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SUBMARINE WARFARE AND UPGRADES

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INDIA’S FIRST INDIGENOUS AIRCRAFT CARRIER, INS ‘VIKRANT’

NAMEXPO Daily International Exposition & Conference on

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PUBLISHED BY MEDIA TRANSASIA

MONDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2013

SELF-RELIANCE MAIN SPRINGBOARD

Indian Navy’s force building has gone through a long drawn out process of early acquisitions from the West, wherein now most of the ships – surface and sub-surface – are built indigenously

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BRAHMOS universal missile system for naval forces at NAMEXPO-2013

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Saab inaugurates Asia Pacific Head Quarter office in Thailand

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DCNS floats out FREMM frigate Provence: A major programme for DCNS and partners

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Eurocopter’s AS565 MB Panther offers a mission-proven rotorcraft to India

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Indian Navy commissions Flight and Tactical Simulator for Seaking helicopter

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Indian Coast Guard Commissions Offshore Patrol Vessel Vaibhav


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PUBLISHED BY MEDIA TRANSASIA

 MONDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2013 EDITOR Pinaki Bhattacharya CREATIVE DIRECTOR Bipin Kumar DESIGNER Sachin Jain (Dep. Art Director), Sujit Singh (Sr. Visualiser) FEATURES WRITER Anandita Bhardwaj SENIOR MANAGER INTERNATIONAL MARKETING Vishal Mehta (E-Mail: vishalmehta@mtil.biz) DEPUTY MANAGER MARKETING Tarun Malviya (E-Mail: tarunmalviya@mtil.biz) MANAGER MARKETING Yusuf Azim (E-Mail: yusuf@mtil.biz) MANAGER MARKETING Jakhongir Djalmetov (E-Mail: joha@mtil.biz) SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR Atul Bali (E-Mail: atul@mtil.biz) MTC PUBLISHING LIMITED 323, Udyog Vihar, Ph-IV, Gurgaon 122016 Ph: +91 0124-4759500 Fax: +91 0124-4759550 CHAIRMAN J. S. Uberoi PRESIDENT Xavier Collaco FINANCIAL CONTROLLER Puneet Nanda GLOBAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES FRANCE/SPAIN Stephane de Remusat, REM International Tel: (33) 5 3427 0130 Email: sremusat@aol.com GERMANY/AUSTRIA/SWITZERLAND/ITALY/UK Sam Baird, Whitehill Media Tel: (44-1883) 715 697 Mobile: (44-7770) 237 646 E-Mail: sam@whitehillmedia.com ISRAEL Liat Heiblum, Oreet - International Media Tel: (97 2) 3 570 6527 Email: liat@oreet-marcom.com RUSSIA Alla Butova, NOVO-Media Latd, Tel/Fax : (7 3832) 180 885 Mobile : (7 960) 783 6653 Email: alla@mediatransasia.com SCANDINAVIA/SOUTH AFRICA Emanuela Castagnetti-Gillberg Ph: +46 31 799 9028, E-Mail: egillberg@glocalnet.net SOUTH KOREA Young Seoh Chinn, Jes Media Inc. Tel: (82-2) 481 3411/13 E-Mail: jesmedia@unitel.co.kr EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE/GREECE/TURKEY Zena Coupé Tel: (44) 1923 852537 Email: zena@expomedia.biz USA (EAST/SOUTH EAST)/CANADA Margie Brown, BLESSALL Media LLC. Tel: (+1 540) 341 7581 Email :margiespub@rcn.com USA (WEST/SOUTH WEST)/BRAZIL Diane Obright, Blackrock Media Inc. Tel: +1 (858) 759 3557 Email: blackrockmedia@cox.net

Namexpo Daily is published and printed by MTC Publishing Limited. Published at 323, Udyog Vihar, Ph- IV, Gurgaon 122016 and printed at Cochin. Entire contents Copyright © 2008. All rights reserved. Reproduction and translation in any language in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Requests for permission should be directed to MTC Publishing Limited. Opinions carried in the magazine are those of the writers’ and do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or publishers. While the editors do their utmost to verify information published they do not accept responsibility for its absolute accuracy. The publisher assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited material or for material lost or damaged in transit. All correspondence should be addressed to MTC Publishing Limited.

www.defencesecurityindia.com www.armada.ch www.asianmilitaryreview.com

OVERVIEW

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onfederation of Indian Industry (CII) provides platforms wherein endusers requirements and manufacturers’ capabilities can be made known to the world. With the aim of exploring business opportunities for the industry in the Indian naval and maritime sector and also to showcase the existing capabilities of the industry to the end-users, CII is organising NAMEXPO 2013: A Premier

Naval and Maritime Exposition and Conference with support of Indian Navy, Government of Kerala, Ministry of MSME and Ministry of Shipping from 23 to 27 September 2013 at Cochin Port Trust, Kochi in Kerala. NAMEXPO will be the first event of its kind in India. FOR NAMEXPO CII IS PARTNERING WITH:  Indian Navy  Government of Kerala to


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03 SCHEDULE

 SEPTEMBER 23 Inaugural Session Technical Session I: Modern Trends in Warship and Submarine Construction

 SEPTEMBER 24 Technical Session II: Future Marine Propulsion and power Generation/Management Technologies Technical Session III: Consortium and Dual Use Technology Approach Towards Development of Naval Weapons and Sensors Technical Session IV: Development of Advanced Naval Aviation Systems and Sustainable Repair Support  SEPTEMBER 25 Seminar on Emerging Opportunities for MSME in Indian Naval and Maritime Sector  SEPTEMBER 26 Interactive Session with Engineering and Maritime Institutes

 SEPTEMBER 27 Demonstration by MARCOS for general public project Kerala as the emerging global Naval Industrial Hub  Ministry of MSMEs, Government of India to highlight the strengths of the Indian SMEs  Ministry of Shipping to cover entire Indian maritime domain NAMEXPO 2013 would be a unique opportunity to the global as well as Indian industry to interact with officials from Indian Navy, Government of Kerala, Indian Coast Guards, Ministry of Shipping, Ministry of MSME, Shipyards and other stakeholders. While the

exhibitors are from diverse background, the conference will cover themes like MSMEs, Naval Aviation, Naval Weapons, Surveillance Systems and Communications, Shipbuilding and Technology Transfer. A great deal of Indian naval and maritime requirements has been met through indigenous industry. However, with the need for increasing the pace of modernization, a simultaneous requirement to acquire state-of-the-art equipment, systems and weaponry based on

sophisticated technologies is also being felt. Given the focus of the Government of India on increasing the scope of business opportunities in the naval and maritime domain, more and more foreign Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) will have to partner with Indian industry in strengthening India's naval and maritime sector. Therefore, NAMEXPO 2013 will also provide immense opportunities to Indian and global companies to collaborate to co-develop and co-manufacture

NAMEXPO Daily International Exposition & Conference on

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technologies and products in India not only for the Indian market but eventually for the global requirements.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS  Sea side Exhibition  Seminar in partnership with Indian Navy  Special Focus on Shipbuilding with the support of Ministry of Shipping  MSME Pavilion  Projecting Kerala as an emerging hub of Naval and Maritime industry in India  Showcasing of indigenous maritime capabilities  Official Delegations  MARCOS Demonstration  Exclusive interactive sessions with Government of Kerala Officials  Procurement Cells  Ships of the Indian Navy on display  Media Briefing by Defence Minister, Chief Minister of Kerala and other key officials  Exclusive sessions with CMDs of Indian Public and Private sector Shipyards NAMEXPO will help bringing manufacturers of equipment, assemblies, components system integrators and the end-users together. NAMEXPO will also facilitate business houses to explore the future areas of cooperation. Through NAMEXPO, we intend to send the message to the world about the current and emerging opportunities in the Indian naval and maritime sector. Indian Navy and various government departments will have the opportunity and benefit of interacting and witnessing the latest technological advancements in the naval and maritime sector at one place. CII will bring the industry participants on board to facilitate interactions with all the official stakeholders. We are keen to project NAMEXPO as a biennial event.


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BRAHMOS UNIVERSAL MISSILE SYSTEM FOR NAVAL FORCES AT NAMEXPO-2013

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rahMos Aerospace, the producer of world’s only supersonic cruise missile BRAHMOS, is taking part in India’s first dedicated naval and maritime exhibition NAMEXPO-2013 being held at Cochin Port Trust, Kerala from 23rd Sept to 27th Sept, 2013. The India-Russia JV Company will showcase the BRAHMOS weapon system in various configurations, including the recently developed and successfully tested underwater variant of the supersonic cruise missile. The major highlight during the international exhibition will be the BRAHMOS Coastal Defence System consisting of the land-attack variant of the 290-km range missile. Also on focus will be the BRAHMOS Ship-based Weapon Complex consisting the ship-to-land and ship-to-ship variant of the missile. The Indian Navy’s newly inducted Project 11356-class guided missile frigate equipped with BRAHMOS as the “prime strike weapon” will also be exhibited during the premier event. A full-scale

model of BRAHMOS fitted with the large-scale replica of the warship will be a major attraction during the five day show. Of the three Project 11356class frigates on order from Russia, two have been commissioned into service -INS Teg on 27 April, 2012 and INS Tarkash on 9 November, 2012 respectively, while the commissioning of INS Trikand is expected soon. All three ships are being equipped with 8 vertical launched BRAHMOS missile system. Both INS Teg and INS Tarkash have successfully test fired the surface-to-surface BRAHMOS missile in vertical launch configuration following their induction in the Navy. The vertical launch configuration of BRAHMOS enhances the stealth capabilities of the warships as the missiles are under the deck and not exposed. The Universal Vertical Launcher (UVLM) being used in these ships has a unique design, developed and patented by BrahMos Aerospace. The ship-based

configuration of the tactical BRAHMOS missile has been deployed on Indian Navy’s frontline warships. The naval variant of BRAHMOS has been successfully test-fired in both vertical and inclined launch configurations from moving warships. The powerful missile can be launched in solo or salvo mode from a warship and completely destroy single or multiple targets within a fraction of few seconds. Among other highlights, the BRAHMOS air-borne launcher and equipment manufactured

by BATL for Defence and Space applications will be on display at the BrahMos Aerospace pavilions at E-69 (indoor) and OD-1 (outdoor). The two-stage BRAHMOS missile system has been developed under a joint IndiaRussia defence project. The cruise missile has a flight range of up to 290-km with supersonic speed all through the flight, leading to shorter flight time, consequently ensuring lower dispersion of targets, quicker engagement time and non-interception by any known weapon system in the world. BRAHMOS is capable of carrying a conventional warhead of 300 kg. The missile can cruise at a maximum speed of 2.8 Mach. NAMEXPO 2013 is a maiden event focused on Naval and Maritime domain. The exhibition is being organised by CII in association with Indian Navy and Government of Kerala. BrahMos Aerospace will be the Technology Partner in the event, pegged as the “first focused naval and maritime exhibition” in India.


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DE DETECT. ETECT T. DECIDE. ENGAGE. EN NGAGE..

IN NDIAN NAVAL NAVAL FORCES FO ORCES THE INDIAN are facing facin ng a complex, demanding demandin ng and growing are challeng ge. With 7500 km of coastline coasstline and challenge. c interests continuous surveillance su urveillance is strategic b necessary. difficult but Outstand ding performance, presenting prese enting a clear Outstanding com mprehensive overview, yet ye et with all the and comprehensive a your fingertips. The Saab Sa aab 9LV details at integrate es the ship’s sensor system, systtem, weapons integrates systemss and data links.

www.saabgroup.com ww w.saabg aabgroup.com

An o open architecture architecture makess 9LV 9L LV a platform suitable suita able for India. It’s It’s custom m built in partnership with h Indian firms and seamlessly essly integrates systems sources. syst tems and weapons from from different diffferent sour ces. To To be b prepared for the unexpected. unexpected. That’s That’s better prepared whyy we strive to anticipate tomorrow. tomorrow.


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06 products, services and solutions ranging from military defence to civil security. Saab and AVIA Satcom are committed to partnering Thailand in building a new generation of defence industry.”  SAAB IN THAILAND

SAAB INAUGURATES ASIA PACIFIC HQ OFFICE IN THAILAND Mr. Dan Enstedt, President & CEO Saab Asia Pacific to the left and Mr. Klas Molin, Swedish Ambassador to Thailand to the right during Saab Asia Pacific Office inauguration.

D

efence and security company Saab has inaugurated its office in Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok. Saab has identified Asia Pacific as a focus Market Area where the company will significantly enhance its presence in order to participate in opportunities across the region. The Bangkok office will operate as a hub for the region. Saab has offices in Malaysia, Korea, Singapore, Japan, Indonesia, Australia and China. On the occasion, Saab also launched its Thailand specific section on its main website on www.saabgroup.com/thailand. In order to support the successful Gripen-, AEW- and frigate-programmes and future business opportunities in Thailand and in the South East Asia region, Saab is increasing its presence in Thailand. The headquarters of Market Area Asia Pacific will now be located

in Bangkok. Saab brings to Asia Pacific world leading products, services and solutions ranging from military defence to civil security. Thailand has been among the top 10 markets for Saab over an extended period of time. The company has extensive engagement with both defence and civilian sectors of Thailand. With the intent of cementing its long term presence in the country, Saab has established a strategic long term partnership with AVIA Satcom by acquiring a minority stake of 37% in the company. The cooperation with AVIA Satcom is in full operation since 2011. According to Dan Enstedt, President & CEO, Saab Asia Pacific, “Saab is not only a provider of reliable, worldleading technologies; it brings

an ethos of trust, reliability and long term relationships. The success of the fighter aircraft, airborne surveillance, military aerospace combat and control systems and naval programs is testimony to the technology, compatibility and service ethos that Saab and Sweden bring to the region. Saab brings to Thailand world leading

“Saab is not only a provider of reliable, world-leading technologies; it brings an ethos of trust, reliability and long term relationships”

—Dan Enstedt, President & CEO, Saab Asia Pacific

Saab’s partnership with the Royal Thai Armed Forces encompasses the Gripen Air Defence Package, ACCS, Radar Systems and RBS 70 for the Air Force; Carl-Gustaf and BT simulators for the Army and the CMS (9LV) and SGAMB for the Navy. Saab is committed to long term engagement in Thailand to serve and deliver to the needs of the kingdom. The company enjoys good relations with all arms of the defence forces and works closely with the Swedish Government in upholding and developing its relations with the Government of Thailand. As part of the Swedish Gripen Air Defence Package, Saab is transferring 100 manyears of advanced aerospace technologies to Thailand. The aim of this transfer of technology is, through longterm partnerships, designed to sustain and positively enhance the aerospace and defense industry in Thailand. Saab’s engagement with Thailand is with all branches of the government. The defence and security company Saab upgraded the combat management and fire control systems on two frigates of the Naresuan class of the Royal Thai Navy. The frigates H.T.M.S. Naresuan and H.T.M.S Taksin were equipped with the latest generation of combat management and fire control systems, 9LV Mk4 and CEROS 200 and there was a subsequent order for additional sights and communications equipment to complete the combat suite on


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the two frigates. Saab also supplied data-link equipment to the ships, which allows communication between frigates and Thailand’s existing Gripen aircraft and Saab 340s, the latter fitted with the ERIEYE airborne radar system. Saab also upgraded the command and control system on the aircraft carrier H.T.M.S. Chakri Narubet. The aircraft carrier was fitted with the latest generation of command and control system, 9LV Mk4. Saab also supplied data-link equipment to the ship, which allows communication between the ship and the Royal Thai Air Force’s Gripen fighter aircraft and the airborne radar system Erieye, carried by the Saab 340 AEW.

 SAAB IN ASIA PACIFIC For Saab, Asia Pacific is a key market with large growth and partnership potential. Saab is committed to long term engagement in Asia Pacific to serve and deliver to the requirements of the various countries in the region. Saab products are in use in a number of countries in the region, including Korea, Japan, China (AIS), Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. Currently Saab is engaged in delivering on a number of programmes in Thailand as well as pursuing many individual opportunities in many other countries of the region. All of Saab’s Business Areas are active in Asia Pacific, offering high-tech solutions and products such as the Gripen, Skeldar, Remote Towers, C4I, EW (Self Protection Systems), Signature Management, Aeronautical Platforms, Communication Systems, Surveillance systems, Fire Control and Radar Systems.

DCNS FLOATS OUT FREMM FRIGATE PROVENCE

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REMM frigate Provence was floated out of its building dock at the Lorient shipyard. With five FREMM multimission frigates at different stages of assembly and construction, this float-out (or pre-outfitting launch) – always a major milestone – highlights the Group’s expertise in concurrent shipbuilding. DCNS’s Lorient shipyard floated out FREMM frigate Provence. Eleven of the 12 FREMM frigates on order are for the French Navy.Operations began in the morning with the flooding of the building dock. Following a number of other steps, the ship was gently floated out of the building dock. Executing a manoeuvre lasting 15 minutes, tugs then moved the frigate to a nearby outfitting berth. Over the coming months, DCNS specialists and subcontractor teams will install the ship’s systems. The next major milestone will be the installation of the

Provence’s masts and sensors, including her radars, antennas, cameras and jammers. DCNS began building the Provence, the third Aquitaine-class FREMM frigate for the French Navy, in December 2010. These highly automated surface combatants require a complement of just 108, or less than half the number required to man earlier generation vessels with similar capabilities. The FREMM multimission design concept can combine missions including anti-air warfare (AAW), anti-surface warfare (ASuW) and anti-submarine warfare (ASW). On 23 November 2012, following the delivery of first-of-class FREMM frigate Aquitaine for the French Navy in compliance with the relevant contractual requirements, European Joint Armament Cooperation Organisation OCCAR signed off her acceptance on behalf of French defence procurement agency DGA.


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SUBMARINE WARFARE AND UPGRADES

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A Malaysian Scorpene class submarine. Similar boats are being built for India © DCNS

century ago naval power was counted in battleships, but the modern arbiter of naval power consists of invisible battleships submarines which have played a major role in shaping modern Asia and are likely to continue to do so. A market survey at the beginning of the year calculated that by the end of the decade the region’s expenditure on submarines will total $46 billion. The submarine is far superior, in terms of influencing a maritime situation, than any battleship for it combines firepower with covert flexible operation, opening the way to a wide variety of other roles, especially in the modern world. Maritime domination was the submarine’s original role focusing upon denying waters to hostile warships; indeed the first modern submarine attack in 1912 was by the Greek

submarine Delfin against a Turkish ironclad. A century later this remains a relevant role as demonstrated in 1982 when the sinking of an ancient cruiser by a submarine saw the Argentinean navy confined to harbour for most of the South Atlantic campaign. The presence of submarines remains a major inhibitor to enemy surface strike or amphibious groups and therefore a deterrent to precipitous action. The submarine then rapidly expanded into interdicting maritime lines of communication and destroying mercantile fleets. The impact of German attacks upon the British Empire in two world wars, and the way US submarines strangled the Japanese Empire in the Second World War are well known. Indeed the latter helped to shape Asian history by weakening Japanese control

on the mainland and the offshore islands and archipelagos. Asian economies are increasingly dependent upon maritime trade over great distances both for importing raw materials and for exporting manufactured goods. The threat from pirates off the Horn of Africa as well as ‘choke points’ such as the Straits of Malacca demonstrates their vulnerability. Submarine attack, or the threat of submarine attack, can wreak havoc on maritime trade; indeed the Japanese Maritime Self Defence Force is shaped to securing the island kingdom’s sea lanes, although most modern navies appear to be in denial and prefer to focus more upon the original role of Fleet attack. Compared with wartime boats, submarines have high underwater speeds, and through hull shaping, ‘rafting’

machinery and shaping moving parts such as propellers they are much quieter, indeed so much so that in 2009 British and French nuclear submarines collided without being aware of each other’s presence. The endurance of diesel-electric boats has been greatly extended through the introduction of air independent propulsion allowing them to remain on station far longer, compensating for a decline. It is also worth noting that US anti-submarine forces have difficulty detecting foreign diesel-electric boats during training exercises. The submarine can now deploy sophisticated torpedoes, such as wavehomers, as well as anti-ship missiles, but another option is to use the mine, which can be laid covertly and with great precision as well as being carefully activated and operated. All submarines can carry mines in lieu of other weapons and the presence alone of mines can disrupt trade as demonstrated by incidents around the Arabian Peninsula during the mid 1980s. The past half century has seen a new threat emerge from under the sea, the ballistic missile submarine. These can vanish into the world’s oceans beyond the ability of any potential enemy to detect them and remain on station almost indefinitely, the limitation being food for the crew. Nuclear-powered vessels can deliver colossal fire power across the globe, and while once the prerogative of the Great Powers they are now in the inventories of Asia’s Great Powers. China has had the Xia since 1987 and is adding the Jin (Type 094) class with a dozen JL-2 missiles with a 4,300 nautical mile (8,000


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09 kilometre) range, while India’s first domestically-produced nuclear submarine, INS Arihant, will be similar but with dozen Sagarika ballistic missiles with a more modest 400 nautical mile (750 kilometres) range. While the capital costs of these strategic deterrents are very high, while India’s first domesticallyproduced nuclear submarine, INS Arihant, will be similar but with dozen Sagarika ballistic missiles with a more modest 400 nautical mile (750 kilometres) range. While the capital costs of these strategic deterrents are very high the operating costs are relatively low. The Trident force, which provides 54 per cent of the US strategic deterrent, uses 35 per cent of Washington’s strategic budget but only 1.5 per cent of naval personnel. The successors to INS Arihant are scheduled to receive ‘cruise’ or ‘air breathing’ missiles, turbofanpowered miniature aircraft with inertial navigation systems capable of flying long missions at low level and concluding with a precision

attack upon the target. These weapons have been launched from torpedo tubes by attack submarines of the US Navy and the Royal Navy since 1991 and provide an impressive, nonnuclear means of strategic strike hundreds of kilometres from the sea. It is a capability that will increasingly be at the disposal of major Asian navies that wish to acquire it, and it is worth recalling that 40 per cent of the world’s population lives within 100 nautical miles (185 kilometres) of the sea in an area which produces 67.6 per cent of the world’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Significantly, India’s Russian-built Kilo (Project 877) or Sindhughosh class submarines are being upgraded at Severodvinsk to operate the Klub missile system family, and while most boats are being adapted to use the 3M54 (SS-N-27) anti-ship missile two have been adapted to take 3M14 (SS-N-30) land attack missiles with a 160 nautical mile (300 kilometre) range. India is also developing a submarine-launched version of the supersonic Brahmos

missile, which has a similar range to the 3M14, and while this might be primarily for anti-ship, a land attack role cannot be ruled out. In fact, conventional land attack now lies within the reach of smaller navies using anti-ship missiles for manufacturers have responded to the growing demand for littoral warfare by adapting these weapons initially to engage vessels operating in the radar clutter from the coast or a harbour and later directly to attack land targets. This capability exists in the latest Exocets, supplied to Malaysia for its Scorpenes, and the turbojet-propelled Block 3 version has a range of 95 nautical miles (180 kilometres). The submarine has a key role even in peace time, or in crises short of hostilities, by providing covert Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) a legacy capability enhanced by modern technology. During the war against Japan submarines regularly exploited the high magnification rates of their optical periscopes to

The Subtics consoles; like those of ISUS 90 are multi-role units. They are to be found in Malaysian boats and will also equip Indian Scorpenes © DCNS

NAMEXPO Daily International Exposition & Conference on

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conduct visual and photographic reconnaissance; indeed, using them to count the number of latrines, US Navy intelligence was able to determine with great accuracy the size of the garrison on the island of Tarawa in 1943. The introduction of mastmounted television cameras, which can be augmented by image intensifier and/or thermal imager systems, has enhanced this capability. These masts can be raised, turn up to 360 degrees capturing and recording an image with a television camera and then be lowered all within 10 seconds and the images can then be studied at leisure upon a console. Interestingly, the new Japanese Souryu class submarines have the licencebuilt Thales Optronics CM 10 mast-mounted system and it seems likely this technology will be acquired by other Asian navies in the coming years especially in new-build vessels such as Australia’s Collins successor. Wartime submarines were also used to deliver special forces both for reconnaissance and commando raids. Modern special forces may be delivered through the traditional inflatable boat but it is more likely they will use swimmer delivery vehicles (SDVs) which can pull them through the water saving time and energy. Major navies are looking at dedicated miniature submarines attached to nuclear-powered attack submarines to deliver special forces from longer ranges, and the concept has already been accepted by some Asian navies such as North and South Korea as well as Pakistan which operate conventional miniature submarines specifically for this role. Modern submarine design is increasingly incorporating features to support special


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operations and these will undoubtedly filter into Asian navies. Germany’s new batch of Type 212A submarines will include a lock-out chamber for up to four special forces troopers at a time while Israel’s German-built Dolphins have a similar feature and the four 650mm (25.6 inch) torpedo tubes in these boats are reported to be for SDVs. Kockums recently revealed their design for the Swedish Navy’s A26 which included a bay on the casing for an SDV or even a miniature submarine, while the conventional torpedo compartment has been replaced by a multi-role space

This is not new; in 1943 US submarines were able to identify a particular Japanese destroyer operating in the waters of what is now Indonesia because it had nicked a propeller blade and had a very distinctive signature. The sophisticated processing of modern sonar systems carries this further forward by monitoring, and recording, the whole of a ships’ acoustic signature. Electronic signal measures (ESM) systems are in all submarines, detecting and monitoring radar and communications signals in order to alert them to the

operated vehicles (ROVs) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), may well extend this ISR function. They could be deployed through torpedo tubes- after all heavyweight torpedoes are wire guided so wire guidance should not be impossible- but there remain questions of control, and the difficulties of recovering these vehicles make it likely they will be disposable assets; but they could be used for hydrographical surveys, to plot enemy minefields (whose presence would be discovered by the submarine’s mine detection and obstacle avoidance sonar) and possibly A Thales flank array in the Sonar 2076 system. Although this is for a nuclear-powered boat it is typical of this type of submarine sensor © Thales Underwater Systems

which can also house SDVs that will depart or enter through a 1.5 metre wide multimission portal in the bow between the torpedo tubes. Behind this is a 6-metre long airlock which can hold up to eight personnel. Submarines can also use their electronic sensors in the ISR role. Sonars can not only monitor traffic and build up a picture of maritime and naval movements but also be used to create a library identifying individual ships to provide further detail of naval activity.

presence of hostile ships and aircraft. The same systems can also be used to monitor radio traffic and to detect and to locate radar stations and help a nation covertly build up a picture of potentially hostile activity in a neighbour. This picture can include technical details of aircraft and of ships, organisation of command and control assets with supporting sensor and weapons as well as clues to strategic intentions as well as operational capabilities. The development of robot submarines, both remotely

to neutralise them. Indeed, if mine fuzes can be designed to switch on or off based upon a timer, then it is technically feasible for ROVs to attach disposal charges with their own timer fuzes to neutralise the mines at a preferred time such as when an amphibious group arrives off its objective. Interestingly the US Navy has announced plans to deploy Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV) from submerged submarines during the RIMPAC (Rim of the Pacific) exercise possibly adding an aerial

reconnaissance capability to the submarine’s already broad inventory of tasks. The existing and potential capabilities of submarines mean that the Asian market remains dynamic with new build and upgrades. In the past 12 months Indonesia has ordered two submarines from South Korea, and Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) has been awarded a contract to build the first two 3,000-tonne Korean Submarine Phase 3 (KSS 3) boats with Seoul having a requirement for up to nine. Singapore has received the second former Swedish Västergötland class boat, RSS Swordsman which, like RSS Archer, has been comprehensively upgraded, refurbished and tropicalised. Building of Scorpenes to meet India’s Project 75 requirement has slipped at least a year although New Delhi is preparing to launch the Project 75A programme while Australia is in a similar position with the Collins class successor in Project Sea 1000. In the distaff side there is no sign of Taiwan getting its longed for new submarines, while Thailand’s plans to acquire German Type 206 coastal boats was scuttled by inter-service financial wrangling. Thailand retains a submarine requirement while Bangladesh and the Philippines would both like submarines, Manila defining the requirement at three boats, but financial hurdles remain too high to overcome. Upgrade programmes continue but news is muted; Pakistan’s Khalids (Agosta 90B) are receiving MESMA air independent propulsion systems and Australia’s Collins will have their Scylla sonars improved, while Russia continues to upgrade India’s Kilo class boats.


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EUROCOPTER’S AS565 MB PANTHER: THE IDEAL CHOICE FOR INDIA’S COASTLINE

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urocopter’s AS565 MB Panther offers a mission-proven rotorcraft in service with military forces across the world. The product is the military version of multi-role, twin-engine Dauphin family whose largest civilian operator is Pawan Hans Helicopters Limited. Since first entering service in the 1970s, more than 1,000 Dauphin-series rotorcraft have been delivered to some 300 customers in 69 countries, accumulating a combined total of more than 5.1 million flight hours. They are used in a full range of operations on land and at sea, earning a reputation for mission capability, cost-effectiveness, ease of operation and flight safety. In its AS565 MB Panther naval version, the all-weather, multi-role light helicopter can

be operated from ship decks, offshore platforms and land bases with demonstrated capabilities to cover the full range of Indian Navy and Coast Guard mission requirements – including maritime surveillance, search and rescue, offshore patrolling and counter-terrorism, casualty evacuation and vertical replenishment. The AS565 MB Panther also is an ideal complementary asset for such anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and antisurface unit warfare tasks as submarine and surface target destruction. It can launch its own torpedoes and provide over-the-horizon targeting to surface ships. In coming years, it will also be armed with light anti-ship missile giving it a ship strike capability. Retaining the Dauphin family’s excellent flight characteristics and

performance, the AS565 MB Panther incorporates improvements that include a unique flight control system and flight management system from Eurocopter’s heavy range of helicopters along with the company’s latest-generation, 100 per cent composite Fenestron tail rotor which provides high maneuverability, low external noise and optimal safety for passengers, ground and air crews. For ship borne operations, the AS565 Panther main rotor blades can be folded backwards to reduce the helicopter’s length, and vertical tail fin can be folded to reduce the helicopter’s height in order to facilitate hangar entry. The Panther is also equipped with a deck securing device (harpoon) permitting it to be secured on IN, ICG and NATO ships via a NATO standard deck grid during

launching and landing maneuvers. A benchmark example of the Panther/Dauphin helicopter family’s mission capabilities and operational flexibility is the H-65 version flown by the US Coast Guard. Their use is further expanded to include armed versions for the interception/interdiction of vessels at sea along with airborne protection of the Washington DC capital region. The H-65 also is the service’s only aircraft used aboard seagoing cutters during deployments. Other countries that deploy AS565/365 Panther/Dauphin helicopters in naval and coast guard services include France, Spain, China, Saudi Arabia, Korea and Malaysia. The mission equipment and systems integrated on these rotorcraft include antiship missiles, search torpedoes, surveillance and weather radars, electrooptical system with FLIR and TV sensors associated with laser range finder, glass cockpits with night vision goggle compatibility, a Link II data link that couples the helicopters’ sensors to shipboard mission systems as well as countermeasures suites with missile/radar/laser warning receivers and chaff and flare dispensers. On the other hand, AS365 – more popularly known as the Dauphin – are medium, twinengine helicopters that can seat up to 12 passengers. It can hover at maximum all-up weight of 4,300 kg up to an outside temperature of + 45°C at sea level. This aircraft is very popular all over the world for demanding missions such as police work, homeland security, search and rescue, offshore and military combat or support missions.


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NAMEXPO Daily International Exposition & Conference on

Indian Naval and Maritime Sector

STEALTH FRIGATE ‘INS TRIKAND’ JOINS INDIAN NAVY

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NS Trikand, the last of the three “Follow On Talwar Class” frigates built in the Russian Federation, was commissioned into the Indian Navy at Kaliningrad, Russia by Vice Admiral R K Dhowan, the Vice Chief of the Naval Staff,

Indian Navy, in a glittering ceremony marked by traditional military fervour that included the Indian and the Russian navies. The commissioning of INS Trikand marks the culmination of a three ship

contract for “Follow On Talwar Class” ships built in Russia, and is therefore a milestone in the Indo-Russian militarytechnological cooperation. Her sister ships INS Teg and INS Tarkash were commissioned last year.

INDIAN NAVY COMMISSIONS AVIATION SIMULATORS

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AUXILIARY CRAFT PRADAYAK INTRODUCED AT SOUTHERN NAVAL COMMAND

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n auxiliary craft, named Pradayak- after another oiler decommissioned in 2007- was inducted into the Navy. Rear Admiral S Madhusudanan, Admiral Superintendent of the Naval Ship Repair Yard, Kochiwas the Chief Guest at the induction ceremony. Speaking on the occasion, the Admiral

complimented the Ship Yard,The Shalimar Works (1980) Limited of Howrah- for delivering the ship in seven months. He also expressed optimism that the barge would enable faster turnaround of warships at Kochi. Somdev Chatterjee, the Managing Director of The Shalimar Shipyard said that it is a matter of pride for the company, to execute projects for the Indian Navy. The Shalimar Works (1980) Limited, a 125 year old company is presently, wholly owned by the Government of West Bengal.

wo state of the art simulators- The Flight and Tactical Simulator (FATS) for Seaking helicopter and the Water Survival Training Facility (WSTF) for aircrew were commissioned at Kochi – the home of Navy’s training command. Vice Admiral Satish Soni, Flag Officer Commanding in Chief Southern Naval Command inaugurated the twin facilities, housed at INS Garuda Navy’s Air Station at Kochi. The Admiral paid homage at the Seaking memorial built at the premises of FATS prior to the event. Speaking on the occasion, Admiral Soni said that such facilities help in reducing accident rates and asked the crew to focus on proper maintenance. The FATS is designed for Pilots and Observers of Seaking helicopters for initial, and periodic training.


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INDIA’S FIRST INDIGENOUS AIRCRAFT CARRIER, INS ‘VIKRANT’ LAUNCHED

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ikrant, India’s first aircraft carrier, decommissioned on 31 January 1997, was reborn. Smt Elizabeth Antony, wife of the Defence Minister Shri AK Antony, christened India’s first Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC) as ‘Vikrant’ meaning “courageous” or “victorious” in Sanskrit.

INDIA COMMISSIONS LARGE OPV; TO BE BUILT INDIGENOUSLY

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ndian Coast Guard Ship Vaibhav, the 3rd in the series of 90 meters class Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) was commissioned at Tuticorin by Vice Admiral Anurag G Thapliyal, Director General Indian Coast Guard. This 90 metres long OPV has been designed and built indigenously by M/s GSL and is fitted with the state-of-the-

In a colourful ceremony filled with traditional pomp and fervour at the Cochin Shipyard Limited in Kochi, Smt Antony launched ‘Vikrant’ in the presence of Shri AK Antony, the Minister of Shipping, Shri GK Vasan, the Chief of Naval Staff Admiral DK Joshi, the F-O-C in C Western Naval art navigation and communication equipment, sensors and machineries. The features include an Integrated Bridge System(IBS), Integrated Machinery Control System (IMCS), Power Management System (PMS), High Power External Fire Fighting System (ABS Fi-Fi Class-1) and one indigenous Close Range Naval Gun (CRN-91) along with an optical fire control system. The ship is designed to carry one helicopter and five high speed boats for search and rescue, law enforcement and

Command Vice Admiral Shekhar Sinha, Commanderin-Chief Southern Naval Command Vice Admiral Satish Soni, Chairman and Managing Director, CSL, Commodore (Retd) K Subramaniam and other officials of the Ministry of Defence and Ministry of Shipping. In addition, a

multitude of Naval officers, yard workers and a few members of the Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL), the manufacturers of the indigenous warship grade steel, were also present. At the launch, marking the end of Phase- I of the project, the imposing ramp of the 37,500 tonne Short Take off but Assisted Recovery (STOBAR) Carrier boasted the indigenous design and build capabilities of the country. The ship has attained its designed length of about 260 m and is almost at its maximum breadth of 60 m. The main landing strip is ready. Over 80% of the structure, containing about 2300 compartments has been fabricated, over 75% has been erected, all the major machinery, such as the two LM2500 Gas Turbines developing a total power of 80 MW, the diesel alternators capable of producing about 24 MW and the main gear box have been fitted. maritime patrol. The ship is also capable of carrying pollution response equipment to combat oil spill at sea. The ship is fitted with advanced Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) making it an apt platform to carry out search and rescue operations in Indian Search and Rescue Region (ISRR). The increasing strength of the Coast Guards is to be viewed in the context of the country’s clear and present danger from non-state actors breaching it coastal security.


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Namexpo showdaily sept 23, 2013++  

NAMEXPO International Exposition & Conference on Indian Naval and Maritime Sector - Showdaily, 23 Sept 2013

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