Page 1

Like it or not, your style is indicative of the person you are. How you present yourself to the world can make a big difference in not only how other people see you, but how you see yourself. There’s a reason you might wear the same hoodie for six years or the same pair of jeans every day for a week straight. There’s a reason you want to look good and feel good. And here in the Valley, we have some of the most stylish people of all time. It doesn’t matter what kind of style is in or cool. In and of itself, style is about pure self-expression. So get out there, do you, and work it ... Valley style. WORDS: Darrion Behrendt, Katie Larson • DESIGN: Serena Wagner


SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Tanara Pereira, left, the owner of Eau Claire Body Care specializes in microblading, a unique cosmetic technique. Carla Cooper, right, gets a Micropigmentation retouch from Pereira.

TR A NSFORM YOUR LOOK ... FOR GOOD

Local experts perfect the ‘microblading’ technique for amazing semi-permanent brows

I

t’s been said that the average woman spends about an hour a day doing her hair and makeup, so it’s no surprise that time-saving permanent and semi-permanent makeup procedures are taking the beauty world by storm. The latest trend? Microblading. Microblading is a form of semi-permanent cosmetic tattooing that requires a special tool with a cluster of needles specifically designed to create individual strokes that resemble natural hairs to fill in your eyebrows. While it’s similar to getting your eyebrow makeup tattooed on, there are a few key differences.

WOR DS: DA R R ION BE H R E N DT For example, microblading creates a natural – almost undetectable – sense of perfection to your brows. Tattooing in the traditional sense, however, creates a bolder and usually more made-up look by completely and solidly filling in the brows. Both procedures last for years, but gradually fade over time. Microblading in particular tends to last one to three years. If you’re looking to add some oomph to your brows, then Tanara Pereira is your go-to girl. She’s the owner of Eau Claire Body Care and is currently the only person in the area licensed to per-

form the procedure. She specializes in hair removal services and micropigmentation, which is a fancy word for cosmetic tattooing. This means that as of right now, this is the only place where microblading magic happens in the Chippewa Valley. That being said, microblading is becoming more popular, and according to Pereira we shouldn’t be surprised to see other businesses like hers popping up soon. Pereira began her career practicing electrolysis in Wisconsin after getting her certification in her home country of Brazil, and she has now been in Eau

VolumeOne.org 50 Sept. 21, 2016

Claire for almost 10 years. She says that after seeing the interest for microblading in Brazil as well as the confidence boost people got after having the procedure done, she decided to get certified to perform microblading on women here in the Chippewa Valley. Pereira’s practice dips into both the medical and tattoo industries, making it extremely unique. While she’s technically considered a tattoo artist by the City of Eau Claire, some of her clients are looking for a solution to hair loss from medical treatment, so her microblading services are often considered to be


SUBMITTED PHOTOS

“Your eyebrows are a big part of your face, you use them for expression, so it’s a big deal, it makes a difference.” TA NA R A PE R E I R A , E AU C L A I R E BODY C A R E

“corrective aesthetic procedures.” Other clients arrive hoping for a more flexible alternative to permanent eyebrow makeup or hope to have their permanently tattooed brows softened. For these clients she uses a special ombre technique to help soften the look of their brows or subtly change their shape. Not only has she seen the effects it can have on her clients – which range from tears of joy to thankful hugs – but

she personally knows how much of a confidence boost the procedure gave her. She’s a true believer in its positive effects and cites the boost in confidence after clients see their new brows as one of her favorite parts of the job. “Your eyebrows are a big part of your face, you use them for expression, so it’s a big deal, it makes a difference,” Pereira says. Eau Claire Body Care shares space with two separate but related busi-

nesses. Pereira and the other two women there consider each other coworkers or business partners and all offer unique, specialized services to make you look and feel beautiful. All three of these ladies have something to offer that most in the area don’t. For example, Brenda Mueller of Clearly You is the only laser technician in the area offering tattoo removal services. And while Laura Ellingboe of Paradise Massage offers massage therapy to many clients with different needs, her prenatal and oncology massages make her stand out from other massage therapists in the area. You can find more information about microblading on Pereira, Ellingboe, and Mueller’s websites or on their respective social media pages, where they share pictures of their work, and information about specials and deals.

VolumeOne.org 51 Sept. 21, 2016


THE RIGHT NIGHT OUT

Oakwood Mall fashion boutique gives back and looks good doing it WOR DS & PHOTOS: K AT I E L A R SON

I

t might sound odd to have a small fashion boutique in the center of a large, box-store mall, but that didn’t stop Kim and Adam Verheyden from going outside the box to open the Apricot Lane Boutique in Oakwood Mall in August. The store showcases a wide array of fashions for most women ages 20 and up, while promising to provide each customer with one-on-one attention as she mixes and matches the fun styles, prints, and colors. In celebration of Fashion Week, the store offered discounts and prizes as well as celebrated new fall fashions. So what’s in this fall? Ponchos, ponchos, and more ponchos (it’s hard to contain

Apricot Lane has several items for sale for which part of the proceeds are donated to a charitable organization.

my excitement) in just about every earth tone imaginable! “I really like the poncho because they are versatile,” explained Stacy Klawiter, store manager at the Eau Claire location. “They can be worn as a poncho, as a vest; they can be put over a dress to dress it up; they can also be belted.” Not into the poncho-wearing scene? It’s OK, because there is a bit of something for almost everyone, and merchandise is always changing due to the store’s policy of only buying six of everything. “With a few exceptions, once it is gone, it is gone,” Klawiter said. Supporting those in need on a national level is a regular practice

“I really like the poncho because they are versatile. They can be worn as a poncho, as vest; they can be put over a dress to dress it up; they can also be belted.” S T AC Y K L AW I T E R ,

A PR ICOT L A N E BOUTIQU E

VolumeOne.org 52 Sept. 21, 2016


at Apricot Lane. Perhaps some of the best items in the store that emphasize giving back are the funky, wildly inappropriate socks emblazoned with messages that state what most people are thinking, but only a few would actually dare to say. The socks, produced by BlueQ Socks, help support Doctors Without Borders, according to the BlueQ website. In keeping with the philanthropic vibe, Apricot Lane also sells The Giving Keys, a pay-it-forward campaign out of L.A., and 3Strands accessories featuring the Red Seed in support of ending human trafficking throughout the world. Lastly, they sell bracelets and accessories produced by a global company called Good Work(s), in which 25 percent of the proceeds go to building solar panels and clean water systems in 12 rural areas.

In support of Breast Cancer Awareness, the store is throwing a Pink Party on Oct. 15. According to Klawiter, customers will receive 10 percent off of their purchases, and that 10 percent will be passed on to Breast Cancer Awareness charities. Check the Apricot Lane Facebook page for more details on the event. Struggle with shopping without the support (and brutal honesty) of your closest friends? No worries. Apricot Lane Boutique offers Ladies Night Out fashion parties. The “Hostess” grabs a small group of eager-to-shop women to mix and mingle with the clothes. The party “hostess” – as well as the loyal friends who tell her that the dress looks fabulous on her – receive discounts, can win prizes, and can even eat and enjoy drinks while circulating the store.

VolumeOne.org 53 Sept. 21, 2016

Valley Style 2016  
Valley Style 2016  
Advertisement