Page 1


magazine

Publisher Tammy Clark tmclark225@gmail.com Editor Heather Page heather@vipmagsc.com Office Manager Tiffany Skipper jtskipp35@gmail.com Advertising Executives Julie C. Tyler juliectyler@yahoo.com Creative Design Tuesday Taylor Ashley Rogers

Contributing Photographers Daisy Bostick Nancy Devon Carsten Erin Daniel Rebecca Giese Fred Salley Contributing Writers Kayla Jebaily Adams Mark W. Buyck, III Nicole Cogdell-Quick, PC Kent Daniels Ashley Elvington Rebecca Giese Zach Hughes Allie Roark Doug Smith Donna Tracy

Serving Florence, Hartsville, Darlington, Marion, Mullins, Lake City and the surrounding areas 2011-B Second Loop Rd, Florence, SC 29501 FIND US ON FACEBOOK

For advertising rates, call 843-687-4236.

6

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


CONTENTS

ISSUE 48

12

24

NOVEMBER 2019 HOME 12 Doug Smith: For These, I Am Thankful 14 Kent Daniels: The Goat Man 16 Rebecca Giese: 3 Tricks To Table Settings 18 Bucket List: Cheraw State Park

HEALTH + BEAUTY 20 HopeHealth: Tobacco Cessation 22 Allie Roark: How To Be Kind 24 Pepsi Carolina Classic

BUSINESS 26 Block & Vino: At-Home Dining Made Easy 28 WebsterRogers: Stephen Holladay 30 Willcox, Buyck & Williams, PA: Early SC Landscape 32 November 2019 Calendar

COVER STORIES

36

36 Pee Dee Electric Cooperative 40 Zeman's Heating & Air 42 All Saints' Episcopal Day School 44 Pee Dee Land Trust 46 United Way of Hartsville 48 Thomlinson & McWhite, Inc. 50 Forest Lake Greenhouses 52 Fowler Furniture & Bedding 54 Evans Ready Mix

56 Fly Away Ball!

50 8

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

60

60 Drink of the Month: Pumpkin Pie Martini


HOME

For These, I Am

Thankful story by Doug Smith

Count your blessings. Name them one by one. I’m often reminded of a school project where we were asked to make a list of 100 things for which we were thankful. After struggling to put about ten items on the list, I was out of thought. However, now that I’m a little older, the hardest part of this assignment would be finding a pen that writes. More about this later. In our house, we often refer to Thanksgiving dinner as the best dinner of the year. Everyone has a dish they like to prepare and share at the table. Over the years I have made multiple different dishes like copper carrot pennies, Brussel sprouts, and green bean casserole just to name a few. Last year, I did a root vegetable traybake. I love the flavors of root vegetables and I’m always trying to share my passion for food with my friends and family. I was so excited to see everyone taking a portion as they walked through the serving line. Even the young kids had this delicious blend of beets, turnips, rutabagas and fresh herbs on their plate. As we were all enjoying the food and getting caught up on life’s events, I noticed how this dish was a big hit and then the questions came. What is this? Root what? Beets, really? The whole table went from small talk to 101 questions about the dinner. I had no idea that something so simple and so good could become such a hot topic. Although no one at the table expressed a love for beets, they all were very pleased with this simple dish.  Back to the "100 things to be thankful for" assignment. Allow me to start by saying I’m thankful for VIP Magazine and how they have allowed me to share my passion for food each month. Thank you to the readers for taking the time to peruse the articles and I trust you have tried at least one of the recipes. I am also grateful for a loving wife and great kids (most of the time). I am thankful for a town that has a local farmers market that we can not only eat local but also get to know the people that grow some of the best food you can buy. Thankful for friends and family that are always there in the good times and the bad. I’m thankful for the people that I work with daily that inspire me to follow my passion for cooking and sharing with friends and family. I’m thankful for our traditions. Just this week the ingredients to start the Christmas Cakes that my daughter and I bake each year were delivered. I could go on and on because I truly have so much to be thankful for and I trust you do as story by Dougwell. Smith Count your blessings. Name them one by one.

Get more from Doug Smith by following him on Facebook and Instagram at "Doug the Food Guy".

12

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


"I love the flavors of root vegetables and I’m always trying to share my passion for food with my friends and family." -Doug

Roasted Root Vegetables INGREDIENTS •  2 tablespoons olive oil  •  2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped •  2 medium sweet potatoes, chopped into chunks •  1/2 pound carrots peeled, cut into 3/4 inch thick rounds  •  1/2 pound parsnips, peeled, cut into 3/4 inch thick rounds  •  1 medium red onion, peeled, and cut into 1/2 inch thick wedges •  1 turnip root chopped into chunks •  1 beet root peeled and chopped into chunks •  1 teaspoon sea salt •  1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

METHOD • Preheat oven to 425ºF. • Add the olive oil to a baking tray. • Toss the root vegetables together coating them in the oil. Sprinkle vegetables generously with sea salt and pepper. Make sure the veggies are in one layer so they will roast evenly.  • Roast veggies for 25 minutes. Remove from the oven, add the parsley and toss. • Roast for an additional 25 minutes or until tender. November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

13


HOME

Did You Know...

story by Kent Daniels

A Lake City Legend,

The Goat Man You may not remember this man, but he is nevertheless a Lake City legend. Any Lake Citian over the age of forty should remember him. After he lost his farm in Iowa during the Great Depression of the 1930s, he started his travels through the south eventually finding his way to Lake City. This man was Charles “Ches” McCartney, perhaps remembered better by his nickname - The Goat Man. Ches led an interesting life and surrounded himself with mutually interesting people. Before coming to South Carolina, Ches visited New York where he met his first wife, a Spanish knife thrower living in New York City. It was Ches's responsibility to keep her knives sharp and to stand as a part of the act having the knives just barely miss severing his skin. After a while, Ches grew tired of his first wife. He left her and married an Iowan. He later sold his second wife to a farmer for $1,000. The reason for the sale was that his wife “took a shine” to that farmer and vice versa. The $1,000 paid for the divorce and the subsequent wedding. He later took a third wife. He went on the road again, preaching, selling postcards with his friends, slowing down traffic, and annoying government agencies from the Humane Society to the Internal Revenue System. Ches and his friends would come through Lake City on Highway 52 going south in the spring or summer, sometimes riding a cart and sometimes walking. He had a brief obsession with the actress Morgan Fairchild and traveled all the way to Hollywood trying to track her down, but failed. Ches ran for president against Lyndon Johnson in 1964 with a campaign to lower the retirement age to 55. He also claimed to be the first “hippie” because of his unconventional lifestyle, long hair, and beard. In the 1960s, while traveling through Chattanooga, Tennessee, some of his friends’ throats were slashed by a gang and he was beaten up. His "friends" were his goats. After this, he lived in an old school bus, finally moving into a Macon, Georgia, nursing home in l987. Ches died in 1998. story adapted from Atlanta Journal - Constitution

Kent Daniels is a Lake City native, retired teacher, and now Director of the Lynches Lake Historical Society.

14

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

Continue to follow Kent in future issues of Vip as he sheds some light on the history of Lake City.


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

15


LIFESTYLE

16

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


3 Table Setting Tricks to

As a child, I loved helping my mom set the "grown-ups" table. Now as an adult, I still admire a well thought out place setting - the shimmer of the gold foil detail on the china or the perfectly placed and pressed napkin. But also as an adult, I realize how expensive those tablescapes can be. Chargers, napkins, glassware, the price tag adds up fast. So today, I am sharing three different table settings that feature items from around the house and backyard to spark your creativity when setting your table this holiday season. Find a way to make your old setting seem new or create a modern twist with grandma's china!

White and Gold Tea Party The star of the show, china was my great aunts. I love the simple White and Gold pattern but wanted to balance the china with a touch of a whimsy tea party. For the placemats, we used brown craft paper and white marker to create a little design. The brown paper makes the setting less formal. The gold napkin rings are bangle bracelets. Who needs expensive napkin rings? For a fun place card, I spray painted a pinecone from the yard gold. And the centerpiece is the matching china teacups with faux plants we had around the house, on top of a collection of old books.

On My Radar! The Hartsville Tree Lighting November 21st! I loved going for the first time last year and can't wait to experience it again this year. It feels like you are walking around in a Hallmark Christmas movie with snow machines and sleigh rides down College Ave.

story and photos by Rebecca Giese

Succulent Garden For this setting, we mixed and matched my great aunt's and my great grandmother's china. I love how the green glass salad plate looks with the blues and greens in my Bamaw's china plates. This pairing inspired a garden-themed tablescape, but to add a modern twist, we went with succulents. The placeholders and the succulent arrangements are available for purchase from the Southern'spirations booth at Fleur De Lis in Hartsville. But you could use any house plants or your own live or faux succulents to recreate a similar garden theme.

Forest Feast My mother's deer plates inspired this setting. For the napkin holder, I cut some twine and tied a bow with a sprig of rosemary from the garden. The placeholder is just two sticks from the yard hot glued together with the name card glued between them. For a centerpiece, I used my mother's clear apothecary jars that had been previously filled with greenery and natural elements. Currently residing in Hartsville, Rebecca Giese enjoys exploring the Pee Dee area, shopping local artisans, trying new restaurants, and finding inspiration from the history and culture surrounding her. When not out on an adventure, she’s telling stories on her blog, Southern’spirations. November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

17


BUCKET LIST

Cheraw State Park story by Zach Hughes

Over the years, there have been many reasons for me to take North Governors Highway traveling north from Darlington. One of those reasons has included traveling to Camp Coker in Society Hill as a Boy Scout. Anytime I pass through Society Hill and see the old wooden sign it reminds me of those days from my youth. This same road just so happens to be the way my father has used to commute to his job as an engineer in Cheraw for the past 25 years. I have always imagined what visuals he takes in while commuting to and from his job. The reason we find ourselves here today is a trip to Cheraw State Park After merging onto Highway 15 and taking a left onto Highway 52 in Society Hill, your destination is only a short scenic drive ahead. Shortly after passing Moree Sportsman Preserve, the landscape begins to give you hints that you are toe to toe with the midlands. If you pay close enough attention you will notice that to the right of this road it almost appears as if the landscape slopes downwards, giving your eyes further to see. Towards the end of Highway 52, right before you would merge onto Highway 1, is a somewhat hidden and marvelous natural beauty. What you will find is one of the most underrated and worthwhile state parks on our list, Cheraw State Park. One of the first things you notice when you enter Cheraw State Park is the beautiful hidden lake that holds the whole area together. This body of water is known as Lake Juniper and the park would not be the same without it. To the right of the boat ramp is a small trail that leads to a bridge that takes you over the spillway for the lake. I remember standing on the bridge as a small child and seeing the water lead right up to the 18

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

edge of the spillway. With a look over the edge, you can see the water curve downward like somewhat of a manmade waterfall. On the other side of the bridge, there is a boardwalk that leads you to the edge of the golf course. Interestingly enough, as a child, I can remember every year my father's company holding its Easter celebration on the open grassy area next to the sandy beach. The greatest experience I have had at Cheraw State Park was when my father and I joined a friend of his to camp on the water's edge from an almost hidden campsite. To add to the excitement, we decided to paddle across the lake to get to our campsite. On a crisp fall weekend, we made our way across the lake with kayaks full of gear, and a pang of hunger to enjoy nature. I just remember slicing through the calm glass water with our boats a little heavier than usual, making our way down the curve of the lake. We landed on the campsite, set up camp and made ourselves at home. With a good night's rest and a hearty home-cooked breakfast, we decided to venture out onto the lake to


Cheraw State Park, located at 100 State Park Road in Cheraw, is open from 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily. There is no admission fee. explore. My father and I paddled to an area adjacent to our campsite that caught our attention. On the south side of the lake was a beautiful section of bald cypress trees that seemed to never end. If I remember correctly, the leaves were a rich rustic yellow, as fall was at its peak. Paddling through the swollen trees, we couldn't help but just be still within the majestic wetlands. The cool breeze off the lake and a nice bright overcast day, with the colors of fall surrounding us, made the day feel almost surreal.

Over the years, fall has become my favorite time of the year. With the richness of the cool weather paired with the masterpiece of colorful leaves, I feel it is the most heartwarming time to get out and soak in nature. To me, it doesn’t matter whether you enjoy the autumn leaves from the seat of a kayak, the porch of a cabin, or the seat of your car. Make sure to spend some time outside with good friends and family, good food, and good scenery.

Zach Hughes resides in Florence with his wife Alexis and their 8 month old son, Christopher. Zach is a local entrepreneur, and has spent most of his time working around the automotive industry. In his spare time, Zach enjoys discovering South Carolina and dabbling in journalism. November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

19


HEALTH + BEAUTY

20

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


Tobacco Cessation story by Nicole Cogdell-Quick, LPC, HopeHealth

E. Nicole Cogdell-Quick graduated from Argosy University, Atlanta, GA, with a Master of Arts in Psychology, Professional Counseling, and earned her Bachelor of Science in Psychology, with a minor in sociology, from Francis Marion University Florence, S.C. She is a certified addictions counselor and a member of the South Carolina Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors.

Tobacco (smoking) cessation is the discontinuation of using tobacco products to include, cigarettes, chewing tobacco, pipes, and snuff. Individuals are motivated by different factors to stop their tobacco use, reasons may include, improvement of overall health, to help improve the health of others, improvement of oral hygiene, to smell better, reduce damage to clothes, furniture, and other valuable items caused by cigarette burns, just to mention a few.   There are behavioral treatments and medications to aid persons in their quest to quit smoking, and research has proven that the combination of medication with counseling is more effective than either alone.  Medications known to be effective include over-thecounter nicotine replacement therapies such as the Nicoderm patch, sprays, gums, lozenges, and electronic cigarettes, or vaping. These therapies help relieve nicotine withdrawal symptoms and cravings and are normally used during the earlier phases of smoking cessation. Other medications include Zyban, Chantix, and specific antidepressants. With all medications, there are risks associated.  E-cigarettes or vaping (also known as juuling) has become a popular smoking alternative and method to help quit traditional cigarettes. Vaping uses a batteryoperated device to inhale an aerosol containing nicotine, flavorings, and other known and unknown chemicals. These devices are often marketed as healthier than cigarettes as they do not contain tar or carbon monoxide. However, research has shown the amount of nicotine inhaled is often higher as the amount of nicotine varies based on the device used, inhaling technique, and the intensity of inhaling. This can result in increased heart and respiratory rates, increased blood pressure, and particles and metals accumulating in the lungs causing impaired lung function, change in lung tissue, lung tissue damage, and irreversible scarring on the bronchioles, known as popcorn lungs, according to the American Lung Association. Research has also shown that, while vaping may have initially decreased the use of cigarettes, it has not been proven to be safer than smoking, and, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more recent studies have shown that individuals who switched to vaping, not only vape but have also returned to using other tobacco products.  

Behavioral treatments include motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness, and telephone support (quitlines).  

• Motivational interviewing allows participants to explore and resolve their uncertainty about quitting smoking and increasing their motivation to make healthy changes. This occurs in a patient-focused, non-confrontational manner as the clinician identifies inconsistencies between the participant’s values and behaviors. • Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps individuals identify triggers associated with their use, teaches relapse prevention and coping strategies to avoid smoking in high-risk situations.   • Mindfulness is a treatment method that teaches increased awareness of and disconnection from sensations, thoughts, and cravings that may lead to relapse by way of intentional thought processes that trigger cravings and desires to use with the skill of reframing cognitions to refute urges.   • Quitlines and telephone support are in place as part of tobacco regulating efforts in each state. The quitlines offer support with smoking cessation counselors who provide support and information. The universal phone number is 800-QUIT-NOW. There are multiple benefits to quitting smoking and just as many effective methods to be used to accomplish this task. Behavioral and medicinal treatments used together increases the success of long-term smoking cessation.  

360 NORTH IRBY ST. FLORENCE 843.667.9414 | HOPE-HEALTH.ORG

November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

21


LIFESTYLE

Remembering and Learning

How to be Kind story by Allie Roark

Allie with her Gigi

H

ave you noticed how the word ‘kind’ is the new trend? Ever since the movie “Wonder” came out we wear shirts about sprinkling kindness or how it’s cool to be kind. Hey, I’m not judging, because I have a few of these shirts in my drawer as well. I can’t help but wonder if we truly know what it means to be kind. The students in room C100 are going to spend the whole month of November learning about kindness, gratitude, empathy, and other social behaviors. Don’t worry, we are still going to cover the state standards, but I believe it’s important to teach these tiny humans how to be good humans. This is something that is easily forgotten due to busy schedules, technology, and too much testing in schools. If asking a child what it means to be kind, a majority of them would respond with ‘being nice’. That answer isn’t wrong, however; if you ask them to give you examples, you start to hear crickets. It’s more than just good manners. It’s smiling at a stranger, asking questions instead of talking about yourself, holding the door open, sticking up for those being picked on, forgiving someone, helping someone who is hurt, or walking into someone else's mess just so that they aren’t feeling alone. In one of our favorite read-alouds, there is a quote that says, “Being kind means having the courage to treat others the way you would like to be treated.” I pray that I am this person for my kids. Although I can be strict (and a little bossy), I hope that I am an example of what it means to care for others. 22

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

I remember being in elementary school. Growing up, I had some pretty great people around me that were perfect examples. One that specifically comes to mind is my Sugar also known as Gigi. My Sugar is my world. She wasn’t just like any old grandma she is the best. She was the giver of compliments. It didn’t matter if it was her grandchild, a friend, or a stranger - she used her words to constantly lift others. My Sugar was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2013 and in her world of “forgetfulness” she still manages to show kindness with hugs that she offers to strangers in Walmart or the grocery store. She continues to show us what it means to be kind to everyone. I will never forget the times I laid on her lap and her sweet whispers in my ear encouraging me to always be kind and continue to dream big. As I teach about social behaviors this month, I am reminded how thankful I am for those around me and for my Sugar that taught me so many valuable lessons. I can only hope that I am being this person for my students as well.


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

23


LIFESTYLE

PEPSI

Carolina Classic 34th Annual Basketball Tournament Supporting the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee Area story by Kayla Jebaily Adams / photos by Daisy Bostick Photography

The Pepsi Carolina Classic Basketball Tournament is back for its 34th year and will take place on December 26 thru 28 at the Florence Center. The 3-day youth basketball tournament, organized by the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee Area, began in 1985 as a fundraiser for the organization. It has grown immensely over the past few decades and is now entering its second year being held at the Florence Center! It still serves as the main fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee, providing vital programs to Boys & Girls Club members in the areas of Good Character, Healthy Lifestyles, and Academic Success. Annually, over 4,000 youth benefit from the Pepsi Carolina Classic Tournament through Boys & Girls Club programming, camps, and events. Pepsi’s relationship with the Carolina Classic dates back 33 years, when Frank Avent, former owner of Pepsi of Florence, Pee Dee Food Service, and Pee Dee Catering, was asked to be a co-sponsor of the event. Avent saw the value of the Carolina Classic as a fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Club and thought a premier basketball tournament in the Pee Dee would bring a competitive

Jeff Stevens

24

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

edge to the region. After Carolina Canners purchased Pepsi from the Avent family in 2005, they continued the tradition of supporting the Classic. Speaking to the importance of giving back to the community, Pepsi of Florence CEO, Jeff Stevens, said, “Pepsi wants its leaders to be good corporate citizens. People support us by purchasing our products and we would like to give back to the local communities in which we work.” The leaders of Pepsi, Pee Dee Food Service, and Pee Dee Catering have done exactly that, and have been huge supporters of the Boys & Girls Clubs and the Carolina Classic. Not only is Pepsi the title sponsor for the event, Pepsi leaders, Jeff Stevens and Jimmy Sandifer, have taken their commitment one step further. Stevens has been a member of the Boys & Girls Club Corporate Board since Frank Avent’s retirement a few years ago. He continues to honor Avent’s memory by donating his time and talents to the organization. Jimmy Sandifer, Market Equipment Manager, spends a great deal of time ensuring the Carolina Classic is a success each year. He attends every game and makes sure everything runs smoothly. In addition to Pepsi, Pee Dee Food Service and Pee Dee Catering are huge supporters of the Clubs as well. Phil Stephenson, Catering Manager, works tirelessly to help the organization with events and fundraisers. The Boys & Girls Club is grateful to have such a special partnership with Carolina Canners, Pepsi, and its affiliated groups. The Carolina Classic Tournament could not be where it is today without the support of Pepsi.


2018 Pepsi Carolina Classic Champions

This year, the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee Area are excited to host teams from West Florence, South Florence, Wilson, Lee Central, North Augusta, Marion, Hartsville, and Darlington at the tournament. Last year, West Florence High School claimed the title after three days of grueling competitions. West Florence Coach, Daryl Jarvis, enjoys participating in the annual tournament. “The Carolina Classic Experience is a firstclass tournament ran by first-class people,” says Jarvis. “The competition is always formidable and a great test before your teams enter into region play in January. Playing at the Florence Center also gives athletes a chance to feel that college experience. It's a big stage that many players wouldn't otherwise experience.” The reigning champions are excited to see what 2019 holds for them as Coach Jarvis enters his secondyear coaching at the tournament. He believes this year will be a challenge, but one that his team is up for. “This year's tournament will be a lot more balanced as we all have lost some key players and we have a few different teams this year. We will have to bring our A+ game if we wish to defend the crown.” Jarvis hopes his players will stay focused, defend their title, and maintain their reputation as one of the best teams in the Pee Dee. The 2019 Pepsi Carolina Classic is a single-elimination tournament with a consolation bracket that is bound to provide fun, excitement, and challenging competition! The Pepsi Carolina Classic, like the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee Area, has been a fixture of the community spanning for decades. The 2019 Tournament will continue the tradition of promising fans a community event with exciting youth basketball! Hope to see you there! November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

25


BUSINESS

At-Home Dining

story by Rebecca Giese photo by Erin Daniel

Made Easy

November kicks off the holiday season, and with that comes many food-centered gatherings. You have your all-star food holiday Thanksgiving, but also many other family gatherings, football game parties, office parties, to name a few. Whether you are looking for the perfect turkey to wow your guests or need an easy meal option for that company that won't leave, Block and Vino has you covered. Located in Hartsville, South Carolina, this family-owned business provides restaurant-quality dishes, quality products, and delectable meat options for any occasion, especially during the holidays. Block and Vino has the perfect turkey that will be the crown jewel of your Thanksgiving spread. The free-range turkeys are raised on Carolina organic farms and are never frozen. Who hates thawing out a giant turkey? For that reason alone, you should call Block and Vino to reserve your turkey. They will only be taking a limited supply of turkey orders; you'll want to ensure your spot on the list and order early! And of those wondering about the size, they range from 10 to 25 pounds, perfect for a small or large Thanksgiving gathering. Not a big turkey fan? Then order their certified Angus rib or filet roasts, ready for your cooking expertise or precooked in their kitchen. Either would impress the hardest of critiques. If you want to please that persnickety aunt, when ordering your roast tell Block and Vino you would like to use your own serving dishes. They will happily plate the delicious homemade roast onto your family china, and it will be your little secret when everyone is raving about it!

26

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

Brent tiller, owner

And while you are ordering your turkey and roast, don't forget about their homemade side options, like mac and cheese and green bean casserole. And for the meals in between the holiday occasions when you still have company and need to feed them? They have meals ready to go like lasagna or chicken parmesan; call ahead for larger serving sizes. If you need a little comfort food for a weekend with the in-laws, pick up a homemade tomato pie or order a breakfast casserole. Let's not forget the football viewing parties and tailgates filling up the calendar this month. Stop by Block and Vino for a keto-friendly broccoli salad or buffalo chicken dip to bring with you! Or are you having a wine night with the girls or an old college roommate in town? Stop by for a bottle of wine, cheeses, and an assortment of meats to create a full charcuterie kit. Don't have any events coming up but need a quick bite at lunch? Block and Vino has a great selection of sandwiches, salads, and low carb options to satisfy anyone on the go. They also have a great selection of steaks, stuffed pork chops, and ribs to add to your dinner table every day. Visit Block and Vino in downtown Hartsville today. Follow them on Facebook to learn about specials and weekly Meal Deals.

215 N 5th St, Hartsville (843) 309-9373 | www.blockandvino.com


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

27


BUSINESS Stephen with wife, Sarah and daughters, Erin, Emily, and Abbey

Stephen Holladay was raised in a small community outside of Lake City, where he says “life was simple and centered around family, friends, and church.” Stephen’s parents taught him from a very young age that if you keep priorities in proper order – which, to them, is faith and family first and you are willing to work hard at the endeavor you have William“IHardaway and chosen, you will have a fulfilling life. He admits, have found his wife, Kristen, are this to be so true.” natives of Florence. Stephen grew up with two brothers, along with a small They are also the proud “army” of male cousins and friends. Whileparents he wasofused toboys: three being a part of the boys’ club, the Lord had other plans Billy (6), Owen (3), and for Stephen once he became a father, as heJames now has (1). three William is beautiful little girls – Erin, and twins Abbeythe andson Emily. of Betty and Stephen’s wife Sarah shares the same profession as him,and as he Dan Hardaway, she is also a CPA. “Her understanding ofisthe demands of this a graduate of Francis profession and her abundant support enableMarion me to manage University, the rigors of busy seasons.” where he received his BBA in accounting. Stephen graduated from Francis Marion University with a degree in accounting in 1989; afterward, he immediately began his career with WebsterRogers. “I just celebrated my 30th anniversary with the firm this summer. The journey began at a career day at Francis Marion University with representatives from national, regional and local CPA firms in a panel Q&A discussion with our accounting class. The local firm representative was Carroll Webster, the then-managing

Stephen Holladay Working Your Way To A Fulfilling Life story by Ashley Elvington / photo by Fred Salley

28

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


partner of WebsterRogers. Listening to his vision of bringing national firm structure and expertise to small towns in South Carolina resonated with me – I was sold. He believed, as I do, that you do not need to be in a big city to do big things...You can accomplish much on your own turf.” As a staff accountant in a traditional small firm manner, Stephen worked in every area of the firm: bookkeeping, tax, and enough audit to know he never wanted to be an auditor. The firm then quickly embarked on a new staffing model that paired making strategic upper level hires from national firms with homegrown talent from local South Carolina universities. The result? A rapid evolution from the traditional silo model of small firms, where every partner provides all services to their respective clients, to a national firm model where staff are expected to develop deep expertise in specialized areas of focus and service clients as a team. Back in 1997, Stephen wasn’t a partner yet, but WebsterRogers showed confidence in his abilities, asking him to lead the tax services line of business for the firm. “While honored and excited, I have to admit I was also a bit terrified by the responsibility that had been placed on me at just 29 years old. But there was no question in my mind - I was NOT going to let this firm down.” During his time with WebsterRogers as well as his tenure as the tax leader, Stephen has witnessed what was a local 20-person accounting firm in Florence bloom into the second-largest accounting and consulting firm headquartered in South Carolina, serving Eastern South Carolina from nine offices with 140 dedicated and talented professionals. “Through our highly trained staff, along with our alliance partnership with the 5th largest national accounting firm RSM, we can deliver national and international expertise into the local South Carolina markets in which we live and serve. This transformation would not have been possible without the steadfast perseverance, dedication and commitment of our staff to the shared vision, values, and culture of the firm we all call home.” One thing Stephen is particularly proud to see is a history of, and continued commitment to, developing their people. “From their first year in the firm to seasoned partners, our staff attend the same national technical training programs as their peers at RSM in their chosen areas of specialization. This enables them to interact regularly throughout the year with national thought leaders of a Top 5 accounting firm. Where many firms stop there, I believe what differentiates us is our holistic approach to professional development. Our staff is introduced early in their careers to formalized soft skills training in areas like communication, teamwork, and business development. This training is then further supported by internal mentoring programs and outside individualized professional coaching. As one of the more seasoned people now, it’s very rewarding to watch our young people grow and thrive in an environment of continual learning and development. We strongly believe

in challenging and empowering our people to reach both their career and life goals by discovering the highest and best use of their God-given talents.” The people of WebsterRogers are the main reason why Stephen loves his job so much. “We are one big family. We don’t just work together, we are committed to each other. We help each other, we pick up the slack when someone goes down and we genuinely desire to see every single person succeed, and not at the expense of someone else. It is faith and family – my core values – that keep me here. Having our managing partner take me under his wing at 21 inspired me to pay that forward by having the great privilege of being in a position to mentor one of our brightest talents. It’s like anything in life - you are only going to get out of something as much as you are willing to give. In turn, giving of my time and energy to upcoming talent, I am proud to have seen a very capable, strong leader emerge in our new managing partner, Amy Fisher Urquhart.” Stephen’s job today is to continually mold and develop his diverse team of tax professionals into a cohesive and complementary unit so that together, they will continually deliver high quality, value-added services to the growing WebsterRogers family of clients. “Our goal is for every firm client to feel the same personal connection and commitment from our service teams, whether they are our largest manufacturing companies or the third-generation retail shop. My contribution to the tax team mix of services is primarily providing tax consulting, planning, and structuring advice to closelyheld businesses and their owners. It is truly a humbling and fulfilling professional role to serve as one of the most trusted advisors of the clients with whom I have developed deep relationships. Many times being the first call from these clients when they have a life event in their business or personally is an honor and a responsibility I take very seriously. Whether it’s structuring a sales transaction to a large private equity group or handholding through a family generational change, my job and commitment is to always strive to deliver the most tax-advantaged result for their situation. I try to approach every transaction and situation as if it were my own family because, in a way, it is.”

"As we approach another 4th quarter of the year, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention what I continually preach to all our clients – the situation or transaction that I cannot help them with is the one I don’t know about ahead of time. There are many incentives buried in our complex tax system that we can help clients take advantage of if we have knowledge in advance, but then many become irrelevant or unworkable after the fact. We strive to stay in contact with our clients throughout the year, but we really stress having 4th quarter meetings with one of our tax professionals to plan for and put into place tax savings strategies before year end when it may be too late. There is nothing more depressing in my job than meeting with a client in February when they bring in their prior year tax information, and discovering a transaction on which I could have saved them significant tax dollars if they had just talked to me in November or December." - Stephen Holladay November 2019 VIPMagSC.com 29


BUSINESS

Early South Carolina

LANDSCAPE

The first settlers in South Carolina clung to the coast. As the S.C. early settlers began to venture into the interior, they quickly found themselves in a vast primeval forest, the southern longleaf pine. The naturalist John Muir described “low, level, sandy tracks; the pines wide apart; the sunny spaces between full of beautiful abounding grasses…, covering the ground in garden style. Here I sauntered in delightful freedom, meeting none of the catclawed vines or shrubs, of the alluvial bottoms.” John

story by Mark W. Buyck, III

Dennett, a northern journalist traveling through the south in the immediate aftermath of the civil war, described his arrival into South Carolina from North Carolina: “the scenery in its general aspect is the same. There, as well as here, for a hundred miles from the coast, the surface is very flat and traversed by many sluggish streams; pine barrens alternate with swamps, and by far the larger portion of the country is covered with forests.” The southern longleaf pine forest covered over 90 million acres (140,000 square miles) and stretched from Southeastern Virginia south to Central Florida and west to East Texas. The eastern two-thirds of the state of South Carolina were within the range. Today there are only remnants of this forest remaining. The old-growth forest proved profitable; however, our ancestors failed to maintain the sustainability of the forest. It is estimated that there are about 3 million acres of longleaf forest remaining mainly in southern Georgia and the Florida panhandle. The coastal plain of North Carolina and Northeastern South Carolina was particularly suited for naval stores production. The longleaf pine is particularly sturdy and their trunks were used as masts on sailing ships. The resin extracted from the trees was cooked or distilled to produce tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine. Tar was applied to ropes and sail riggings to prevent them from decaying. Pitch

30

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


and rosin were used as caulking on boat sides and bottoms to prevent leaking. Turpentine had several uses. In the first half of the 19th century, turpentine was mixed with alcohol and provided an inexpensive form of lighting for homes, public buildings, and streets. This use was eventually replaced by the even cheaper kerosene. By the 1870s, the white pine forest in the Great Lakes and Northern Mississippi River region had been exhausted. Timbermen looked south for the country’s growing demand for lumber. The center of the longleaf pine trunk, the heart pine, continues to be particularly appealing for its tight grain, durability, and resistance to fire. The forest became more accessible as timbermen began utilizing and building their short-line railroads increasing access to the trees. Instead of replanting or encouraging the regrowth of the longleaf pine, landowners began clearing their lands for row-crop production. When the forests were replanted, most landowners opted for loblolly and later slash pines as these species were faster growing and provided a faster return on investment. Longleaf pines also rely on periodic burning of the understory. What was once a natural occurrence in forests became rare as fire control practices in the 20th century discouraged burning. By the 1930s, the native southern longleaf pine forest had for all intents and purposes been cleared and hauled away. Restoration efforts are being made throughout the Southeast. There are longleaf stands in the Sand Hills State Forest in Darlington and Chesterfield Counties. State Forestry Commissions have also recognized the benefit of controlled burning for forest management. While we will never see the primeval forest again, we can preserve a representative sample of this unique ecosystem.

248 West Evans Street | Florence, SC | 843.662.3258 2050 Corporate Centre’ Drive, Suite 230 Myrtle Beach, SC | 843.650.6777

Business Law, Litigation, Real Estate, and Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

31


NOVEMBER sunday

monday

tuesday

wednesday

thursday

Send in your events to heather@vipmagsc.com! 3

4

5

6

7 Lake City On Parade

Bean Market, Lake City

Ducks Unlimited Banquet Woodhaven, Marion National Candy Day

10

11

Trinity-Byrnes Open House Florence

12

Veterans Day Ceremony Veterans Park, Florence

17

Election Day

18

National Nachos Day

13

14

Edwin McCain Live FMU PAC, Florence

National Happy Hour Day

19

Business After Hours McLeod Occupational Health, Florence

20

21 YP Lunch & Learn

with Leroy Gibson Florence Chamber

Symphony Orchestra with Rodrick Brown Veterns Park, Florence National Take A Hike Day

24

25

Lights of Love Carolina Pines, Hartsville

32

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

FMU Concert Choir & Voice Collective FMU PAC, Florence

Holiday Open House Downtown Hartsville Business Over Breakfast The King's Academy

26 History Fields Ron McNair Life Center, Lake City

Universal Children's Day

Shop Small Open House Downtown Darlington

27

28

Trivia Seminar Brewing, Florence

Florence Turkey Trot Briggs Elementary, Florence


friday

1

saturday

2 Blithe Spirit (1st-9th) Florence Little Theatre

Pecan Festival Downtown Florence

Family Feud Live Celebrity Edition Florence Center

8

Holiday Appetizers MFBG, Lake City

9 Pig Pickin' in the Park Williamson Park, Darlington

Carolina Food Truck Rodeo (8th-10th) Florence Center

15

Honda Turkey Run Timmonsville

16

November Fest Benefiting McLeod Children's Hospital Downtown Florence

22

Jingle Bell Market (22nd-24th) Florence Center

29

Dog Daze MFBG, Lake City

Holiday Goodness Bazaar Dillon Wellness Center Swamp Fox Highland Games & Celtic Festival Columns Plantation

23

Visit Pee Dee State Farmers Market

30

Small Business Saturday

November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

33


34

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


COVER STORY | LEAD IN

CELEBRATING

The Success of Local Business

48 48

Follow pages 36 through 54 to learn more about local Businesses Celebrating Their Past and Inspiring Our Futures VIPMagSC.com VIPMagSC.com

November November2019 2019


COVER STORY

80

CELEBRATING

years

Pee Dee Electric Cooperative story by Ashley Elvington

Electricity has always held a fascination with us. From the beginning when we were kids learning about Benjamin Franklin and his famous kite experiment, there’s always been an interest in where it comes from and how it lights our paths, cooks our food, or visually stimulates us through televisions. Today we rely on it nearly as much as we do food and water. Pee Dee Electric Cooperative's (PDEC) infatuation with “Powering the important things in your life,” has done just that for 80 years now. Through the next few paragraphs, we discuss how PDEC has progressed over the last 80 years and what a powerful and positive tie they have with our community.

History of PDEC PDEC line workers throughout history have stood by 24x7 to provide power and restoration as needed. Their crews are bonded together as teams to serve.

36

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

Beginning in the 1930s, rural America welcomed the luxury of electricity with humble, open arms. The Pee Dee Region developed its own cooperative on December 7, 1939 to serve those areas that investor-owned utilities deemed unprofitable. By December 16th, 95 members paid their $5 membership fee to join the cooperative and the very first meeting was held on December 21st, 1939.


By March 1940, Pee Dee Electric was renting its first office building in the old Doyle Barber Shop in Darlington. By August 1940, Pee Dee Electric took over SC REA, bringing in 213 miles of line and 619 members. On August 26th, 83 homes in Darlington county received electricity for the first time. In July 1941, a statewide association of cooperatives was formed as the staff members grew in size. That same month, credit was issued to members of up to $10 to buy electrical appliances and/or equipment. In December of 1942, Pee Dee Electric joined the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, which would go on to become a treasure in Washington, DC. By 1948, Pee Dee Electric joined 14 other cooperatives to create the Central Electric Power Cooperative to form transmission lines to connect them to Santee Cooper’s power generation. Once 1954 arrived, Central Electric had built 1,000 miles of transmission lines. The 1960s brought lower prices for electricity. More and more appliances were being used and power supply was available from hydroelectric dams or coal burning power plants. Some worried electricity

would soon become “too cheap to meter.” In 1961, the Cooperative was looking to grow even more than it already had, providing electricity to new subdivisions. In July 1965, Pee Dee Electric merged with Marion Electric Cooperative, with Marion Electric becoming a district office for Pee Dee Electric. With this merger, 15 employees and 2,898 members from Marion county and the southern half of Dillon county were added.

The 1970s were a turning point for the cost of electricity for power providers. New plants were being built and low cost power output was being fully consumed. The demand for power required new and more expensive generation. In 1975, the Cooperative announced the arrival of the Darlington county water system. The 1980s began with fear of energy crisis, as a newsletter from the Cooperative warned of an energy situation that appeared “bleak and unpredictable.” Customers were encouraged to add insulation to their homes and told members that higher temps in the summer and lower temps in the winter could save energy and money.

7 Co-op Principals 1. Open and Voluntary Membership 2. Democratic Member Control 3. Members’ Economic Participation 4. Autonomy and Independence 5. Education, Training, and Information 6. Cooperation Among Cooperatives 7. Concern for Community April 2019

VIPMagSC.com

37


COVER STORY

The Pee Dee gets power 1891 1899 1902 1904

Darlington Hartsville Marion Florence

Pee Dee Electric has more than 30,000 services in place serving residents, businesses and industries, and 2,800+ miles of line in Chesterfield, Darlington, Dillon, Florence, Lee, and Marion counties.

PDEC linemen have the quote, "I am my brother's keeper," to remind them to stay safe and look out for each other while on the job.

In November 1980, Pee Dee Electric became the first cooperative in SC to create a program geared towards women, known as Women Involved in Rural Electrification, or simply WIRE. These women were members, employees, or wives of employees, and it was their purpose to advise and work with the Board of Trustees. In July 1983, WIRE awarded its very first scholarship, the first of many to come from Pee Dee Electric in the years that followed. 38

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019

In the early 1990s, Pee Dee Electric announced its first scholarship to Francis Marion University. The scholarship program was, of course, created and run by WIRE. Since then, scholarships have been offered to students that attend FMU as well as Florence-Darlington Technical College. In ’92, the Cooperative created a new way to enable members to raise money for charities and organizations, known as Operation Round Up. Members allow Pee Dee Electric to “round up” their bill to the nearest dollar. For those with a bill of $92.71, the customer would pay $93 and the .29 cents left would go to the Pee Dee Electric Trust Board, who disburse all monies collected to worthy projects throughout the Pee Dee.


In November of 2000, Pee Dee Electric announced its subsidiary, Pee Dee Electricom, would create a new Class A 717-acre commercial and industrial park, located off I-95 in Florence. In October 2001, the industrial park was named Pee Dee Touchstone Energy Commerce City. Today the commerce park is home to Johnson Controls, FedX, Pepsi, Performance Food Group, Ruiz Foods and Harley Davidson. In addition the park employs over 2000 people. In 2002, new online account features were added, with e-bills and the ability to pay online.

Crews work around the clock to restore power during devastation

today & the Future In October, Pee Dee Electric Cooperative mailed capital credit checks to members, returning $3,228,549 to those who received service in 2005, 2006, and 2018. These credits are funds remaining after the cost of doing business and expenses are paid, just one of many benefits to being a member! Another perk? Members that receive amounts less than $50 will receive a credit on their bill. Since 1950, they've returned over $108 million to their members. This Cooperative has achieved so much since its very beginning, but perhaps what it takes the most pride in is being local and serving local. When you call, you speak to an actual person. If you want to stop by and see President and CEO Mike Fuller, you can. He explains, “To us, you are not just a customer; you are a member of our coop and without you, we would not exist.” It should come as no surprise then to learn that the Co-Op received a score of 93 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index, a national measure of customer satisfaction. Surely this Co-Op will continue to have success in the future, as they “shine a light” on those who matter most, the members of the Pee Dee community.

Mike Fuller, President & CEO

"Powering the important things in life." 1355 East McIver Road, Darlington (843) 665-4070 • www.pdec.com April 2019

VIPMagSC.com

39


COVER STORY

82

CELEBRATING

years

Zeman's Heating & Air In 1937, Frederick “Freddie” Zeman fulfilled his dream of opening his own electric and refrigeration business in Marion, S.C. That business is known today as Zeman’s Heating & Air. Freddie grew up in New York City, this is where he learned how to do refrigeration work. He realized quickly how much money could be made in the business but also recognized that most homes didn’t have air conditioning units in New York. Temperatures in New York were cool enough to open windows. This is when he made his way south to a warmer climate. Upon reaching Marion, he liked what he saw and decided he had gone far enough.

Top picture is Alan, Teddy and Rick. The middle picture is Freddie Zeman, circa 1937. Pictured at bottom is Teddy, Rick and Alan, circa 1990.

Today, Zeman’s is ran by Freddie’s son, Teddy, and his two grandsons, Alan and Rick. The business has grown over the years to include the sale of appliances along with heating and electrical services for both commercial and residential properties. Freddie passed away in 2010 but his family continues to run the business as he once did, in a “warm, friendly manner, welcoming all!”

615 North Main Street, Marion • (843) 423-2860 40

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

41


COVER STORY

60

CELEBRATING

years

All Saints' Episcopal Day School Founded in 1960, All Saints’ Episcopal Day School celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. The school started as a mission of All Saints’ Church with 40 preschool-age children from the Florence community. Today, 250 students represent 20 different countries in an internationally accredited independent, Christian school for 3K-6th grades. All classroom teachers are state-certified and more than half have graduate degrees. There is a 98% average retention of teachers and more than 90% annual retention of students.   As a STEM certified school, All Saints’ offers an interactive science, technology, engineering, and math lab to all students, beginning in 3K. Additional enrichment classes include art, music, library, physical education, religion, computer, and Spanish. Students may participate in five sports: soccer, volleyball, basketball, tennis, and cheerleading. A wide variety of extracurricular clubs and competitions includes Student Council, Crusaders’ Chorus, Beta Club, Lego Club, Battle of the Books, Math Team, Quiz Bowl, Spelling Bee, yearbook staff, Young Ambassadors Club, Junior Teen Institute, and Spanish Club.   As students progress to the 5th and 6th-grade years at All Saints’ they have unique leadership opportunities like the annual educational class trips to colonial Williamsburg and Washington, DC. They are leading and mentoring younger students in Chapel, reading, community service projects, Spirit Day assemblies, and special traditions like the candlelight graduation ceremony, independent and group study for science projects, International Day, Metric Olympics, Blessing of the Animals, Grandparents and Special Friends Day, and many other experiences.  

1425 Cherokee Road, Florence • (843) 662-8134 • www.aseds.com 42 42

VIPMagSC.com VIPMagSC.com

November November2019 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

43


COVER STORY

photography by Fred Salley, Location: Mozingo Preserve on Black Creek Pictured left to right: Ashley Scott, Seth Cook, Lyles Cooper Lyles, Hughes Page, Shannon Copes, and Rion McAllister

PDLT Board Members

Pee Dee Land Trust Pee Dee Land Trust (PDLT) started in 1999 as an all-volunteer land mitigation organization servicing a few counties in the Pee Dee region. Board members and a small, yet passionate group of individual supporters helped transform PDLT into a full-service land conservation non-profit that now focuses on the entire Pee Dee Watershed. From the sandhills to the salt marshes, PDLT is celebrating its 20th Anniversary and all the land conservation efforts made over these last two decades. PDLT has partnered with 75 landowners to permanently protect the conservation values on their private property, which consists of over 30,000 acres across the Pee Dee Watershed. From 13 to 2,100 acre tracts, PDLT focuses on preserving the natural, agricultural and historical resources for their future best use in farming, timber harvesting, recreation, and habitat. Significant land along waterways is PDLT’s highest priority to not only preserve the land resources but to ensure water quality and scenic views. PDLT owes much of its success to the people and organizations that have helped collaborate to build the organization’s past, present and future efforts. The Black Creek Land Trust was the first organized local land trust in the Pee Dee Watershed and much of today’s conserved land in our area is thanks to these pioneers. PDLT and Black Creek Land Trust merged in 2014 in an effort to create a stronger watershed-wide staffed land trust. In addition to the conservation easements held along the Black Creek in Darlington County, two nature preserves open to the public were transferred to PDLT to care for.

www.peedeelandtrust.org • (843) 667-3229 44

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


20

CELEBRATING

years

Without the dedicated landowners, supporters and staff, PDLT would not have grown into the goto regional land trust for the Pee Dee Watershed. Currently, PDLT has five full-time staff members, one part-time staff member, and a Board of Directors made up of 21 individuals representing the nine core counties in the Pee Dee Watershed: Chesterfield, Darlington, Dillon, Florence, Georgetown, Horry, Marion, Marlboro, and Williamsburg. “Our landowners are our largest asset,” said PDLT Executive Director Lyles Cooper Lyles. “Without the landowners' commitments to leave a conservation easement legacy, we wouldn’t be able to successfully pursue our vision to protect the past and ensure the future of resources in the Pee Dee Watershed.” Planning for the next 20 Years PDLT agrees to help protect the owners' restricted use of their resources in perpetuity, and therefore long-term stability of the organization is a key component to the organization’s strategic planning. Annual Membership, major operations donors, fundraisers and grants from private and governmental agencies support PDLT’s dayto-day operations. Significant gifts of land and financial assets to the Our Places Endowment, Land Stewardship, and Scarborough Opportunity Funds help support annual operations needs and build long-term financial stability for conservation efforts throughout our region. The largest obstacle that faces land conservation is the lack of landowner and public education about the benefits. PDLT provides educational opportunities for landowners who may benefit from a conservation easement as a part of their legacy planning. Also, PDLT is actively promoting a media campaign to educate the general public about the many benefits of private land conservation and combat some of the most common misconceptions. Preserving farming, timber, and recreational tourism resources are PDLT’s #1 objective and well-planned development is needed to accomplish well-balanced communities for the future. Instead of having to react to the dismantlement of our resources, PDLT promotes a proactive approach to working with landowners to build the critical greenways and blueways to keep these resources connected for future generations. April 2019 2019VIPMagSC.com November VIPMagSC.com

45 45


60

CELEBRATING

COVER STORY

years

United Way of Hartsville Sixty years ago, Hartsville wanted to organize an annual campaign to raise funds for its varied charitable organizations. The campaign would provide significant financial assistance under the umbrella of what would become the United Fund, and in 1972 the name was changed to United Way (to conform to the name of the national organization). A challenge was issued to create a funding agency to oversee the campaign and community leaders responded with a public meeting at the Hartsville Chamber of Commerce. Twelve directors representing various service clubs were elected to head-up the new organization. The mission was, “to stimulate the interest and participation of the citizens of Hartsville on behalf of worthy educational, health and welfare organizations.”  Ten charities joined right away. The goal was set at $43,378 and represented the total budgets of 12 health and service agencies. Sonoco set the pace and made the first corporate contribution of $6,000. In addition to local companies, the public sector was generous. Within weeks, it was announced that the United Way had exceeded its goal by 68%. The United Way of Hartsville continues to advance the common good and improve the lives of friends, families, and neighbors through targeted areas of education, income, and health. The budget has grown to over $340,000 to address the needs of our community. All but 1.6% of the money raised stays local. The 501(c)3 organization is a member of the United Way Association of South Carolina and of United Way Worldwide.   In addition to direct funding of their Community Partners, the United Way receives grants to help fund initiatives such as the Born Learning Trails in Pride and Byerly Parks and a new computer room for the Boys & Girls Club. An annual Coats4Kids drive provides over 500 coats to K-12 students during the winter. For fire victims: beds, linens, major appliances, dishes, pots and pans, and furniture are provided. In hurricane disaster situations they provide relief with food, water, baby needs, and whole-house tarps. Homeless assistance includes: clothing, shoes, blankets, food, personal items, and hotel stays during inclement weather. Over 150 large backpacks are given to middle and high school students annually. After finding so many children and seniors sleeping on the floor, their “signature” program was born: Operation Sweet Dreams – providing a bed, sheets, comforter set, and a pillow to over 580 students and seniors in Darlington County within the past 22 months.  Pictured right are the sidewalk paintings of the Born Learning Trail at Pride Park, a United Way Worldwide initiative.

606 West Carolina Avenue, Hartsville • (843) 917-4055 46

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

47


COVER STORY

101 CELEBRATING

years

photography by Nancy Devon Carsten

Pictured above, Mac Heath, Co-owner. (Not pictured, Stewart Heath, Co-owner.) Pictured left is the grandfather of Mac and Stewart, Mr. Irving P. McWhite, one of the original founders.

Thomlinson & McWhite Inc. Trusted since 1918, Thomlinson & McWhite Inc. is a 3rd generation family-owned, locally operated propane company with a local team of expert techs always there for their clients. What started as an ice and gin business, Thomlinson and McWhite now serves as a leader in propane, diesel fuel, and gasoline. They pride themselves on providing safe, reliable services in Lake City, Bishopville, Sumter, Johnsonville, Kingstree, and all surrounding areas. “Our goal is to provide sincere exceptional customer service while maintaining consistently competitive propane prices,” says Mac Heath, President and Co-owner. With more than 100 years of experience, Thomlinson & McWhite understand that their customers have different needs and they have the experience to find solutions to meet their needs. “We treat our customers like friends and family and nothing is more important than safety,” says Mac. This year Thomlinson & McWhite celebrated 101 years of business. There’s a lot to be said about a company continuing to be respected by a community for that many years. The Heath family looks forward to satisfying customers for many years to come.

210 East Main Street, Lake City • (843) 374-2214 48

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

49


COVER STORY

30

CELEBRATING

years

photography by Fred Salley A current photo of Tim and Lisa King is pictured above, and them circa 1990 below

Forest Lake Greenhouses Tim and Lisa King and Forest Lake Greenhouses have been together longer than Lisa cares to admit. When she was first approached about do a feature for the anniversary issue, she said, “No way! I don’t want people to know I’m that old!” Putting vanity aside, Lisa and Tim see it as a privilege to be in business for 30 years these days and know that their success isn’t theirs alone. The team members that work with them and the surrounding community of Florence have been continuously supportive of their growing greenhouse business. They give all the credit to them! “Starting a business is one thing, but staying in business is a whole different ball game,” says Lisa. “You need to remain true to the original purpose of starting the business and always remember that the plants and the people come first.” A strong presence in the community is also important to Tim and Lisa. They believe in giving back to the individuals and the community that have helped them along the way. Future plans at the greenhouse include Tim admitting that Lisa is still in charge. Lisa jokingly shares that as long as he stays in the back growing greenhouses and she stays upfront in the garden center, their marriage and the business will continue to grow stronger every day! “They’ll see you in the garden!”

3108 Alligator Road, Florence • (843) 662-5666 50

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

51


COVER STORY

60

CELEBRATING

years

Rick Fowler pictured right. Rick with his parents, Fred and Ann pictured below.

Fowler Furniture & Bedding What was previously known as Carolina Furniture House was started in 1959 by Fred Fowler and E.M. Alford. The store had a humble beginning on a side street with used furniture and a few new pieces. The old furniture store later went to mostly new furniture and eventually relocated to Main Street in 1981. In 1995, Rick Fowler, Fred’s son, entered the business after graduating from Francis Marion University. After the company celebrated 50 years in business, Fred and Rick, along with Fred’s wife Ann, discussed closing the doors. They felt Fred deserved a chance to enjoy some retirement years. Rick joined the Horace Mann Insurance team. Ann worked at H&R Block but felt Fred needed something to do, simply because he would get up and get dressed, then go to the store to watch TV and read the paper. While working with Horace Mann, Rick began selling some value-oriented upholstery lines on the side. This allowed affordable furniture for the area; he was opened a few days a week. This also enabled Fred to do what Fred did best - assist people in finding furniture. After three years of working insurance, Rick decided to step away from the insurance industry and re-enter the family business full-time while altering the store. Now known as Fowler Furniture & Bedding, the store is dedicated to offering an economically challenged area a great place to purchase quality furniture with lots of choices and low prices. They offer over 40,000 square feet of furniture and financing options such as 12 months no interest with credit approval and a 90-day in-home layaway with no credit needed. They look forward to assisting customers for many years to come.

229 South Main Street, Mullins • (843) 464-9362 • www.fowleronmain.com 52 52

VIPMagSC.com VIPMagSC.com

November November2019 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

53


COVER STORY

40

CELEBRATING

years

Reamer Evans, Sr. - 1979 Sarah Kirby, Don Kirby, and Micky Maxwell. Not pictured, Reamer Evans, Jr.

Evans Ready Mix Celebrating 40 years, Evans Ready Mix is family owned and have always strived to provide excellence for its customers. Siblings Reamer Evans, Jr., Micky Maxwell, and Sarah Kirby along with Sarah’s husband, Don, now own the company that their father, Reamer, began to build in 1979. The team believes they owe their success to of course their customers, many who have been with them since the beginning, and also their father’s integrity. “He was an honest, smart, hardworking, and kind man,” says Micky. “We continue to try to honor him by keeping these values in what we do here every day.” From sidewalks to skyscrapers, Evans Ready Mix has been a part of many building foundations in Florence and surrounding areas. Sarah adds, “We appreciate the communities business and continued support throughout the past years and hope to continue to serve you in a way that would make our father proud.” Mr. Reamer left the legacy to his children to continue when he passed in 2003. As the family celebrates 40 years, they look forward to many more years of providing timely, quality services, and solutions for all industrial, commercial, and residential concrete needs.

2175 West Sumter Street, Florence • (843) 662-8418 54

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

55


LIFESTYLE

Fly Away A Relay Race For Dogs Ball! story by Ashley Elvington

If your dog loves to play ball, chances are they will enjoy the sport of flyball. Flyball is a relay race where two four-dog teams race against one another in parallel lanes. Each “contestant” jumps four hurdles, triggers a spring-loaded box to release the ball inside, catches the ball, and then takes it over the hurdles to the starting line. The next dog is then released, then the next, and then the last in line. Speed and accuracy are a priority in this game; if any errors are made, the dog will have to re-run, adding to the team’s total time. Tournaments are divided into divisions so teams can compete against teams of equal abilities. All dogs, no matter the breed, no matter if purebred or mutt, can compete. Seniors ages 7 and over can also partake in the fun! Dogs are awarded for winning their division and for accumulating points throughout their flyball careers. This sport is a great way to help your dog stay active while forming a close bond with them. Flyball is also a wonderful way to spend time connecting with fellow dog lovers. Florence has its own flyball team, known as the Pawmetto Pack, that was formed in 2002. This pack of pooches is one of four flyball clubs in South Carolina, it is also the only club that hosts tournaments each year – one in December and one in February. These pups know how to play the game and play it well, as they travel to play in tournaments located in North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Tennessee. While the Pawmetto Pack is currently a small club, the group is looking to grow in size and welcome new members and their beloved companions. The club practices weekly in Florence and even when they aren’t training their champs, they’re enjoying one another’s company. As you can see, flyball creates a bond between not only owners and their pets, but between owners as well. If you would like to sign your fur baby up for flyball or simply wish to learn more about the sport or Pawmetto Pack, visit them on Facebook, or website www.pawmettopack.com. 56

VIPMagSC.com

September 2019


November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

57


58

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


SERVICE DIRECTORY

November 2019

VIPMagSC.com

59


HOME

the

Pumpkin Pie martini

1/2 ounce Stoli Vanilla Vodka 1 ounce Pumpkin Spice liqueur (such as Hiram Walker) 1/2 ounce Kahlua 1/2 ounce Butterscotch Schnapps 1/2 ounce half-and-half Crushed graham crackers Cinnamon stick (garnish)

Add all liquids in a shaker filled with ice. Shake and strain into large martini glass rimmed with crushed graham crackers. Garnish with a cinnamon stick. 60

VIPMagSC.com

November 2019


Profile for VIP Magazine

November 2019  

November 2019  

Profile for vipmagsc