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Student Affairs

“As student life professionals we are inspired by the enduring legacies of St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi…”

at Siena College 2009-2010 Annual Report

Dr. Maryellen Gilroy

From the Vice President for Student Affairs Maryellen Gilroy, Ed.D. Dear Colleagues, Students, Parent and Friends of Siena College, Forty years ago, “student affairs” was not a

web-based attendance reporting protocol

sions on policies or practices. Our rela-

formalized division in higher education.

for the campus community in response to

tionship with the greater Catholic com-

Student affairs professionals were seen as

the H1N1 outbreak, hosted three “Girls

munity is exemplified by our leadership

little more than “surrogate parents.” How-

Take Charge” leadership workshops for

of and participation in the Association for

ever, the challenges facing colleges and

local area high school girls (over 300 par-

Student Affairs at Catholic Colleges and

universities today — safety, crisis re-

ticipants), and trained various College per-

Universities; in fact, we hosted the na-

sponse, threat assessment and emergency

sonnel to be conflict resolution mediators.

tional conference last summer in which

preparedness and response, and manage-

47 Catholic colleges participated.

ment of student mental health issues —

Less obvious is the distinctiveness of

have expanded the traditional student

Siena’s Division of Student Affairs. We are

This Annual Report is meant to share

affairs responsibilities. These increased

clearly influenced by the Franciscan and

with you the accomplishments of the

responsibilities have made student affairs

Catholic mission. At the root of this mission

past year (using direct and indirect as-

work much more diverse and complex. Our

is the importance of relationships between

sessment measures) and to provide you

Division of Student Affairs is no exception.

all members of our community. The im-

with goals for the upcoming year. Our

In this past year, members of the Division

portance of being in relationship with and

Annual Report process allows us to re-

won two awards in a case study competi-

knowing our students is particularly evi-

flect critically upon what we have done

tion from the College Student Personnel

dent within the Division of Student Affairs.

well and to welcome the challenges and

Association of New York State, developed a

Whenever possible, students are active

opportunities to do better. We welcome

participants on committees making deci-

your feedback, as well.


Our Mission in Student Affairs The Division of Student Affairs at Siena College affirms the unique worth of each student and offers support to attain self-understanding and academic success. Through various services

Division of Student Affairs

Maryellen Gilroy, Ed.D. Vice President for Student Affairs

the staff cultivates an environment that integrates the values and teachings of St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi to enhance and support student learning and development and to prepare graduates for lives of discernment, civic engagement and professional growth. Our

Jeanne Obermayer Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/ Dean of Students

Franciscan Catholic values serve as a lens through which to view the world, our way of being in relationship with each other and where the potential of each student is affirmed.

Michael Papadopoulos ‘82 Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/

The framework for Student Life programs and activities reflect four values and are the essence of how we advocate for a climate of mutual respect and individual responsibility in the

Director of Public Safety John Bebb

Siena College community:

Associate Dean of Students

A student centered philosophy. We are committed to advocating for student needs and

John Felio

concerns, and keep this at the core of our work as we create a just and peaceable environ-

Associate Dean of Students/Parent Liaison

ment for individuals to develop as scholars and leaders. An appreciation for differences. We strive to provide opportunities that expose students to

John Dierna Director, Campus Programs and Student Activities

different viewpoints, attitudes and beliefs to open their minds. These are critical as we advocate for a community of respect and individual responsibility.

Wallace Bzdell, Ed.D. Director, Center for Counseling and Student

A belief in teamwork. We work together with all members of the College community for the common good of students reflective of the relational nature of a Franciscan community. A reverence and respect for religious and spiritual belief and practice. As members of a

Development Carrie Hogan, MS, ANP Director, Health Services

Franciscan Catholic college, we strive to support all students in their journeys of faith; to

Kathleen Brannock, J.D.

encourage students to express their faith in prayer, liturgy and service with others; and to

Director, Residential Life

work toward putting faith into action for the betterment of the world around us.

Oscar Mayorga Director, Damietta Cross-Cultural Center Shannon O’Neill, Ph.D. Director, Sr. Thea Bowman Center for Women


What our students say about us… The Division is committed to fostering student development and providing leadership opportunities. We are also committed to the on-going process of assessment and reflection as to how we can renew and enhance our Student Life program. Each year several indirect and direct measures are utilized to guide our planning for the upcoming year. Results from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey* and CORE survey showed that:

85 % of Siena student responders report feeling a sense of belonging.*

87% of Siena student responders report that campus staff is caring and helpful.

81% of Siena student responders report that Siena administrators are approachable.*

91% of Siena student responders report that Student Life staff work on behalf of students to support their endeavors as scholars and leaders.*

83% of Siena student responders reported that Student Life staff provide opportunities for students to be exposed to different attitudes, beliefs and experiences.*

82% of Siena student responders report that Student Life staff work effectively with other areas of the campus to solve problems and create solutions for students.*

91% of Siena student responders report that Student Life staff facilitate opportunities for students to express their faith through formal and informal experiences and service regardless of their religious or spiritual beliefs.**

*Data are taken from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of Siena students across all four class years (n=534). Percentages are for students who indicated a satisfaction score of 5, 6 or 7 on a 1 (not satisfied) to 7 (very satisfied) scale. **Data from the CORE Survey, spring 2010, a representative sample of Siena students across all four class years (n=155). Percentages are for students who indicated a satisfaction score of strongly agree or agree on a scale of 5 choices ranging from strongly agree to no opinion.


Highlights The 3-year-old “Saints Facts” campaign has reduced misperceptions of normative student behavior. Three years ago, 54% of students indicated that they drank four or fewer drinks per occasion (this includes those who abstain totally). That number increased to 59% in 2009. Student perception that the typical student consumes 5+ drinks per occasion decreased each of the past three years (from 77% to 67%). Siena College Student Health Survey 2007, 2008, 2009

An independent consultant, specializing in

Dean of Students Office What We Do The mission of the Dean of Students Office is to serve as a central campus resource, assist students in the management of issues or concerns, and aid in the achievement of personal and academic success. Through a variety of direct interventions and services, students are supported in ways that enable them to reach their academic and personal goals while balancing the rights and responsibilities of a learning community. We:

Educate students in the areas of community standards, health and safety protocols and Code of Conduct procedures utilizing trained mediators and student advocates.

Serve as an initial point of reference for students who have questions, concerns and suggestions about their campus experience. Oversee “Saint Facts,” a social norms approach to address the misperception and reduce the prevalence of high-risk drinking and other high-risk behaviors. Serve as a liaison between students, faculty, staff, and administrators to solve problems, assist with individual or group crisis management, navigate various campus procedures, and serve as an advocate for students when needed.

student conduct process, reviewed Siena’s Student Conduct program and determined that it reflects current and national best practices. The report stated that Siena’s student conduct system “not only serves to promote and maintain a positive and productive learning and living environment, but also engages students on a holistic level with their development and education.”

The Conflict Management and Mediation Program increased the number of formal mediations by 50% from 2008-09. This provided an alternative to the formal judicial process for resolving student conflicts. In addition, this program served as a vehicle to provide training to other members of the College community, thereby creating a pool of trained mediators for conflict resolution and informal mediation.

Assessment Results √ √ √

82% of Siena student responders reported that Siena Life provides helpful information about campus.*

86% of Siena student respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they realize they may exercise their rights in a reasonable manner that will not violate the College’s Franciscan and Catholic traditions or infringe upon the rights of other members of the College.**

√ √ √

88% of Siena student respondents agreed or strongly agreed they were treated with respect throughout the review of their case.**

√ √ √

80% of Siena student respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they feel the resolution/sanctions imposed will help them learn from the situation. **

70% of Siena student responders reported that student disciplinary procedures are fair.* 88% of Siena student respondents agreed or strongly agreed that, while they have individual rights, they also have a responsibility to protect and maintain an environment for living and learning.**

95% of Siena student respondents reported that they were made aware/informed of their rights and responsibilities in the student conduct system. ** 71% of Siena student respondents reported that they think more now about the potential consequences of their actions than they did before the incident they were involved in. Additionally the same percentage of students responded that they have a better understanding of Siena’s Franciscan and Catholic values and mission as a result of the incident.** 82% of first year student responders reported that AlcoholEdu prepared them to identify and/or help someone who has alcohol poisoning. *** 80% of Siena student responders reported that Siena consistently enforces the under 21 drinking law. ****

*Data from Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009 , a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=534) **Data from Student Conduct Feedback Survey 2009-2010 (n=259) ***Data from AlcoholEdu fall 2009, first year students (n=759) ****Siena College Health Survey 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=1061)


Dean of Students Office cont.— Goals 

Complete a review of the Conflict Management and Mediation Program utilizing national best practices benchmarks to enhance the current program and outreach efforts.

Increase by 2% from 2009-10 the percentage of students reporting that, through their involvement with the student conduct process, they have a better understanding of how the College’s behavioral expectations are shaped by Siena’s Franciscan and Catholic mission and that they think more about the effect of their actions on others in the Siena community than they did before.

Submit a grant application to the Department of Justice addressing sexual assault, stalking and relationship violence. Funding would provide for training and enhance collaborative relationships with community partners.

Parent Liaison Program What We Do

Highlights 

In its first year, more than 250 students and parents utilized the Parent Program. Issues varied from dealing with normal college adjustment matters (for both students and parents), troubleshooting academic and social issues and referring students and parents to appropriate college resources.

A web-based “Parents Guide” was created.

Parents and families of Siena students are valued members of our community. The Parent Program is an opportunity for families to connect with the college on issues of concern or to make suggestions as to how to make the Siena experience better. This program:

Serves as central place for parents concerns to be triaged and to connect parents with campus services and resources.

Provides regular communication geared specifically for campus about what is happening on campus.

 

Works with parents on transitional and developmental issues of college students. Coaches parents on how to guide students appropriately through various college situations.

Goals  Schedule at least one direct communication with firstyear parents once per semester.

 Assess quality and frequency of information sent to parents to determine additional Parent Program offerings.

 Work with other campus offices (Admissions, Development) on parents issues and program offerings.

 Develop on-line parent newsletter and web-based feedback survey.

Resource


Highlights 2009-2010 saw a record-setting year for Resident Assistant Applications. A total of 127 students applied for 61 position far exceeding our average of 90 applicants per year. The number one reason cited for why new RA applicants chose to apply was due to having positive interactions with their own RA.

One focus of the Residential Life programming events was on developing leadership through targeted programs/groups such as: Leadership in the First-Year Experience (LIFE) - 30 first-year students participated in this leadership development course team-taught by members of our Residential Life staff and Future Leaders in Student Affairs (FLSA) - 20 students attended a series of eight workshops that focused on exploring the world of Higher Education and Student Affairs as a career path.

Office of Residential Life What We Do The mission of the Office of Residential Life is to assist students to live the Franciscan mission within the residence halls by emphasizing community and the value of relationships, personal and group accountability, mutual respect and a sense of cooperation and sharing. We:

The First Year Experience (FYE) had more

Foster a safe and healthy living environment on campus.

Encourage students to get involved with and provide leadership for residential activities.

Cultivate conditions that enhance academic and social learning opportunities within the residence halls (e.g. working with faculty on living-learning communities).

Each spring the Office facilitates the housing selection process for over 1,800 returning students to choose their rooms for the next academic year. For the 2009-2010 selection process an enhanced online component was introduced, reducing onsite selection time for students and allowing for greater efficiency by electronically displaying in real-time open and assigned rooms/suites/townhouses.

Residence Life staff worked with students and the College’s Facilities team and architects in planning a new, state-of-the-art, 264-bed residence hall opening in the fall, 2010. This new hall, along with our continued renovations to MacClosky Square townhouses, demonstrates our commitment to upgrade facilities to meet student needs.

Develop and implement activities and programs that focus on social, academic, faith and spiritual life topics.

Assessment Results

than 150 students attend 12 programs and the Sophomore Year Experience (SYE) saw more than 400 students attend 10 programs including the highly successful Major/Minor Fair with all academic majors/minors represented.

Goals

85% of Siena student responders reported that residence hall staff are concerned about “me” as an individual.*

70% of Siena student responders reported that residence hall regulations are reasonable.*

 Develop targeted initiatives to further decrease vandalism in

71% of Siena student responders reported that their hall/apartment complex sponsored quality programs.*

 Evaluate current practices and continue to streamline housing

93% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their Resident Assistant regarding efforts to get to know them.**

97% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their Resident Assistant regarding helping with a problem.**

96% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their Residence Assistant regarding organizing programs and activities.**

94% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their on campus housing experience. **

* Data from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=554) ** Data from the ACUHO/EBI Survey 2008-2009 (n=1,181)

 Launch the newly established Residence Hall Association (RHA) to centralize residence hall governance and to further promote community within/among residential areas. the residence halls. operations.

 Continue to analyze housing trends to determine facility needs and housing upgrades.


Highlights  Programs offered during Opening Week, Family Weekend and Senior Week invited both students and parents to participate in Catholic and Franciscan tradition and ritual.

 Student leadership trainings were intentionally structured to include presentations addressing leadership in the Franciscan tradition.

 Consultants from the Association of

Office of Campus Programs and Student Activities What We Do The mission of the Office of Campus Programs and Student Activities is to provide diverse and balanced intellectual, cultural, and social programs that encourage student learning and leadership development outside of the classroom. We:

 Provide students with opportunities for community engagement and leadership development through social, intellectual, spiritual and services-oriented programs from the moment each arrives on campus

(orientation) through the finals days leading to commencement.

 Work with students, student organizations, faculty and staff to provide programming for the campus community.

 Host “Siena Leadership Institute,” a yearlong program for 15 selected sophomores.

 Supervise the administration of student activities fees for the Student Events Board and over 70 student clubs and organizations.

Assessment Results √

74% of Siena student responders report that there are a sufficient number of weekend activities for students.

88% of Siena student responders report that they can easily get involved in campus organizations.

76% of Siena student responders report that the student center is a comfortable place for student to spend their time.

77% of Siena student responders report that new student orientation services help students adjust to college.

Data from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=554)

College Unions International (ACUI) reviewed student activities, programs and services and made recommendations for strategic improvements to operations and program.

 A newly implemented on-line social community called UPeers was offered to incoming students to help the class connect with one another and members of the Siena community prior to arriving on campus. An additional feature of this site provided timelines to guide individuals through critical required tasks throughout the summer months leading to opening week. Tracking of site visits for both UPeers and a newly created “Parent Page” illustrated a high level of use for both students and parents.

Goals 

Develop assessment processes and benchmarks (ACUI/EBI Benchmarking and other) to determine baseline measures of program objectives and effective utilization of fiscal resources.

Implement and evaluate a “Common Student Leader Training Program” (utilizing Franciscan narratives) to make connections for student leaders between the Franciscan tradition and leadership skill development.

Improve training for club advisors and revise the club advising manual.

Implement recommendations and action plan of Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Consultant Report.


Highlights  The Department obtained new CCTV hardware and software and increased camera coverage to all residence halls.

 A new College Emergency Operation Plan was developed and disseminated to College administrators and an Emergency Response Guide to the campus community.

 Several officers were trained and certified to teach the defensive driving and the Rape Aggression Defense classes. In addition, the Department offered CPR/AED training.

Office of Public Safety What We Do The mission of the Office of Public Safety is to promote and maintain a safe campus environment, grounded in our Franciscan and Catholic identity, where the respect and dignity of all individuals is maintained in order to allow our community to experience academic, professional and personal success, and the College to succeed in its educational mission. We:

 Two officers qualified to implement and conduct a “bike patrol” on campus as a green alternative.

 Provide a safe campus environment that fosters individual responsibility, and consideration for others.

 Provide various safety awareness pro-

 The web-based Guest Registration system was revised to increase functionality and ease of use by students.

 Multiple informational brochures and

grams and training for students and the Siena College community.

 Coordinate with local and federal law enforcement agencies whenever necessary.

pamphlets addressing the topics of altered (fake) IDs, identity theft and sexual assault prevention were published and disseminated to the campus community.

 Focus on crime prevention and investigation, safety education, emergency preparedness, response and recovery.

Assessment Results √ 98% of students indicated on the 2010 CORE survey that they received notification of an emergency incident on campus.**

√ 90% of Siena student responders report that the Siena campus is safe and secure.***

**Data from the CORE Survey, spring 2010, a representative sample of all four class years (n=155) ***Data from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=554)

√ 84% of Siena student responders report that Public Safety staff respond quickly to emergencies.***

√ 74% of Siena student responders report that Public Safety staff are helpful and approachable.*

√ 63% of Siena student responders reported on the 2010 CORE survey awareness of Public Safety offering educational classes.**

√ 75% of Siena student responders report that Public Safety staff acts respectfully in their interactions with students.*

√ 83% of Siena student responders report that Public Safety has been responsive with they called for assistance.*

√ 91% of Siena student responders report that Public Safety adequately communicated information and workings to the Siena community about incidents.* *Data from the Siena College Health Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=1,061)

Goals  Improve access control and CCTV systems to enhance overall safety on campus.

 Improve utilization of current departmental space to better support employees and users.

 Continue to add AED s in campus buildings and to provide training for College staff.

 Refine and update College Emergency Operations Plan and Emergency Response Guide.

 Secure Department of Education funding for emergency management activities on college campuses.


Highlights  Disability Services staff provided skill-based and goal setting workshops and strategies for students with learning disabilities.

 Disability Services staff collaborated with the Center for Counseling and Student Development to develop training for student life and academic support staff on strategies for supporting students with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Office of Services for Student with Disabilities What We Do The mission of the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities is to provide programs and services designed to support and encourage the integration of students with disabilities into the mainstream college experience. We:

 Ensure educational opportunities and a

 Provided consultations for faculty on how to approach and refer undiagnosed learning disabilities with students.

academic success of students utilizing the services of our programs.

 Determine appropriate accommodations (e.g., extended time for test-taking, provision of note-takers) in compliance with College policies and state and federal equal access laws.

responsive campus environment for students with disabilities.

 Advocate for student needs, both inside and outside the classroom to promote

Assessment Results

√ Average GPA for all students enrolled in the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities was 2.68.*

√ 80% of Siena student responders reported that the institution is committed to students with disabilities.**

Goals

 Develop targeted trainings for staff in a variety of cognitive and behavioral areas, i.e. coping strategies, goal setting, different learning styles, Asperger’s Syndrome, etc..

√ Students with cognitive disabilities of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and

 Explore and provide a plan to provide alternate

Learning Disability (LD) and Psychological Disabilities made up 58% of students receiving services through the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities.*

text files for students with print-related disabilities.

√ Students with medical conditions accounted for 31% and students with mobility and sensory

 Facilitate planning of a high school transition

impairments made up 11% of those enrolled in our Office.*

√ 84% of Siena Senior student responders reported that guidance and advisement services offered by Office of Services for Students with Disabilities was effective.*

√ 85% of Siena senior student responders reported that the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities was helpful, understanding and capable of providing services and assistance to them.*

√ 100% of Siena senior student responders reported that, given their experience with the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities, they would recommend a disabled high school student to consider attending Siena.* * Data extracted from Senior Client Exit Survey, spring 2010.Measurement is a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) ** Data from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=554)

program for students with disabilities between Siena and local school districts.


Highlights  11% of total student population utilized the service and were seen for on-going individual counseling.

 Over 142 hours of workshops/ trainings were provided on topics such as time management, building academic skills, sexual assault prevention, healthy relationships, helping a friend with an eating disorder and the psychology of peak performance.

Center for Counseling and Student Development What We Do College life brings many opportunities as well as challenges that are often stressful. Students experience those challenges in a number of different areas. Some students have difficulties adjusting to the changes in academic demands from high school to college, others experience confusion in deciding on a major or career path and still others struggle with issues in their families and relationships. We:

 357 individual consultations were provided for students, parents, faculty and staff about mental health concerns for others and/or personal concerns.

 Provide educational programming and workshops.

 Continue to explore ways to train faculty and staff on how to identify and refer atrisk students to the Center for Counseling and Student Development.

 Assist and counsel students with transitional and development issues.

Assessment Results √ 94% of surveyed clients reported that their counselor helped them develop ways to improve their relationships with others.

√ 65% of surveyed clients reported that their concern interfered with their progress as students; 67% reported that counseling positively affected their progress as students and the likelihood that they will complete their degrees.

√ 88% of surveyed clients reported that their counselor provided them with emotional support.

√ 89% of surveyed clients reported that their counselor helped them develop one or more strategies to cope with their concerns.

√ 85% of surveyed clients reported that they were glad they came to counseling and would come again if needed.

√ 91% of surveyed clients reported that they would recommend the services of the Center for Counseling and Student Development to other students.

√ 91% of surveyed clients reported that their counselor treated them in a nonjudgmental and caring manner. Data extracted from the Client Survey, Center for Counseling and Student Development, 2009-2010. Measurement is a scale of 1 (not applicable) to 5 (strongly agree)

Goals  Integrate information about the Center for Counseling and Student Development into the social norms programming to increase campus-wide awareness of the services provided.

 Provide downloadable relaxation exercises through the Siena iTunes site as an additional resource for students, faculty and staff.

 Participate in continuing education training and workshops that provide specialized training that is relevant to working with Siena students.


Highlights  Health Services clinic achieved Joint Commission and New York State Department of Health recertification and the Magnet Distinction for Nursing Care redesignation.

 Staff completed specialized Asthma Care training in pursuit of specialty certification. Implementation of Pulse Oximeter use based on national asthma care standards now available for students.

 Health Services staff became members of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nurses.

 Activated Emergency Plan to prevent an

Health Services What We Do Siena College Health Services is an ambulatory care program focused on health promotion, disease prevention, health education, clinical care and referral services to the student community. Health Services is contracted through St Peter’s Health Care Services, the Albany area’s leading healthcare system. The program models itself on the American College Health Association’s standards of College Health Nursing Practice and Healthy Campus 2012. Within New York State, Siena College Health Services is one of 3% of all college health services accredited by the Joint Commission. Clinical staff maintain national board certifications in adult and family practice specialties On average,

H1N1 outbreak/epidemic on campus; provided mobile triage center in residence halls.

 Coordinated Wellness Carnival in which 10% of the student population utilizes the Health Services monthly. We:

Provide primary health care and referral to all students with an emphasis on health maintenance and illness prevention.

Educate students on how to reduce their risk for disease and injury by helping them learn to make appropriate lifestyle changes.

Maintain an ongoing emergency care contingency plan in conjunction with Public Safety and community agencies in the event of catastrophic emergencies to ensure the safety of students, staff, and faculty.

Assessment Results √ 98% student satisfaction reported by student clients with the services received from Health Services.

√ 100% compliance with New York State Immunization Public Health Law four years in a row (2006, 2007, 2008, 2009).

√ 100% of full-time students provided verification of health insurance coverage with a 10% enrollment in the Aetna Student Health Insurance plan . Data extracted from the Health Services Satisfaction Surveys, December 2009 and April 2010. Measurement is a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent).

350 attendees and 15 community vendors attended.

 One of two area colleges selected as part of the New York State ILI (influenza like illness) tracking program with weekly submission of data and specimens for flu tracking for New York State Health Department.

 Implemented

student health appointment scheduling system which enhanced service delivery and customer satisfaction.

 Improved efficiency and stewardship of resources by developing a supply inventory tracking system for medical supplies and medications.

 Implemented medical housing accommodations review team to review requests for students with special medical needs residing on campus.

Goals  Obtain computerized access to clinical systems laboratory results at Saint Peter’s Hospital.

 Participate in grant application opportunities to enhance emergency preparedness as it relates to communicable disease outbreak and medical emergencies.

 Redesign the Health Services materials to better market and to increase awareness of clinical expertise, health promotion, and disease prevention.

 Provide continued outreach to various departments on health and disease prevention, flu prevention, and disease prevention.


Highlights  Hosted three Girl Take Charge Leadership workshops for local area high school girls with Siena students serving as mentor/facilitators with more than 300 participants. This was part of a $15,00 grant from State Farm Insurance Company.

 Sponsored the 4th Annual Service

Sr. Thea Bowman Center for Women What We Do Established in the fall of 2004, the Sr. Thea Bowman Center for Women educates the college community about women's contributions, achievements, concerns, and potential. We:

events such as : A Week Without Violence, Fair Trade Sales, Breast Cancer Advocacy, Cinderella Project, Service Trip to the Dominican Republic, United Student Against Sweatshops, and Reading Women Book Club.

 Provide leadership and educational opportunities for the community by promoting awareness about gender issues.

Trip to the Dominican Republic to work with the impoverished children of Santo Domingo.

 Increased the number and volume of fair trade and sweat-free sales/events on campus.

 4th Annual LUNAFEST Film Festival raised over $4,000 for local and national breast cancer organizations.

 Provided site experience for AmeriCorps VISTA Volunteer to develop mentoring partnerships between young girls in the local community and students.

 Promote understanding among women and men from different classes, cultures, beliefs, ethnic and religious backgrounds

 Promote the personal, professional and spiritual development of women at Siena.

 Address issues of social justice, wellness, service and advocacy through annual

Assessment Results

Goals

√ 80% of students surveyed agree or strongly agree that the Sr. Thea Bow-

 Create an enhanced Web presence for prospective and cur-

man Center for Women raises awareness about social justice issues and provides opportunities to take action on those issues.*

rent students using multiple forms of media and awareness raising methods to address social justice issues.

√ Focus group research revealed that the Center’s reputation was an entity

 Assist the College in the effort to achieve fair trade college

that provides students with an outlet for addressing social justice issues. The Center’s reputation and the ability to involve students in addressing issues that they are passionate about were identified as one of the Center’s strengths. A focus group participant said, “The Center embodies the Franciscan tradition while offering a unique outlet for support and activism regarding social justice issues, specifically those that pertain to women. These initiatives connect Siena to not only local issues but global issues as well.” **

status through the national certifying organization Transfair.

√ Focus group research revealed that the Center has a reputation for signature events such as: A Week Without Violence, Fair Trade Sales, LUNAFEST Film Festival, The Cinderella Project, Service Trip to the Dominican Republic and Honor an Awesome Woman Brunch.** *Data from the Core Survey 2009, a representative sample from all four class years (n=144) **Focus Group conducted with student staff and members of the Women’s Center, spring 2010

 Create additional short-term immersion service trips focusing on social justice and the relationship to the principles of Catholic Social thought.

 Develop a Center for Women and Leadership/Service and an annual conference for local area high school girls.


Highlights  Organized, in collaboration with Career Services, the Seventh Annual Diversity Career Fair with over 500 student participants and 79 employers.

 Coordinated campus fundraising efforts for victims of the Haiti earthquake. Collected $6000 in donations for Catholic Relief Services.

 Use of the Unidad Umoja Lounge increased as a result of the Multicultural DVD collection check-out system. Weekly staff meetings with student program managers supported the consistent usage of the space due to the computer station, study stations and lounge space.

Damietta Cross-Cultural Center

 Multicultural Student Advisory Committee provided valuable insights regarding various issues related to diversity efforts on campus and programming from Multicultural Affairs.

(formerly known as Multicultural Affairs)

What We Do

In the spring of 2010, the Office of Multicultural Affairs was officially named the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center. Damietta is significant to the Franciscans because it is the location in Egypt where St. Francis of Assisi and Sultan malik al-Kamil met during September of 1219. For several days in the midst of a war between competing cultures and religions, two men sat down together and searched for common ground. Their meeting changed their attitudes, altered their perspectives, and influenced their subsequent behavior. It left them mutually enriched. It also left us with a legacy of respectful, inter-cultural and inter-religious dialogue. It is this 800 year-old tradition, bestowed on us by a Catholic Christian saint and a Sunni Muslim sultan, which the programs and services of the Damietta Cross-Cultural Center seek to honor and advance at Siena College. The purpose of the Damietta Center is to:  Develop cross-cultural programs reflective of Franciscan and Catholic values and gospel teachings.  Provide cross-cultural competency reflection experiences for students.  Collaborate with the Sr, Thea Bowman Center and the faculty member and friar in residence in the administration of the Living, Learning, and Serving program in the New Residence Hall—a social justice living and learning community.  Work with academic departments, the Franciscan Center for Service and Advocacy, College Chaplain, to develop domestic and international immersion service programs focusing on inter-cultural and inter-religious dialogue and social justice as it relates to Catholic Social thought.  Refocus programming with club and organization activities advised by the Center so they align with the Damietta Center’s mission and that they provide opportunities for cross-cultural and inter-religious encounters.

Assessment Results (Multicultural Affairs) √ 80% of Siena student responders reported a strong commitment to racial harmony on this campus. *

√ 87% of Siena student responders reported that Siena welcomes people of varying perspectives, ethnicities, religious faiths, lifestyles and beliefs.*

√ 96% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their fellow residents’ respect for people of differing races/ethnicities.**

√ 98% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their fellow residents’ respect for people of differing gender.**

√ 96% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their fellow residents’ respect for people of differing sexual orientation.**

√ 98% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their fellow residents’ respect for people of differing religious beliefs.**

√ 96% of Siena student responders reported being extremely satisfied or satisfied with their fellow residents’ respect for people of differing political views.** *Data from the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey fall 2009, a representative sample of students across all four classes (n=534) **Data from the ACUHO-I/EBI Resident Satisfaction Survey, 2008-2009 (n=1,181)

Goals  Introduce the campus to the mission of the Damietta Center.

 Sponsor with other student life offices and academic programs ,ten cross-cultural /mission focused programs and five cross– cultural competency building programs.

 Evaluate current and new programming to determine if it aligns with the mission of the Damietta Center.

 Develop a cross-cultural competency measure in collaboration with Institutional Research.

 Provide assistance and support to the Admission Office to recruit a more diverse student body.



2009-2010 Student Affairs Annual Report