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AU T U M N

2013

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY + STEP BY STEP + WHAT YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT… + MUCH MORE


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Contents List Autumn 2013 Meet the Team.........6 Featuring Age UK Bedfordshire’s Information, Advice and Support Service staff.

Greenfingered Grandma..................7

Looking forward to the change of colours in our gardens as the autumn approaches.

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Halloween: Some Spooky Facts & History.........8 Are you going to celebrate October 31st?

What’s Happening in Bedfordshire............9

Just a few select dates featured on various events taking place in the upcoming months.

Step By Step............10

We only get one pair of feet so it’s important to take care of them.

Banana Cupcakes....11 Why not try our delicious recipe for these cupcakes.

Bogus Callers...........12

Older people are less likely than any other age group

to be victims of crime. But there is one type of criminal that target older people: bogus callers.

What You Didn’t Know About…..........14

A new feature, where we ask a prominent local person a series of questions that aim to get behind their public persona.

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Cover Image Pictures and Memories of Age UK Bedfordshire through the years. © Age UK Bedfordshire 2013

Meet the team… Editor

Amanda Jones Tel: 01234 360 510 Email: amanda.jones@ ageukbedfordshire.org.uk

Sub-Editor

Klaudia Len Tel: 01234 360 510 Email: klaudia.len@ ageukbedfordshire.org.uk

Age UK Bedfordshire

Head Office 78 - 82 Bromham Road Bedford MK40 2QH Tel: 01234 360 510 Email: voice@ ageukbedfordshire.org.uk

Designer

Chris Keller Email: chris@ lancepublishing.co.uk

Sales Manager

Laurence Rowe Tel: 01536 526689 Email: laurence@ lancepublishing.co.uk

Publisher

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Lance Publishing Ltd 1st Floor Tailby House Bath Road Kettering NN16 8NL Tel: 01536 512624 www.lancepublishing.co.uk

Printer

Be Body Confident in Later Life..............16

Tips on how to feel confident about your body.

Puzzle Page.............18 The usual trio are back!

Charlie Chuckles.......21 He’s back and is trying to make you smile.

Lance Print Ltd Tel: (01480) 492183 www.lanceprint.co.uk

This magazine is produced on behalf of Age UK Bedfordshire by Lance Publishing Ltd. All rights are reserved by the charity and no part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the charity. Age UK Bedfordshire will accept no responsibility for, or necessarily agree with, any claims made or views expressed in this publication, nor does the mention of any product, service or advertisement imply a recommendation by Age UK Bedfordshire. Reg. Charity No. 1090535

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Foreword from the CEO As the weather draws towards Autumn and the heat of the Summer is soon to be a forgotten memory; we turn towards looking forward to things such as Halloween, Bonfire Night and the inevitable planning for Christmas, which will be upon us before we know it.

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e have enjoyed the strawberries and cream and the long hot days (maybe too long and too hot for some of us). The unexpected heatwave was not without its problems for most of us, keeping cool was the paramount thought uppermost in most of our minds and taking care of the young, older and frail, and our pets was a priority. However, there were the upsides, such as Andy Murray winning Wimbledon, the Royal baby, the Ashes, and Chris Froome winning the Tour de France. All in all not bad for this small but pleasant land. More locally there has been the launch of the two new Healthwatch organisations. Healthwatch is a national initiative that has evolved from Local Involvement Networks. In Bedfordshire there are two Healthwatch organisations, one in Bedford Borough and one in Central Bedfordshire. Both have now launched and are working across the county. Their remit is making sure that the overall views and experiences of people who use health and social

care services are heard and taken seriously at a local and national level. To become a member of your local Healthwatch (depending upon where you live in Bedfordshire) visit - www. healthwatch.co.uk and find your local contact details. Inside this issue of VOICE are the regular gardening, puzzles and joke features plus our new section with Q and A‘s with local people of note. There is also the What’s on in Bedfordshire section and much more useful and interesting reading including some information on body confidence, bogus callers, and a spooky history of Halloween with some fun facts. In addition read about our Information and Advice Team and the good work they do. So put your feet up, rest awhile, and enjoy. Happy reading.

Karen Karen Perry CEO, Age UK Bedfordshire

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Age UK Bedfordshire

Meet the Team

In our Autumn 2013 edition we are featuring our Information, Advice Service and Support Service. Pictured below are just a few members of the team.

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nformation, Advice and Support is more or less what is says on the tin. Each year we deal with approximately 12,000 enquiries from older people or their friends and family. These enquiries are generally over the telephone, but often people will simply drop in to our offices in

Bromham Road, Bedford for advice, information and quite often additional support. Information can be as simple as posting out a list of registered care homes in Bedfordshire or even as to how to how they can contact their local Member of Parliament. Other people may want advice on pre-retirement issues or perhaps how to

Pictured: Nancy, Wendy, Leanne (Mng), Dave and Jenny Information & Advice Admin Team.

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change their gas or electricity provider. People will talk to us about health issues, housing, money concerns, fear of crime and issues surrounding loneliness following a bereavement or how to pay for additional heating over winter. We have fully trained staff and volunteers who can answer most questions to help and support customers to resolve their issues. If customers are not able to visit our office and their issue cannot be resolved over the phone, we have a team of staff and volunteers who can visit customers in their own home. Often these visits are to help an older person complete, what can sometimes be complex benefit entitlement application forms. If you need free and confidential information and advice on something that is concerning you, please contact us on 01234 360510, or Email enquiries@ ageukbedfordshire.org.uk. (You must live in Bedfordshire and be over 50). The two case studies below provide an idea of the range of help we provide.

Case Study 1 Mrs A, Bedford

Mrs A is 61 and lives alone. Some years ago she was involved in a major road traffic accident which resulted in severe brain damage and multiple physical injuries. This has meant that she has faced great difficulties in coping with day to day living. Mrs A was in financial difficulties because of her inability to plan as a result of her injuries. Our aim was to provide support in dealing with debts and her claim for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). Through a number of home visits, we assisted with the completion of the ESA form and worked with Mrs A to raise awareness of the financial situation she was in and her responsibilities.

Pictured: Mary, Leanne and Penny Suppor t Ser (Mng), Gwen vice Team

Once finances had been put in order we were able to assist in putting day to day help in place to make life easier. Now that Mrs A’s finances are in better order, she is able to have a regular home help to assist with cleaning and shopping. The contact with Mrs A’s regular home help, assists in providing both a routine to her week and social interaction. These combined have had a positive effect on Mrs A’s health and enable her to maintain her independence and remain in her own home. Without our support Mrs A’s health would certainly have deteriorated further as she was living in poor conditions. Mrs A said that she was very grateful for our support and unfailing patience. She said that over time we had helped her to understand her financial position and that she now feels much happier and able to cope on her own.

Case Study 2 Mrs L, Dunstable

Mrs L, aged 90 had been recently bereaved. She suffers from glaucoma. She had not left her home, other than for hospital appointments,

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Greenfingered Grandma As we enter the autumnal season I look forward to the change in the colours in my garden.

T for three years, due to failing eyesight and lack of confidence. She applied for Attendance Allowance (AA) last year but was turned down. She had not requested a reconsideration or appeal. Mrs L contacted us because she did not know who else to turn to and needed support. Following a home visit and a discussion with an Age UK Bedfordshire adviser Mrs L decided to re-apply for AA and asked us to assist her to complete the form. Mrs L was subsequently awarded an additional £230 pcm. We talked to Mrs L about the things she would like to do and as a result she uses some of this extra money to take a taxi to visit friends occasionally and attend regular meetings of her local faith group. Her confidence is re-building as is her social life. Without our support, Mrs L would have become even more isolated and possibly depressed as a result. Mrs L told us “That without your help I would have been left here to die. No one seemed to care!”

he change in the leaves brings a fierce, fiery perspective to the mellow greens of the last summer foliage. There is still much to enjoy in the autumn and lots of end of season harvesting to be done. I’m sure I will manage to coax a last fruit from my tomato plants in the greenhouse before they are replaced with winter storage space! Autumn jobs include planting spring bulbs such as daffodils ready for the new season and some spring bedding such as wallflowers. Keep an eye out for the first frosts and protect tender plants, moving them under cover. In mid-autumn perennials can be tidied and cut back and late autumn is when we can take hardwood cuttings. Clear away fallen leaves for composting. Whilst I was deadheading the roses the other day my inbox pinged

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and Mrs P from Felmersham had sent me an Email. She asks: ‘I have noticed a white bloom on some of the leaves on my roses which seems to be spreading. Some of the badly affected leaves are falling off. What is it?’ This sounds like a form of mildew Mrs P. Mildew is most commonly found as Powdery Mildew and is a type of fungus. It can be seen on the surface of the leaf, starting on the

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IMAGE: © AGE UK, 2009

Gardening With…

top and if left to spread will affect the whole leaf and even other parts of the plant. The mildew can stunt growth and affect flowering, especially on roses. A severe problem can eventually kill the plant. It is best to use good methods to tidy up the plant and spray with a fungicide, available from Garden Centres. Removing the affected leaves promptly will stop the mildew from spreading and prune any touching, distorted or dead stems to increase the flow of air through the plant. Water from below and avoid watering the leaves of the plant. I hope this helps Mrs P and that you can enjoy many blooms on your roses in future years. Next time we can look forward to the winter season in the garden.


Halloween Some Spooky Facts & History On 31st October, we celebrate Halloween, thought to be the one night of the year when ghosts, witches, and fairies are especially active.

IMAGES: © ORI-ARTISTE, ELENA SCHWEITZER, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Why do we Celebrate Halloween?

The easy answer to this question is that no one really knows the origins of Halloween. What we do know for sure is that Halloween is on the eve of a major Catholic festival, All Saints (1st November) and the eve of the pagan Celtic festival known as Samhain. The three days between 31st October and 2nd November see pagan and Christian celebrations intertwined in a fascinating way and is a perfect example of superstition struggling with religious belief. Currently, it is widely thought that Halloween originated as a pagan Celtic

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festival of the dead related to the Irish and Scottish Samhain, but there is no evidence that it was connected with the dead in pre-Christian times. Read on for some superstitions and traditions of Halloween.

Trick or Treat

Many of today’s Halloween traditions are associated with America, however they originated in Celtic history. For example the custom of ‘trick or treat’ originated in England as ‘Mischief Night’ when children declared one ‘lawless night’ of unpunished pranks (usually May Day eve or Halloween). In the late 19thC, the Irish belief that ‘the little people’ or fairies played pranks on Halloween and led boys and young men to carry out practical jokes on

that night. Nowadays, children dress up in costumes and go from door to door where they knock on the door, or ring the doorbell, and yell ‘Trick or Treat!’ The idea being that the owners of the house give the children a treat (sweets or money) or the children will play a trick on them - I believe that in legal terminology this is called extortion!

tree, then refused to let the Devil down unless the Devil agreed to never let Jack into Hell. The story goes that the Devil agreed, but when Jack died, he was too sinful to be allowed into Heaven, and the Devil wouldn’t let him into Hell. So, Jack carved out one of his turnips, put a candle inside it, and began endlessly wandering the Earth for a resting place. He was known as Jack of the Lantern, or Jack-O’-Lantern. Nowadays the typical JackO’-Lantern is a pumpkin whose top and stem have been carved off and inner membranes and seeds scooped out to leave a hollow shell. Sections of a side are carved out to make a design, usually a face. A light source (traditionally a candle) is placed inside the pumpkin and the top is put back into place (often after a ‘chimney’ is carved in the lid in order to allow heat to escape). The light illuminates the design from the inside. Jack-O’-Lanterns are generally made for Halloween, and were originally made from large turnips, beets and swedes, before the introduction of the now more familiar pumpkin from the Americas.

Superstitions Associated with Halloween

It was believed to be the night when the barrier between the living world and that of the

Jack-O’-Lanterns

It was the Irish who brought the tradition of the Jack-O’Lantern to America. The practice of carving JackO’-Lanterns goes back to the Irish legend of Jack, a lazy but shrewd farmer who tricked the Devil into a

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Hazel Nuts

The hazel nut was sacred to ancient Celts, they were believed to have divining powers and was sacred to poets. The magic power of this nut was considered to be especially powerful on Halloween - and was often used in marriage divinations. Robert Burns wrote about this Halloween custom in Scotland: “…Some merry, friendly, countra folks Together did convene, To burn their nuts, an’ pu their stocks, An’ haud their Halloween Fu’ blithe that night.” Hazel nuts were sometimes named after an individual, and then thrown into the bonfire on Samhain eve. The manner in which it burned would

determine the ‘fate’ for that person for the next year.

Apple-Bobbing

Float a number of apples in a bowl of water (supposedly representing the Cauldron of rebirth), and try to catch one using only your teeth. When you have caught one, peel it in one unbroken strip, and throw the strip of peel over your left shoulder. The letter the peel forms is the initial of your future husband or wife.

Nut-Cracking

Place two nuts (such as conkers) on a fire. Give the nuts the names of two possible lovers and the one that cracks first will be the one.

Halloween Costumes

It’s traditional for people (especially children) to dress up at Halloween. In the past this wasn’t done just for fun, it was thought that the costume would confuse any evil spirits so they wouldn’t play any pranks on you. Nowadays Halloween costumes can range from cute to downright scary. The simplest costume has to be draping a white sheet over your head and making a couple of holes for the eyes, but a lot of people go all out as vampires, witches, or a character from a horror film.

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What’s Happening in Bedfordshire? 7th September Bird Walk

The Forest Centre, Marston Vale Millennium Country Park, Marston Moretaine, Beds. Tickets are £3 (£2 concessions, volunteers and friends). For further information phone: 01234 767037, Email: info@ marstonvale.org.uk, or visit: www.marstonvale.org

7th and 8th September Woodworks

Celebrating woodwork through crafts, skills and music at The Forest Centre, Marston Vale Millenium Country Park, Marston Moretaine, Beds. Tickets £7.50 adults, £4 children. For further information phone: 01234 767037, Email: info@marstonvale. org.uk, or visit: www. marstonvale.org

8th September Stondon Classic Transport Festival

From 11am to 6pm at Stondon Recreation Ground. For further information Email: stondonbigweekend@ live.co.uk

Important Dates for your Diary 27th October British Summer Time Ends Don’t forget to put your clocks back one hour at 2am

31st October Halloween 1st November All Saint’s Day 5th November Guy Fawkes, Bonfire Night 10th November Remembrance Sunday

Check Bedford Borough Council website for Bedford Borough events

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IMAGE: © MARIDAV, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

spirits was at its weakest. In the old days people lit bonfires to ward away evil spirits and in some places they used to jump over the fire to bring good luck. Halloween was also a time to honour the dead, and divine the future.


there’s lots we can do ourselves. First and foremost, it’s important to wear comfortable, well-fitting shoes. ‘Many people wear slippers if their feet are hurting, but this can make things worse as slippers encourage you to shuffle rather than letting the joints work as they should,’ says Mike O’Neill. ‘A pair of running shoes is the best option as these provide a good amount of shock absorption and stability and also support the arch.’ Good nail care can also help to keep feet feeling comfortable. Unfortunately, many of us find it hard to clip our toenails properly, partly because it can be hard to reach but also because they become tougher with age.

Look After Your Nails

StepByStep IMAGE: © AGE UK, 2009

We only get one pair of feet so it’s important to take good care of them. But many of us will develop some foot problems as we age, simply as a result of daily wear and tear.

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nyone who has experienced foot pain knows only too well how debilitating it can be. Over time, it can become a significant health issue because, if we can’t walk comfortably, we’re less likely to get out and about and

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take part in the social activities or daily exercise that is vital for our health and wellbeing.

Get Checked

What’s more, people who suffer from diabetes or arthritis should check their feet regularly and ensure they attend checkups as requested, as they are at risk of amputation if they don’t seek timely treatment. Fortunately, there’s lots we can do to protect our feet and most common problems can be treated successfully by a chiropodist or podiatrist there’s no difference between the two, but most now prefer to call themselves podiatrists.

‘As we get older, an annual foot health check is as important as a sight or hearing test,’ says Mike O’Neill, Consultant Podiatrist and spokesperson for the College of Podiatry. ‘Conditions like diabetes or circulatory problems can all be picked up by looking at the feet and common problems like corns, cracked skin and ingrown toenails can be successfully treated.’ Unfortunately, though, unlike the free sight tests for over 60s, you will have to pay for an annual health check.

Get the Right Footwear On a day-to-day basis,

However, nails that become too long can press against the end of the shoe and the constant pressure can cause soreness, infection or ulceration. Toenails that have been poorly cut can also become ingrown. ‘If you’re struggling to cut your own nails, ask a family member for help as hacking at them could do more harm than good,’ says Mike O’Neill.

Keep Feet Moisturised

Finally, daily application of a moisturising lotion will help to keep feet feeling soft and supple. ‘As we get older the skin on our feet starts to dry out, we lose the fatty pads that cushion the bottom of the feet, the joints start to creak and circulation is reduced,’ says Mike O’Neill. ‘As a result, the skin on the soles of our feet and heels becomes dry and nails become brittle and more difficult to manage.’

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Ingredients

• 255g Flour (sifted) • 110g unsalted butter (softened) • 2 ripe bananas (mashed) • 55ml buttermilk • 2 eggs • 115g sugar • 1 tsp vanilla • ½ tsps baking powder • ¼ tsp salt

Method Step One

Pre heat oven 180°C/350°F/ Gas Mark 4. Line a cupcake baking tray with paper liners. Sift the flour, baking powder, sugar and salt into a bowl and mix together. Place the butter and vanilla in another bowl and blend together until a creamy consistency.

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Step Two

Gradually add the sugar, beating the mixture until light and fluffy, add in the eggs one at a time beating them well each time. Add in a little of the buttermilk, then a little of the dry mixture, followed by some of the mashed banana to the creamed mixture - beat well after each new ingredient and repeat the alternating process until all the ingredients are combined.

Step Three

Spoon the mixture into the cupcake liners, up to about ½ full. Place them in the oven and bake for 20 mins. Remove from the oven and leave to cool for 5-10 minutes. Transfer onto a cooling rack to cool completely.

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IMAGE: © JOHAN LARSON, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Banana Cupcakes


Bogus Callers Older people are less likely than any other age group to be victims of crime. But there is one type of criminal that targets older people: bogus callers.

IMAGE: © AGE UK, 2009

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lso known as distraction burglars, bogus callers trick their way into homes to steal money and valuables while the householder’s attention is elsewhere. Most callers are genuine and mean you no harm, but bogus callers can often seem very plausible and will try to fool you. Follow our advice and keep yourself safe and secure at your door. You can download our guide

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(www.ageuk.org.uk/homeand-care/home-safety-andsecurity/bogus-callers), Avoiding scams, which covers bogus callers, internet fraud, competition scams etc.

Bogus Caller Task Force

Password Scheme

All electricity‚ gas and water companies have a doorstep password scheme. If you haven’t already done so‚ set up a password

In the county, Bedfordshire Trading Standards offer the Bogus Caller Task Force which is supported by the three Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships. Bedfordshire is also a No Cold Calling Zone, if you do get cold callers you should ring the Bogus Caller Hotline on 08454 040506. If you feel frightened, harassed or intimidated at anytime dial 999 and report the incident to the police.

with each of them, choosing passwords that are unique and that you will remember. When a representative calls they will give you this unique password to confirm they are legitimate. Keep the passwords out of sight but where you can easily find – if you need to fetch it‚ close the door first.

Safety and Security in your Home

Use a door chain and‚ if you can‚ a spy hole. This makes it easier for you to identify who is at the door without fully opening it.

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door. Don’t let any caller pressure you into making a quick decision - if you are unsure‚ do not open the door.

Put Your Door Chain on If you do not currently have a chain or spy hole, arrange to have them fitted. Here at Age UK Bedfordshire our Handyperson Service can help, call us to find out more information.

Valuables and Money

Do not keep large amounts of money in the house. It is safer in a bank or building society account. Do not leave money lying around where it is visible from outside or where it can be easily found. Do not leave valuable items in view or where they can be easily found. Items of sentimental value‚ such as jewellery‚ may also be those that most appeal to burglars. It may be worth getting a small safe for your home.

What to do When Someone Calls Before you go to the door: •C  lose and lock the back door and any accessible windows before you go to the front door. • Bogus callers often work in pairs. One of them will try to keep you talking at the front door while the other tries to get in through the back door or a window.

L ook Through Your Spy Hole or Window • Try to check who a caller is before opening the

• Before you answer the door, put your door chain on and keep it on while you check the callers’ identity. • If you want to check with their company, keep the door chain on‚ tell the caller you are going to call their company and close the door.

Check the Caller is Who They Say They Are • A genuine caller will not object to you leaving them on the doorstep and closing the door while you confirm their identity‚ even if it is raining. • If the caller says they represent an electricity‚ gas or water company or another organisation such as the council or a charity, follow the checklist below to check that a caller is who they say they are. • Ask for the password if you have set one up with the company, use it.

Does the Caller Have an ID Card? If the caller does not have an identification card‚ ask the caller to go away and close the door. If the caller persists‚ dial 999 and ask for the police. If the caller does have an identification card, ask to see it: • Examine the card to see if it looks genuine. • Check the expiry date - is it still valid? • Does the photograph

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on the card match the person at the door? • Check the photograph is the original – has anything been stuck over it? • If you want to call their company, do not use the telephone number on the caller’s identification card - if the identification card is not genuine then the telephone number on the card will not be genuine either • Find the telephone number in your phone book, on a bill or call directory enquiries • Ask the company to confirm they have sent someone out to you. They will ask you for information about the identification card, what the caller looks like and may also ask for the date of birth or password of the caller. • If you need to get more information from the caller, leave the door chain on at all times. • If the company does not know the caller, dial 999 and ask for the Police, who will tell you what to do.

Put your Safety First

Sometimes bogus callers pose as someone needing help - perhaps a glass of water or access to a telephone. Put yourself first. Do not feel you are rude or uncaring by saying ‘no’ – your own safety is more important. Remember‚ it is your home. If you are unsure‚ do not open the door and do not let the caller in.

Rogue Traders

Some cold callers will offer to do roofing‚ building or driveway resurfacing. Some will vastly overcharge for unnecessary‚ shoddy or non-existent work. Do not agree to any cold caller doing any work for you.

Never Accept an Offer to Drive you to Withdraw Money

There have been instances where older people have been

driven to their bank or building society to withdraw money to pay the cold caller’s charges. Do not accept an offer to be driven from anyone you do not know or do not trust. If you are pressurised to hand over money‚ keep your door closed‚ dial 999 and ask for the police.

Need Some Work Done?

If you think you may need to have work done on your house or driveway‚ ask for quotes from two or three reputable companies. Friends and relatives may be able to recommend companies or tradespeople they have been pleased with. Call us here at Age UK Bedfordshire to see if our Handyperson Service can help or to gain information and advice.

Your Passwords

Write the contact details and passwords for your electricity‚ gas and water companies below and cut this out and keep it in a safe place.

Water

Supplier: Contact Number: Doorstep Password:

Gas

Supplier: Contact Number: Doorstep Password:

Electricity Supplier:

Contact Number: Doorstep Password:

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What You Didn’t Know About… This is a new feature, where we ask a prominent local person a series of questions that aim to get behind their public persona.

IMAGE: © AFRICA STUDIO, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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o start us off, we have invited Marjorie Stephenson, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Age UK Bedfordshire. Marjorie undertook her nurse training at the Central Middlesex Hospital followed by midwifery (part 1). After initial posts as a staff nurse and ward sister in the clinical field, she achieved promotion through management ending up as the Director of Professional Development with the Bedford and Shires Health and Care Trust before retiring the in the late 1990s.

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Since her retirement she has been involved with a number of charities and is very active in the community, joining the board of what was then Age Concern Bedfordshire in 2001. In 2009, she, together with the Chief Executive successfully steered the transition of the organisation from Age Concern Bedfordshire to Age UK Bedfordshire. When Marjorie joined way back in 2001, the whole organisation managed with only two rusty old PC’s. We now manage the organisation using bespoke computer programmes, ipads and smart phones!

Marjorie Stephenson Chairman, Board of Trustees, Age UK Bedfordshire Q: Who has been the biggest influence on your life? A: My mum who always instilled in me to do my best, and my husband who taught me that I could do anything if I really wanted to. Q: If you could take only one book and one record onto a desert island what would they be? A: A good dictionary and Brahms 4th Symphony (or Parry’s, I was Glad or Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now).

Q: Did you have a nickname? If so how’d you get it? A: Tom - There was a radio programme featuring a North country comedian named Al Read and he had a favourite saying - “Who does he look like, who does he remind you of in’t he just like our Tom our Tommy to a tee”. I used to mimic him so I became ‘Tom’. Q: What did you think you were going to be when you grew up? A: An air stewardess for BOAC (British Overseas Aircraft Corporation)

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Q: If you could wave a wand and make one significant change on the planet what would it be? A: I would like people to take more responsibility for themselves, and I would also like to see improved care and respect for older people, who appear to sometimes be seen as redundant or a burden, a ‘commodity’ to be dealt with. Q: Can you talk about the biggest obstacle(s) you have had to overcome so far. A: Coping with the death of my husband.

Q: Who was the last person you hugged? A: My lovely brother-in-law. Q: Which radio station do you listen to more than any other? A: Radio 2. Q: Which book are you currently reading? A: Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. Q: Do you have a sporting hero? A: Jack Nicklaus the golfer.

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to look and feel younger. • If you normally wear neutral shades like navy, black, grey or brown, think about adding a colourful scarf or tie, or add a vibrant handbag or socks. • ‘This is an easy and affordable way to keep up with fashion,’ says fashion stylist Luanne McLean.

 o See Changes in D Your Appearance as Part of You

Be Body Confident in Later Life As we grow older our bodies change and, living in a culture obsessed with youth, it’s sometimes hard to feel confident about how we look. Below are tips from some experts on how to feel body confident in later life.

IMAGE: © PRESSMASTER, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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e all have days when we feel invisible, unattractive and self-conscious. Often it’s because we compare ourselves, unfairly, to the way we looked when we were young. After all, we live in a culture which is obsessed with youth, so it’s harder to be body confident if we’ve gained a few pounds, our hair has turned grey, or our skin has started to wrinkle and sag. ‘The dominant focus on youth and attractiveness

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means that older people are often depicted as less valuable and less visible,’ says Dr Emma Halliwell from the Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England. ‘However, psychologists have repeatedly shown the way you look is not related to the extent that someone is happy, popular, loved or successful.’ With this in mind, we asked the experts for some tips on how to improve our body image and boost our self-confidence in later life, so that we can look - and feel - our best.

Do’s Do Pay Yourself One Compliment Each Day

• ‘Self praise has as much, if not more, effect than a compliment from someone else,’ says psychotherapist Marisa Peer, author of Ultimate Confidence. • ‘You might feel a bit silly, but say something great about yourself first thing every morning. If you can learn to feel good about yourself, others will feel positively towards you too.’

Do Experiment with Colour

• It’s easy to get stuck in a rut, and wear the same type of clothes every day. But you’d be surprised how introducing some colour into your wardrobe can help you

• ‘Your body tells a story about who you are and what has happened in your life,’ says Dr Emma Halliwell. • ‘The lines around your eyes show your sense of humour and the amount of times you laughed. Your stomach may have carried children and allowed you to bring up a family. • ‘By telling a story about your appearance you begin to see your body as a friend rather than an enemy to battle against.’

 o Gentle, D Regular Exercise

• ‘Lots of older people avoid physical activity, and that includes walking, because they’ve lost confidence in their body and worry that they are too old, too unfit or might hurt themselves,’ says Ana Barretxeguren, founder of Brighton Pilates Studio. • ‘But regular, gentle exercise like pilates can help you to feel less vulnerable. It improves balance and keeps you strong and flexible, which reduces the risk of falls - and means you’re less likely to hurt yourself if you do take a tumble.’

Do Focus on the Things You Like About Your Appearance • ‘The ageing process can be tough, but it happens to us all eventually,’ says

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Marisa Peer. ‘Instead of mourning the loss of your youthful figure or smooth skin, focus on your good points.’ • ’Stand in front of the mirror and notice all your good points - your nice smile, the twinkle in your eye, your lovely hands or your great posture. Research has shown that this is really beneficial.’

vocabulary,’ says Marisa Peer. ‘Call yourself “wise” or “experienced” instead. • ‘Remember that other cultures place much greater value on age and experience, so focus on the fact that you still have a lot to offer which isn’t based on youth or the way you look.’

Don’ts

Don’t Wear Clothes that are too Small - or too Big

Don’t Compare yourself to Other People

• ‘It’s common for men and women to make appearance comparisons with their friends, family members, celebrities and other people in the media,’ says Dr Emma Halliwell. • ‘Research shows that doing this leads to increased body dissatisfaction. So when you notice yourself doing this, actively turn your attention to something else until you begin to break the habit.’

Don’t Spend too Much Time on the Sofa • ‘It’s not always easy for older people to exercise, especially if they have a heart condition or joint issues,’ says Ana Barretxeguren. ‘But it’s important to keep moving as we get older, as regular exercise helps us to look and feel better. • Pilates is a great option because a qualified instructor can work with you on gentle exercises that are suitable for your level of fitness.’

Don’t Call Yourself Old • ‘This is a negative word, so cut it out of your

• ‘Sizes vary between stores, so don’t stick with a set size just because you can’t face going up or down the size scale,’ says Luanne McLean. • ‘Wearing clothes that fit you perfectly is more important than a number on a label, and you’ll feel more comfortable and confident in clothes that flatter your shape.’

Don’t Slouch

• ‘Start paying attention to the way that you stand, sit and walk,’ says Ana Barretxeguren. ‘So many people tell me that they stand differently after a few Pilates classes. This is because the exercises improve core strength and encourage you to focus on your posture. Standing and sitting correctly not only protects your back, it immediately makes you look taller, slimmer and more confident.’ Please remember if you have any health problems check with your GP before undertaking physical exercise classes or similar.

working hard to improve life for older people

AUTUMN 2013 | 17


Puzzle Page

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Solutions to all three puzzles can be found on page 29

Sudoku The Game of Logic Place each of the digits 1 to 9 in each row, column and 3x3 box. There is only one solution.

Wordsearch Which One is Missing? Can you find which Autumnal word is missing from the list below? ACORN AUTUMN BONFIRE BROWN HARVEST LEAF OCTOBER ORANGE RAKE

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Test your local knowledge in our Quick Quiz.

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Quick Quiz

1. Zara Phillips is married to which former rugby union player? 2. The Prince of Wales spent a term at which Welsh university?

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4. Who did The Queen succeed as monarch? 5. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark was the father of which Royal? 6. In which year did The Princess Royal win gold at the European Eventing Championships? 7. Which member of the Royal Family was born on 8/8/88? 8. At which air base is the Duke of Cambridge currently serving? 9. Lady Louise Windsor and James, Viscount Severn are the children of which royals? 10. On which date does The Queen’s actual birthday fall?

Share Your Voice With Us…

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e are looking to publish a selection of articles where readers write into the magazine

1 8 | AUTUMN 2013

with their thoughts, views on topics raised in the magazine or support they have received from Age UK Bedfordshire. Please write to: The Editor, Age UK Bedfordshire,

Voice, 78-82 Bromham Rd, Bedford MK40 2QH or Email: voice@ ageukbedfordshire.org.uk. We look forward to hearing from you next time…

Remember the next edition will be available from early September so if you have any stories, events going on or photographs please send them in.

www.ageuk.org.uk/bedfordshire


working hard to improve life for older people

AUTUMN 2013 | 19


CHICKSANDS PRIORY Near Shefford, Bedfordshire

THE SUMMER SOIREE

with Richard Hills Saturday, August 24 at 6.00pm

£10.00

LEN RAWLE

Theatre Organ Concert Saturday, September 14 at 7.30pm

£10.00

‘Steam on the Screen’ with Wurlitzer accompaniment by

DONALD MACKENZIE

Saturday, October 12 at 7.30pm

St. Albans Organ Theatre 320 Camp Road, St Albans AL1 5PE

A permanent playing collection of rare mechanical musical instruments, café / dance organs, player pianos and theatre pipe organs. Live performances are given, together with a commentary. Opening Hours: 2.00 to 4.30pm on the second Sunday of the month. Theatre Organ Concerts and special events ticket and information line

Tel: 0300 3 65 65 65

£10.00 T: 03003 65 65 65 E: info@stalbansorgantheatre.org.uk W: www.stalbansorgantheatre.org.uk

Chicksands Priory, the only standing remains of the Gilbertine Order, is open to the public, by appointment, on the first and third Sunday afternoons of each month, from April through to October. To book your tour, please email: tours@chicksandspriory.co.uk

We look forward to hearing from you

For all your travel arrangements, local & long distance, UK & Continental

16 - 57 Seat high quality vehicles

01296 661604

email: info@masonsminicoachhire.co.uk 2013 Excursions Brochure Available. Please contact us for your free copy.

www.masonsminicoachhire.co.uk

2 0 | AUTUMN 2013

www.ageuk.org.uk/bedfordshire


Every issue Charlie Chuckles will do his best to make you smile!

Charlie’s Comical Quickies! Q: What happens if you eat yeast and shoe polish? A: Every morning you’ll rise and shine! 

Q: What do you get when you cross a fish and an elephant? A: Swimming trunks. 

Q: What is orange and sounds like a parrot? A: A Carrot. 

Ever Wondered…

Holmes & Watson Go Camping

Why the sun lightens our hair, but darkens our skin?

Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson were going camping. They pitched their tent under the stars and went to sleep.

Why is the man who invests all your money called a broker? Why don’t sheep shrink when it rains?

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Why is the time of day with the slowest traffic called rush hour?

Why didn’t Noah swat those two mosquitoes? Why is ‘abbreviated’ such a long word? Why don’t you ever see the headline ‘Psychic Wins Lottery?’

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1. Mike Tindall, 2. Aberystwyth, 3. The Falklands War, 4. George VI, 5. The Duke of Edinburgh, 6. 1971, 7. Princess Beatrice, 8. RAF Valley, Anglesey, 9. The Earl and Countess of Wessex, 10. 21st April

working hard to improve life for older people

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Answers&Solutions from page 26

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Why is it that doctors call what they do ‘practice’?

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Why is lemon juice made with artificial flavour, and dish washing liquid made with real lemons?

You know that indestructible black box that is used on aeroplanes? Why don’t they make the whole plane out of that stuff?!

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Why are they called apartments when they are all stuck together?

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Why isn’t there mouseflavoured cat food?

ometime in the middle of the night Holmes woke Watson up and said: “Watson, look up at the stars, and tell me what you see.” Watson replied: “I see millions and millions of stars.” Holmes said: “and what do you deduce from that?” Watson replied: “Well, if there are millions of stars, and if even a few of those have planets, it’s quite likely there are some planets like earth out there. And if there are a few planets like earth out there, there might also be life.” And Holmes said: “Watson, you idiot, it means that somebody stole our tent.”

AUTUMN 2013 | 21

IMAGES: © TRIFF, ALEXEY STIOP , SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Charlie Chuckles


THE HEATH INN LEIGHTON BUZZARD, BEDFORDSHIRE

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Our privately owned, traditional country Inn has 16 large, comfortable en suite guest rooms, restaurant and a cosy wooden-beamed bar with open fire. For the summer months enjoy a cool drink in our pretty courtyard garden. We also have an enclosed children’s play area with swings and a slide. In our bar and restaurant we serve a varied menu of delicious home cooked food ranging from an extensive bar snack menu to an a la carte menu in our restaurant Balens. All our food is prepared using fresh and locally sourced, high quality produce. On a Sunday enjoy our traditional Sunday Roast served from 12 noon until 4pm. In our charming rustic bar we serve some excellent cask ales along with a selection of draft lagers and quality wines. You will also find some superb live music evenings here throughout the year. Check our website for further details. Balens, our a la carte restaurant is available for private hire. Whether you are planning to stay for business or for pleasure, The Heath Inn offers our travelers an affordable, quality stay in a warm, friendly atmosphere - a welcome change from the average

We aim to fill our clients with confidence in the knowledge that any work undertaken by us, will be completed to the highest possible standard.

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Modern ApArtMent: SleepS 4

Situated on the top floor of a three storey block the apartment has its own residents’ swimming pool. It has the advantage of being away from the bustle of the town centre but within walking distance (10 minutes to the marina and another 5 to the town centre). It has a twin bedroom, open plan kitchen and lounge. There is a family sized bathroom. The lounge has a sofa (which converts into two more single beds) and a table to seat four. There is ample car parking space in front of the building.

to book ContACt:

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w w w. l a g o s a l g a r ve.co.u k 2 2 | AUTUMN 2013

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Seasons Garden Centre Garden Centre - Huge Range of Gifts, Shrubs, Garden Furniture, Cane and Pine Furniture, Books, Lots of Special Offers on Gravels, Decorative Chippings and Composts.

Restaurant - Serving Hot and Cold Food from 10.00 - 4.00 and our very popular Sunday Carvery each Sunday from 12.00 - 2.30 only ÂŁ6.95. Lots of Home Made Scones, Flapjacks, and Great Home Made Food. Open Mon - Sat 9.00 - 6.00 & Sun 11.00 - 5.00

Seasons Garden Centre Bedford Road, Wilstead, (Wixams Village) MK45 3HU

01234 741909 www.seasonsgardencentre.co.uk

Pets and Aquatics



Voice autumn 2013