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N O I SH FA

o N 21

u

g/S n i r p S

8

r ‘1 e m m

M

A N A ONT


Hanah Oulton


What’s Inside Issue 21

Coach 1941

Zara Martin

Kelly Kiara

Montana Rose Brown

Gambrell (Chris)


Glitter Fashion Week

Trends

Beauty

Rose (Olivia)

Nicopanda


Editor’s Letter I think we can all agree that Spring has finally arrived and what better time to ‘rise and shine’.

Sprouse to name a few. She gave us an insight into photography in the music industry and her shining success story.

In the world of Voir we’re fully embracing everything that comes with a new Spring/ Summer season with open arms: the latest fashion trends that have dazzled us on the runway to the rising stars that have, in our eyes, shone above and beyond the rest.

Nicola Formichetti is yet another name we’ve featured in this star-studded issue, the creative mind behind the boundarypushing brand that is none other than Nicopanda. He is known for styling one of the most controversial pop artists in the world; the genius behind the iconic Lady Gaga meat dress. Transferring all that creative energy and quirky ideas, and bottling it up into a fashion line with a constant buzz is what caught our attention, and we’re excited to share that with you.

This issue is graced with some real talent. We had a chance to catch up with Kelly Kiara who went from re-writing a comeback version of a Justin Bieber classic, to becoming the fastest signing Universal Publishing has ever made! She’s making her way to the top, writing for artists Mabel, Ray Blk and M.O as well as recording her own work to be released soon. We know we will be keeping a close eye on that girl. Montana, who has recently been signed with one of the UKs leading model agencies, stunned us with our “Shinier Things” editorial and Issue 21 joint cover. In a fun and energetic shoot with dazzling pieces, she had no trouble owning the looks and bringing them to life. Not to mention the incredible Olivia Rose (cutting edge photographer and all round cool creative) working with huge names like Skepta, Big Shaq and Cole

Taking inspiration from all this fresh talent, has sparked a desire in us to express our true style, and what better time to start than a new season. Voir is bringing you all the standout looks in Hip&Runway; key Spring/Summer 18 trend edits; and a flavour of the fashion weeks of Milan, Paris, New York and London through the lenses of Chris Moore and the team at catwalking.com. Finally, our brightest star and cover girl Zara Martin is shining from the heavens. Not only is she a successful entrepreneur, she’s presenter; influencer; model; DJ for the likes of Chanel, Dior and Tom Ford; and to add to this she has her own


headphones line at Skinnydip. Is there anything this girl can’t do? She killed our fierce fashion shoot in the bustling, quirky heart of Camden, blinged-out in the latest show-stopping runway pieces. With all the darkness in the world, it is important to continue to see a light that can inspire us to shine from within. Whether that be from fashion, art, beauty or music, this season is about feeling good, welcoming fresh talent, expressing personal style and being ready to ‘rise and shine’. Every so often we need to have fun and not be afraid to experiment, so here’s to adding a little glitz and glamour to your life and rising above anyone who says otherwise. Xx


Words: Hannah Oulton, Images: Catwalking.com


Your Friendly Channel


HiP &RUN

Y A W

The first glimpse of sunshine brings nostalgia of springtime blossoms and coconut scented summers. The change of season brings a change in fashion: fresh colour palettes, new textures and romantic silhouettes. Spring-Summer ’18 is all about the glitter and sparkle, so let the light nights commence and the good times roll. This season is  all  about feel good fashion: sequin sensations, pretty pastels, tempting textures and fantastical finery. Fun and flirty with just enough pizazz to get our beloved FROW stars sending us into a tizzy with their Kira Kira posts. Not to mention that Versace super reunion…the fab five (Carla Bruni, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford and Helena Christensen) came together in memory of Gianni Versace, setting the world of social media alight.   The only place to start is with those mesmerising adornments. I’m talking sequins, crystals, beading…more, more and more. From full sequin, superwearable mini t-shirt dresses at Christian Dior, to all-out 80s sequin glam from Gucci; embellishment was everywhere. Jeremy Scott brought the fun – sequin hoodies, diamante-encrusted fishnet and to-die-for encrusted boots. Totally wearable, definitely extra; we’re sold. Emilia Wickstead brought us the nostalgic romanticism with beautifully feminine silhouettes, adorned with fine embellishment in classic hues, whilst Dolce & Gabbana brought our fantasy statement pieces to life – that floral trophy jacket? Major! There was enough sparkle to satisfy even a magpie’s eye for shine and then some. Bravo.   Flowing from the sparkle to the shine, we saw a penchant for light reflecting fabrics with every stride of those long-limbed beauties down the runway. Whether it be Tom Ford’s super-silky suits, Erdem’s jacquard dresses or Alberta Ferretti’s lamé mini shorts and shirts (total 50s with a noughties heavenly twist by-the-way), it’s the season to get your shine on. Throw in the plastics – rain coats, visors, boots – and you’ll be shining right on through SS’18.


CHRISTIAN DIOR SS18


GUCCI

CHRISTIAN DIOR SS18


JEREMY SCOTT

GUCCI

JEREMY SCOTT

EMILIA WICKSTEAD


HiP &RUN

Y A W

What’s a new season without a new tale of textures? Tassel trimmings, layers of ruffles and feather finishings: texture is the gift that just keeps giving. Balmain gave us ruffled shoulders and hems, matched with floor-length fringing for a three-dimensional finish. We saw feather details on dreamy pastel macs on the Ralph & Russo runway, billowing soft, fringe skirts from Max Mara and quilted coats with layers upon layers of chiffon and feather ruffles from Alexander McQueen. More is totally more when it comes to texture – layer up silks with knits cinched with a waist belt and you’ve got yourself a summer trend in one, insta-worthy look. Pastel palettes and sheer finishings were two key styles running through the catwalks for summer ’18, pulling together the glitter and sparkle treats. Those sugar-sweet pastel hues will be dominating our spring dreams this season. Ok, so pastels aren’t particular ground-breaking for Spring-Summer but add in that sheer fabric and we’re a hot mess. Missoni’s beach-ready dresses had us longing for exotic climates, Preen’s mixture of translucent ruffles with pale green hues made for the ultimate wedding outfit and Emilia Wickstead’s sheers made for a collection of staples we didn’t even know we needed! Opt for the pencil skirt à la Fendi, an eye-catching shirt like Stella McCartney or a power statement suit in the name of Victoria Beckham and you’ll take a full frontal step into the sheer proclamation. Just remember to dig out the big knickers!   No look would be complete without a smattering of accessories and this season is all about the OTT statement earrings, waist-cinching belts (ahem, that Gucci pastel number?? O.M.G) and disco heels. Over-embellished is a must for all accessories this summer. Whether you’re keeping it chic with staple pieces or making a statement with this season’s glitz and glamour, build in big and beautiful coloured accessories and ‘show-stopping’ is the phrase that will cling to you.   Whether you’re a veteran season follower or you’re daring to try something new, make Spring-Summer ’18 your time to experiment. Layer those pastels, puff out those ruffles and amp up those sequins. No matter your style, glitter and sparkle never goes out of fashion…you get that glow girl, it’s shining from within. H.O.


BALMAIN SS18

GUCCI SS18


GUCCI

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN SS18


DOLCE & GABBANA

RALPH & RUSSO

MISSONI

PREEN


Stying: Jyoti Matoo, Art Direction|Photography: Luke Walwyn, MakeUp: Loren Owen representing Makeup London Academy, Hair: Kymberley Holmes, Styling Assistants: Sachin Gogna, Alice Walker, Photographic Assistant: Lauren Geddes.

Zara Martin is a name, or should we say brand to know right now. The perfect doyenne for our ‘Rise & Shine’ cover issue, she has become a successful entrepreneur, presenter, model, influencer, Women For Women ambassador and DJ. Her work sees her playing at such runway shows as Dior, Chanel and Tom Ford, and she has successfully launched her own headphones range with Skinnydip. Is there anything this girl can’t do? Voir’s cover shoot captured Zara around the streets of Camden Town, London styled in jaw-dropping runway finery and causing a stir amongst visitors. We caught up with her afterwards to talk collaborations, supporting women and inspiration.


Zara wears Gucci Rectangular Frame Acetate Sunglasses £865.00 TOMMY X GIGI Leather Jacket £495.00 TOMMY X GIGI Speed Short Sleeve T Shirt £50.00: All available at Flannels Black Faux Leather Chap Trouser £30.00 Red High Waisted High Leg Bikini Bottom £10.00: Both available at PrettyLittleThing


You’ve said that little girls aren’t conditioned to aspire to be DJ’s. Despite this, you’ve still managed to build a career for yourself. How did you get in to the industry? By being a really mediocre TV presenter LOL. TV was my great love, but as with all first loves - they break your heart. I got over it with DJing and then that turned out to be my “thing”. What’s been the stand out moment in your career so far as a model and a DJ? There have been a few surreal moments which I guess give you some sort of validation you’re not crazy. I did this campaign that ended up on billboards all over London. One was above the tube station I used to take to get me to a job I hated. It felt like the Universe giving me a cheeky little wink. You’ve recently collaborated with Skinnydip. How did you find the process of designing and creating headphones with this brand? It was a great learning experience. I loved the products we created and was so grateful not just for the opportunity but also for the creative freedom Skinnydip allowed me. It was a true collaboration in that sense. It really is an incredible feeling to see something that was just a picture in my mind translated into a physical product on the shelves of some of my favourite stores. I want to make more stuff now!! You’ve said that you have a love/hate relationship with fashion – do you feel there are pressures in the fashion world that aren’t there in the music world? I love clothes (and shoes. And bags. And....) I think I was referring to the fashion industry when I made that comment, which is sometimes a hard place to be. I guess it’s the same with music but people are just nicer. 


GUCCI Aviator foldable Acetate Sunglasses £735.00 Philipp Plein Strapless Dress £1,735.00: Both available at Flannels Necklace: Stylist’s own


Voir recently did a feature about beauty brands that empower women for International Women’s Day. We featured Elemis who are supporting Women for Women International which we know you are involved in. How did you become an ambassador? I was just at the House Of Elemis! I am a genuine fan of their brand and ethos - it’s so great that they are such big supporters of Women For Women. I became an ambassador after attending their gala many years ago. I was so moved by what I witnessed that evening I reached out to Brita, the Director of WFWI, to learn more and to see how I could get involved. So far, the charity have helped half a million women in countries affected by war and conflict rebuild their lives. I’m currently working on a collaboration with Delores Daywear in aid of Women For Women to help raise awareness and funds for the incredibly important work they carry out. Available May 1st from deloresdaywear.com  Who would you say has been the biggest inspiration or influence in your life?  My delightful insane friends and family.  What advice would you give to aspiring female DJs who are looking to get in to the industry? The same advice I would give to anyone - male or female - in any industry:  Work hard and don’t be an asshole.

Phillip Plein Studded Leather Jacket £9,500.00 Available at Flannels | Tutu: Stylist’s own Le skinny black sunglasses £69 Available from Poppy Lissiman | Belt: Stylist’s own


Phillip Plein Studded Leather Jacket £9,500.00 Available at Flannels | Tutu: Stylist’s own Le skinny black sunglasses £69 Available from Poppy Lissiman | Belt: Stylist’s own


Montana Rose Brown by Studio Voir

Whether it is in THE clothes, the accessories or the beauty, HIGH-FASHION sparkle is the new spring glow. Concept|Stying: Jyoti Matoo, Art Direction|Photography: Luke Walwyn, Styling Assistant: Sachin Gogna, MakeUp: Eve, Hair: Kymberley Holmes, Production Assistants: Lauren Geddes, Olivia Perl.


Wekoko - Silver Mesh Top. Skirt Available from Flannels by Gucci. Belt Available from Flannels by Gucci. Sunglasses by Jaded London. Boots by Misguided.


Wekoko - Silver Mesh Top. Skirt Available from Flannels by Gucci. Belt Available from Flannels by Gucci. Sunglasses by Jaded London. Boots by Misguided.


Rainbow Dress - Pretty Little Thing. Sunglasses by Topshop. Rainbow Red Pu Boots by Pretty Little Thing.


Holographic Sequin Catsuit by Jaded London. Leather Jacket by Moschino. Sunglasses by Topshop. Black Diamante Sock Boots by Pretty Little Thing. Beret by Pretty Little Thing. Clutch Bag by Kenzo - Available from Flannels.


Pink And Gold Metal Bralette Available from @whatsupimlauren Depop Shop. Silver and Gold Bomber by Jaded London. Silver and Gold Flares by Wekoko. Bumbag by Moschino - Available at Flannels. Sunglasses by Jaded London. Heels by Pretty Little Thing.


‘Fake’ Boob Tube by Jaded London. Cow Print Biker Jacket, Sequin Chaps, Sequin Pants and Sunglasses by Jaded London. Heels - Kurt Geiger.


Cow Print Catsuit by Jaded London. Bumbag by Topshop. Sunglasses by Jaded London. Heels by Pretty Little Thing.


‘Fake’ Boob Tube by Jaded London. Cow Print Biker Jacket, Sequin Chaps, Sequin Pants and Sunglasses by Jaded London. Heels - Kurt Geiger.


Coach SS18 campaign by Steven Meisel


Words: Kat Evans, Images © Coach 1941

Everything that shimmers and shines has been magically worked into the Coach Spring/ Summer ’18 collection – from sequins to crystals – it’s all about catching the fashion magpie’s eye.


Your invite to join the glitterati has not been lost in the post – it’s all wrapped up in a Spring/Summer collection that oozes sparkle and urban chic. Ladies and gentlemen welcome to New York - Coach 1941 is transporting you into the future and it’s not turning back. What was once a classic all-American brand has been propelled into the fashion super league, with a heavy dose of glitz, glam and all that shines. The luxury fashion house’s creative director Stuart Vevers has once again masterfully stayed true to Coach 1941’s signature celebration of all things American heritage, only this time adding the killer twist that has earned him his stripes in the fashion world. Everything that shimmers and shines has been magically worked into the Coach Spring/Summer ’18 collection – from sequins to crystals – it’s all about catching the fashion magpie’s eye. Think Studio 54 with metallics; think Little House on the Prairie and delicate silk slip dresses with lace cut-out detailing and sheer layering; think Wild Wild West with cowboy-style suede with leather trimmings; think biker gangs with leather patchwork detailing and tough jackets; think college varsity with that recognisable lettering emblazoned across jumpers, jackets and accessories; and think patchwork Americana-style boots with a metallic twist. Staple design meets futuristic bling, and just got the Millennials screaming more more more. It is the brand’s hometown of New York City which is the apple of Coach’s eye this season. Not only does the show’s set take you to a downtown alley which is literally paved with glitter, it pays homage to the artwork of New York’s late great street artist/graffiti god Keith Haring, who left an indelible print on the city in the ’80s. Some of his iconic cartoon character prints are emblazoned across the collection: his instantly recognisable barking dog can be seen on jumpers, jackets, bags and even more eyecatchingly so on the collection’s faux fur gilet. With a nod to New York’s ‘70s nightclub scene, the glitz and glam offer the base for this season’s must-have evening-wear.


Coach SS18 campaign by Steven Meisel


The colour palette glides seamlessly from pastel shades of pink and purple satin to deep, darker hues of burgundy and navy – all in keeping with Coach’s signature style, demonstrating how the Coach woman is the full package of classic yet cool, sexy yet elegant, all with a sense of ‘Oh this? It’s just something I threw on’ attitude. “I want to build out the wardrobe.” states Vevers, “the Coach girl goes out, she dresses up, so how do I find a way to make that feel like us? There’s something in the air about dressing up. A certain…it’s glamour and grit. New York glamour.” The collection is reassuringly cool with skirt lengths kept low, silhouettes loose and necklines high through layering, giving today’s woman the perfect style to go from street to club with a fearless attitude. Or as creative director Stuart Vevers puts it, “inspired by our Coach girl gang – the way that they wear, party and live in our clothes,” The silk slips with intricate lace detailing and multicoloured sequinned skirts are toughened up with fitted leather jackets and studded leather or patchwork ankle boots. Satin metallic bomber jackets are layered on top of jumpers and t-shirts embellished with glitter and sequins. Trouser suits are shown in pastel-coloured satin and dropped waist dresses have an Americana feel with cowboy-style trim around the shoulders. The accessories don’t escape the glitter bomb either – Coach’s archives have been raided to bring back the brand’s classic mailbox bag which was first created by Bonnie Cashin in 1972, but we now see it given the embellishment treatment with crystals and Haring’s artwork. The Coach brand has been under the creative leadership of Yorkshireborn Vevers since 2013, and ever since he took the reins, he has changed the direction of the house from the classic heritage luxury it had been built on, to something more forward-thinking. By bringing a breath of fresh air in the shape of fun, spontaneity and playfulness to the brand, he has caught the attention of a younger generation of fashion-lovers and earned the brand an entirely new Coach army.


Coach muse Selena Gomez and Kiersey Clemons were front and centre in the audience of the Spring/Summer show, whilst models-of-the-moment Adwoa Aboah, Kaia Gerber and Winnie Harlow, all glided down the glittercovered runway. All are firm members of the Coach Gurl gang, as Vevers has affectionately named it. Chloe Moretz, Suki Waterhouse and fashion’s latest darling transgender model Hari Nef are also huge fans. It’s coming full circle – it’s this new army that keeps Vevers (by his own admission) on his toes. Gomez has become the brand’s darling. Much of Vevers’ inspiration for Spring/Summer came from collaborating with her; she spoke and sequins appeared, creating the perfect line for fashion magpies all over the world. There’s only one question that remains… when will you be accepting your invite? K.E


Coach SS18 campaign by Steven Meisel


SS18 Intros by Alice Walker, Illustrations by Chris Gambrell


CHRISTIAN DIOR

OSCAR DE LA RENTA TOM FORD DOLCE & GABBANA

Shine Bright Like A Dia

DOLCE & GABBANA

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

MARC JACOBS

New Year’s Eve seems to have come quicker than we were expecting, but any excuse to add a little sparkle into April showers right? Marc Jacobs, Coach 1941, Valentino and Tom Ford are some of many designers that have shone on the runway.


VALENTINO

MICHAEL KORS

ALBERTA FERRETTI

COACH 1941

COACH 1941

mond

HALPERN

GUCCI


BALENCIAGA

EMILIO DELAMORENA CHRISTOPHER KANE

Lumberjack Chic The plaid picnic blanket doesn’t have to be the only bold print this Spring/Summer. Key designers like A.W.A.K.E, Alexander McQueen and Balenciaga are all embracing the check, so whether you’re bored of neutrals or just want to showcase your Scottish roots, this trend is bound to make a statement.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

MIU MIU


HERMÈS

EMPORIO ARMANI

EUDON CHOI

A.W.A.K.E.

BALENCIAGA

FENDI

BOTTEGA VENETA


DOLCE & GABBANA

EMPORIO ARMANI

TOM FORD

MIU MIU

Suits Me! MARC JACOBS

To suit anyone of any gender, the trouser suit has got a promotion from the corporate world into high fashion. Female empowerment is at a new high and what better way to rock confidence than being the ultimate boss lady coming from designers like Isabel Marant, Miu Miu and Dolce and Gabbana.

HĂˆRMES


HAIDER ACKERMANN

DOLCE & GABBANA

GABRIELA HEARST

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

ISABEL MARANT


Illustrations by Chris Gambrell


BOTTEGA VENETA

ALBERTA FERRETTI

ACNE

DRIES VAN NOTEN

VERSACE

MICHAEL KORS

CHRISTIAN DIOR BOTTEGA VENETA

Powder Pastels SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

Mint, strawberry and peach sorbet are the ice cool colours that could be giving your spring wardrobe a fresh makeover. The feminine yet current trend was seen by Acne Studios, Chanel and Dries Van Noten, injecting a soft, candy-coated colour onto the catwalk.


COACH 1941

COACH 1941

CHANEL

CHANEL

VIVETTA

VERSACE

REJINAPYO

MICHAEL KORS

DRIES VAN NOTEN

VIVETTA

DRIES VAN NOTEN


EMILIO DELAMORENA

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

TOM FORD

DOLCE & GABBANA

MICHAEL KORS

CHANEL

Destination Pink Are we sick of wearing pink yet? Absolutely not. Embrace your inner Barbie as Millennial pink is going nowhere and the boldly feminine shade is stronger than ever, seen everywhere from the likes of Christopher Kane, Dior and Versace.


VERSACE

CHRISTOPHER KANE

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

EMPORIO ARMANI

CHRISTIAN DIOR

RALPH & RUSSO


FENTY X PUMA

SPORTMAX

PUBLIC SCHOOL

Sports Luxe PUBLIC SCHOOL

Looking sporty whilst not actually partaking in any exercise whatsoever has never been so fashionable. Upgrade the casual sporty style to a luxe level by inspiration from Fenty X Puma, Lacoste and Dior. Less sporty spice, more modern athlete.


FENTY X PUMA

FENTY X PUMA

CHRISTIAN DIOR

LACOSTE

TOM FORD

FENTY X PUMA

PUBLIC SCHOOL


JASON WU GUCCI

HELMUT LANG

MAISON MARGIELA RALPH & RUSSO

Sheer Luxury Gucci, Jason Wu and Valentino are all for #freethenipple this trend season. You can dial the daring style back with wearable sheer skirts or feminine bralettes, however if you want to embrace the look, an accidental nip slip won’t be an issue.


VALENTINO

DOLCE & GABBANA

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

EMPORIO ARMANI

FENDI


DIOR STELLA MCCARTNEY ISABEL MARANT

Ruffle Up BALMAIN

Don’t let the vision of an 80s American style prom dress put you off. Key designers like Balmain, Christopher Kane and Stella McCartney have all showcased the bold design which can easily be incorporated into your own style to make a statement and perhaps ruffle a few feathers. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN


ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

RALPH & RUSSO

EMILIOD ELAMORENA

CHRISTOPHER KANE

ERDEM

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI


Illustrations by Chris Gambrell


The

And The

The

FASHION WEEK IN PICTURES Brought to you by Catwalking.com


Gucci SS18


LND O ON

SS18

Richard Quinn

Preen

Pam Hogg

Jack Irving

Jason Wu

Christopher Kane


Ashish

Chalayan

O

Anya Hindmarch Sophia Webster

Temperley London

House of Holland

DN


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Holly Fulton

DN


L


Preen SS18

DN


NEWO K YR

SS18

Monse

Sies Marjan

Jeremy Scott

Tory Burch


NE

Fenty X Puma

Tom Ford

Tom Ford

Alexander Wang

O


NE

Anna Sui

Alexander Wang


O


NE


Fenty X Puma SS18

O


PARiS

SS18

Moncler Gamme Rouge

Off_White

Thom Browne

Junya Watanabe

Vivienne Westwood


Emanuel Ungaro

PA

Balmain

Saint Laurent

Balmain

Comme des Garรงons

Maison Margiela

i


PA

Yohji Yamamoto

Saint Laurent


Valentino


PA


Emanuel Ungaro SS18


MiLAN

SS18

Dolce & Gabbana

Salvatore Ferragamo

Stella Jean

Marco De Vincenzo

Moschino


i

Gucci

Giorgio Armani

Dolce & Gabbana Etro

Fendi


Mi

Dolce & Gabbana

Versace


Prada

LA


Mi


Salvatore Ferragamo SS18

LA


N IC

OPA


The nicopanda brand is known for its boundary pushing styles that blur the gender line in a bold and emphatic way. Words: Olivia Perl


Anyone remember Lady Gaga’s meat dress? It would be impossible to forget the pop singer covered head to toe in actual meat but who’s the man behind this memorable madness? None other than Nicola Formichetti, the creative mind behind the über cool brand NICOPANDA. First introduced in New York as a pop up shop in 2011, NICOPANDA has leapt from strength to strength and can now be found as a quirky staple of high flying runways. The brand is known for its boundary pushing styles that blur the gender line in a bold and emphatic way – most recently in the Spring/Summer 2018 collection that they produced at London Fashion Week. They’re edgy and playful, and in touch with the millennial demographic – need some tips on how to make your insta look on point? NICOPANDA’s page is your perfect inspiration. But who is the man behind it all? Aside from being a prominent member of the Haus of Gaga, Nicola Formichetti has worked with fashion houses such as Dolce & Gabbana, Alexander McQueen, Puma and now MAC Cosmetics.


His career actually started in the world of journalism when he was offered a monthly page called ‘Eye Spy’ for ‘Dazed and Confused’ magazine. His career took off from there; he became Fashion Editor in 2005 and then Creative Director in 2008 before moving on to become Fashion Director of Vogue Hommes Japan – quite a repertoire! So it’s no wonder that he and his brother Andrea have created a brand that captures a certain individuality and confidence that isn’t afraid to push the boundaries and get people talking. Formichetti has transferred his eye-catching and off-the-wall creativity from styling one of the most controversial pop stars in the world to his own adventurous brand. Quirky, fun and daring NICOPANDA is precisely what Voir embodies. And we love. O.P


KiSS RO FROM A

INTO VIEW

Interview by Jyoti Mato

SE

o, transcript by Lauren

Geddes & Olivia Perl.

Olivia Rose is one cool chick. She’s friendly, re laxed and thought provokingly ho nest so it’s no wonder that she’s making a stir in the w orld of music photogra phy. She’s recently worked with bi g names such as fictio nal rapper Big Shaq and Premier Le ague footballer Dele Alli on a Lynx campaign and on anothe r occasion, actor Cole S prouse on a shoot for ASOS. She’s so inspiringly herself th at it’s easy to see why her photogra phy is as popular as it is as she is able to squeeze out and capture the most interesting part of anyone’s person ality in her work. We sp ent some time catching up with Olivia to find out more about her fascinating path to succ ess.


When did you first disco ver your love for photog

raphy?

It’s funny when people ask me that because it’s taken a very, very long time. It’s something that I resiste d at every possible opportunity, pa rtly because my dad is a photographer and partly becaus e I was at University rig ht in the thick of digital photogra phy. That just never ap pe aled to me, I’m allergic to pixels , that’s what I tell peop le. That’s quite a lonely position to be in when all of yo ur peers are so excited about th is new technology, beca use for me it was always subject first. I’m a sociologist be for e I’m a photographer, the ca mera is secondary to my lov e of people. Photography op ens doors for me to mee t extraordinary people. Whether it’s twenty minutes or tw o weeks, I often learn something, or inspire someone, an d that is the essence of life. What do you love so muc h about the ‘old school’ style of photography? I don’t care about the eq uipment and that’s the truth. If I had my phone, or a dis posable camera, or a pe n and paper even, I can still pr oduce you an image an d I think it’s really important to kn ow that. It’s all about lea vin g the tech to one side. I’ll be at Eskimo Dance and I’m in the pit with a medium form at film camera that I ca n only get ten frames on one roll of film. There will be th es e guys next to me literally with their jaws on the floor because what is this girl doing in the dark trying to change rolls of film? I’m totally aware th at the room is too dark bu t that’s all part of it and it’s on e of the things that I th ink pe ople remember me for. I’m no t going to get that mom en t wh en everyone is hysterically laughing if I don’t take it now. But there are so many ways that we can bring film back in a way that you can’t wi th digital. Film works, th at ’s why people have been using it for so long. You said that you did everything you could to avoid photography, so how did you end up studying Fa shion Photography at Central St. Mar tins? I applied for textiles and fine art – literally I want ed to do anything but photograp hy – but I got rejected from all of these courses. At school I was a boffin, I’m a high achiever, so I wasn’t used to peop le rejecting me and the irony was


that the only course th at would accept me wa s fashion photography. I was defin itely going to swap cour ses, but two years in we had a tu tor start called Itia Doro n and he was the first person to turn my feelings of lon eli ness in to an appreciation for my method making me sta nd out. From the moment he sa id that, I knew I could ne ver deviate from my method be cause that is how you pr od uce an image that looks like Ol ivia Rose took it. For me th e compromise isn’t on my met hod or how I shoot or my sty le, but kind of my clients really and who I’m happy to wo rk for and where I think my work be st fits. You refused a project a while ago with ID M agazine because it didn’t fit to yo ur style. How would you describe that style in three word s? My style is feminine, tra ditional and it’s uncom promising. I said feminine spec ifically because I do belie ve that depending on your ge nder, you race, your up br inging, your sexuality – you ha ve a different way of se ein g. I am a woman and I’m lookin g at things in a differen t way. For example if you have a tw enty year old extremely beautiful and talented singer in the studio there is the pr opensity for a man to look at her in a certain way. Apar t fro m Annie Libervitz, you’re hard pr essed to find another wo man to shout out in the last so rt of thirty years. We’ve got a new wave of people coming up who are more diverse and who are producing that wo rk that is more interes ting. So, I think there’s a bit of ch ange happening at the moment where clients are begin ning to understand that the person behind the camera changes the atmospher e. How did you go from finishing your degree to working with musicians and celeb rities? Did you get your self out there? The other half of my life up until about 2 years ago was working as a picture ed itor. I was freelancing at every newspaper, magazine an d online platform and th at was in a really practical sens e to pay my bills. For ab out five years I was shooting bu t my pictures would neve r be seen by anyone because I did n’t really know what to do with the stuff. It’s a really dif ficult part of photograph y, getting your work noticed and ev en having the confidenc e to say ‘I’m a photographer’. I still now find it a little bit difficult.


It’s really difficult to put yourself in a place wher e you can say ‘right, I’m going to be a photographer’, es pecially in a world where everyone has a camera. Those fiv e years when I wasn’t showing anyone my work was m e understanding what that mea nt. I had the freedom to do all of these projects with no on e else’s brief and no on e else’s budget – everything wa s paid for by me. Ever y penny I made from my working life I put in to my othe r working life and it allowed me to work out who I was an d what I was interested in – spec ifically race and mascu linity. So what was the turning point? It’s all about who you kn ow, people say it, but ne ver a truer word was spoken. My fri ends from University stu ck with me over those five year s, and they were making waves in the industry. One of my best friends ended up being the fashion editor of ID Mag azine and that’s when I started getting ID commissions. You have to forge conn ections here and there. It beco mes very small, especia lly when you’re into music photog raphy because the world of music is very, very small but it is a little family. It’s good and bad because when you’re pa rt of it it’s lovely but wh en you’re not it’s very intimidatin g. So the advice I would offer to someone who’s not ye t part of it: don’t let it intimidate you. Just go and make the right friends becaus e that’s really the only way in – make the right friends. Who’s your inspiration? Who do you look up to an d admire in the industry? The first thing I would say is that I quite cons ciously try not to look at my peers because I think that it starts to get a bit competitive an d people try to do the sa m e thing but better. But my phot ography heroes are Ro dg er Ballen who is amazing, I love Urben Ken, Aberde n an d in the American West. I’m quite traditional with my references and people who are my heroes. Often wh en I don’t have my camera that’s when I get my best ins pir ation, I’m more about social inspiration. It’s not as simple as ‘I love Aberden so I want ed to shoot like that’ fo r me it’s like I love that Aberden wanted to go and take pic tures of these mad people in th e American West. That I relate to. What piece of work would you say you’re most prou d of?


If you had asked me th is question last year, I probably would have said my Skepta Guardian Gu ide cover. Skepta was one of the trickiest people to pin down when we were sh ooting ‘This is Grime’ so I never got the Olivia Rose traditional portrait mom ent with him. The irony was that the Skepta cover sh oot came up about a week after we had put the bo ok to bed so there was som e sweet irony in that wh ich I found pleasing. I’m alw ays in to things that ot her people may find negativ e or a challenge – that’s my thing. The music industry is qu ite male dominated – yo u don’t sound like someo ne who gets intimidate d by that? My decision that I made was if you want to play wi th the big boys then you’v e got to go and play with the big boys. But you know what, that’s unfor tuna te because there is noth ing weak about sensitiv ity , emotion and femininity, in fact it is the bravest and most courageous thing you can be. But if you’v e got to grow a big pair of balls so you can go in an d teach everyone it’s okay to cry then fine; that’s wh at you’ve got to do. Do you have a team th at you prefer to work wi th or are you open to collabo rating with new people? I’m more picky at this stage in my career th an I would have been at the start. But I’m dedicated to my assistants, I believe in them learning somet hing and not just being chea p labour. I believe in pa ying them properly. Where I can really make a differ ence is by taking on somebod y who really deserves the opportunity, somebody that someone else m ight not have looked at. I’m so endlessly impressed with these kids that want assist me because I ne ver wanted to assist anyone . But the way these kids ge t in touch with me now – it’s not easy to send th at email when you’re eight een years old to someo ne that you admire. I will alw ays give them the time of day even if I can’t have them on a job becaus e I know what it takes to wr ite that email.


Finally, you’ve achieved so much in your career and you are everything the Voir reader is about – yo u’re daring to be different. Bu t you also seem quite en trepreneurial. What would you say to others wanting to pursue their dreams? It’s funny, I was in the shower about 3 month s ago and I had a bit of a reve lation that I run a busin ess. And that just happened and I’m really proud of my self, because honestly – an d this is important – I’m a mess just like everyone else and I’m still nervo us every time I shoot. My first big directing job I had to pull the cab over three times on the way home to be sick. So anyone else ou t there who is also a mes s and thinks they can’t do it – get over it because it do es n’t matter. If you’re really passionate about som ething you can do it, and even tually the money will co me. It doesn’t matter what yo u love, just go with it be ca use we’re all a mess out he re and you are either go ing to find ways to do somethin g you love or you can sp end five days in a thankless job. I know what I’d prefe r.


TO THE

INTO VIEW

Interview by Jyoti Mato

o, transcript by Olivia

Perl & Alice Walker.

The woman who put the comeback sass into Just in Bieber’s “Love Yourse track, ar tist/songwriter lf” Kelly Kiara has gone on to even greener pastur First interviewed for Vo es. ir Fashion in June 201 6 , sh e has now become the fastest signing for wor ld-renowned Universal Publishing: writing mus Mabel, girl band M.O, R ic for ay Blk and Liam Payne. S he ca ught up with our editor Jyoti Matoo before emba rking on her next music al project.


So much has changed sin ce the last time we inter viewed you, haven’t you signed with Universal? Yes, I signed with Unive rsal Publishing about a year ago – it was the quickest signin g they had ever done, I signed with them in three days. I wa s still living in Leeds wh ilst commuting to London and LA so th ey put me in touch with this producer who was also signed wi th them and he had do ne Mabel’s first EP. He showed me some music that was alr ea dy started and asked me to write the rest of it. Just on a wh im I did, it got sent to Mabel and she loved it, so we ende d up writing ‘Roses’ together which she put on her EP. Sinc e then we’ve done loads of music toge ther: I wrote Mabel’s ne xt single with her and I’ve been working with other ar tists like Ra y Blk, Liam Payne and Era Istrefi. I’v e got two songs coming out with the girl band M.O but I’m no t one of these people wh o dwells on success – I can’t afford to sit back. You’ve been so busy ov er the last year and yo ur career has gone from strength to str ength. Has it been diffic ult managing all of these new opportu nities? Last year was definitely the most difficult year fo r me because I made sure to say yes to everything I was asked to do. I worked with some really big pe ople and that’s addictiv e. I think the most difficult thing was being away from my com for t, all of my family and friends live in the North. This work can become quite self-obsessive an d introverted so I’ve m ad e sure that I’ve always gone back home no matter what tim e it is – all the way back up North – to spend time with my family and my dog. I think I’m reall y lucky in that respect because not everyone can do that. Yo u’ve got to ground your se lf and take everything with a pinch of salt and get on with it – I think that’s what I’ve learnt th e most this year. We’ve heard that you’v e decided to branch ou t from writing for other musicians and release your own music? It’s really exciting! It’ll be interesting for people to hear what I want to say because it’s different from a lot of ar tis ts I’ve been working with. I’m excited for people to see me as an artist now. It was important that I decided early on who I was and what I wanted to write about, so being in sessions eit her for other people or for myself allow ed me to fine tune what type of artist I was and who I am as a person. It’s important for me to think: ‘How am I going to be dif ferent from these other girls that are doing what I’m doing?’


Do you have a message

that you want to send th

rough your music?

I realised that I want to make girls feel empowe red. I want girls to listen to my music and feel like they can relat e to it and feel good about themselves like ar tists I listened to as a kid such as Christina Aguilera. I want to be ab le to emulate how she m ad e me feel – like I could wear what she wo re or change my hair ev ery other week. I really want to be the ar tist th at makes girls feel sexu ally liberated. That’s really important for me. What advice would you

give to aspiring ar tists?

I think my advice would be if you’re starting out: say yes to everything. But at the same time kn ow who you are as an ar tist and what your values are. What is differ ent about you as an ar tis t? Look at that and translate that into who you are and once you’v e got that I think the music will translate. Do n’t be afraid to experim ent. If there was one ar tist wh o you could write for an d one who you could collaborate with, who wo uld they be? From a song writing pers pective, I would love to recreate a sound that people may not have heard before for someb ody who already has their own musical soun d and identity, for exam ple, my idol Christina Aguilera. Collaboratively I would love to work with IAMDDB. Obviously she’s a northern lass an d I think my music and her music would creatively complement ea ch other. Another ar tist that I’m most inspired by is Kehlani. I actually met her in LA and really had to underplay how much of a fan I was! It’ s so inspiring when you see somebody saying something that relates to you because it mak es you feel like you’re not alone. From your own experienc e, what do you think ar e the most important things to think about wh en finding a manager? One thing to remembe r is that your manager is going to be a reflection of you so you need to make sure that whoe ver it is will be able to understand you and be on the same wavelengt h. Remember that the manager works for you, you don’t work for the m anager, so you need to be very clear and dir ect with what you want . And finally, any news on

when your single is going

to drop?

I don’t have a date but it should be within the ne xt few months. I have all the songs ready, bu t the first one that I’m going to be releasing is going to be within the ne xt month I would say.


“mIuwsiacnt girls to listen to my

and feel like they can relate to it and feel good abou t themselves like artists I listened to as a kid such as Christina Aguilera.

�


FASHION Intro by Alice Walker, Illustration by Chris Gambrell

We are barely into Spring/Summer, yet the fast-paced fashion industry has already showcased the season ahead on the runways. Here is our take and a sneak preview of the Autumn/Winter trends to come.


This Autumn/Winter we’re bringing back the 80’s as Emilio de la Morena, Halpern, Marta Jakubouski and Molly Goddard showcase golden oldies like animal print, vibrant colours and shoulder pads.


Every colour under the sun was seen from Halpern, Marta Jakubouski and Molly Goddard for Autumn/Winter as a celebration of LGBTQ. Fashion reflects the world around us and 2018 is about diversity and equality, therefore adding euphoria to the runway.


Flamboyancy is key as Tulle is the fabric to either go big or go home. This trend plays on an Edwardian ballerina style with a current twist, seen on the runway by Huisham Zhang, Molly Goddard, Roksanda.


Delpozo, Preen and Roksanda all bring a ray of sunshine to the Autumn/Winter 2018 runway. Yellow resonates with the new generation’s optimism and affinity for gender neutrality.


With denim having a loss of interest, designers like W Anderson, Simone Rocha and Temperley London have turned to comfort, practicality and utility to combat the possible weather of this Autumn/Winter.


Traditional British fabrics have had a refresh for Autumn/Winter. Emilia Wickstead, House of Holland, J.W Anderson, Simone Rocha all brought chic Sherlock Holme vibes whilst taking inspiration from the British Punk scene.


MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA


ANNA SUI

SS18 is going to be the season that you shine. Take inspiration from luminous glowing skin by Pat McGrath at Maison Martin Margiela, through wet-look hair being tucked under jewellery as seen at Alexander McQueen, to gitter eyeshadow in a variety of hues as seen at Undercover by the team at Katsura Kamo.

ASHISH


TOPSHOP

UNDERCOVER

STELLA JEAN


ASHISH SS18

VIKTOR & ROLF MARNI


ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

STELLA JEAN

ASHIS


RALPH & RUSSO


VALENTINO

CHANEL

EMPORIO ARMANI

FRANCESCO SCOGNAMIGLIO


Sophia Webster

Comme des Garรงons

Marco De Vincenzo

House of Holland


Etro

INSPECTION

Fendi

Jeremy Scott

Closer

Chalayan


Voir Fashion Magazine - for those daring to be different. Voir is an online publication issued on a quarterly basis. Issue 21 Rise & Shine was illuminated by: Jyoti Matoo Editor-In-Chief / Stylist jm@voirfashion.co.uk Luke Walwyn Art Director/Photographer art@voirfashion.co.uk Kymberley Jefferson : Head Hair Stylist Eve : MUA Felix Laurens Brand Liaison creative@voirfashion.co.uk Sachin Gogna > Lauren Geddes > Editorial Team/Creative support WRITERS, ARTISTS & CREATIVES Hannah Oulton - Hip & Runway Kat Evans - Fashion Writer Olivia Perl - Writer/Researcher Alice Walker - Writer/Researcher Marianne Tupelo - Fashion research Special Thank You to the following: Flannels Chris Gambrell Illustrator Guest MUA: Loren Owen representing Makeup London Academy Montana & Management Team Zara Martin & Management Team Catwalking.com For creative submissions creative@voirfashion.co.uk art@voirfashion.co.uk For collaborations and editorial content: jm@voirfashion.co.uk For general enquiries editorial@voirfashion.co.uk For beauty enquiries lifestyle@voirfashion.co.uk

Illustrations by Chris Gambrell


Issue 21: Dedicated to those who let their light shine.

No.


IVY WATSON BY

studiovoir.co.uk

Voir Fashion Issue 21 : Rise & Shine ft Montana Rose Brown  

Voir Fashion Issue 21: Rise & Shine features Montana starring in ’Shinier Things’ editorial, entrepreneur and DJ Zara Martin photographed in...

Voir Fashion Issue 21 : Rise & Shine ft Montana Rose Brown  

Voir Fashion Issue 21: Rise & Shine features Montana starring in ’Shinier Things’ editorial, entrepreneur and DJ Zara Martin photographed in...