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CAN’T BE BEET This squash and beet salad uses a warm vinaigrette to make a summer staple into winter comfort PAGE 5

FORCE OF NATURE Eastside Tavern’s karaoke nights don’t start until Hurricane Johnny blows everyone away PAGE 8

D I E H A R D BURNT RUBBER. HOT EXHAUST TIPS. FLAWLESS PAINT. FOR THE MEN OF COMO CAR CULTURE, A CAR ISN’T JUST TRANSPORTATION. IT’S AN EXTENSION OF SELF.

PA G E

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IN THIS ISSUE

ONLINE

December 1, 2016 VOLUME 18 ISSUE 39 | PUBLISHED BY THE COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN

FEATURE One car-clueless writer heads full-speed into CoMo Car Culture, a local group of auto enthusiasts whose passion for their vehicles borders fanaticism. PAGE 10 NEWS & INSIGHT Embrace the giving spirit with one of many volunteer opportunities in Columbia. Vox is here to help find the right philanthropy for you. PAGE 4 SCENE Like all of fashion, color trends change year to year. Stephens College designers predict what the next hugely popular hue might be. PAGE 6 Still craving mom’s mac ‘n’ cheese? There’s a scientific reason why your favorite foods from childhood are so comforting. PAGE 7 MUSIC Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, including nine-time Grammy winner Wynton Marsalis, and Catherine Russell grace the Missouri Theatre stage as they play Big Band Holidays. PAGE 9

SWEATER WEATHER It’s the ugly sweater party time of year, and you’re searching for a new look to spice up your holiday party outfit. Look no further than our guide to shopping for some topical tops. OY WITH THE REVIVAL ALREADY! Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life debuted on Netflix last week and brought new life to the series that ended in 2007. Fans of the show have had nearly a decade to imagine what might have happened to the beloved characters. Vox examines how the reality matched up to high expectations. ACTIVELY ANTI-VIOLENCE Jackson Katz has dedicated his career to violence prevention. He spoke on the MU campus about men’s role in anti-violence, and one Vox writer was there to soak in his message.

EDITOR’S LETTER

ARTS & BOOKS Copper boom, Gilmore Girls fans! Lauren Graham’s new book Talking as Fast as I Can explores her life from childhood to the Gilmore Girls revival. PAGE 19 Two local yarn-lovers offer tips for getting started in your journey to become a master knitter — or at least help you make a scarf. PAGE 20 Q&A H. Russ Brown has worn many hats in the theater, including actor, designer and playwright. His recent work Stud Ducks brings a dedicated 1970s father and his family to life. PAGE 21 COVER DESIGN: BEN KOTHE COVER PHOTO: EVAN COBB CCC member Somrith Lem sits in his 2010 Chevy Camaro.

CHRISTINE JACKSON EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

320 LEE HILLS HALL COLUMBIA MO 65211 573-884-6432 VOX@MISSOURI.EDU ADVERTISING: 573-882-5714

We’re social. Vox Magazine @VoxMag @VoxMagazine Vox Mag

When I was in high school in Wildwood, west of St. Louis, a group of teen gearheads gathered in the parking lot of the Chesterfield Valley Sonic Drive-In on Thursday nights. They would meet, admire one another’s cars and then race on a nearby service road. It was poorly organized and probably not entirely legal. That’s the sort of scenario I was envisioning when we sent writer Rick Morgan to explore CoMo Car Culture, a group of Columbia automotive enthusiasts found on Wednesday evenings in the parking lot of The Home Depot. Rick was expecting the intimidating crew from The Fast and the Furious. I was expecting punks in a parking lot. What Rick found instead was a group of people who enjoy pouring their hearts into their vehicles and talking some serious shop. The people in charge of the group, organized via Facebook, don’t condone the racing and burnouts that defined the weeknight Sonic stops of my teens. And they willingly accepted Rick, who honestly doesn’t know jack about cars, into their circle. There are still those who fit the stereotype of those engine-revving racers who used to blow by the local ice rink, but most of the CCC members get together for a more low-key (and legal) reason. They just love cars.

VOX STAFF Editor: Christine Jackson Deputy Editor: Dan Roe Managing Editor: Madison Fleck Creative Director: Ben Kothe Digital Managing Editor: Abby Holman Art Directors: Madalyne Bird, Elizabeth Sawey Photo Editor: Mary Hilleren Online Editor: Lea Konczal Multimedia Editor: Mitchel Summers News & Insight Editors: John Bat, Katelyn Lunders The Scene Editors: Kelsie Schrader, Jessica Sherwin, Brooke Vaughan Music Editors: Marlee Ellison, Meredith McGrath Arts & Books Editors: Katie Akin, Luria Freeman Contributing Writers: Bobby Ceresia, Corin Cesaric, Mitchell Forde, Max Havey, Kelsey Hurwitz, Lis Joyce, Rick Morgan, Rachel Phillips, Karlee Renkoski, Stephanie Sandoval, Alex Schiffer, Tyler Schneider, Guimel Sibingo, Mike Tish, Carolina Vargas, Catherine Wendlandt, Taylor Ysteboe Editorial Director: Heather Lamb Executive Editor: Jennifer Rowe Digital Director: Sara Shipley Hiles Writing Coach: John Fennell Office Manager: Kim Townlain

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PHOTOS BY OR COURTESY OF EVAN COBB, THE UGLY SWEATER SHOP/FLICKR


RADAR

Vox’s take on the talk of the week

Written by: Marlee Ellison, Katelyn Lunders, Meredith McGrath, Brooke Vaughan

WORLD AIDS DAY

“Magic” is in the air

THE NEW STOP, DROP AND ROLL Colleges are examining their safety protocols after Monday’s attack at The Ohio State University. A student rammed his car into a group of people and attacked them with a knife. Eleven victims were hospitalized. OSU Police tweeted “Run Hide Fight” after the stabbing. The instructions come from the Department of Homeland Security’s protocol for surviving an active shooter by running away, hiding and, as a last resort, fighting the attacker.

The lighting of the Magic Tree is tonight at 6 p.m. at The Village of Cherry Hill. To some, this is the most Instagram-able moment of the year, but for others it’s an over-glorified waste of electricity. If you do manage to get a good photo at night where the only lighting is provided by a tree, please let us know. Seriously. But if you choose to pass on this particular tradition, here are some other worthy events to get you in the holiday spirit: • Living Windows Festival from 6–8 p.m. Friday in downtown Columbia • “We Always Swing” Jazz Series presents Big Band Holiday at 7 p.m. Sunday at the Missouri Theatre • Elf The Musical Jr. at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Stephens College

GOOD BYE

GOTTA HATCHIMAL

The former Cuban leader Fidel Castro survived nearly 600 assassination attempts during his life, but he died on Friday at age 90. His funeral will be Dec. 4 in the eastern city of Santiago after his ashes tour throughout Cuba. In a year of high-profile deaths, this one had a little less of a sting.

The Hatchimal, a large plastic egg with a trainable bird inside, is one of the most popular toys for gifting this holiday season. The toys are already expensive at $60, but, because they are selling out, parents are signing their names onto wait lists at stores and spending $199–$499 on Amazon and eBay. These might just be the Kylie Jenner Lip Kits of the kid world.

D E C E M B E R :

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World AIDS Day, the first-ever global health day, started Dec. 1, 1988. Locally, to honor and continue the progress made over the years, The Center Project will screen the documentary How to Survive a Plague about AIDS activists at 7 p.m. at its location, 515 Hickman Ave. There will be free HIV testing at the event. Spectrum Health Care will also host free walk-in HIV testing from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at its office, 1124 Wilkes Blvd. Ste. 100. For more information go to facebook.com/ SpectrumHealthCareMissouri.

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“Surprisingly emotional... hysterically funny... and genuinely surprising” - Gothamist

by Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood

Adults Students Seniors

12 $ 10 $ 10 $

1800 Nelwood Drive; Columbia, MO | 573.474.3699 | www.cectheatre.org “5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche” is presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC. PHOTOS BY OR COURTESY OF JONATHAN QUILTER/AP, KYLE SPRADLEY, AMAZON, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

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NEWS & INSIGHT

Time to give back

’Tis the season to find the right service opportunity in CoMo

BY JENNIFER ALDRICH

The holiday season is upon us, and that means it’s time to shop for friends and family. Why not try a different kind of gift this season? Instead of material items, lend your time, effort or resources through different volunteering opportunities around Columbia. But the giving doesn’t have to stop after the holidays. Check out these options to find the right fit to start giving back this season and continue the giving year-round.

IF YOU WANT TO RAISE MONEY: The Salvation Army

IF YOU WANT TO SERVE FOOD: The Food Bank

The Salvation Army bell ringers outside supermarkets are holiday icons. Funds collected help the community through services such as the free lunch program. Director of development Cyndy Chapman says volunteers must be at least 18 years old or have a parent or guardian with them.

Janese Silve, communications coordinator for the Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri, says the food bank needs people to serve throughout the year to pack food. The biggest event of this season is the holiday food drive on Dec. 14 at the corner of Broadway and Providence Road. Volunteers will ask for donations and must be 16 years old.

Contact: Katie Harris-Smith at 442-3229 at ext. 227.

Contact: Janese Silve at 447-6611

IF YOU WANT TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY: The Ronald McDonald House

Volunteers can provide food for families staying at the Ronald McDonald House by cooking a homemade meal in the kitchen or by paying for a catered meal. Each meal needs to feed about 40 people. Contact: Heather Westenhaver at heather@rmhcmidmo.org or 443-7776 ext. 314

A better resolution IF YOU WANT TO WORK WITH PEOPLE: The St. Francis House

IF YOU WANT TO PURCHASE GIFTS: Toys for Tots

The St. Francis House is a Catholic organization that provides meals, shelter and community to homeless Columbian residents. Steve Jacobs, who has served at the House since its opening 34 years ago, says people can serve meals and visit with guests during meal times. Volunteers can also help sort through clothing and donations.

If you love giving gifts, buy new, unwrapped presents for Toys for Tots. Melissa Barnes, the Columbia coordinator, says the organization needs gifts for newborns and people up to 18 years old, as well as volunteers to help bag toys. Volunteers of all ages are welcome. However, those younger than 18 years old will need adult supervision. Last year, Toys for Tots in Columbia delivered 7,700 toys to children in the community.

Contact: St. Francis House at 875-4913

OR

Contact: Melissa Barnes at 826-1536

Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital Sylvia Jackson, chief of voluntary service, says the hospital is looking for volunteers to help set up for small parties during December and for businesses to donate services or goods. “We love when the community comes in to help, but we also love when they have a commodity that we can use,” Jackson says. Contact: Sylvia Jackson at Sylvia.Jackson@va.gov, or 814-6000 ext. 52538

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OR Rainbow House At Rainbow House, an emergency shelter for children, those who serve are paired with families, and then the volunteer purchases items on the family’s wish list. The agency also accepts donations such as toys and toiletries. Contact: Margaret Andrews at mandrews@rainbowhouse.com or 474-6600 ext. 2102

Many charities and organizations see a significant decline in volunteers after the holidays, even though these groups need help to serve the community throughout the year. Here are a few options to add volunteering into your agenda.

FOOD BANK FOR CENTRAL AND NORTHEAST MISSOURI Position: Volunteers to pack food orders Hours: Find available shifts at sharefoodbringhope.org/volunteer Contact: Janese Silve, 447-6611

HARRY S. TRUMAN MEMORIAL VETERANS HOSPITAL

Position: Transporting veterans to appointments and errands, visiting with veterans and a receptionist to provide information to VA visitors. Hours: Varies per volunteer position. Hours are 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Contact: Sylvia Jackson, 814-6000 ext. 52538 or sylvia.jackson@va.gov.

RAINBOW HOUSE

Position: Volunteer positions available to cook a dinner for guests, play with kids or sort through clothing donations. Hours: Once per month Contact: Ellen Bradley, 474-6600 ext. 2115

ILLUSTRATIONS BY BEN KOTHE, FLATICON


THE SCENE

EAT THIS

Winter Squash Salad

Walnut Street Tap + Kitchen serves up a belly-warming salad for the chilly months ahead

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WHERE

The Winter Squash Salad from Walnut Street Tap + Kitchen features a warm vinaigrette and pickled beets prepared in-house by chef Dustin Del Grosso.

Chef Dustin Del Grosso looks at flavors, would normally be a cold, crunchy salad into a pleasant dish people can seasonality and aesthetics when he enjoy when the weather gets cold. creates new dishes, and his new Winter Del Grosso didn’t want to Squash Salad at Walnut Street Tap + overpower the salad by seasoning Kitchen knocks out all three. the ingredients too strongly. “I keep The Winter Squash Salad has it real simple,” he says. “I like to let a base of baby spinach, which Del foods speak for themselves and not Grosso chose because it flourishes in make it too complicated, especially the wintertime. Roasted butternut with a salad because it’s going to get a squash cubes lightly seasoned with dressing that has all salt and pepper the flavor you need top the spinach WALNUT STREET TAP + KITCHEN in it.” Each time Del along with pickled WINTER SQUASH SALAD, $10 Grosso invents a dish, beets, toasted 1200 E. Walnut St. he creates a list of pumpkin seeds, goat Tues.—Thurs. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; seasonal ingredients, cheese and a warm Fri.—Sat. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; 397-6396 picks out the ones he pumpkin and bacon thinks will pair well vinaigrette. together, then tries it Del Grosso out and tweaks it. chose beets for their earthy flavor and Front House Manager Endi Rolufs vibrant color. He pickles the beets says, “Dustin is great; I love the himself in a vinegar, water, salt and influence he brought here. It’s unique sugar blend. The toasted pumpkin to Columbia, and it’s what brings seeds — sprinkled with red chile and people in.” salt, then roasted in the oven — add a Del Grosso recommends pairing healthy dash of fiber and magnesium a zinfandel or an IPA with the salad. to the dish. The crumbled goat cheese “A stronger red wine would be able to lends a new color and texture to each battle the flavor of the beets and the goat bite, as well as a complementary cheese,” he says. creaminess. The menu will continue to be The finishing touch is the dressing, a combination of pumpkin purée, apple updated with seasonal items throughout the year, Del Grosso says. The salad cider vinegar, mustard and a few basic came onto the menu Nov. 1, and he seasonings, that’s served on the side. expects it to stay until the weather Instead of oil, Del Grosso uses honey warms up in early or mid-spring. and bacon fat in the dressing to make it hearty and full-bodied. The dressing —JESSICA SHERWIN wilts the spinach, transforming what PHOTO BY CARSEN SIKYTA

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BXR.COM

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THE SCENE

Life in color As Pantone gets ready to reveal its 2017 Color of the Year, instructors from the Stephens College School of Design discuss color’s impact on fashion BY LINDSEY JENKINS Color carries meaning, and that meaning depends on the individual. Where one person views a vibrant red as an indicator of passion, another might see anger or violence. In fashion, color has even more value. It considers psychological, emotional and cultural factors. “(Fashion designers) basically depend on it,” says Stephanie Carlo, assistant professor at Stephens College School of Design. “It’s not just about textiles. It’s not just about textures — color determines everything.” One company, Pantone Inc., understands the significance of color in the design industry. Pantone created a universal color system and, since 1963, has used its code for identifying every hue imaginable as a starting point for worldwide design. Carlo and her fellow professors teach at the 14th best design school in the world, according to the online publication The Business of Fashion. At Stephens College School of Design and design schools around the world, the Pantone palette is a shared language for all designers, Carlo says. She can send it to designers anywhere in the world and still receive the exact color she asked for. In 2000, Pantone expanded its influence by developing the Color of the Year, a system that serves to highlight recent trends and project where fashion is headed in the coming months. For 2016, Pantone chose two colors,

an unprecedented move that illustrates the current discussion of gender fluidity, how individual ideas of masculinity and femininty are not so stagnant. The colors were Serenity and Rose Quartz, a light blue and a pink reminiscent of the pastel hues of baby blankets. Amy Parris, a fashion instructor at Stephens College, predicts a bold saffron (a golden yellow) as the Color of the Year for 2017. Fashionistas have already seen pops of the color on the runway, namely in spring 2017 collections from this year’s New York Fashion Week. Soon after the Color of the Year is announced, shoppers will likely see it at mass retailers such as Target. Many people have recently adopted the fast-fashion approach, Parris says, meaning retailers pick up on the trends and quickly get them on the racks for eager, fashion-forward consumers. At the Stephens College School of Design, students have exercised colornaming practices and adopted the theories of Sir Isaac Newton, which explain how color reflects off certain fabrics and takes in light. Although the professors and students in the School of Design readily experiment with trending colors, most recently Rose Quartz and Serenity, “we really feel like there’s an artistic expression that’s unique to each student,” Parris says. “So we like to give them freedom of playing with color.”

Learn how one local business makes natural Serenity and Rose Quartz dyes at VOXMAGAZINE.COM

That’s so last year

The recent history of the hues Pantone chose as Color of the Year

2010

TURQUOISE

Mermaids knew turqoise was happening long before Pantone did.

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2011

HONEYSUCKLE

Picture the dresses from the 2011 movie Bridesmaids.

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2012

TANGERINE TANGO

If a gala apple and a clementine had a love child

2013

2014

Just imagine — an entire year of St. Patrick’s Day.

Remember that purple hue Kesha dyed her hair?

EMERALD

RADIANT ORCHID

2015

MARSALA

Think red wine or the popular deep-reddish lipsticks of autumn.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MARY HILLEREN


THE SCENE

Childhood food cravings explained Chances are you don’t just want food; you want memories, too The weather is changing, the busy holiday season is coming, it’s always dark outside and, for some reason, you keep craving tomato soup and grilled cheese with the crust cut off, just like your parents made when you were a child. It’s not unusual to crave comfort foods during stressful times and ache for the simplicity associated with childhood. In winter especially, the lack of sunlight results in lower levels of serotonin, a chemical that maintains mood, and this can drive us to eat foods such as sweets, simple carbohydrates and other not-sohealthy options that improve the chemical imbalance in the body. Even if those foods are bland or kind of gross, we still want them. Dietitians, and professors in the departments of psychology and nutrition explain why. It’s all in your mind A large part of the reason we still enjoy that bright-orange mac ‘n’ cheese or those frozen, bread-filled Bagel Bites ILLUSTRATIONS BY MADALYNE BIRD, FLATICON

is because of psychological associations we’ve formed. Matthew Will, a professor in the psychology department at MU, said in an email that food can become associated with childhood experiences. So, for example, if your parents made you an icecream sundae every time you were sad as a child, you might habitually grab a pint of Ben & Jerry’s when you need a grown-up pick-me-up. Another reason people have positive associations with food is because they control it, says Jennifer Bean, an assistant teaching professor in MU’s department of nutrition and exercise physiology. Jennifer Tveitnes, a clinical dietitian, agrees that associations play a large role. These foods were made by your parents and eaten in your home where warmth and love abounded, so they carry those comforting feelings now, Tveitnes says. In the name of science How certain childhood foods affect the

Snacks that send you down memory lane:

BY CORIN CESARIC brain chemically also impacts our desire to keep eating them. Sugary foods, such as homemade chocolate chip cookies, are rewarding, Will wrote in an email. “One thing they do is release opioids, and this will elevate mood.” Tveitnes says starches are another commonly craved food in low times. Foods high in starch such as breads, potatoes and pasta end up as sugar in your bloodstream and further lift spirits. Relieve stress healthily Tveitnes says there are several other ways to control emotions and stress beyond eating comfort foods. She suggests activities such as exercise, talking to a friend, journaling or taking a relaxing bath. It’s okay to indulge in sweets every now and then, but coping with stress healthily is important. First, when you’re driven to carbs, choose complex ones, such as whole grains and vegetables, rather than refined ones. Your stomach and adult metabolism will thank you. 12.01.16

MAC ‘N’ CHEESE Its color is unnatural, and it comes from a box, but the starches and the cheesy flavor combined with childhood memories keep us coming back for more. DINO BUDDIES Parents always said to not play with your food, but Dino Buddies chicken nuggets were the exception. Protein helps the brain produce serotonin, but, honestly, the dino-macaroni combo will never be beat. COSMIC BROWNIES School lunches wouldn’t have been the same without these chewy, sprinkled brownies that give your brain lots of sugar ­— and release those good-mood opioids. |

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MUSIC

Rockin’ like a hurricane

Downtown karaoke is synonymous with Johnny — Hurricane Johnny, that is BY BRANDON BYER Thursdays at Eastside Tavern mean one thing: karaoke. In this hole-in-the-wall venue, locals trickle past the stage at the front as the doorman asks for IDs and wraps wristbands around arms. Patrons might purchase a PBR, Stag or double well — the evening’s drink specials — or mingle and sit along walls crowded with memorabilia, costume masks, signs and sculptures. Skip Harvey, Eastside’s karaoke jockey, sits at his post and watches regulars try to sing Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline,” Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” and OutKast’s “Hey Ya!” However, something is missing. The big draw for karaoke night hasn’t walked through the door yet. Coming straight from a six-hour prep cook shift at Pizza Hut, a man in a blue rain jacket, oversized red button-down shirt, blue jeans and a pair of white Nikes makes his entrance. He takes a seat on a lounge chair adjacent to the stage. Harvey grabs the mic. “Ladies and gentlemen, the man that’s going to rock you like a hurricane for the next five minutes,” Harvey says, introducing the next performer in an enthusiastic tone. “Please welcome and pay homage to the one, the only, the force of nature, Hurricane Johnny H!” The patrons hoot and holler over their applause. A massive projector screen and five small TVs simultaneously read “JOHNNY F*CKING H” as John Mayer’s “Waiting on the World to Change” pops up in the queue of songs. Guo-Xun Huang, 39, better known as Hurricane Johnny, loves his karaoke. He’s been performing in Columbia since 2007. For the past six years, he has been loyal to Eastside Tavern every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening. Johnny was born in Tainan, Taiwan, in July 1977. The culture places immense value on his academic success, but Johnny loved music and singing more than school. To assimilate into American culture, Johnny picked his name from a dramatic British film Friday the Thirteenth, in which actor Richard Hulton plays a supporting character named Johnny. “I liked it enough to go with it,” Johnny says. In 1993, Johnny immigrated with his father to the U.S. and settled in Jefferson City. He attended high school for three years before starting at MU in August 1996. Graduating in 2002 with an interdisciplinary studies degree, Johnny 8

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Guo-Xun Huang, better known as Hurricane Johnny, has also performed at Eastside’s comedy nights. Emcee Skip Harvey says he’s one of the more honest, say-it-how-it is stand-up performers, which makes his acts hilarious.

took on a bevy of different temporary jobs until he became a member of the preparation crew at Pizza Hut in December 2003, where he still works. An introverted homebody who doesn’t drink, Johnny never dreamed he’d walk into a bar. That changed when he got wind of a karaoke night happening at Arch and Column Pub back in 2007. It would be the first of many. Before the citywide smoking ban took effect Jan. 9, 2008, he would sing his karaoke and leave. “I didn’t fancy smelling like a used ashtray,” Johnny says. There was no lingering in the bar until the law changed. Nonetheless, Johnny became a karaoke sensation. People were drawn to him as soon as the lyrics reverberated off the walls. Everyone loved his shtick. “In an activity that I think most people do for irony, he’s the most sincere human being I think that has ever performed karaoke in the history of the world,” Harvey says.

THE ZEITGEIST OF JOHNNY H IS BUILT ON THE PILLARS OF ENTHUSIASM AND SINCERITY. – SKIP HARVEY, KARAOKE JOCKEY Johnny began singing seven nights per week at various Columbia bars, clubs and taverns. Harvey knew Johnny would be a major success at Eastside Tavern when he worked at Arch and Column trying to jumpstart his career as a DJ. When Harvey moved to Eastside Tavern full time as both head bartender and karaoke emcee in 2007, Johnny followed. Because of Johnny’s impact on the crowds, Harvey would introduce him in conjunction with forces of nature just to be funny; monikers included thunderstorm and even gale force wind. But the nickname hurricane stuck. Johnny refuses to take the stage until his introduction happens. He expects it nowadays. Dustin Miller, also known as “D-Mike” ventures to Eastside Tavern

at least once per week. He knew about Johnny from the get-go. The two sang “Bohemian Rhapsody” together; it’s D-Mike’s favorite performance of Johnny’s that he’s been a part of. Johnny’s favorite song, if he had to choose just one, is Whitney Houston’s version of “I Will Always Love You.” “The zeitgeist of Johnny H is built on the pillars of enthusiasm and sincerity,” Harvey says. “I don’t think karaoke would be as special without him, anywhere in town.” EASTSIDE TAVERN 1016 E. Broadway Mon.–Sat., 8 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., karaoke Thurs.–Sat., 256-1500, facebook.com/eastsidetavern

PHOTO BY ALLISON COLLINS


MUSIC

See this: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and Catherine Russell

An all-star cast of jazz musicians bring their talents to the Missouri Theatre at 8 years old and attended Tanglewood Music Center at just 17 — making him the youngest student to ever be admitted to the prestigious school. He has produced more than 80 records, selling more than 7 million copies worldwide and is the only musician in history to have won a Grammy five years in a row. He also happens to be the first and only artist to have won the award for both jazz and classical recordings in the same year, which he did in both 1983 and 1984. Greg Croll has been a season ticket holder with “We Always Swing” Jazz Series for about 15 years. A veteran jazz fan and a member of the “We Always Swing” jazz board, he’s seen the orchestra several times and is quick to point out why Marsalis and his group are so Born in New Orleans, Wynton Marsalis showed a talent for popular among jazz fans. music at an early age. “He’s got a pretty charismatic personality, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, a collection of 15 world-class jazz musicians directed by nine-time Grammy-winning trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, comes to the Missouri Theatre on Sunday. Marsalis has made a name for himself by performing music spanning the jazz spectrum, including New Orleans, bebop and modern styles. He began performing

BY TYLER SCHNEIDER

and he’s a spectacular musician,” Croll says, adding that he particularly enjoys the group because they “pay homage to the tradition of jazz.” Joining the stage as a special guest is jazz singer Catherine Russell, who has performed with legendary acts such as Cyndi Lauper, Steely Dan and David Bowie. She was raised in a musical family. Her father, Luis Russell, was Louis Armstrong’s musical director and collaborator, and her mother, Carline Ray, earned degrees from Juilliard and the Manhattan School of Music. In 2012, she won a Grammy Award for her vocals on the soundtrack for the HBO series Boardwalk Empire. She has performed songs from all eras of jazz and blues and has a powerful, soulful voice that has captivated audiences worldwide. “She’s just a classic jazz singer,” Croll says. He notes that Russell creates an intense emotional experience: “She draws you into her performance.” The program, called Big Band Holidays, will mark the orchestra’s first show in Columbia since 2011.

Catherine Russell

“They’ll be playing selections from their repertoire, primarily tunes that reflect the holidays,” says Josh Chittum, media and public relations spokesperson for “We Always Swing.” “It’ll be a wonderful opportunity for individuals to get in the holiday spirit and experience what is one of the best big bands playing jazz today.” JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA Sunday, Dec. 4, doors at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m., $25–65, 449-3009, ext. 1, wealwaysswing.org

No Fee November is here. Apply for free the entire month! Use code: NoFeeNov16

Get started at Apply.CCIS.edu or call (573) 875-7610 PHOTOS BY OR COURTESY OF FRANK STEWART & SANDRINE LEE

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MUST CARS

L OV E story RICK MORGAN

photos EVAN COBB STEPHANIE MUELLER

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ONE AUTOMOTIVELY CHALLENGED WRITER SPENT TWO MONTHS WITH THE GEARHEADS OF COMO CAR CULTURE TO UNDERSTAND AN UNYIELDING, FOURWHEELED INFATUATION.

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EXHUASTION COMPOUNDED MY ANXIETY AS I DROVE TO GANS CREEK RECREATION AREA ON A SUNDAY MORNING IN SEPTEMBER. I DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THE CAR FANATICS I WAS GOING TO MEET, BUT I HAD A FEELING THEY WOULD USE FOUR-WHEEL JARGON SUCH AS “TURBO” AND “CARBURETOR” AND “V12.” I PROBABLY SHOULD HAVE MARATHONED TOP GEAR INSTEAD OF GOING OUT SATURDAY NIGHT.

Cars with untold amounts of money, sweat, ego and personalized parts poured into them occupied almost every space in the back parking lot. Automobile enthusiasts from all over Boone County popped hoods and pointed at engines like something out of a Pennzoil commercial. I drive a 2010 Hyundai Elantra with a massive dent on the back bumper, and I’m not sure how to even change my own oil. I decided to park in a separate lot. CoMo Car Culture is a group of car enthusiasts based in Columbia, and they were granted permission to use Gans Creek Recreation Area for their annual September showcase. As I drove to the park, I kept thinking about The Fast and The Furious and how some Dominic Torettotype would make me do a highly dangerous or illegal rite of passage if I was going to write a story about their renegade gang. I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but I envisioned a lot of gauge earrings, Monster Energy and vape cigarettes. I wasn’t wrong, but I certainly wasn’t totally right, either. The weather was warm and sunny, which resulted in a sizable turnout for the group (which currently totals more than 1,171 Facebook members), and the overwhelming majority of the 250 parking spaces at Gans Creek were occupied by member-owned cars. The makes weren’t anything jaw dropping: Nissan, BMW, Mitsubishi, Dodge, Volkswagen, Jeep. There were even Hyundais, which made me regret parking so far away. People weren’t ogling the types of cars; they were pointing out engine parts and modifications to the outside of the car, which I found out is called the body. The atmosphere was informal; members parked their cars, popped their hoods and walked around the lot to

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talk to other members. Conversations happened in clusters around someone’s engine, people pointed out work that had been done and discussed new parts or regaled those within an earshot of past motor vehicle escapades. Here’s just one of the overheard conversations they were having, which I hardly understood: “Efficiency is the key. Efficiency and displacement.” “That’s why they have direct-injected motors nowadays. There are 2-liters banging 420, their wheels from the factory. That’s how you do it, man.” “The new f***ing Mustang with the 4-cylinder is faster than the V8 with the tailing car. It’s like Bye! Bye! Bye!” I would stand around these circles and awkwardly nod. My vocabulary generally consisted of noncommittal terms such as “mmmm…” and “ahh” and “word.” I felt like the chess team captain who accidentally sat down at the jock lunch table. Big Daddy’s BBQ was on hand serving up orders out of its food truck. The group showcased a disc jockey as well, DJ Vanquish, who played synchronized mashups of Rihanna, Journey, The Outfield and G-Eazy, among many others. The tan, dark-haired DJ didn’t say much into his microphone. He just mixed tracks and let the music play. DJ Vanquish is apparently a member of CCC himself, but his car recently caught fire. He was too busy mixing tracks, and it was too loud near his booth, so I never got the full story. Toddlers waddled all over the parking lot with their parents. I got the feeling this wasn’t the first time most of them were surrounded by cars. One little girl in a pink stroller barely flinched when an engine revved about 3 feet away from her tiny head.

A large, furry German Shepherd named Trouble split time between patrolling the lot, meeting new friends and panting in the shade. Some members sold water bottles and black-and-white shirts with “CoMo Car Culture” written over the Missouri state outline. Brandon Qualls and Somrith Lem, founding members and two Facebook group admins, watched over the event like proud parents.

“AS LONG AS YOU LIKE CARS…”

Qualls and Lem started the group almost three years ago, toward the end of 2013. The original group was called ShowMe Fresh and was primarily a Facebook group for people to talk about their interest in various cars. Lem was eager for the group to grow, so he added any random person who wanted to be in the group, a practice Qualls quickly nixed. They created a new Facebook group called CoMo Car Culture and started being more selective about who is allowed to join. The two say there is no strict membership criteria. “As long as you like cars and have a passion for it, you’re more than welcome to join CoMo Car Culture,” Lem says. He and Qualls say they generally do some light vetting of new members who want to join, checking their Facebook pages to make sure they actually like cars and aren’t robots. Members do not pay dues and are not subject to any sort of initiation. I said I was writing this article and was let in the group immediately, and I have not been forced to fight/race/kiss anyone. These guys really like cars. At one of their Wednesday night meetings, I heard a big guy with a dark beard and a purple sweatshirt tell a story about a “meth-head” who hit Purple Sweatshirt’s car with his vehicle. Purple PREVIOUS SPREAD: PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK


Sweatshirt, in his mid-20s, got out of his car and started Depot on Clark Lane and got permission to use the berating the alleged meth-head, almost getting into a lumber side of the parking lot. For weekly meet-ups fight until the meth-head’s girlfriend convinced him to Bryant also set up “cruises” for the group, which can best return to their car. Purple Sweatshirt, in his fit of rage, be described as the automobile equivalent of a fun run. “We would stay away from the traffic, have some fun called his insurance agent, who also happens to be his mother. When the couple took off, Purple Sweatshirt on some windy roads,” Bryant told me during a Wednesday instantly hung up on his mother/ evening CCC meet at The Home ABOVE: CoMo Car Culture insurance agent and called 911. Depot. member James Dwyer found Purple Sweatshirt recalled the this FD Mazda RX-7 sitting in a 911 call: “You better listen very care“GET TOGETHER AND GET barn. Dwyer spent about a year fully while I give you this license rebuilding and renovating it. plate,” he said. No squad came. OUR CAR FIX IN” OPPOSITE PAGE: The club’s As of Nov. 30, CoMo Car Culture The group gains new members co-founder Somrith Lem’s Chevy has 1,165 members and is still on a regular basis. Although the six Camaro was at Gans Creek growing. There are five admins (Lem CCC admins can make sure every Recreation Area for the CoMo and Qualls are two of them) charged new member is a car enthusiast, Car Culture annual showcase in with adding new people and keeping making sure the member isn’t a prick September, which filled more the Facebook page under control. is a different story. than 200 parking spaces. New members generally hear about “We have the occasional people the group through word of mouth. who will do something stupid,” Lem “We’ve got connections in every dealership here in town,” says. “Something stupid” consists of, but is not limited group admin Ryan Elbert says. “Car audio places, tinting, to, starting a fight, burning out of a parking lot, abusing detailing. You name it, there’s somebody in the group the allotted meet-up space and street racing. The admins who does it.” say they feel it is their job to police the group and make When the group was first getting started, they met sure these things don’t happen. at the Andy’s Frozen Custard parking lot every week. Irresponsible behavior will get you kicked out of Andy’s was initially cool with the dessert and automobile CCC, but there is only so much the admins can do. enthusiasts meeting in its lot back when only 20 or so “We just kick them out of the (Facebook) page,” Lem people would show up. says. “But for a meet like this, they’ve been here before, The group eventually outgrew the small parking lot, they’re going to show up.” as now about 50 to 75 people show up when the weather Lem said this to me on Oct. 5 when I attended my is nice (attendance drops off when it gets cold). Group first Wednesday night meet at The Home Depot. The admin Adrik Bryant talked to a manager at The Home meets don’t include any formalities; people just show up

and talk about their cars. Although the group does not organize any official racing and forbids that behavior at all CCC events, the admins can’t control what members do on their own time. Think of it like the school principal who knows that two kids are going to fight around the block after school and can’t do anything about it. That night, there were about 20 to 30 car enthusiasts near the lumberyard parking lot, most people forming small clusters together as they talked about cars and what they had worked on the past week. No small children or pets attended, but two 17-year-old high school students, a guy with a moped doing timed trials around the parking lot and a bizarre three-wheeled motorcycle showed up. The group located itself as far away from the front entrance as possible, lest they get in the way of someone buying late-night mulch. These weekly events are the heartbeat of the group. Lots of jackets at these meets have car-related logos stitched across the chest such as O’Reilly Auto Parts, Nissan or Jiffy Lube. If you want to avoid judgment, your best bet is to arrive early and leave late, or else park far away. All eyes are on the cars. A massive white pickup that peeled out of the parking lot elicited comments such as “Better go to the fuel station” and “There goes Daddy’s money” and “That’s hot.” “People talk in the (Facebook) group about what they’ve done to their cars, and people know on Wednesday night they’ll get to see that car,” Qualls says. “It’s just a day during the week for us to get together and get our car fix in.” People might occasionally race on their own, but Qualls says police and news media often assume people were racing when they weren’t. Take, for example, the roll-over crash on St. Charles Road that made news in early October. A Honda Civic and a Chevy Corvette were involved in roll-over accident (both drivers walked away fine). The Missourian headline reads, “Car race ends in crash near Battle High School,” and the opening sentence says the two cars got in an accident as a result of racing. But Qualls says it’s not true. Qualls is friends with the driver of the Corvette, who is also a member of CoMo Car Culture. The Corvette driver told Qualls the Civic was slowly driving in front of him in an attempt to be irritating. The Corvette driver tried passing the Civic, hit a puddle and lost control of his car. If this sort of thing happened with two Toyota Priuses, the police report and newspapers would’ve probably called it an accident resulting from foolish driving. But it was a Corvette and a modified Civic (Qualls says the Civic had a little custom work and a unique paint job that made it stick out). This view is contrary to the eyewitness account of Boone County Sheriff’s Deputy Patrick Richardson, who saw both cars racing and clocking in at 60 mph. Richardson tried to catch up to the cars before the Corvette wiped out, he told the Missourian. “When the cops see something like that, they think The Fast and the Furious car culture,” Qualls says. “So obviously they thought racing with those two cars being in the same vicinity.” The accounts differ, but that aside, the group frowns upon such incidents. Afterward, the Corvette driver was berated online as people in the group posted the news article and speculated about his driving. Reputations of CCC members can change just about overnight. When searching for new group leaders, Qualls and Lem make sure the member is active in the car scene, well-spoken and level-headed (having a dope car helps, 12.01.16

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D Y L A N Q U I S E N B E R RY AG E 18 , S T U D E N T AT M U MITSUBISHI LANCER GTS

5 speed manual transmission 2.4-liter 4-cylinder engine Hood 3M vinyl wrapped aesthetics Injen intake: brings colder/denser air into the engine to make it run more efficiently TIEN lowering springs: lowers the car’s center of gravity, improving its handling abilities Ralliart racing pedals: allows driver to reach each pedal easier

NRG racing steering wheel: requires less rotation to turn the vehicle IN Focus weighted shift nob: allows for quicker shifts IN Focus shift foot Black painted wheels RokBlokz mud flaps Evo X spoiler: creates more downforce, holding down the rear end and giving the tires more grip Custom center exit exhaust

too). The admins monitor the Facebook page to make sure nothing gets posted that might offend anyone. For example, one member posted a picture of a girl’s Facebook profile so the group could make fun of her, which the admins quickly took down. “We don’t want people who aren’t active members to look on the page and be like ‘These guys are slandering

A M E R I C A’ S AUTOMOTIVE I N F AT U AT I O N How the U.S. became enamored with cars

14

a girl’s name,’” Qualls says. “That’s not the image that we want to portray.”

“YOU SHOULD START COMING TO OUR WEDNESDAY MEETS”

Cameron Jones pops the hood of his Subaru BRZ STI Series Blue. A crowd of fellow CCC members gathers around the engine, talks about modifications on the car and warms its hands on this chilly November night at The Home Depot. Jones wears a black Ansai jacket and gray OP shoes as he tells me about his job selling motorcycle parts at Jones Honda (yes, family business). He has been around cars and bikes his entire life. Jones patiently walks me through the work on his car the way a lifelong NFL fan would explain American football to someone from Spain. Jones does all of his own work on the Subaru. The BRZ doesn’t come with the higher performance STI, or Subaru Tecnica International, parts, so Jones made it himself. His end goal is to equip the car with 350-wheel horsepower and have it around 2,600 pounds. Its weight currently sits at 2,750 pounds. He says he wants to shed the weight to make the car faster and more aerodynamic. Jones is now 25 years old, but he started working at the shop when he was 14. He joined CCC a month after the group’s creation. Jones closes the hood of his car, and the group scatters to its respective cliques in the dark parking lot. Across from Jones, Tyler Woods sports a flat-brim baseball hat with a floral pattern as he walks me through

C A M E RO N J O N E S AG E 2 5 , WO R K S AT J O N E S H O N DA SUBARU BRZ STi SERIES BLUE

GrimmSpeed cold air intake: lowers intake temperature and improves performance Vishnu performance unequal UEL header: increased performance and unequal length header gives it the boxer engine rumble GReddy EVOlution Tail Lights: Jones hated the stock taillights on the BRZ

the modifications to his 2015 Ford Focus Titanium. The 18-year-old Central Methodist University freshman wears white Nikes, black frame glasses and diamond stud earrings. The Ford isn’t so simple. Woods sounds embarrassed when he tells me his car isn’t that cool and probably shouldn’t be in a magazine article. He gets giddy when I tell him we want to take photos of his car anyway. His roof rack has his BMX bike and a cooler strapped on because he is heading home to Lake Ozark for the Thanksgiving break. Dylan Quisenberry, 18, tells me about how he ended up at The Home Depot. This is the first meet for the St. Louis native. A “dude in a truck” tried racing him at a traffic light.

1893

1895

1908

J. Frank and Charles E. Duryea create first American gasoline automobile

Frank and Duryea’s Stevens-Duryea model wins Chicago Herald-Times Race

Henry Ford debuts the Model T

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TUNER TERMINOLOGY Get to know some gearhead vocabulary

BALD TIRES

When the tread on tires has been worn away after many miles BURNOUT

Spinning the wheels against pavement without the car actually moving, making a mark on the ground and creating lots of smoke Quisenberry dusted the poor truck, which was driven by a CCC member. After winning the impromptu race, the driver of the truck buried the hatchet. “You should start coming to our Wednesday meets,” he told Quisenberry. Quisenberry is wearing red Nikes, multicolored socks and shorts despite the 30-degree temperatures. The Missouri freshman runs the 1-mile and 800-meter races for the track team. Just as he trains his lean frame to run faster, he wrenches his Mitsubishi Lancer GTS into racecar form.

“DON’T RACE THEM”

Young men, testosterone and fast cars: They’re inevitably going to mix (although the group doesn’t condone lead footedness).To keep kosher relations with police and public perception, “racing” is a matter of semantics. A member named Derek (he wouldn’t give me his last name) referred to it as “spirited driving.” He claimed that members will only do things like speed heavily or burnout if the situation calls for it — basically, if there is nobody around. A general sweep of internet message boards confirmed Derek’s definition. The Reddit crowd (as well as many other forums) all seemed to agree that driving is spirited when you are pushing your car to its limit, possibly speeding and crossing over double yellows, maybe turning a little aggressively. There cannot be other people around. The driver needs to be alert, the car needs to have been checked for safety, and road conditions need

1913 U.S. produces 485,000 cars

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

1956 President Dwight Eisenhower creates 41,000 new miles of highway systems

TYLER WOODS

CRUISE

A group of homies go driving at any given moment, usually lasting a couple hours. Regularly ends at Gumby’s for pizza and drinks

AG E 18 , S T U D E N T AT C E N T R A L M E T H O D I S T U N I V E R S I T Y F O R D F O C U S T I TA N I U M

COBB air filter: allows better air flow into the engine ESR wheels Godspeed Project coilover: lowers the car to improve handling Full Cat-Back FS works: for sound and performance

Wood panel trunk Roof rack: for simple practicality

CURBED WHEELS

When scraping against a curb damages the wheels

Tinted everything: to make it look mean

DETAILING

RokBlokz mud flaps: keeps the rocks from chipping the paint

Restoring/cleaning the inside and outside of a car RECKLESS DRIVING

Spirited driving with other cars or pedestrians around, heavily frowned upon in car community

to be favorable (no ice, rain, etc). Driving this way around other motorists or, God forbid, pedestrians is a cardinal sin. This is where the internet clique draws the line between “spirited” and “reckless.” However, Columbia Police Department Public Information Officer Latisha Stroer says any aggressive driving represents a hazard to others on the road and strongly condemns it. Members will occasionally talk about racing at Wednesday evening meets, but that’s about it. I got some unsolicited advice from a member named Jordan one night. “If someone says they have a slow car, they’re lying,” Jordan says. “Don’t race them.” To some CCC members, police sometimes can be unnecessary pests. I was told that, even though nobody races at the Wednesday meetings, cops are on the lookout for anything illegal.

1966 Federal standards of automotive safety are instituted

SPIRITED DRIVING

Vigorous driving that includes throttling up and speeding; it is critical that nobody else is around STOCK AND STOCK PARTS

How the car arrives from the dealership; the original parts that come with the car WHP

Horsepower of the vehicle measured only at the wheels

1978

2009

U.S.-made cars peak at 12.87 million annual units

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Federal Reserve Board bails out GM and Chrysler for $80 billion

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CoMo Car Culture admin and co-founder Brandon Qualls sits on the hood of his red 2008 Honda Civic Si. Qualls created the group with Somrith Lem in 2013.

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There are no official racetracks in Columbia. The closest ones are in Rogersville, Missouri; Topeka, Kansas; and Madison, Illinois. Columbia native and NASCAR pro Carl Edwards tried to open one here, but it fell through. Qualls says an official track in Columbia would be a great way to stop people from taking to the streets. Even at the family-friendly annual meeting with dogs and toddlers present, police made a brief appearance. “They’re already here,” a member behind me said half-jokingly. The cops left immediately after a quick drive around, only to reappear a few hours later. They left again after realizing that nothing illegal was happening. The whole thing felt like a family auto show, not a sketchy racing event. After voicing my interest in seeing some illicit racing at my last Wednesday night meeting, a younger member explained that I was looking in the wrong place. Serious racing, he explains, happens in bigger cities such as St. Louis and Kansas City. CCC, he says, was just for people who do hands-on work under the hood to get together and talk shop.

“I HOPE YOU HAVE THICK SKIN AND LIKE SHENANIGANS”

BY THE NUMBERS: CAR OWNERSHIP How Americans are becoming less tethered to their four wheels

IN 1983, 69% OF 17-YEAR-OLDS HAD A DRIVER’S LICENSE, BY 2008, THAT DECREASED TO 50%

N AMES OF FAC EB OOK U SERS CH A N G ED TO IN ITIA LS FOR PRIVAC Y

NM (NEW MEMBER): THANKS FOR ACCEPTING ME! HERE’S MY 2006 [MUSTANG] GT MILD BOLT ONS.

PM: WHAT’S YOUR CROWD COUNT? NM: WORKING ON A 47 DEATH TOLL BR: WELCOME. I HOPE YOU HAVE THICK SKIN AND LIKE SHENANIGANS!

Every time a mechanic suggests I get something done to my car, I usually end up calling my dad or a handy friend to make sure I’m not getting taken for a ride. In other words, I don’t fit CCC’s one criteria for membership: liking cars. Luckily for me, they let me through the gates of the Facebook group, which is an inside look into the automotive banter that reads more like hieroglyphics than English to me. One common inside joke, for instance, is that Ford Mustang drivers, due to a relationship between the car’s brutish torque curve and unrefined traction management tendencies, often lose control of their vehicles during spirited driving and crash into onlookers. The digital terrain can quickly become harsh and personal. New members aren’t always welcomed warmly on the Facebook page. One new member posted a picture of a white BMW. Another member commented “Great...

30% DROP IN NEW CAR PURCHASES FROM 2007 TO 2011 AMONG PEOPLE AGES 18-34

B E H I N D - T H E - W H E E L L OO K AT A T Y P I C A L C O MO C A R C U LT U R E FAC E B O O K T H R E A D

JM: CAN THIS THING EVEN SPIN A TIRE?! NM: BETTER THAN YOUR 3 TON CHEV JM: WE MIGHT HAVE TO SEE ABOUT THAT! LOL

another bmw guy,” while another member commented “Dude rolling in a 335? Why not just go ahead and have your dick cut off.” In August, Qualls had about $3,000 worth of car tools stolen from his garage. I think that’s more money than my car would get right now on the open market. Take into consideration how important these tools are

33% OF DRIVERS WERE UNDER THE AGE OF 30 IN 1983, AND 22% OF DRIVERS WERE UNDER THE AGE OF 30 IN 2011 IN THE FIRST YEAR ELIGIBILITY, 44% OF PEOPLE WILL GET THEIR LICENSE

54% OF PEOPLE GET THEIR LICENSE BY THE AGE OF 18 FROM 2004 TO 2011, THE NUMBER OF ANNUAL MILES DRIVEN BY AN AVERAGE AMERICAN DROPPED 6%

to a car enthusiast, and the loss becomes even more devastating. However, CoMo Car Culture came through for Qualls. Despite the bad rap around car fanatics and the mental picture of drag racing, burnouts, Tokyo drifting, Monster Energy and Vin Diesel, CCC really does foster a sense of community. The group organized a fundraiser in September at Cosmopolitan Park to help Qualls get back some of the money for his tools. In total, they raised $800. “We’re a tight-knit group of people,” Elbert says. “Everybody knows each other, and we’re all willing to help each other out.” Members of the group put together a toy drive for Rainbow House Emergency Shelter in Columbia last December. The group hosted a Thanksgiving food drive at Albert Oakland Park on Nov. 6 and collected 551 pounds of food for the Central Missouri Food Bank. Qualls delivered the food himself. CoMo Car Culture shouldn’t be mistaken for a charity, but the admins have a mission beyond the testosterone-ridden cliché that comes to mind within car culture. A general belief in the group is that the amount of money you put into your car isn’t the point. Members are more impressed by passion and hard work than disposable income. “A $500 car can still be a good car if it gets you from Point A to Point B,” says Shelby Guy, a CCC member for the past two years. The group will continue to meet, word of mouth will continue to spread and new members will continue to join. Lem, Qualls and the other admins will groom new moderators to police the group, both online and in person. They will try to keep it fun, safe and centered around the simple passion for cars. And they will continue to deal with punks. Before I left the showcase that Sunday, a member stepped on the gas hard enough to burn out. His wheels spun in place before he accelerated out of the parking lot, leaving behind a trail of skid marks on the pavement. Remaining members groaned and shook their heads. “That’s how you get kicked out.”

16- TO 34-YEAROLDS DROVE 23% FEWER MILES ON AVERAGE FROM 2001 TO 2009. THOSE OVER 65 WILL MAKE UP 20% OF AMERICAN DRIVERS BY 2025

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BABY BOOMERS (AGES 55-65) ARE 15 TIMES MORE LIKELY TO PURCHASE A NEW CAR THAN MILLENNIALS (AGES 18-24)

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VIES EVENTS MUSIC DINING NEW ENTSMUSIC DINING NEWS MOVI USIC DINING NEWS MOVIES EVEN NING NEWS MOVIES EVENTS MUS WS MOVIES EVENTS MUSIC DININ

Free Every Thursday


ARTS & BOOKS

Read this: Talking as Fast as I Can details all the Gilmore gab Lauren Graham’s first memoir follows her Hollywood journey

You gorged on turkey and stuffing, exchanged pleasantries with family and then retreated to your couch to binge the Netflix special Gilmore Girls: A Year In The Life. Now that you know those final four words, you fear it’s the end of your Stars Hollow journey. Don’t worry; Lauren Graham’s new memoir Talking as Fast as I Can: From Gilmore Girls to Gilmore Girls (and Everything in Between) just hit the shelves. The book is a collection of personal essays from the star that explore her life from childhood to Gilmore Girls round two. It also includes photos and entries from the diary she kept during the filming of the recent revival. Talking as Fast as I Can will also offer a little something for everyone, even if they aren’t fans of Gilmore Girls or Parenthood. Graham offers commentary on relationships, diet and exercise, and ageism in Hollywood. Graham is not a novice writer. She majored in English at Barnard College before getting her Master of Fine Arts in acting. This is her second book. Her

2013 novel, Someday, Someday, Maybe, about an actress in the 1990s, was a New York Times bestseller. If you enjoyed Anna Kendrick’s Scrappy Little Nobody or Amy Schumer’s The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, or if you’re a fan of looking inside Hollywood, you should give this a read. Graham shares a sassy, fast-talking spirit with many of the characters she plays, but they don’t always believe the same things. Vox rounded up a few sound bites from the actress’ career to see where real-life Lauren and on-screen Lorelai agree and disagree. On relationships: Lorelai: “It’s all any of us wants — to find a nice person to hang out with ‘til we drop dead. Not a lot to ask!” Lauren: “I think a good relationship is a really valuable and great thing to have, if you can have it. But I also see how rare it is. ... I’m really fine; I believe I’ll end up with somebody. But I really do think it’s important to know how to make your own fun.” (Calabasas, 2006)

KOPN 89.5fm...Where Else?

BY RACHEL PHILLIPS Lauren: “I don’t eat desserts, and I avoid things like chips and salsa, which I love, but I know aren’t going to keep me on track. I love Japanese food, and I cook a lot of fish, rice and vegetables.” (Spry Living, 2014)

On rambling: Lorelai: “Well, you know my babbling capabilities are infinite.” Lauren: “I have a pre-pre-superpre-interview for The Tonight Show where I have to tell funny stories, which is a problem because I have the beginning of a lot of funny stories, and then I don’t have that clincher button ending. None of my stories end — they just ramble.” (Time Out New York, 1998) On being tough: Lorelai: “Just suck it up, but stop complaining because you’re not two.” Lauren: “Challenging yourself to face your fears can give you a real boost, even when things don’t go your way. What if you’re tougher than you think you are?” (Seventeen, 2016) On eating: Lorelai: “I would like a cheeseburger, with a side of cheeseburger, and see if they can make me a cheeseburger smoothie.”

Hassle-free living in the heart of campus for Mizzou students.

Monday thru Friday National Programming Line-up... Democracy Now! with Amy Goodman 8-9am and Noon-1pm Studying abroad, have an internship or Graduating next year? We can just do a semester for academic reasons.

The Diane Rehm Show 9-11am

Fresh Air with Terry Gross 11am-Noon

Financial aid coming in late? MU can wait. A landlord won’t. It’s much more convenient than commuting. There are no sublet situations, deposits or utilities, and it’s a short walk to class. Everything’s included: Dining plan, laundry, cable, all utilities, WiFi, and screaming-fast Ethernet.

2017-18 Housing and Dining Contracts for current Mizzou students are now available! No-risk signup! Cancel up until April 1 with no penalty. For more information, visit

reslife.missouri.edu

On your radio dial at 89.5 fm or live streaming at kopn.org PHOTO COURTESY OF AMAZON

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ARTS & BOOKS

Craft your way to a warm, productive and fashionable winter Knitting and crocheting by hand combines creativity and challenge. This pastime, often associated with grannies, has found new life in crafters of all ages. Knitting and crocheting can create community and save some dough on winter accessories and holiday gifts. Nancy Workman, an employee at True Blewe Yarns & More, has been passionate about knitting, crocheting and teaching the crafts for the past 40 years. Bex Oliger, owner of Hillcreek Yarn Shoppe, loves to chat about this hobby. Workman and Oliger lend their vast knowledge and a few key tips to loop in anyone looking to give this increasingly trendy activity a shot.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

The main differences between crocheting and knitting are the tools and the feel of the final product. Crochet requires a specialized hook, and knitting uses two long needles, which can be composed of wood, plastic or metal. Oliger says many people are intimidated by knitting because each hand holds a needle, which can be tricky to maneuver a beginner. Crocheting makes multiple loops in a row, and the final product tends to be bulky and bumpy. Knitting progresses with one loop going through another loop, which creates a flatter, smoother surface. Crocheting also creates open spaces 20

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BY KARLEE RENKOSKI

within the fabric, so it’s much easier to rip out or repair stitches.

BUY YOUR SUPPLIES

This hobby can be as expensive or affordable as you make it. Hooks and needles range from $2 to $15, and the cost is dictated by the material of the tools. The price of yarn ranges from as little as $2 to as much as $75. “A lot of people go for the cheapest yarn and materials, but you’re more likely to stick with it and enjoy the process with better quality,” Oliger says. It is also important to note that the expense also depends on the size of your project. Patterns that provide instructions on how to make a given item can be found online, in books and at yarn and craft stores.

FIND GOOD RESOURCES

There are various ways to learn these skills. Workman taught herself to crochet as a child and learned to knit from an eighth-grader while serving as a parent chaperone for a school field trip. There are numerous how-to books on the subject, as well as video tutorials online. Although some organizations such as The Knitting Guild Association and Crochet Guild of America have helpful websites, Oliger and Workman

agree that nothing beats learning from someone while watching them work. They strongly encourage getting involved with a group such as the mid-Missouri Knitting Guild, which meets at True Blewe Yarns once per month, or a gathering of friends.

GET TO WORK

Oliger has beginners start knitting in a round pattern to make a hat or cowl, and crocheting beginners start with a simple square. Workman says some great starter projects for both crocheting and knitting are potholders, towels, dish cloths and sometimes small blankets, depending on the complexity of the pattern. Once you’ve mastered the techniques and feel comfortable with those, take on more complicated patterns, such as afghan blankets, shawls and scarves. You can also try crocheting and knitting without a pattern and see where your creativity takes you.

MU student Maddie Magruder has some serious knitting skills. Watch the video at VOXMAGAZINE.COM

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MADALYNE BIRD, PIXABAY


Former resident H. RUSS BROWN started writing scripts for children’s shows in Columbia; now he returns for a local production of his play Stud Ducks

A

s a kid, H. Russ Brown created his own comic book stories, but writing wasn’t how he got started in theater. While growing up, Brown trained in martial arts. When his sensei sent him to show actors how to fall safely, he was hooked and began training in fight direction. Brown and his wife, Elizabeth Brown, moved to Columbia in 1991 from Garland, Texas. Here, he wrote his first script and landed a resident fight choreographer job with the MU Theatre Department. In 2002, he left Columbia to pursue his Masters of Fine Arts at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois. Brown has filled almost every theatrical role including actor, designer and educator. Currently, he is head of the Theater Department and artistic director at College of the Mainland in Texas City, Texas. He will return to Columbia for Talking Horse Productions’ presentation of his play, Stud Ducks, running from Dec. 2 to 4 and 9 to 11. He’ll take part in a Q&A session with the audience after the performance on Dec. 2. Set in Texas in 1978, the play was inspired by Brown’s own hilarious, larger-than-life grandfather. It follows Milton Day and his grandson Russell through their adventures with the petrified horned toad, Ol’ Rip. Talking Horse Productions Executive and Artistic Director Ed Hanson, who worked with Brown at Maplewood Barn Theatre, says Brown’s writing style is charming. “I get the sense from reading the play that it’s almost as if Russ sort of eavesdropped on conversations and transcribed them.” Vox chatted with Brown about writing, teaching and returning to Columbia.

What is your favorite writing style? Comedy comes easily to me. Drama does not. I enjoy drama. I love the challenge of writing something a little weightier. But I can’t ever get away from the comedy. Even the darker stuff — ­ I’ve written a few dark pieces­­— is funny in some way. That’s just my natural go-to place. Who inspires you? I really love Tom Stoppard (playwright), his style of writing, the flow of his dialogue. Lanford Wilson (playwright) is probably my favorite, though. He can so easily blend truth and realism and humor together. How has your work in other areas of theater influenced you as a playwright? I’m so used to having a hand in all things. I was a scene designer and an actor and a fight choreographer long before I was a playwright. I think very much of the physical storytelling as I’m writing. So it’s not just about the words and the conflict. I also see the actions in my head. I try not to get heavy handed with my stage directions, you know, like Tennessee Williams or somebody. I try and only give those stage directions that are absolutely necessary. What do you like most about being a theater educator? I love mentoring. I mean I don’t want the spotlight on me anymore. I haven’t performed in quite a while, and that’s not my desire. I want that for them. Until I met my wife, there was no one in my life encouraging me in this. In fact, where I grew up — I

grew up in a little 1A high school — arts weren’t a thing at all. There was no one there for me. So I like being that person who wasn’t there for me. How did you translate the personalities of family members into characters in Stud Ducks? When you’re creating your character, you’re very careful to find the voice of each individual character and that they remain true to that voice throughout. This is how they talk. This is how they react. This is their general way of feeling and approaching things. Even the way they structure their grammar and turns of phrase and things like that. And you’ve got to make sure you’re consistent and true to that character throughout, which was a lot easier in this process than it was in others. With this one, it was pretty easy because I had so much history — rich, rich history — to draw on. What do you hope audiences take away from Stud Ducks? I hope it takes everyone to a place of nostalgia, of a simpler time, of a time when things were just a little bit more black and white than they are nowadays. I hope it takes them back and to a fond remembrance of someone in their lives, some crazy, frustrating, love-ya-to-pieces-no-matter-what kind of person in their lives who was key in how they developed and became who they are. —RACHEL PHILLIPS PHOTO COURTESY OF H. RUSS BROWN

12.01.16

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THE TO-DO LIST

this week in Columbia

ARTS & CULTURE Sweet Charity

Macklanburg Playhouse’s last show of 2016 is Sweet Charity. Follow Charity Hope Valentine’s life in New York City in this musical with classic tunes such as “Big Spender.” Thurs.–Fri., 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., Macklanburg Playhouse, $16, $8 students and seniors, 876-7199

Living Windows Festival

For one night only, the window displays of downtown Columbia quite literally come to life. Participating shopkeepers remove merchandise from their storefronts and insert enchanting and festive spectacles. The night wouldn’t be complete without holiday treats and a visit from the man in the North Pole. Friday, 6 p.m., Downtown Columbia, Free, 442-6816

Masters Exhibit Opening Reception

This annual event brings the works of artistic greats to mid-Missouri. This year, it features works from mid-century masters such as Pablo Picasso, Leonor Fini, Rolph Scarlett and Enrico Donati. The exhibit runs through Dec. 23. Friday, 6 p.m., Sager Braudis Gallery, Free, 442-4831

The Polar Express Pajama Story Time

Barnes and Noble is hosting a special reading of The Polar Express that will feature coloring activities and “Dear Santa” letter writing. Throw on your pjs, and don’t forget your ticket! Friday, 7–9 p.m., Barnes and Noble, Free, 445-4080

City Kwanzaa Celebration

A weeklong celebration honoring African-American culture, Kwanzaa is about creating unity. Columbians can celebrate and learn about the holiday at the city celebration with food, community awards, entertainment and more. Saturday, 2 p.m., Progressive Missionary Baptist Community Building, Free, 874-7460

Elf The Musical Jr.

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Buddy the Elf can bring Christmas cheer to even the Scroogiest among us, even in early December. Enjoy this TRYPS Kids’ production of this new classic Christmas story. Saturday, 2 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m., Warehouse Theatre, $12; $7 children, 449-4536

Seasonal Calligraphy Class and Floral Arrangement

Learn the basics of modern calligraphy with Christy Asper of The Ink Cafe. Attendees will leave with a starter set, including a pen, nibs, practice sheets and a calligraphy notebook, and the expertise to jump start this lovely lettering style. In addition, Katie Burnham Wilkins of KBW Floral Design teaches the techniques of floral arrangement for holiday decorations. Sunday, 5–8 p.m., Poppy, $100, 214-240-3880

Festival of Lessons & Carols

Central Missourians are invited to join the Westminster College community for its annual Festival of Lessons and Carols, a community workshop service that seeks to celebrate the birth of Jesus through scripture and song. The service includes the reading of nine scriptures and carols performed by the Westminster College choirs and other area musicians. Sunday, 5–6:30 p.m., The Church of St. Mary the Virgin Aldermanbury at Westminster College, Fulton, Free, 592-5262

A Dickens Victorian Christmas

Do you long for a time of waistcoats, corsets and figgy pudding? Let Stephens College whisk you away to the Victorian era for a 19th century English Christmas night, complete with music, dance, games, refreshments and Mr. and Mrs. Dickens themselves. Sun.–Wed., 7:30 p.m., Historic Senior Hall Parlors, $16, 876-7199

Picturing Black American Families This exhibition displays documentary photographs that depict cross-generational connections and experiences of modern-day black families. The photos were taken from three photo collections, which were preserved in Columbia. Tues.–Fri., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sat–Sun., noon–4 p.m., Museum of Art and Archaeology, Free, 882-3591

CIVIC The Lighting of the Magic Tree Holiday Festival

The holiday spirit of Columbia officially begins Thursday with the lighting of Magic Tree at 6 p.m. Arrive early, and stay late for a chat with Santa Claus, a mule wagon ride, food-truck eats and holiday songs. Tonight, 5–8 p.m., The Village of Cherry Hill, Free, 777-5900

Women Who Own It Speakers Series: Carolyn Sullivan

Carolyn Sullivan shares how she reached career success to be able to earn a living doing what she loves — business. She has more than eight years in the field, but her journey to success was not an easy one, so she shares how to persevere in the working world. Friday, noon–1 p.m., Missouri Women’s Business Center, Free, 777-5236

Saturday Morning Science with Elizabeth King

Saturdays are for cartoons and learning. This regular series provides the public with free science education. MU assistant professor Elizabeth King in the Division of Biological Sciences will tell you about the price of a long life. Saturday, 10:30–11:30 a.m., Bond Life Sciences Center, Monsanto Auditorium, MU campus, Free, 882-0093

FOOD & DRINK Ugly Sweater Party

Welcome winter in your holiday best — best ugly sweater, that is. Purchase


food and drinks to enjoy with friends at this celebration that benefits First Chance for Children’s monthlong fundraising drive. Don’t be a Scrooge — donations are encouraged. Tonight, 4:30–7 p.m., Room 38, $5, 777-1815

Chocolate Festival

Chocolate lovers and holiday shoppers can eat some sweets and check some names off shopping lists at the first annual Chocolate Festival hosted by Tiger Chiropractic and Wellness Center. There will be many craft and food vendors, including Pampered Chef, Dove Chocolate and Scentsy. Sunday, noon–4 p.m., Parkade Plaza, Free, 443-1414

MUSIC The Cadillac Three

This trio is known for its mesh of country and rock. They are the remaining members of rock group American Bang. After the lead guitarist left to pursue a solo career, the trio rebranded and issued a self-titled album in 2013. The latest, Bury Me In My Boots, came out in August. Prep for a rockin’, high-energy set. Tonight, 8 p.m., The Blue Note, $18, 874-1944

Ultimate Painting with EZTV and Nevada Greene

These mellow indie rockers are inspired by the sounds of the ‘60s and ‘70s, and they bear a striking resemblance to The Velvet Underground. Don’t expect to hear a copy of “Pale Blue Eyes” or “Sweet Jane,” though. Ultimate Painting keeps its sound on the modern side. Tonight, 8 p.m., Cafe Berlin, $8, 441-0400

The Motel Brothers with Ray Wild

The Motel Brothers and Ray Wild, both staples on the CoMo music scene, are using their musical expertise for a good cause. See these two talented acts and help Pi Beta Phi sorority fund its mission trip to Guatemala at the same time. Saturday, 8:30 p.m., Rose Music Hall, $5, 874-1944

Poundgame Addison Live

Support Midwest hip-hop artist Poundgame Addison as he spits his originals on Rose’s stage. He’ll be joined by Darrein Safron and special guests Slim B, J. Jones, Tony J and Sam Maxfield. Sunday, 8:30 p.m., Rose Music Hall, $5, 874-1944

The Golden Fleece with Sterling/ Pale and The Birdwatchers Three midwestern acts are set to hit the stage. Sterling/Pale and The Birdwatchers will set the tone with indie pop and harmonizing country, and The Golden Fleece will top off the night with a dose of mystic, psychedelic rock. A $5 donation is suggested. Wednesday, 8 p.m., Cafe Berlin, Free, 441-0400

SPORTS Stephens College Basketball vs. Lyon College

Can Stephens College Basketball take control of its schedule early in the season? The NAIA Division I hoops competition begins early for the Stars as they compete against the competitive Lyon College Scots from Batesville, Arkansas. Tonight, 7 p.m., Silverthorne Arena, $5, 441-5174

GOT A GIFT DILE

MM A?

Missouri Women’s Basketball vs. Missouri State It’s time for some hoops, Tiger fans. The Tigers play the Missouri State Bears and will attempt to strengthen a promising winning record. Friday, 7–9:30 p.m., Mizzou Arena, $5, 884-7238

SCREEN Almost Christmas (PG-13)

All Walter (Danny Glover) wants for Christmas is his four grown children to come home and get along after his wife’s death. But if that happens, it will be a Christmas miracle. R RUNTIME = 1:52

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (R)

A soldier returns from Iraq and remembers his time at war through flashbacks during a victory tour in this new movie from Ang Lee. R RUNTIME = 1:50

Incarnate (R)

A young boy possessed by a demon must be saved by a scientist who can enter subconscious minds. R RUNTIME = 1:27

Grab a Gift Set or Gift Card Your One-Stop Holiday Shop!

STOCK UP FOR THE HOLIDAYS ON THE CHEAP!

Rules Don’t Apply (PG-13)

In a new vision from director Warren Beatty, a young actress in 1958 grapples with her new career, Hollywood life and an affair with her driver that is forbidden by their employer, Howard Hughes. R RUNTIME = 2:07

Also playing Allied (R) F, R Arrival (PG-13) F, R Bad Santa 2 (R) F, R Doctor Strange (PG-13) F, R The Edge of Seventeen (R) R Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG-13) F, R Hacksaw Ridge (R) F, R Harry & Snowman (NR) RT Loving (PG-13) RT Moana (PG) F, R Moonlight (R) RT Trolls (PG) F, R

Theaters F = Forum R = Regal

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Bring in this coupon & receive $1 OFF any purchase of $20 or more!* *Must be 21 or older. Offer expires 12/31/16.

Surgeon General's Warning: Quitting Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risk to your Health.

Expires 12/31/16

RT = Ragtag = Available in 3-D

3305A Clark Lane, Columbia, MO • 573.814.5111 12.01.16

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12.01.2016

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