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distance to the nearest village is about two hours on foot and in difficult terrain. The area is incredibly beau­ tiful with the small beach in the hook, the green car­ pet of grass and steep Árnafjall towering over the area. Follow the path diagonally uphill towards the moun­ tain wall. It can be a little confusing here because it can look like there are several paths. But when you get further uphill and westwards, you will see the path that goes through Kálvarók more clearly. Beware of slippery rocks in some places on the way up. Follow the cairns through Jøkladalur and Kjógvadalur. Then you come up to Gresskarðadalur. Here, the path is difficult to see. Walk in the green area under the rock wall on your right-hand side and head for the green area up by Gresskarð at the end of the valley. From Gresskarð, located at approximately 630 me­ tre altitude, you have clear view of Árnafjall, which is the highest mountain on Vágar. Right above you is Eysturtindur, which is the second-highest mountain on the island. This place is perfect for a coffee break and to enjoy the colours of the evening sun on the surrounding mountains. The descent to Gásadalur

is quite rocky and it can be difficult to discern the path. But go down through the rocky area, and when you get further down, you can spot a trail that runs from the edge and down the valley. In recent years, the path has been expanded to a road for vehicles. Moving further downhill, you spot the small village of Gásadalur, which is located in the valley by the sea. The closer you get, the more you’ll understand why Gásadalur is many photographers’ favourite site. The settlement is unique and fascinating no matter which angle it is viewed from. Gásadalur has been one of the most isolated villages in the Faroes. Until a tunnel was built in 2004, the village could only be reached by walking along a steep mountain path south of the village, or by helicopter service, which started flying to Gásadalur in 1983. There are several explanations for the name Gásadalur (Goose Valley). Tradition says that the name is relat­ ed to Gæsa, a woman from Kirkjubøur. She had eaten meat during Lent, which was forbidden. As punishment, she lost all her property and moved to the valley, which was named after her. Another ex­ planation for the name is that it comes from wild geese that used to live in the valley during the sum­ mer.

Hiking in the Faroe Islands | 41

Hiking in the Faroe Islands  

Fresh air, wind in your hair, tall mountains, sunny valleys, fascinating fog, beautiful lakes, grazing sheep and breathtaking views. These a...

Hiking in the Faroe Islands  

Fresh air, wind in your hair, tall mountains, sunny valleys, fascinating fog, beautiful lakes, grazing sheep and breathtaking views. These a...