

 Increase the number of relaxations and meditations 74% of Siena student responders reported that they would consult with the Center for Counseling and Student Development if worried about a friend (n=892)*

available on the Siena I-tunes site as anecdotally this provided to be a popular methodology for providing relaxation exercises.

 Increase the attendance of staff at professional develop78% of Siena student responders reported that they would recommend the Center for Counseling and Student Development to a friend who is feeling highly stressed or overwhelmed (n=892)* *Data from the Siena College Health Survey, fall 2010, a representative sample of students across all four class years (n=1187). Percentages are for students who indicated they strongly agreed or agreed on a scale of five choices ranging from strongly agreed to no opinion for these questions.

ment conferences to attain CEUs and professional development training for the 2011-2012 academic year


Highlights  Health Services clinic successfully completed the Magnet Distinction for Nursing Care onsite survey in September. No issues were identified and certification was achieved.

 Implemented a food allergy policy, procedure and program on campus.

 Instrumental in the Aetna Student Health Insurance Plan contract renewal with the College.

Health Services What We Do Siena College’s Health Services is an ambulatory care program focused on health promotion, disease prevention, health education, clinical care and referral services to the student community. Health Services is contracted with St. Peter’s Health Care Services of Albany, NY . We:

Provide quality health care to students with compassionate, competent staff.

Promote a healthy college community by prevention of disease and disability from infectious disease.

 Added additional Psychiatric Nurse

Improve access to the health care system by promoting student self advocacy and wellness as it relates to personal health, well being and personal responsibility for health care.

Assessment Results 69% of Siena student responders agreed that if they had a health related question or felt ill, they would speak with a member of the Health Services staff (n=617)* 73% of Siena student responders reported that they feel Health Services is a campus resource for students (n=652)* 100% JCAHO documentation compliance (n=18)** 98% customer satisfaction (n=162)** 100% immunization compliance (n=3460)*** *Data from the Siena College Health Survey, fall 2010, a representative sample of students across all four class years (n=1187). Percentages are for students who indicated they strongly agreed or agreed on a scale of five choices ranging from strongly agreed to no opinion for these questions **Data from the St. Peter’s Health Care Services Patient Safety and Quality Improvement JACHO monthly audit ***Data from the New York State Department of Health Post Secondary Immunization Survey, 2010

Practitioner services to meet the needs of Siena students receiving services through the Center for Counseling and Student Development.

Goals  Obtain computerized access to clinical systems at St. Peter’s Health Care Services.

 Reevaluate special accommodations process in collaboration with the Office of Residential life and dining services to promote efficiency, consistency and student safety.

 Renew the 3 year St. Peter’s Health Care Services contract with Siena College.


Highlights  Successfully piloted the Border Awareness Experience Trip to work with the Women’s Intercultural Center of Anthony, NM. Four students and the Bowman Center Director met with a variety of organizations that work with immigrants and immigrations issues, including U.S. Border Patrol.

 With thee help of AmeriCorps VISTA, the

Sr. Thea Bowman Center for Women What We Do Established in the fall of 2004, the Bowman Center for Women is located in the New Residence Hall. It provides leadership and education to members of the Siena College community by promoting awareness about social justice issues, particularly those that affect women. Its student staff, along with the Director, works to create a more informed and active campus community that takes part in its many service and advocacy opportunities. We:

 Through programming, the Center promotes the personal, professional and spiritual development of women at Siena.

The Center has signature programs that address issues of social justice, nonviolence, health/wellness and service including: A Week Without Violence, Fair Trade Sales, Women of Wisdom Mentoring Program, Breast Cancer Advocacy, The Cinderella Project prom dress project, Dominican Republic service trip, Reading Women Book Club, Movies that Matter film series, I Love My Body Day, Campus Kiva, Honor an Awesome Woman Brunch, Charity Baby Shower, Yoga, Eating Disorder Awareness Week and Girls Take Charge Young Women’s Leadership Program.

Assessment Results 93% of Siena student responders agreed that the Bowman Center for Women raises awareness about social justice issues, particularly those facing women. (n=287)* 92% of Siena student responders agreed that the Bowman Center for Women provides opportunities to participate in programs for service and advocacy on social justice (n=287)* Results from post event evaluation indicated that 100% of participants agreed that the Fill Her Shoes Women’s Leadership program provided ideas/ concepts and initiatives that they will take with them and incorporate them into their lives. All participants said they would recommend the program to their friends. *Data from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment, administered spring 2011, a representative sample from across all four class years (n=295). Percentages are for students who indicated quite a bit or some on a three point scale for these questions.

Center expanded its women’s leadership programming by initiating the Women of Wisdom (WOW) mentoring program. This program connects Siena students with at-risk girls n the community through weekly sessions at Girls Inc. and local schools.

 Through the continuing support of the State Farm Grant, the Center was able to host Girls Take Charge Leadership programs for local area high school girls and pilot a women’s leadership program for our Siena students call Fill Her Shoes.

 The Center was instrumental in the application and ultimate designation of Siena College as a Fair Trade College. Siena is only the third college in the country to earn this designation and the first Catholic college. Siena was awarded a grant by Fair Trade USA to host a regional Fair Trade conference for colleges and universities.

 The Center’s Non-Violence committee successfully initiated Siena’s International Day of Peace which included campus participation in the peace postcard project, peace magnets, conflict resolution workshop, peace banner and peace vigil.

Goals  Expand the current Girl’s Day into a week long summer opportunity for girls from all over the Capital Region.

 Pursue grants to support the Women of Wisdom Mentoring program and create an Institute for Young Women’s Leadership.


Highlights  Dedication of the Damietta Cross-

Damietta Cross-Cultural Center What We Do The Damietta Cross-Cultural Center’s mission is to foster campus-wide, cross-cultural competency in the service of a just world. At the heart of the Center’s mission is the acknowledgment that we are all members of the human family regardless of our race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, ability and socio-economic status We:

The purpose of the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center is to provide programs that develop and enhance student’s cross-cultural competency.

The Center provides retreats and workshops that allow students to reflect on their multiple identities and develop the value of solidarity.

The Damietta Cross-Cultural Center collaborates with our campus partners to exemplify our commitment to fostering a inclusive campus

Assessment Results 41% of all Siena student surveyed reported that they knew how the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center serves the Siena Community (n=295)* 58% of AHANA Siena students surveyed reported that they knew how the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center serves the Siena Community (n=61)* *Data from the ACUI/EBI Student Activities Assessment, administered spring 2011, a representative sample from across all four class years (n=295). Percentages are for students who indicated quite a bit or some on a three point scale for these questions.

Cultural Center in the fall 2010 semester was a great success. The author of the Saint and the Sultan and Professor of Journalism, Paul Moses, was the keynote at the dedication.  The Damietta Center focused on four important topics this year: Power and Privilege, Immigration, Dialogue and Social Justice weeks. These themed weeks were used to focus on topics that transcend any particular group because these topics affect all people regardless of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, ability and social economic status. For example, Dr. Goodman was the keynote for Power and Privilege week. Dr. Goodman is a scholar and trainer on the topic of cultural competency and social justice. She was a dynamic speaker who addressed students, faculty and administrators through interactive and meaningful group exercises which helps them to reflect on their self-identity and how they relate with others.  The Director of the Damietta Center, Oscar J. Mayorga, participated in a ten day Franciscan Peacemaking Pilgrimage to the Holy Land. This trip was sponsored by the Franciscan Order. You can read Oscar Mayorga’s blog of his journey by going to: http:// peacemakingpilgrimage2011.blogspot.com.

Goals  The Damietta Center will successfully implement the Cross-Cultural Solidarity Experience.

 The Center will increase its name recognition through programming and service opportunities.

 The Damietta Center will successfully implement and report on the 2011 Freshman CIRP Survey results.


Highlights  Developed new Business Continuity Plan model for Student Affairs to ensure readiness to resume business if needed.

 Completed audit on compliance with Clery; addressing identified areas to ensure full compliance with The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting released by the Department of Education in February, 2011.

 Developed risk management train-

Student Affairs Compliance What We Do The mission of Student Affairs Compliance is dedicated to ensuring compliance with the increasing number and complexity of applicable federal and state laws and regulations. To meet the ever changing reporting and compliance requirements in student life, a dedicated position, Student Affairs Compliance Officer, was developed. The purpose of this position is to identify and evaluate our programs and projects to ensure compliance with both College policy, as well as state and local law, to provide internal audits as part of regulatory and reporting requirements, and to serve as part of our practice of ensuring excellence.

Goals  Initiate and coordinate the development, implementation and maintenance of proactive risk management strategies/initiatives at the departmental level within Student Affairs and those areas that overlap with Student Affairs.

 Develop and implement student organization risk management education (clubs, club sports, student organizations, student travel, risk and liability.)

 Identify changes in applicable legislation, rules, regulations, standards, and related trends that are relevant to Student Affairs (i.e. Clery reporting, Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, Higher Education Act) and monitor the performance of Student Affairs compliance related activities.

 Coordinate Student Affairs Business Continuity Plans with the College Risk Director.

ing program for student clubs, organizations and advisors.



2010-2011 Student Affairs Annual Report