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THE GOOD LIVING MAG AZINE

from SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

M I D D L E S E X H E A LT H & LIFE I

J U LY 2 0 1 0

MIDDLESEX & health

life

July 2010 $3.95

Rooms across the

COLOR SPECTRUM TILES THAT BEGUILE Portuguese delights in South River JERSEY BEACHES: What to know before you go

GARDEN GLORY IN COLONIA

HEALTH WATCH I

5 food myths, busted

I

Stay healthy in the heat

I

Is a sleep study right for you?


Spe Discocial Avail unts able! Call f o detail r s.

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ADVERTISEMENT

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Vizzini & Co. is representative of a unique style we like to call ‘organic design’. We incorporate a mix of styles from soft contemporary to shore traditional, all with an eye toward an understated look and feel. Our showroom settings are all about comfort; the seating is luxurious, the fabrics simple and classic, the accessories dedicated to the room, the lighting subtle and inviting. Our buyers seek out the unusual, the textural, and of course the classics incorporating Asian, French, English and European influences. You are most cordially invited to visit with us, roam our eight thousand five hundred square foot facility and enjoy the thrill of discovery with each step you take. Thank you for your interest, and we look forward to working with you.

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Contents

12

44

22 July 2010

36 Faces of Saint Peter’s

Features 12 Escapes /

A shore thing

Visit one of these 7 Jersey coast hot spots and you’ll find more than a picturesque beach.

At home /

18

Tiles that beguile

20

Garden glory

22

Taken together, these tiny treasures add up to big-time style for walls and floors.

A green-thumbed local shows off his lush outdoor space.

Conversations with Lorenzo M. Borromeo, M.D., board-certified internist; and Scarlett Szymanski, director of Ambulatory Oncology Services at Saint Peter’s

38 Inside look Help for ‘the sandwich generation’ Busy with kids and a career—and caring for an elder too? Adult day care may be the answer.

41 Tech savvy Tired of being tired? If slumber leaves you

unrefreshed, a night in the sleep lab may lead to relief.

The color spectrum Want your home to make a vivid statement? Dip into a bright palette.

Departments

42 Seasonal health Stay healthy in the heat Summer’s temperature-

related illnesses are treatable—and preventable.

43 Up close 4 Welcome letter 6 Editor’s letter 10 Flash

Captured moments around the county

28 Health watch · 5 food myths, busted · Take the hint · 5 facts labels don’t tell you

34 The buzz Notable events at Saint Peter’s University Hospital

Healing humor A onetime comic thrives on using

jokes to help hospital patients cope.

44 Glorious food The power of polenta This versatile cornmeal

treat brings a touch of Italy to many a delicious dish.

46 Middlesex gourmet Iberian escape Get your fill of authentic

Portuguese fare at Ria-Mar in South River.

48 Faces of Middlesex Parade brigade

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SPECIAL EVENTS 24th Annual Golf Classic Monday, September 13 11:00 AM Shotgun Start The Ridge at Back Brook 211 Wertsville Road, Ringoes Cost: $750 per player. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, contact the Saint Peter’s Foundation at 732-745-8542.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Random Acts of Fun in Highland Park Thursday, July 8 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM Stop & Shop parking lot Raritan Avenue, Highland Park A health-and-wellness evening with free health screenings, information and “Ask the Healthcare Professional” opportunities. Saint Peter’s University Hospital clinicians will be on hand to meet and speak with guests.

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar Thursdays, July 8, August 12, September 9 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Saint Peter’s University Hospital 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick If you’re at least 100 pounds overweight, you simply can’t afford to miss this life-altering seminar. Our bariatric surgeons will explain everything you need to know to make an informed decision on weight-loss surgery. In addition, you’ll learn about The Program for LIFE™, a customized support plan for weight-loss patients. To register, call 1-866-97MYPFL (1-866-976-9735).

Community Mobile Health Services Saint Peter’s Community Mobile Health Services provides health education and screenings, including blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol, stroke, body mass index and more. Community groups and businesses interested in scheduling services at your location can contact Community Mobile Health Services at 732-745-8600, ext. 8903.

Welcome LETTER

Efficient care for our community SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM WAS recently the site of a press conference with New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and Dr. Poonam Alaigh, commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. The press conference was held to announce $85 million in charity care funding for New Jersey’s uninsured residents. Though this safety net provides some of the financial support hospitals need to continue caring for those in our community, we must find means to deliver patient care in the most efficient way possible for all those we serve. Toward that end, we formed the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System in 2007, a restructuring that reflects our expansive scope of services. Saint Peter’s University Hospital is our flagship, and Saint Peter’s Health and Management Services Corporation encompasses outpatient programs, such as the CARES Surgicenter, the McCarrick Care Center and Saint Peter’s Adult Day Center in Monroe Township. The Adult Day Center helps families stay together as their members age and independence becomes challenged. We renovated the facility and expanded our social and medical programs to keep clients active and engaged. Get an “Inside Look” on page 38 from two clients and their caregivers. We also renovated our Center for Sleep and Breathing Disorders (Tech Savvy, page 41), and upgraded our testing capabilities for a more complete explanation of why you or your child may not be sleeping soundly. Faces of Saint Peter’s (page 36) features an internist who has served his patients for almost 50 years, as well as a dynamic administrator who keeps our outpatient oncology program at the cutting-edge. Finally, in Up Close, page 43, meet one of our volunteers who spreads the healing power of laughter throughout Saint Peter’s.

Sincerely,

RONALD C. RAK, J.D. President and Chief Executive Officer Saint Peter’s Healthcare System

254 EASTON AVENUE | NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600 | www.saintpetershcs.com

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SPH-1057 SUSAN AD MHL:SPH-1057 SUSAN AD MHL

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MY JOB IS TRULY A

LABOR OF LOVE

Susan D’Angelo, BA, ADN, RN, CCRN

Governor’s Nursing Merit Award for Registered Professional Nurse: Acute Care

SAINT PETER’S HELPS ME MAKE A DIFFERENCE…EVERY DAY. As a charge nurse in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, Susan D’Angelo has been caring for fragile newborns for over 20 years. She is a shining example of the compassion and dedication that is a long-standing tradition with all the nurses at Saint Peter’s and just one of the reasons our team continues to win the coveted Magnet Award for nursing excellence. We’re proud to recognize Susan and all our nurses for their outstanding level of care.

To learn more about our award-winning nursing team, call 732-745-8600 or visit saintpetershcs.com

Treating you better...for life. 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600

Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen � State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia � Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine

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Editor’s LETTER

Home wishes I HAVE SOMETHING OF A LOVE-HATE RELATship with the homes we publish in Middlesex Health & Life. On the one hand, I find these photos lovely and inspiring—a testament to the endless possibilities of interior design. On the other hand ... they make me a bit wistful about the less-than-ideal corners of my own home. Take the sweeping garden we profile on page 20: Just a peek at the lush landscape of this Colonia home makes me want to pull up a chair to while away a lazy summer evening with a book and an icy beverage. It’s a shame I don’t have the patience for that watering and weeding. Likewise, the fun and splashy offerings in “Tiles that beguile” on page 18 make me want to reenvision a backsplash or bathroom. At least the vibrant rooms in “The Color Spectrum,” page 22, are proof positive that I’m not alone in my quest to add bright hues to almost any space. See for yourself what a difference it can make. Luckily, the rest of our pages feature indulgences we can all try whenever the whim strikes. In “Iberian Escape,” for example, we dish on the Portuguese delights served up at Ria-Mar in South River. Is it worth the excursion? Find out for yourself on page 46. Learn about more tasty treats in Glorious Food on page 44, in which we give the scoop on our favorite grillable grain: polenta. Find out tips and tricks for preparing this cornmeal concoction—recipe included! Finally, for the ultimate in Jersey summer delights, we present “A Shore Thing” on page 12. There we profile our seven favorite seaside destinations in a 2010 beach guide, complete with all the info you need— from parking to fees to food availability and more. If you find yourself heading to the same slice of sand each summer, it might be time to expand to new horizons. Just grab a towel, some sunscreen and this issue to peruse in your beach chair—then hit the road! Perhaps we’ll see you there.

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RITA GUARNA Editor in Chief

6/7/10 2:52:15 PM


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web editors ANNMARIE MARANO JESSICA SOLLOWAY

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director of production CHRISTINE HAMEL

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sales & marketing coordinator ELIZABETH MEE

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editorial contributions: The editors invite letters, article ideas and other contributions from readers. Please write to Editor,

Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201-571-7003; fax 201782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Any manuscript or artwork should be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope bearing adequate return postage. The magazine is not responsible for the return or loss of submissions. advertising inquiries: Please contact Wilkie Bushby at 201-571-2220 or wilkie.bushby@wainscotmedia.com.

6/3/10 1:22:24 PM


Saint Peter’s Healthcare System president and chief executive officer RONALD C . RAK , J . D .

chief marketing officer PETER CONNOLLY

director, marketing and media relations

Dreams begin here...

MICHELLE LAZZAROTTI

marketing and public relations representative VIRGINIA SCIORRA

Saint Peter’s University Hospital executive director ALFRED GLOVER

president, medical and dental staff

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Saint Peter’s Health and Management Services Corporation

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executive director STEVEN S . RADIN , ESQ .

SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. For more information about Saint Peter’s facilities and services, please visit www.saintpetershcs.com or call 732-745-8600.

Published by

Wainscot Media chairman CARROLL V. DOWDEN

New Store Hours

Tues.–Fri. 9:30am–5:30pm • Sat. 10:00am–4:00pm Closed Mon.

44 South Martine Ave, Fanwood, NJ 908-332-2207 Tues.–Sat. 9:30am–5:30pm • Closed Mon. Evenings by appointment

Exquisite Landscaping You’ll Love Forever

president MARK DOWDEN

executive vice president, publising director DEBORAH JONES BARROW

vice presidents AMY DOWDEN NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA SHANNON STEITZ

subscription services: To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Middlesex Health

& Life, Circulation Department, PO Box 1788, Land O Lakes, FL 34639; telephone 813-996-6579; e-mail lauren.mena@wainscotmedia.com.

Middlesex Health & Life is published four times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645, in association with Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. This is Volume 4, Issue 2. ©2010 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.00 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the advice of a healthcare professional. Acceptance of advertising by Middlesex Health & Life does not constitute an endorsement of products or services.

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FLASH SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM HELD its annual gala at The Heldrich in New Brunswick. The Bishop’s Award was presented to William J. Marino, chairman, president and CEO of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey. “That’s Entertainment” was the theme of the night for the State Theatre’s 2010 benefit gala in New Brunswick. The evening featured songs by Lynda Carter, as well as casino games, food, and more. At the Westwood in Garwood, meanwhile, the American Red Cross Tri-County Chapter (serving Middlesex, Union and Somerset) held a “Fais Do-Do” awards fundraiser. The event, named for a Cajun dance party, included bluegrass music, food and more.

1.

2.

3

4

6

SAINT PETER’S GALA 1. The Most Rev. Paul G. Bootkoski, Bishop of the Diocese of Metuchen; Paula Marino; honoree William J. Marino; Ronald C. Rak, J.D., president and chief executive officer, Saint Peter’s Healthcare System

STATE THEATRE BENEFIT GALA 3. Vinnie Brand, Lynda Carter and Wesley Brustad 10

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4. Karla Brustad, Andy Markey and Efrem Dlugacz

TRI-COUNTY RED CROSS ‘FAIS DO-DO’ FUNDRAISER 5. Keiona R. Miller and Doug Singleterry 6. Phyllis and Al Mirabella 7. Kathy Cryan, Elaine Pearson and Hannah Peterson 8. Victor Sordillo 9. Katy and Armondo Angeles

8 Think you belong in Flash? Send photos from your gala or charity event to Middlesex Health & Life, att: Flash editor, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Include your contact information, a short event description and names of all who appear. (Submissions are not guaranteed to be published and must meet the following image specs: 4x6 color prints or 300 dpi jpg, tif or eps files. Prints must be accompanied by an SASE in order to be returned.)

9

CHRISTOPHER BARTH

2. Michael McCormick, Thomas and Annamaria Reilly, Antoinette McCormick, Carleen Steward-Fruhschein and Jason Fruhschein

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ESCAPES

A SHORE THING VISIT ONE OF THESE 7 JERSEY COAST HOT SPOTS AND YOU’LL FIND MORE THAN A PICTURESQUE BEACH “Down the shore”—it’s one of those distinctly Jersey phrases, and for most of us it evokes a pleasure-seeking trek south to one of the state’s myriad beach towns. And while everyone seems to have a favorite spot already— Jersey boasts 127 miles of beaches, after all—this season we ask you to broaden your horizons and explore these seven unique locales, each offering a range of activities both on and off the sands. Here’s what you need to know for a summer to remember:

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ASBURY PARK Distance from Middlesex: 45 minutes Description: With a host of premier music venues, art

• Food: Restaurants and concession stands available along

galleries and streets lined with Queen Anne Victorian–, Gothic-, Federal Revival– and Moderne-style buildings, this historic city along New Jersey’s central coast has been a mecca for music and the arts for a century.

• Showers: Outdoor showers available along beach Other attractions: While the beach might rule by day, at

BEACH INFORMATION: • Entrance: $5 for adults daily; children 12 and under free • Parking: Metered street parking and metered parking

lots available on Ocean and Kingsley Avenues • Public restrooms: Located along the boardwalk • Lifeguards: On duty 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. • Special options: Surfing is permitted at beaches on the

north end of town.

boardwalk

night you can catch a concert at one of the city’s famous live music venues, such as Convention Hall and Paramount Theatre, both located on the boardwalk, and The Stone Pony, a legendary rock club that’s hosted such music greats as Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi. Where to eat: Live jazz, hearty Mediterranean-inspired cuisine, gorgeous views of Wesley Lake—you’ll find this and more at Moonstruck (732-988-0123, www.moon strucknj.com), a lively multilevel eatery on the south side of the city.

SANDY HOOK Distance from Middlesex: 45 minutes Description: Once an important U.S. mili-

tary base, this 7-mile–long barrier beach peninsula jutting into the Atlantic Ocean and Sandy Hook Bay is currently part of the National Park Service’s Gateway National Recreation Area, which encompasses 26,000 acres of parklands in parts of New York and New Jersey. It features seven public beach areas, salt marshes, a holly forest and numerous historic landmarks.

The lighthouse at Sandy Hook

BEACH INFORMATION: • Entrance: Free • Parking: Nine parking lots available; $10

per vehicle daily

ALAMY

• Public restrooms: Seven throughout the park • Lifeguards: On duty 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily at North

Beach, Gunnison Beach and South Beach Areas C, D and E • Special options: Fishing is permitted at Nine Gun Battery Field, Fishing Beach and South Beach Area B; nonmotorized car-top boats can be launched from Beach Area C and the Horseshoe Cove salt marsh; surfing is allowed in Area C; nudity is permitted at Gunnison Beach. • Food: Concession stands are open in each beach area from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. You can also dine at the Sea Gulls’ Nest Oceanfront Deck Restaurant & Bar in Beach Area D, which sells salads, sandwiches, hot platters and alcoholic drinks. • Showers: Six outdoor showers throughout the park

Other attractions: Take a stroll on Sandy Hook’s walking paths, hiking trails and new 5-mile multiuse pathway, which also accommodates bicyclists and inline skaters, to discover the area’s natural wonders, including more than 300 species of birds. History buffs can also tour the historic Fort Hancock district at the northern tip of the peninsula, which contains the Sandy Hook Lighthouse—the oldest standing lighthouse in the country, dating back to 1764. Where to eat: Take in an elegant seafood dinner with the Sandy Hook Bay as a backdrop at Doris & Ed’s (732872-1565, www.dorisandeds.com), located in a centuryold bayside inn in the nearby town of Highlands. An added bonus: more than 315 wine choices. continued

M I D D L E S E X H E A LT H & L I F E

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ESCAPES

POINT PLEASANT BEACH featuring rides, games, food vendors and other activities.

BEACH INFORMATION (mostly for Jenkinson’s, Fun awaits at Jenkinson’s Boardwalk.

Distance from Middlesex: 50 minutes Description: Situated on the northern tip of the Barnegat

Peninsula, this family-friendly town draws crowds with its sandy beaches along Ocean Avenue and 1-mile boardwalk

a popular 1-mile private beach): • Entrance: $7 for adults on weekdays, $8 on weekends

and holidays; $2 for children 5 to 11 daily; free for children under 5 • Parking: Free parking on side streets; metered parking on Ocean Avenue; four Jenkinson’s parking lots available on Ocean Avenue (fees start at $5 per vehicle) • Public restrooms: Located at various spots along the boardwalk • Lifeguards: On duty 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Special options: Though surfing is not permitted at Jenkinson’s, you can hit the waves on the south side of the municipal beach on Maryland Avenue. • Food: Four dining areas located on boardwalk • Showers: Indoor showers available at two bathhouses ($4 for adults, $3 for children) Other attractions: Jenkinson’s Boardwalk offers fun for all ages with a host of amusement rides and games, four dining facilities, three sweet shops and an aquarium where you can view Atlantic and Pacific sharks, penguins, alligators, seals and more ($10 for adults, $6 for seniors and children ages 3 to 12, free for children 2 and under). More mature crowds can check out Jenks Club, a hip nightclub on the boardwalk featuring DJs and live bands. Where to eat: Located on the boardwalk, Martell’s Sea Breeze Restaurant (732-892-0131, www.tikibar.com/ pages/seabreeze.html) offers a variety of fine steak and seafood specialties and stunning views of the Atlantic in a relaxed setting.

LONG BEACH ISLAND Distance from Middlesex: 1 hour 35 minutes to the

island’s entrance Description: This 18-mile–long, quarter-mile–wide island offers opportunities for a tranquil beach getaway in its six municipalities: Barnegat Light, Beach Haven, Harvey Cedars, Long Beach Township, Ship Bottom and Surf City. With no boardwalk and few public bathrooms along the beach, the island tends to cater to overnight visitors, though day-trippers can find various amenities in Beach Haven, located on the south side of the island.

BEACH INFORMATION (for Beach Haven): • Entrance: $5 for adults daily; free for senior citizens and children 12 and under 14

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• Parking: Free street parking; public lots by the bay • Public restrooms: One available on the beach near the

Centre Street entrance • Lifeguards: On duty 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. • Special options: Surfing, boogie-boarding and fish-

ing locations depend on surf conditions of the day; check with lifeguards for updates • Food: Vendors are not allowed on the sands, but you can take in a casual meal at The Palm Grill, a bistro with patio seating located on the beach at the Sea Shell Resort & Beach Club. • Showers: Outdoor showers are located next to bathroom area.


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Other attractions: Perfect for a family outing or a roman-

tic date, the Surflight Theatre in Beach Haven offers a variety of musicals, comedy shows and children’s productions in a charming theater equipped to seat up to 450 people. After the show, grab a cone next door at the Show Place Ice Cream Parlour, where an animated waitstaff sings as they serve. Where to eat: Cinnamon-dusted Costa Rican tilapia and Argentinean bistro steak skewers are just a few of the inter-

national delights at Plantation Restaurant (609-494-8191, www.plantationrestaurant.com), a hip, exotic bar and eatery in Harvey Cedars. Where to stay: Dating back to the 19th century, the historic Surf City Hotel in Surf City (609-494-7281, www.surfcityhotel.com), located just one-half block from the ocean, offers a range of accommodation types, including a two-bedroom apartment with a kitchen, laundry facilities and an outdoor deck (rates start at $160/night).

ATLANTIC CITY Distance from Middlesex: 2.5 hours Description: This glitzy city-by-the-sea is a reveler’s

haven, complete with free public beaches, world-class casino resorts and a bustling boardwalk offering upscale shopping and a host of games and amusement rides, among other pleasures.

BEACH INFORMATION: • Entrance: Free • Parking: Metered spots throughout city, public parking

garages available at casinos and hotels (fees may apply)

COURTESY OF LUXE QUA BATHS AND SPA

• Public restrooms: Located along boardwalk • Lifeguards: On duty 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Special options: Surfing permitted at Crystal Beach on

New Hampshire Avenue, Delaware Avenue Beach and Downtown Beach at Raleigh Avenue; kayaking and windsurfing permitted at Jackson Avenue Beach • Food: Food vendors and eateries available on the boardwalk • Showers: Outdoor showers located near lifeguard stations Other attractions: At Caesar’s Palace, check out The Pier Shops at Caesars, a 900-foot–long pier over the ocean housing 80 upscale retail shops, and the luxe Qua Baths and Spa—a 16,000-square-foot facility featuring Roman baths, an herbal steam room and Vichy showers. Organic treatments, such as the Ocean Spray Body Renewal and Detoxification Therapy, restore skin, ease tension and soothe muscles. Of course, you can visit one of the city’s numerous bars and dance clubs for a bit of nighttime fun, such as Casbah Nightclub at the Trump Taj Mahal or Mur.mur at the Borgata. Where to eat: Buddakan (609-674-0100, www.thepier shopsatcaesars.com) at The Pier Shops at Caesars serves up innovative contemporary Asian cuisine in a hip, sexy

setting adorned with rock gardens, thatched roofs and a gigantic golden Buddha. Where to stay: Hip and happening, the Borgata (609317-1000, www.theborgata.com)—a 2,000-room luxury casino-hotel at Renaissance Pointe—offers a full taste of all the glitz and glamour Atlantic City has to offer, thanks to a 161,000-square-foot casino floor, 12 restaurants and bars and a 54,000-square-foot spa (summer rates start at $109/night). continued Pamper yourself at the luxurious Qua Baths and Spa.

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ESCAPES CAPE MAY Distance from Middlesex: 2.5 hours Description: With 2.5 miles of public beaches and one

of the state’s most impressive collections of beautifully restored Victorian homes, this peninsula city situated at the southernmost point in New Jersey—also a National Historic Landmark—attracts hoards of fashionable visitors each season.

BEACH INFORMATION: • Entrance: $5 daily or $10 for a three-day pass for

adults; children 12 and under free • Parking: Metered street parking throughout city; metered parking lot on Jackson Street • Public restrooms: Five, at various locations on beach near the promenade • Lifeguards: On duty 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Special options: Surfing is permitted on beaches after hours, though surfers tend to prefer the Cove Area at the south end of Beach Avenue. • Food: You’ll find vendors selling hot dogs, sodas and snacks at 12 spots along Beach Avenue.

• Showers: Outdoor showers available at select bath-

room areas Other attractions: If a day on the sands has you craving

a glass of red and white, visit the Cape May Winery and Vineyard, which produces such top-quality wines as Chardonnay, Riesling, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. You can explore the 150-acre vineyard on a 1.5-hour guided tour, which also includes wine sampling, fruit and cheese and a souvenir glass ($20 per adult, children under 21 free). Where to eat: Located in the heart of Cape May’s historic district, the Washington Inn (609-884-5697, www.washingtoninn.com)—originally a 19th-century plantation home—serves up a host of eclectic dishes in five elegant dining rooms. Where to stay: Enjoy a romantic jaunt at the Queen Victoria (609-884-8702, www.queenvictoria.com), a luxurious bed-and-breakfast offering 32 rooms and suites in four stunning Victorian-era buildings located just one block from the Atlantic (rates start at $220/night).

The Starlux hotel

• Special options: Surfing, kayaking and skim boarding

is one of WIldwood’s

are only permitted during unguarded hours. • Food: Various food vendors and eateries available on boardwalk • Showers: Indoor showers available at various locations on boardwalk Other attractions: Learn about Wildwood’s numerous buildings representing “Doo Wop”—a popular architecture style in the 1950s and ’60s featuring boomerang rooflines, jutting facades, zigzagging balconies and other wacky elements—at the Doo Wop Experience, a museum celebrating the city’s heyday with cool artifacts from the era. From here you can hop on the “Doo Wop Back to the ’50s (and ’60s) Tour,” a 90-minute guided bus tour that takes visitors to various Doo Wop–style landmarks ($12 for adults, $6 for children). Where to eat: Beach Creek Oyster Bar and Grille in Wildwood (609-522-1062, www.beachcreek.net) offers creative steak, meat and seafood plates, plus an oyster and martini bar and open-deck seating overlooking the Schooner Island Marina. Where to stay: For a taste of Wildwood’s colorful past, perch at the Caribbean Motel (609-522-8292, www.caribbeanmotel.com), a fully restored vintage Doo Wop–style motel across the street from the ocean, featuring a futuristic lobby with an elevated ramp, a central pool area and island-inspired décor (rates start at $199/night). I

many Doo Wop delights.

THE WILDWOODS Distance from Middlesex: 2.5 hours Description: Encompassing the boroughs of Wild-

wood, North Wildwood and Wildwood Crest, this familyfavorite destination offers 5 miles of sandy beaches and a 38-block boardwalk featuring more rides than Disneyland!

BEACH INFORMATION: • Entrance: Free • Parking: Available at metered spots on Ocean Avenue,

a metered municipal lot on Schellenger Avenue and the Convention Center lot along Ocean Avenue (fees vary) • Public restrooms: Located at various spots on boardwalk • Lifeguards: On duty 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


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1. Daltile’s Basketweave Honed tile, from the Stone à la Mod collection. Fabulous Flooring, Edison, 732-9067656; www.daltile.com 2. Chrysanthemum mosaic from Ann Sacks’ Beau Monde collection. Short Hills Marble & Tile, Short Hills, 973376-1330; www.annsacks.com 3. Sicis Marilyn Monroe mosaic; custom orders can be modeled after your favorite photo. Custom mosaics: Sicis New York, 212-343-7065; other Sicis products: Wayne Tile Co., Ramsey, 201-825-8000; www.sicis.it 4. Solistone’s Standing Pebbles collection. Eagle Tile & Home Center, New York, 212-423-0333; www.solistone.com

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© MELABEE M. MILLER

5. Danse Blanc from Artistic Tile’s Chateau collection. Artistic Tile, Shrewsbury, 732-212-1616; www.artistictile.com 6. Avenue Blend from Walker Zanger’s Skyline Glass collection. Walker Zanger, Perth Amboy, 732-697-7700; www.walkerzanger.com 7. Bisazza’s Summer Flowers Blue mosaic. Mobil Flooring, Manalapan, 732-792-8100; www.bisazza.com/usa 8. Porcelanosa’s Firenze mosaic. Porcelanosa, East Brunswick, 732-6131915; www.porcelanosa-usa.com I 8

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GLORY

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by Kristin Colella

“MY GARDEN HAS BEEN IN MY FAMILY for 60 years, and I’ve been actively working in it since the ’70s,” says Colonia homeowner Jeffrey Zirpolo. “It contains indoor and outdoor pools, a koi pond, a greenhouse and expansive views of an adjacent golf course, but what I enjoy most are the mature plants and trees. I have several 40-foot–tall metasequoias that I planted 35 years ago, and a weeping beech dating back to 1958. It’s incredible that they’re so old yet thriving!” Tip: “Don’t get too focused on creating a per-

fectly manicured garden. Instead, let nature take its course. For instance, my viburnums have reproduced and spread throughout the garden, with some growing as tall as 10 feet. They’re beautiful and they help shield me from the busy road outside my home.” I

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photography by Tim Street-Porter

The

Color

spectrum WANT YOUR HOME TO MAKE A VIVID STATEMENT? DIP INTO A BRIGHT PALETTE

olors are the smiles of

C

nature,” said 19th-century English writer Leigh Hunt— but why should the great outdoors have all the fun?

Our own little man-made corners of the world can also benefit from startling swaths of vibrant hues. Sure, dressing a room in a brilliant shade can be a daring tact. But as these inspiring rooms reveal, when done to proper effect, this dazzling choice can engender grins aplenty—a reaction that would surely do Mr. Hunt (not to mention our old friend Roy G. Biv) proud.

RED:

In the rosy Manhattan living room of designer Miles

Redd, the all-out glamour of an oversized red-velvet couch is tempered by a host of eclectic touches—a gallery-like wall of artwork, floor-to-ceiling bookshelves packed with beloved tomes and a subtly patterned parquet floor. Whimsical blue pillows provide cushy points of contrast. continued

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ROOM DESIGN BY: MILES REDD

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ORANGE: Brilliant yet soothing, this sunny sitting room—tucked into a Hollywood Hills villa—features juicy shades that invigorate but don’t overwhelm. The calming effect is further enhanced by the room’s multitude of Asian touches—Japanese Imari plates, a golden statue of a Buddhist goddess and a bamboo coffee table among them.

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ROOM DESIGN BY: MARIAN MCEVOY

ROOM DESIGN BY: ANNIE KELLY

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YELLOW:

White trimmed with black may be

the dominant palette in this master bedroom, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the cleverly placed patches of yellow that give the space a lemony pizzazz. In addition to contrasting colors, the owner of this 18th-century Hudson Valley home played with lines and curves to create the just-right balance of quirky and sleek. continued

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GREEN:

Color us envious of the easy,

breezy beauty imbued in this Los Angeles home by a striking oversized painting. With such a bold statement piece taking center stage, all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needed are a few cozy touches, courtesy of a simple distressed console table, a collection of multihued glass vases and a colorfully tempting assortment of fruits arranged in a retro-chic bowl.

ROOM DESIGN BY: MICHAEL BRUNO

ROOM DESIGN BY: PAUL FORTUNE

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ROOM DESIGN BY: WALDO FERNANDEZ

VIOLET:

Who needs paint? This modern

bedroom proves that, just like your mother told you, it’s what’s on the inside that counts— and what’s inside here is a chic bed and side table imbued with bold purple splashes, plus a comforter, rug and lamp that repeat the hue while echoing the furniture’s sharp angles. I

BLUE:

A showstopping electric-blue silk

couch is the unabashed star of this Paris living room. More muted but equally enticing is the Cubist painting perched above; a pair of simple-but-fanciful lamps and a trio of glass candlesticks, meanwhile, provide opportunities for illumination as well as spots of visual relief.

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HEALTH WATCH

food myths,

5 BUSTED

DIETITIANS REFUTE COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS—AND OFFER RELIABLE TIPS FOR EATING RIGHT

Think you’re savvy about healthy eating? Well, some of what you “know” about food may be mere folklore. Middlesex

Health & Life consulted diet experts about a number of widespread beliefs, and these five turned out to be bogus:

Myth #1: Frozen veggies are less nutritious than fresh.

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Foods begin to lose their nutritional value the minute they’re picked. “Nutrients are degraded by air, heat and time,” says Joan Salge Blake, clinical associate professor of nutrition at Boston University. Most “fresh” foods have lost much of their worth by the time they reach our plates. Flash-freezing, however, retains nutrients at their peak, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial plant chemicals, says nutrition specialist Christine Gerbstadt, M.D., of Sarasota, Florida. “Eating local” is the best way to eat fresh. “Most studies have looked at a 10to 14-day lag time between harvesting and testing,” says Stephanie DiBacco, assistant professor of nutrition at Russell Sage College in Albany, N.Y. “If you’re eating local food sooner than that, it will have almost as much nutrition as flash-frozen.”


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Myth #2: Bananas are fattening. We’ve long known bananas are a rich potassium source, but they also have a reputation for being high in sugar and therefore a threat to one’s waistline. That’s a bum rap, say our experts. “Fruit’s not fattening,” says Blake. “It’s the added sugar in processed foods like soft drinks and baked goods that adds unnecessary calories. A banana is a great source of Mother Nature’s finest nutrition.” Dr. Gerbstadt agrees: “One banana is packed with nutrition and worth every calorie. Bananas are a terrific way for active people to replenish glycogen stores and get a quick energy boost.”

Attention, Snackers Pick nuts instead of chips for between-meal munching—they’re high in fiber and protein, and provide heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats.

Myth #3:

6

Myth #4:

mini-meals are better than three big ones.

“I was always a proponent of eating small meals, but the evidence just doesn’t show the practice to make a difference in maintaining a healthy weight,” DiBacco says. Rather, it’s the total number of calories—not how you spread them out—that counts. Dr. Gerbstadt agrees: “If the calories are the same, meal frequency is really a matter of lifestyle choice,” she says. What is important: not skipping breakfast. “Studies show that women who miss breakfast do more impulse snacking,” says Blake. “When snacking is unplanned, you’re vulnerable to whatever food is around when you get hungry, such as donuts at a meeting. When you plan your meals, you can snack on things like fruits and nuts on your schedule.”

Myth #5:

Foods like celery have “negative calories.” You may have heard that some foods are so lowcal that the energy it takes to chew and digest them more than makes up for the calories they contain. But the truth is that nothing you eat can subtract calories. “It takes about 10 percent of the calories in any food for the body to digest, absorb and use its nutrients, a process often called ‘specific dynamic action’ or ‘thermic effect,’ ” explains Dr. Gerbstadt. “A food like celery has only a few calories per stalk to begin with, but no matter how vigorously you chew, those calories never reach zero or become a negative number.” Nonetheless, crisp and fiber-rich foods are wise choices for a healthy diet. “They fill you up without a lot of calories,” says DiBacco.

Cooking vegetables lessens all their nutrients.

While it’s true that water-soluble vitamins like B and C diminish when cooked in water, fiber and minerals are not affected by cooking. “And fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E and K actually do better in heat,” says DiBacco. So do the antioxidant properties of the nutrient lycopene, found in tomatoes. “You can minimize nutrient loss by steaming or boiling for a short time in a covered pot with a small amount of water,” says Blake. “Even better, try microwaving, grilling or roasting your veggies to maintain more nutrient value.” No matter how you cook them, vegetables are a key component of a sound diet. “The bottom line,” Dr. Gerbstadt says, “is that we all should eat four to five servings a day of vegetables from a variety of choices for optimal health.” I

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Take the

HINT YOUR BODY MAY BE WARNING YOU OF ILLNESS. HERE’S WHAT TO DO

Give yourself a good once-over—notice any quirks? Doctors say small imperfections could signal an underlying issue. But which oddities call for professional attention? Experts offer guidance on becoming your own diagnostic sleuth.

Clue: EARLOBE CREASES It could mean: Heart disease Back in 1991, a study in The American Journal of Medicine found that participants with a diagonal crease in at least one earlobe were more likely to die from heart disease than those whose earlobes did not bear creases. The report caught national attention at the time, but studies reported since then have produced mixed results. One possible explanation for the link is a lack of elastin, which contributes to hardening of the arteries, but the connection may simply be due to the fact that earlobe creases are more common later in life, says Andres Mesa, M.D., a cardiologist at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston. “Whenever you age you’re prone to have more hypertension, hyperlipidemia and other complications,” he adds. What to do: Get regular checkups. “Earlobe creases can serve as a reminder that you’re getting older and you should pay more attention to heart-disease risk factors,” says Dr. Mesa.

Clue: DARK UNDER-EYE CIRCLES It could mean: Allergies “When you have significant hay fever you experience a change in blood flow to the nose and sinuses,” says James Li, M.D., allergist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “As the blood expands in some of the veins in the face, it can appear as a dark or bluish tint under the eyes.”

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What to do: If your dark circles are accompanied by other hay-fever symptoms (sneezing, coughing, congestion), consider purchasing an over-the-counter antihistamine or seeing your doctor for an allergy test.


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HEALTH WATCH

Clue: THIN THIGHS or A THICK NECK It could mean: Heart disease

What to do: “If you see a marked color change in all

A study in the British Medical Journal found that subjects with a thigh circumference of less than 60 centimeters had a greatly increased risk of developing heart disease and dying prematurely. “The link may be due to these patients having low muscle mass,” says Dr. Mesa, which may lead to insulin sensitivity and a risk of metabolic syndrome. Meanwhile, research from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Framingham Heart Study found that a wider neck—a circumference of more than 34.2 centimeters in women and 40.5 centimeters in men—increased heart-disease risk factors. “The theory is that wide necks have more deposits of fat,” says Dr. Mesa.

a physician,” says Dr. McDonald. But don’t panic—

What to do: Data are still too preliminary to prompt a response, says Dr. Mesa. “More research is needed, but I think measuring waist circumference has really proven itself.” A waist circumference greater than 88 centimeters in women and 102 centimeters in men has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease. If you exceed these limits, see your doctor about healthy ways to slim down.

Clue: DISCOLORED NAILS It could mean: Diabetes Yellow nails can be a symptom of this disease, says dermatologist Michel McDonald, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, though the reason for this is not yet confirmed.

of your nails, it’s a good idea to get checked out by this discoloration may be due to fungus or aging.

Clue: PALE NAILS It could mean: Anemia Press on your nails and take note of their color: While most people’s nails will turn immediately back to pink, an anemic’s may remain white for a moment or two. “When you are anemic you don’t have the blood rushing back as quickly into the capillaries,” says Rebecca Kazin, M.D., head of the Johns Hopkins Dermatology and Cosmetic Center at Green Spring Station in Lutherville, Maryland. “But if you are this anemic you would likely have other symptoms, such as fatigue and a tendency to bruise easily.” What to do: Speak to your doctor, says Dr. Kazin.

Clue: MALE BALDNESS It could mean: Heart disease In a study published in Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers found a link between male baldness and an increased risk of this condition. Risk was greatest in men with extensive vertex baldness (on the crown of the head). What to do: “If you have baldness, it doesn’t mean you’ll have heart disease,” says Dr. Mesa. “But it might be a good idea to get your blood pressure and cholesterol checked.” I

4 well-known body warnings: TRUTH OR HYPE? PHYSICIANS ASSESS THE VALIDITY OF THESE “TROUBLE SIGNS” Apple-shaped bodies are linked with greater heart disease risks than pear-shaped bodies. “Excess fat around the waist is a different kind of fat than that around the hips, and is associated with greater heart disease risk factors,” says Andy Kates, M.D., director of the Heart Disease Prevention Program at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. TRUE

Skin tags can signal colon polyps. “There’s been insufficient evidence to extrapolate a link,” says gastroenterologist Eric Esrailian, M.D., assistant clinical professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA in Los Angeles. HYPE

Too much vitamin A can cause excessively dry lips. “An excess of vitamin A can shut down your oil glands, so monitor your intake and don’t have more than 5,000 IUs a day,” says dermatologist Michel McDonald, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. TRUE

White mouth corners can indicate a yeast infection. Yeast infections don’t just occur in your intimate regions; your mouth can be infected by a pesky yeast called Candida, says Dr. McDonald. Because this sort of infection will not likely affect other areas of the body, you can treat it with a topical medication from your dermatologist. TRUE

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5 facts labels don’t tell you HERE’S WHAT’S MISSING FROM PACKAGE NUTRITION DATA— AND HOW TO MAKE SMART CHOICES ANYWAY Savvy shoppers know that checking food labels is a key to helping your family eat healthy. The bad news? “They’re incomplete,” says Bruce Silverglade, director of legal affairs for the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). He helped Middlesex

Health & Life identify five important points food packages fail to reveal:

1

How much sugar. “If a cookie uses different types of sugars—high-fructose corn syrup, fructose, etc.—the label can show these as individual ingredients,” says Silverglade. “If they were grouped together, ‘sugar’ could very well be first.” Labels also do not separate out added sugars from natural ones (think of the innate sweetness of applesauce), and offer no guidance on how much to consume: For fat, sodium, etc., labels show a clear “% daily value” based on a 2,000-calorie daily diet—but not for sugar. “There should be one,” Silverglade says. What to do: The CSPI suggests limiting sugar to 40 grams per day and scanning ingredients for sugar’s aliases.

2

The whole story on whole grains. “The gov-

ernment recommends we eat more whole grains, but sets no rules on how much whole grain a food must have to be described as ‘made with whole grain,’” says Silverglade. “It could be a dusting.” CSPI favors labels that show clearly what percentage of grains are whole. What to do: For now, look for products for which the first listed ingredient begins with the word “whole.”

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Where the ‘trans fats’ have gone. Many food

packages today boast “0 trans fats.” But in some cases, says Silverglade, “the company has added plain old saturated fat to replace the trans fat, making the product just as bad as, or worse than, the original.” CSPI says a redesigned label should categorize these fat levels as “High,” “Medium” or “Low,” with red ink calling attention to “High” levels. What to do: Don’t be swayed by “trans fat” claims alone—judge each product after examining “saturated fats” too.

5

The ‘true’ fiber content.

The CSPI says “dietary fiber” should be termed simply “fiber” and include “only intact fiber from whole grains, beans, vegetables, fruit and other foods.” Today the FDA also permits the inclusion of such “faux-fiber” additives as maltodextrin and polydextrose. “It’s unlikely that they lower blood cholesterol or blood sugar,” says Silverglade. “Companies are basically padding the product to up the numbers.” What to do: Keep an eye out for fiber additives and try to get most of your fiber from natural sources. I

ROBIN G. LONDON 2008

Caffeine quantities. The CSPI says these should be required. “A bottle of Starbucks vanilla Frappuccino contains 96 milligrams, more than many brands of coffee have in

a 6-ounce cup,” says Silverglade. Even Dannon’s coffee yogurt packs in 30 milligrams. What to do: Exercise moderation until labeling information improves.


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IT’S NOT IF YOU WIN OR LOSE

BUT HOW YOU STAY IN THE GAME

WE SPECIALIZE IN PREVENTION, TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION OF SPORTS INJURIES…AND MORE. Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute offers a multidisciplinary approach to treatment that recognizes the unique relationship between sports medicine, orthopedic surgery and physical rehabilitation. Whether you’re injured, suffer from osteoporosis or arthritis, recovering from surgery, or just want to get in shape, our sports medicine team can help. Our staff includes a board-certified sports medicine specialist from Saint Peter’s University Hospital, three in-house, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons from University Orthopaedic Associates, and physical therapists. Every member of our team has extensive experience caring for professional, Olympic and student athletes... even weekend warriors. All of us at the Sports Medicine Institute are committed to providing patients with a prompt diagnosis, comprehensive treatment and thorough rehabilitation.

To learn more about Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute, call 732-565-5420 or visit saintpetershcs.com

Treating you better...for life. 562 EASTON AVENUE, SOMERSET, NJ 08873

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a t S a i n t P e t e r ’s

AN HONOR FOR CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP

$85 million for charity care New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and Health Commissioner Poonam Alaigh, M.D., announced during an April press conference at Saint Peter’s University Hospital that charity care funding for the state’s uninsured residents would increase to $85 million. The governor said New Jerseyans need access to health care and hospitals need to be fiscally solvent. He and the commissioner toured Saint Peter’s and paid a visit to Guadalupe Ricardo Castro of New Brunswick, who had just given birth to a son.

Saint Peter’s Healthcare System has received the 2010 Corporate Citizen Award from the American Conference on Diversity, a statewide organization. Saint Peter’s was honored for supporting New Jersey’s cultural diversity through in-house educational celebrations, actively building relationships with our area’s many ethnic and faith communities and delivering culturally sensitive care to our patients. Tab Chukunta, director of Community Outreach, and Susan Ballestero, interim chief operating officer for the healthcare system; and Al Glover, executive director of Saint Peter’s University Hospital, (left to right) accepted the award.

A second shining ‘Beacon’

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The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Saint Peter’s University Hospital earned its second Beacon Award for Critical Care Excellence from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. There are more than 6,000 ICUs in the United States, and only 30 have earned this coveted award twice. “Our nurses are very passionate about and exceptionally skilled in the care they give,” said nurse manager Pamela Harmon (standing at left, in lab coat). “As a result, patients and their families benefit greatly.”


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I’M TAKING STEPS TO HELP FIND THE CURE

Avril Keldo, MSN, APN-C, RNC, OCN Oncology Nurse Manager

THE COURAGE OF MY PATIENTS IS ALL THE INSPIRATION I NEED. As the oncology nurse manager at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, Avril Keldo helps patients fight the toughest battle of their lives: cancer. But her commitment and dedication doesn’t end when her day does. She also helps patients stand up to cancer by walking for the cure. Avril has received some of the highest patient satisfaction scores in the nation* and leads a team of nurses with the highest percentage of certification in their specialty, another example of nursing excellence at Saint Peter’s. We’re proud to recognize Avril and all our nurses for their outstanding level of care.

To learn more about our award-winning nursing team, call 732-745-8600 or visit saintpetershcs.com

Treating you better...for life. 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600

Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen � State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia � Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine

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Faces of SAINT PETER’S

Lorenzo M. Borromeo, M.D. After graduating from medical school at the University of Santo Tomas in his native Philippines, Lorenzo M. Borromeo, M.D., board-certified internist, heard about “a little Catholic hospital in New Brunswick” from an uncle who had gone to Cook College at Rutgers. Dr. Borromeo came to Saint Peter’s University Hospital in 1963; nearly 47 years later and at 74 years old, he is still here and in a fulltime solo practice. He does not have a physician partner because, he says, “in my hospital practice the nurses are my partners.” He lives in Bound Brook with his wife, Nancy. They have five grown children and one grandchild.

Q: Are you surprised that you’ve been here for so long? Yes. I was just planning to train here. But I met Nancy and got married, had children, and everything changed. Where my family is, that is where I am. My family is the center of my life, and my profession keeps me focused.

Q: Do you return home often? Almost every year. I do miss the island I come from, a peaceful resort island called Camiguin. I visit my three sisters and my brother there, to keep our family traditions alive.

Q: Did you always want to be a doctor? No, I wanted to be a farmer, a country gentleman. My father was a surgeon with the Philippine-American Guerrilla Medical Corps, and he died during World War II. I was just 6. As the eldest in my family, it was the tradition that I follow him, so my destiny was decided. And it has worked out very well.

Q: Do you remember making house calls? I still do them! My patients are old now, and I have a bond with them. If they are not far away, I still go to their homes. I am more busy now taking care of older patients with multiple medical problems. It gives me an inner peace and joy to realize I have in some way influenced their quality of life. Someday I will know when it’s time.

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Q: Any plans to slow down?


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Scarlett Szymanski As director of Ambulatory Oncology Services, Scarlett Szymanski manages radiation oncology, infusion, mammography and CyberKnife services. After earning her degree in allied health from Gwynedd-Mercy College in Pennsylvania, she worked nearly 20 years as a radiation therapist in Philadelphia and Florida. She now lives in Ottsville, Pennsylvania, and has been at Saint Peter’s since 1999.

Q: As a director, do you miss the daily patient contact? That was my biggest concern in taking the position. I love working with our patients more than anything. Fortunately, I still get to know most of them. I try to be out on the floor as much as possible with patients and staff. They’re like my family.

Q: It must call for a special sensitivity to deal with cancer patients. The people who work here are very special. They truly care about our patients. I never have to ask them to go above and beyond their duties—they just do it. My radiation oncology staff achieved the highest patient-satisfaction ranking in the country for 18 consecutive months, and my other departments are working hard to achieve that goal. Saint Peter’s offers the most high-tech equipment and treatments, but it’s the people who work here who set us apart from other oncology centers.

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Q: How do you find and hire such people? Anyone can learn the technical skills, but I look for the things you can’t teach—qualities such as a caring attitude, an outgoing personality, someone with a skip in their step. Having a great doctor is important, but the people who treat you every day make all the difference in your overall care experience. There’s nothing like hearing a patient say “I couldn’t have done this without you.”

Q: How do you “get away from it all”? I love watching sports and going to the movies. I like to entertain friends and family at my home. I love the beach, so I like traveling to warm places like Florida. I

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Inside LOOK

Help for ‘the sandwich generation’ BUSY WITH KIDS AND A CAREER—AND CARING FOR AN ELDER TOO? A D U LT D AY C A R E M AY B E T H E A N S W E R DALE MUMFORD LIVED A FULL AND RICH life for nine decades in northwest Pennsylvania. He was a Penn State graduate, a dairy farmer, a Purple Heart–decorated World War II veteran, a rural mail carrier and a school board member. Active in his local church, he was also a community leader who helped bring electricity to his rural area. “A real citizen,” says his daughter, Linda Mumford of Plainsboro. But two years ago, when he was 90, it became clear he could no longer live independently. Though still fairly healthy physically, Dale began to experience cognitive difficulties. Linda and her husband, John, decided to take Dale into their home. But both work full-time, she as a psychologist, he as a systems manager. “We needed a place for Dad to go during the day,” Linda says. Happily, they found one: the Saint Peter’s Adult Day Center in Monroe Township, a service of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. Adult day care may be the answer when an elderly family member needs some looking after, but doesn’t require a nursing home or other residential care facility. An adult day facility provides seniors the medical and personal care they need, along with social interaction and a change of scene that can offer them fun and stimulating activities. Such a center also frees up their caregivers to tend to the other fronts of their busy lives without having to worry about their loved ones. Dale had tried another facility but was not happy there. When he and his daughter visited the Saint Peter’s center, they were “very impressed by the large and sunny facility, and the fact that the staff was very upbeat,” Linda says. “They clearly enjoy being there and seem to have a really good time. When Joan Kibbler, the activi38

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ties director, asked Dad what activities he might enjoy were he to attend the center, he said, ‘Just to be here would be nice.’” Dale has been going to the adult day center since July 2009, and “we’re very pleased with the service,” Linda says. Her dad even looks forward to the commute to and from, which the center arranged. “Tony Defilippo, who drives Dad every day, is remarkably sensitive to his needs,” says Linda. “He’s just fabulous; he has a heart for what he does.” That’s exactly the experience the center hopes to deliver, says Lisa Catlin, a licensed clinical social worker and administrator for the center. “We exist for two reasons: to care for the elderly who are impaired in some way, and to give caregivers a break during the day,” she says. A full-time staff of seven includes Catlin, a director of nursing, two nursing assistants, an activity coordinator, a dietitian and a social worker. Elder care begins by addressing health needs. The nurses assess health status, administer medications and help with any other medical issues. The dietitian ensures that clients are eating properly. And all staffers assist with daily activities such as feeding (the center provides breakfast and lunch), hygiene and toileting. But that’s not why people enjoy coming. “We also provide structured, stimulating activities to give them the socialization they may not get at home,” Catlin says. The center was completely renovated one year ago. It doubled in size to 8,100 square feet and now has an all-new kitchen, a home theater, a parlor with a fire-


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Helen McGiff of Monroe Township (left on couch) and Lidia Morales of Spotswood enjoy knitting together in the parlor at the Saint Peter’s Adult Day Center in Monroe Township. Debbie Maldonado, nursing assistant, is one of the medical caregivers who works with clients to ensure their

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

safety and comfort throughout the day.

place and a beauty salon for hair and nail services. “We wanted to offer a cutting-edge facility, and we think ours is now the best out there for day care,” Catlin says. There are numerous daily activities, including pet therapy, music therapy, art, karaoke, playing Wii and exercise classes designed specifically for the elderly (such as chair exercise). “We also make sure to keep our clients mentally active with cognitive games such as trivia,” Catlin says. “We produce a newsletter every day with trivia, current events, the day in history and more.” There are at least two activities going on at any one time, each for differing levels of physical and mental ability, she says. Clients can also spend time reading, watching TV or napping, but the staff tries to discourage

those activities because they can be done at home. More important, staying active helps the elderly sleep better. “When people aren’t active all day, they stay up at night,” Catlin says. “An activity-and-sleep routine is healthier, and it gives caregivers a good night’s sleep too.” Those caregivers—including adults in the “sandwich generation” faced with both child care and elder care—appreciate the help the program gives. “Cognitive disorders such as dementia or Alzheimer’s disease can make people prone to wander or to become depressed or volatile,” Catlin says. “Family members are not equipped to provide that level of care 24/7. Most can’t stay home during the day. In-home care often leaves the loved one sitting in front of the TV. Here

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Inside LOOK

Do you have ‘caregiver stress’? Caring for a sick or elderly loved one can place an emotional and physical strain on the caregiver. This common problem even has a name: caregiver stress. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, caregiver stress can leave you feeling: • frustrated and angry taking care of someone with dementia who often wanders away or becomes easily upset • guilty because you think you should be able to provide better care, despite all the other things you have to do • lonely because all the time you spend caregiving has hurt your social life • exhausted when you go to bed at night. Caregivers often have health problems because they are less likely to take good care of themselves. For instance, women caregivers, compared with women who are not caregivers, are less likely to get needed medical

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therapy dog who visits the Adult Day Center, enjoy quality time together.

care, fill a prescription because of the cost or get a mammogram. Research also shows caregivers are less likely to get enough sleep, cook healthy meals or get enough physical activity. If you believe you’re suffering from caregiver stress, a fresh look at arrangements for the care of your family member could be in order—and the Saint Peter’s Adult Day Center may be able to help. In addition, talk to your doctor or a counselor, psychologist or other mental health professional. To learn more about caregiver stress, visit www.womenshealth.gov/faq/caregiver-stress.cfm#c. Saint Peter’s offers two support groups for caregivers. For information, call nurse Stephanie Fitzsimmons, 609-655-2220; or social worker Beth Chassin, 609-409-1363.

requirements for health care as provided in a hospital, including training, continuing education and privacy rules. The nurses and assistants are all Saint Peter’s– trained, so you know your loved one is in good hands.” Linda Mumford says the hospital link offers other benefits. “Saint Peter’s has a medical practice right there, so doctors can attend to certain problems immediately,” she says. “And there’s a rehab center [Saint Peter’s University Hospital Comprehensive Care Group at Monroe] next door, where Dad is taking physical therapy to gain strength. That he can do that while I am at work is very helpful.” Mitch Barnett agrees. “If you need time for yourself as a caregiver, or your parent needs socializing, I highly recommend the center,” he says. I

A key resource for families The Saint Peter’s Adult Day Center is located at 200 Overlook Drive, Pondview Plaza, Monroe Township, N.J. 00831. It is open Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Transportation to and from the facility can be provided. To learn more about the center, call 609-655-6853, visit www.saintpetershcs.com/adultday or on Facebook visit www.facebook.com/SaintPetersAdultDayCenter.

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they socialize while being medically monitored.” Mitch Barnett found that to be the case when he enrolled his 78-year-old mother, Joyce. Mitch, 54, lives in North Plainfield, but has moved in with his mother and father, Larry, in Monroe Township. Joyce has multiple sclerosis and is in a wheelchair, and Larry, 80, has his own health issues, says Mitch. “We tried in-home care, but my mom is a very social person. She needs to be around people. That’s what keeps her going.” His mother is particularly pleased with the staff at the center. “The people who run the place really care,” says Mitch. “They are not just there to pick up a paycheck. They treat everyone like family.” Catlin is not surprised to hear such feedback. “The best thing about the center, we hear, is the people who work here,” she says. Many of them have been here since we opened 13 years ago. “These types of jobs typically have high turnover, so our longevity shows we have caring people who love their jobs,” adds Catlin. Furthermore, the staff is especially well trained in elder care. “As a part of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, we are held to much higher standards than a private facility,” Catlin says. “We have to meet all the regulatory

Lidia Morales and George, a pet


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Tech SAVVY

Ashgan Elshinawy, D.O., director of the Center for Sleep and Breathing Disorders at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, talks

TIRED

of being tired? IF SLUMBER LEAVES YOU UNREFRESHED, A

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NIGHT IN THE SLEEP LAB MAY LEAD TO RELIEF AFTER EIGHT HOURS IN BED, YOU STILL dread the morning alarm clock. You’re sleeping long enough, but not well enough, and you’re ready to nod off at quiet moments during the day. If this sounds all too familiar, you may have a sleep disorder. “Many people have sleep disorders and don’t realize it,” says Ashgan Elshinawy, D.O., a pulmonologist who is director of the Center for Sleep and Breathing Disorders at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “When a disorder is identified and treated, they’re often amazed at how much more refreshing a night’s sleep becomes.” The most common sleep disorder is obstructive sleep apnea, in which one stops breathing for at least 10 seconds, often many times nightly. Sleep apnea affects many overweight people and is often marked by loud snoring—though not all sufferers are overweight, and not all snoring indicates apnea. The obstruction is usually caused by pharyngeal fat pads in the back of the throat, which relax during sleep and close off airways. One predictor for obstructive sleep apnea is a neck size of at least 17 inches for men and 16 inches for women. To test for sleep apnea, a sleep study, or nocturnal polysomnogram, is performed in the sleep lab. Patients are hooked up to a series of wires attached to the skin by electrodes. Electrical signals generated by brain waves, heart rate and rhythm are recorded into a computer. The computer also records breathing patterns and the amount of oxygen in the blood. Afterward, a sleep specialist interprets the results. The sleep lab can also investigate parasomnias— abnormal behaviors during sleep that can include sleepwalking (most prevalent in children), recurrent night terrors and even potentially harmful behaviors. Sleepmaintenance insomnia, in which you fall asleep easily

with a patient before her sleep study begins.

but wake up during the night, and periodic limb movement disorders can also be diagnosed with a sleep study. Ask your bed partner if you snore incessantly, stop breathing while asleep or kick during the night. If the answer is yes, chances are you should see a sleep specialist. “There are several treatments we can offer to help with various sleep disorders,” says Dr. Elshinawy. The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, for example, is to wear a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) device at night, the doctor explains. It gently pushes air through a tube into the nose via a face mask. There are also oral appliances that can be fitted to realign the jaw and open the air passage, and losing a substantial amount of weight often can help improve if not eliminate sleep apnea. Surgery to remove fatty tissue in the throat, she says, is not as effective as CPAP. “If you suspect you or a family member may have one of these sleep disorders, consider seeking help from a sleep specialist,” advises Dr. Elshinawy. I

HOW SLEEP DISORDERS CAN AFFECT CHILDREN Adults aren’t the only ones with sleep problems. Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Center for Sleep and Breathing Disorders offers specialized testing that can determine when a child is experiencing sleep difficulties. Children often have different symptoms than adults, says Lewis Milrod, M.D., pediatric neurologist at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s. “Rather than looking exhausted, they may become overactive and inattentive, as if they have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. “If you hear your child snoring, and if he or she is not doing well in school because of attention problems, see a sleep specialist,” Dr. Milrod advises. He adds that a child should be tested in a lab designed for children. At the Saint Peter’s facility, for example, parents always stay with a youngster through the night’s testing. And any wires to monitor brain waves, leg movements or breathing are put on after the child is asleep.

To find out whether you need a sleep study, call Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Center for Sleep and Breathing Disorders at 732-937-6055. The center is fully accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

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Seasonal HEALTH

Stay healthy in the heat SUMMER’S TEMPERATURE-RELATED ILLNESSES ARE TREATABLE— AND PREVENTABLE

“THE TEMPERATURE’S RISIN’,” AS THE song says, and a glance at the calendar suggests “it isn’t surprisin’.” But too much exposure to summer heat can cause potentially serious medical problems. “Heat-related illnesses, from least to most severe, are heat cramps, heat tetany (hyperventilation, often accompanied by a tingling feeling in the hands and fingers), heat exhaustion and heatstroke,” says Michael L. Hochberg, M.D., of EmCare, chairman of emergency medicine at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Emergency physicians typically see heat-related problems in two main groups, the doctor says. One is healthy people—teens and younger adults—who have been involved in outdoor activities and were unprepared for the extreme heat. Another is especially vulnerable individuals who may lack full awareness of their situation, such as babies and young children or elderly adults. “Even young, healthy people in their 20s and 30s who work in the heat, such as construction workers, firefighters and police officers, are susceptible to heat-related illnesses,” says Dr. Hochberg. And exertion isn’t always to blame—prolonged exposure alone can cause heatstroke. “The most important initial treatment is to get into a cool environment,” says Dr. Hochberg. “That can mean the shade or a room with air conditioning or a strong fan. Next, you need to replace lost fluids with plain water or drinks that contain electrolytes, such as Gatorade.” More alarming are the problems that can befall the very young and the very old. Of course, a small child should never be left alone in a hot environment, such as an automobile. And prolonged hot weather poses a danger to elderly people who may have health problems already. That’s why public health authorities recommend checking on elderly friends, relatives or neighbors. There are no definite guidelines, Dr. Hochberg

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SHIELD YOUR CHILD FROM HEATSTROKE Children are more prone to heatstroke than adults. If your youngster has been playing too long in the heat and shows any of the signs below, bring him or her into a cool indoor location immediately and apply cool water to the skin with a washcloth, advises Michael L. Hochberg, M.D., of EmCare and chairman of emergency medicine at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. If symptoms don’t ease within a few minutes, take your child to an emergency room. • high temperature (103 degrees or higher) without sweating

• nausea, with or without vomiting

• hot, red, dry skin • confusion

• rapid, shallow breathing

• dizziness

• lethargy

• fast pulse

• headache

says, for safe temperatures or time limits for heat exposure. “But temperature isn’t as important as humidity,” he says, “because that interferes more with our natural cooling mechanism, which is sweating.” Most of us will be warned by our bodies to seek relief when heat becomes a danger. I


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Middlesex UP CLOSE by David Levine

Healing humor

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A ONETIME COMIC THRIVES ON USING JOKES TO HELP HOSPITAL PATIENTS COPE

WHEN HE SAW AN ELDERLY WOMAN SITTING forlornly in the waiting area of the Saint Peter’s University Hospital Emergency Department, Joe Cardone knew just what he had to do. After asking first if the woman minded talking to him, he said: “You seem depressed.” “I am,” said the woman, who was waiting while a friend received treatment. “I’m 84, and everything in my body is breaking down.” “Well, what have you bought in your life that hasn’t broken down?” Cardone asked. “Imagine what your car would look like after 84 years! There is nothing on earth as strong as your body.” The woman smiled. And Cardone had done his job—helping people accept difficult situations through humor and positive thinking. Cardone, 70, is a “humor volunteer” at Saint Peter’s. Every Tuesday, this former stand-up comedian spends the day on the oncology unit, in the Emergency Department or wherever else in the hospital he finds a need for a laugh. And he administers that famous “best medicine” to whoever needs it—patients, family members, visitors and even doctors and nurses—along with the psychological boost laughter is known to provide. He also works with children who suffer from emotional and behavioral difficulties in the hospital’s “For KEEPS” program. KEEPS stands for Kids Embraced and Empowered through Psychological Services. Cardone uses humor and magic to help students from 5 to 17 deal with anger and a low self-image. “I talk to them about learning through hard work, respect and honesty,” says Cardone. “I perform some magic tricks and then show them how they’re done. Learning these tricks really helps these students build self-esteem.” Cardone, who lives in Piscataway with Justine, his wife of 48 years (they have two grown children and two grandchildren), grew up in a funny family in Pennsylvania. “My parents had a small grocery, and when they closed on Friday everyone gathered and told jokes,” he says. “I joined in, and people thought I was funny too.” In his 20s, Cardone had a comedy act with a partner, and then went solo, playing the Poconos’ “Borscht Belt” with a one-liner style he compares to Henny Youngman and Jackie Mason. He also went to college, earning a master’s degree in education. He then spent more than 38

years teaching and supervising in the Metuchen School District and at Middlesex County College. Well before he retired in 2003, “I knew I didn’t want to just sit home and watch TV,” says Cardone. “I had learned in teaching that if you use comedy effectively, you can enhance learning. I wanted to keep doing that as a humor consultant and inspirational speaker.” He started at Saint Peter’s soon after he retired. When he first meets someone, he mostly listens. “I learn a lot from patients,” he says. “You see life differently when you’re ill, and it’s important for me to understand how they feel.” When the time seems right, he’ll offer inspirational words and, “if the occasion arises, I’ll do some oneliners,” he says. “Laughter creates positive emotions by releasing chemicals such as endorphins and dopamine. It also boosts the immune system. And you can’t be angry and laugh at the same time. Try it—you just can’t.” Like any entertainer, Cardone gets as much fulfillment from his work as his listeners do, if not more. “One of the best feelings for a comic is when you make them laugh and walk off the stage—you’re on a high,” he says. “When I can make a patient laugh and he or she asks me to come visit again later, that’s an even better feeling than leaving a nightclub floor.” I M I D D L E S E X H E A LT H & L I F E

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Glorious Food

The power of POLENTA

by Diane Szulecki

Grilled polenta with shrimp and escarole Serves 4

1 tablespoon extravirgin olive oil, plus 2 teaspoons for drizzling 4 cloves garlic, chopped ⁄2 teaspoon crushed red pepper, or to taste 1

2 14-ounce cans no-salt-added diced tomatoes, drained ⁄2 teaspoon dried oregano 1

1 pound peeled cooked shrimp (31–35 per pound; thawed if frozen), tails removed if desired 6 cups thinly sliced escarole (about 1 small head) or spinach 1 16-ounce tube prepared plain polenta, sliced into 8 rounds 8 oil-cured olives, pitted and chopped (optional)

• Preheat grill to high. • Place 1 tablespoon oil and garlic in a large saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until the garlic is sizzling and fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add crushed red pepper; cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add tomatoes and oregano; bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until juicy, about 3 minutes. Stir in

THIS VERSATILE CORNMEAL TREAT BRINGS A TOUCH OF ITALY TO MANY A DELICIOUS DISH

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escarole is wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat, cover and keep warm. • Oil the grill rack. Grill polenta slices until hot and slightly charred, 3 to 4 minutes per side. • Divide the sauce among four shallow bowls or plates. Top with the polenta slices, sprinkle with olives (if using) and drizzle each serving with 1⁄2 teaspoon oil. Serve immediately.

Nutritional facts,

per serving

293 calories • 8 grams fat • 32 grams protein • 4 grams fiber • 634 milligrams sodium

involves slowly pouring the cornmeal into boiling water and stirring continuously until it reaches a thick consistency. From that point, the polenta can either be served from the pot or left to firm and cook further on the grill or in the frying pan. It’s a good-news food for not just a full tummy but a flat one, too: Polenta is low in fat and high in iron, vitamin B-6 and zinc—a rare comfort food that isn’t uncomfortably guilt-inducing. I

RECIPE SOURCE: EATINGWELL.COM; STOCKFOOD

IS POLENTA ONE OF THOSE FOODS YOU’VE heard about but don’t really know? Have no fear; it’s not mysterious. Polenta is cooked cornmeal—a longstanding comfort food of northern Italian origin that may even predate the invention of bread. Its soft, grainy texture and subtle flavor make it a perfect accompaniment for meat, fish, veggies, stews, sauces and ragouts. And it can be prepared in a number of ways: soft and creamy (often likened to grits), grilled and sliced, baked, fried or gratinéed. No wonder the mellow European standard is gaining popularity in America’s home kitchens as well as on its restaurant menus. Soldiers of the Roman Preparing polenta from “scratch” Empire regularly using regular cornmeal is one option; the consumed polenta, food can also be bought premade in a tube then known as or in dry packaged form and in a variety of pulmentum. grinds to suit different tastes. Cooking

shrimp and escarole; cook, stirring, until the


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Middlesex GOURMET

by Maria Lissandrello

help. The red is fruity and full-bodied and goes down easily, so watch it. Use it to wash down a panful of steamed clams in green sauce. They’re terrific—plump, garlicky, briny and even better with a hunk of the grade-A Portuguese rolls. But you can skip that salad you’ll get shortly after you sit down. It’s standard-issue sog—iceberg (that’s none too crisp), onion and tomato overly dressed in a vegetable oil–based vinaigrette—and unless you have an enormous appetite, it’ll simply spoil you for what’s ahead. Like the picadinho di chourico, for instance—a big stew of spicy sliced chorizo, sliced onions and ripe black olives. If you’re watching your salt intake, you might want to go easy on the dish; order it for the table (everything practically demands to be shared or brought home to be enjoyed as leftovers for days) and have just a few slices as a piquant complement to your other plates. Certainly, the stuffed mushrooms could have used a bit of pep; oversize button mushrooms filled with a mostly bread-crumb mixture, they were greasy vehicles with little flavor. Of course, you’ll find the usual array of IF YOU’RE FAMILIAR WITH THE CUISINE IN paelhas (remember, it’s a Portuguese place, so it’s paelha, Newark’s famed Ironbound section, you’ll recognize not paella) and mariscadas. We chose the namesake much of the fare at Ria-Mar, a South River satellite paelha Rio-Mar, a pot brimming with shrimp, scallops, of that neighborhood’s Portuguese eateries. It takes a mussels, clams, Alaska king crabs and lobster tails atop few twists and turns through a dodgy residential area to yellow rice. Good? Sure! Great? Nah. It was a customary find Ria-Mar, an odd, hulking edifice housing a full concoction, and unfortunately, the lobster was dry. Far, far banquet facility, bar and restaurant. And if you park better was the bacalhau a Gomes Sa, shredded salt cod in the sorely-in-need-of-repaving parking lot out back, stewed with onions, garlic, olives, boiled potatoes and prepare to walk past a klatch of smokers outside the banhard-cooked eggs. Dressed with olive quet hall entrance. oil and a few squeezes of fresh lemon Once inside, however, the Ria-Mar juice, the dish was delectable indeed. ambience becomes more inviting. Restaurant & Bar Mild, sweet, citrusy, savory—it had Colorful murals depicting Portuguese 25 Whitehead Avenue, South River; it all. fishing villages warm the space, 732-257-1100; www.ria-mar.com And do make room for desthough tables in the main dining Hours sert. The toasted almond cream cake room are placed close together and Open daily, 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m. recalled the famous Good Humor there are no nooks or crannies affordWhat you should know bar in a wonderful way, and the ing a more intimate experience. • Entrées average $22 banana coconut cake was a rich, Luckily, the crowd is laid-back and • Full bar moist rendition with a frosting that jovial and the servers friendly, so you • Banquet facility was hard to resist. Needless to say, can relax along with the rest. • Reservations suggested we left full and contented. I A sip of sangria will surely • Major credit cards accepted

Iberian escape

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YOUR COMPLETE HOME FURNISHING SOURCE

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faces of MIDDLESEX

Parade brigade Boy Scouts Salvatore (left) and Dominic Tesoriero stand proud with dad John at the Highland Park Memorial Day Parade.

JON MUZZARELLI

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J ACO B S O N

Contr acting, Inc.

Building relationships for generations

since 1992

Fine Home Builders & Renovators Allow Jacobson to develop your dreams into reality, guiding you through the various phases of construction from inception to completion.

NEW JERSEY

NEW YORK

732.984.6700

718.967.8175

W W W. J A C O B S O N C O N T R A C T I N G . C O M

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TOWN & COUNTRY KITCHEN AND BATH

Rooms Designed for Living

Town & Country Kitchen and Bath offers some of the finest cabinetry in the industry. Our services include everything from kitchen and bath design to complete interior design. We are known for quality and exceptional service, turning homeowners dreams into reality. We carry a large selection of styles to ensure personal expression and taste at any budget. Visit our 3000 sq ft showroom to see all our product lines on display. 25 Bridge Avenue Suite 100 Red Bank, NJ 07701 â&#x201D;&#x201A; P: 732-345-1441 www.townandcountrykitchenandbath.com Lic. 13VH04755300

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Middlesex Health & Life July 2010 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Saint Peter's Healthcare System

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