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magazine Publisher Tammy Clark tmclark225@gmail.com Editor Heather Page heather@vipmagsc.com Office Manager Tiffany Skipper jtskipp35@gmail.com Advertising Executives Jordan Pupa jordan@vipmagsc.com Julie C. Tyler juliectyler@yahoo.com Creative Design Tuesday Taylor Ashley Rogers

Contributing Photographers Nancy Devon Coward Erin Daniels Rebecca Giese Phillip Guyton Fred Salley Contributing Writers Mark W. Buyck, III Kent Daniels Ashley Elvington Rebecca Giese Zach Hughes Jordan Pupa Allie Roark Doug Smith Donna Tracy

Serving Florence, Hartsville, Darlington, Marion, Mullins, Lake City and the surrounding areas 2011-B Second Loop Rd, Florence, SC 29501 FIND US ON FACEBOOK

For advertising rates, call 843-687-4236.

COVER CONCEPT

As summer comes to an end and school is in full swing with new routines setting in, we find ourselves eager for fall. Eager for cooler weather, football, sweaters, and fall’s flowers adding color to our landscape. That along with stories centered around a growing community is what decided our September cover. Happy reading! If you’d like your photography featured on Vip’s cover, send your entries to heather@vipmagsc.com.

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CONTENTS

ISSUE 46

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SEPTEMBER 2019 LIFESTYLE 12 Rebecca Giese: Project Excape 14 Seminole 6 Travel Football Team 16 Allie Roark: Cultivate Kindness 18 ReStore: Tips To A Better Thrift 20 Around Town: Wine Down Wednesday 22 Bucket List: Murrells Inlet Marshwalk

HOME 24 Doug Smith: Life's Sweet Ingredient 28 31st Annual River Sweep 29 TV Suggestion: Four Weddings And A Funeral 30 Kent Daniels: 50 Years of Tobacco in Lake City 32 September 2019 Calendar of Events 38 Gift Guide: The Ultimate Football Fan

HEALTH + BEAUTY 40 HopeHealth: Keeping Up With Medications 42 National Senior Care Month 44 The Pharmacy: CBD Oil

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46 Fun Facts: 6 Living Generations 48 WebsterRogers: Jessica Carney 50 The Continuum: Jeanette Altman

BUSINESS 52 Wilcox, Buyck, Williams, PA: Strom Thurmond 54 Florence Chamber Member of Month: Doris Lockhart 56 Hartsville Chamber: Fest da Villa 57 Book Suggestion: Where They Come From, Where They Hide 58 Newsworthy: Something To Celebrate

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60 Drink of the Month: Black Demure Cocktail


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LIFESTYLE

ESCAPING IN THE NICK OF TIME:

PROJECT EXCAPE photos and story by Rebecca Giese

Deep in the safari, the year is 1930, a warlord and his army are approaching. Only with the help of their team will the researchers find the hidden mystical gem and save it from a grasp of the powerful warlord. Using their skills with codes and maps, they work together to solve the case. Sounds like an excerpt of some Indiana Jones movie or a new show on the History Channel, but what if I told you that you can be immersed into this adventure at Project Excape, a locally owned escape room operated in downtown Hartsville. Escape rooms have been on the rise throughout the country, and now in Hartsville, we can experience the trend and enjoy the fun! The traditional makeup of an escape room is a storyline based room full of puzzles, locks, and mysteries one needs to complete to, well, escape. The kicker is you have only one hour to do so. Project Excape currently has two different rooms to try: an interstellar, Cypher Space and The Lost Jewel of Zanzibar based during a 1930 African safari. Last week I gathered friends and my parents to try the Lost Jewel of Zanzibar room. I was pleasantly surprised by the level of detail, the overarching theme, and the array of puzzles provided. It was trickier than I had anticipated. The unique clues and puzzles allowed each member of

the team to contribute and ultimately work together to escape. I want to tell you every cool detail and fun story, but that would give away the surprises when you visit. But what I can say is I highly recommend Project Excape, especially during the last hot days of summer! This escape room is a great activity when you have a group of varying ages and interests. Maybe take your family game night up a level. Or plan your next company team building with Project Excape. You can book a reservation and inquire about birthday parties and corporate events via their website www.projectexcape.com. But what happens when you don't escape within the hour? Well, the warlord gets the jewel of course! Knowing that the loss will eat at you, Project Excape has "Redemption Saturdays.” Once a month people that did not escape can come back to retry for half off. We did successfully escape the Lost Jewel of Zanzibar. Supposedly it is the one better for beginners; I am already trying to figure out when I can go back and try the Cypher Space room! Project Excape is the perfect adventure right here in the Pee Dee. Thank you to Project Excape for hosting us and for all the fun!

On My Radar! • SC Tobacco Festival in Lake City - Saturday, September 21 in Lake City, celebrate the tobacco farmers, farms and auctions with live music, food trucks, pony and rides and more!

Currently residing in Hartsville, Rebecca Giese enjoys exploring the Pee Dee area, shopping local artisans, trying new restaurants, and finding inspiration from the history and culture surrounding her. When not out on an adventure, she’s telling stories on her blog, Southern’spirations.

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• Time for some college football! Need a fun side dish for a tailgating event? Head to VIP's website for the July issue where I shared several yummy options!


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LIFESTYLE

Pee Dee Region's First Travel Football Team story by Ashley Elvington

REGULAR SEASON SCHEDULE

Sept 7 State Kickoff in Columbia Sept 14 @ Greenville Sept 21 Lee County Sept 28 @ W. Cola Oct 5 @ Dillon Oct 12 Myrtle Beach Oct 19 Goose Creek Oct 26 @ Charleston Nov 2 Moncks Corner Nov 23-24 State Playoff Weekend Nov 29-Dec 1 Thanksgiving Classic Dec 7-8 State Championship Home games are played at Sneed Middle School in Florence. 14

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If you haven’t heard of the Seminole 6, where have you been lately? This amazing group of talented individuals makes up the Pee Dee Region’s first travel football team and 501c3 nonprofit. With the leadership of Director Mike Goodman and Assistant Director Candace Hampton, it is the mission of Seminole 6 Sports to assist children with the life-long values of teamwork, dedication, and exceptional work ethic on the playing field as well as in the classroom. The number one goal of Seminole 6 Sports is to provide a safe, enjoyable and memorable experience in football for all who participate. The vision of Seminole 6 Sports is to provide a safe and fun environment for kids while also building an athletic program that will shape character and create role models, as well as positively impact athletes, coaches, volunteers, and the community. With this program, the highest level of character, discipline, and leadership is demonstrated in order to help kids succeed in sports and life. Currently, there are four teams under Seminole 6 Sports,

including – 8U (for those ages 7 and 8, coached by Bivens Elliott), 10U (for those ages 9 and 10, coached by Steven Thayer), 12 U (for those ages 11 and 12, coached by Doug Gamble), and 14U (those ages 13 and 14, coached by Mike Goodman). Speaking of Mike, he is the Head Coach and brings 15 years worth of experience in youth sports to the program. He shares, “Since I was 6 years old, football has always had a presence in my life. It was my first love. The first approach to the game as a coach – you have to love the kids. It’s all about the kids!” Practice is two to three times a week from 6:30-8:30PM, and the program mainly finds its recruits from Lake City to Bishopville and everywhere in between. The teams will travel to locations such as Myrtle Beach, Columbia, Dillon, Cheraw, Monks Corner, and more throughout the season. Their home field, however, resides at Sneed Middle School in Florence. Mike shares, “Principal Ben Oates has been a dream to work with! We truly couldn’t do it without his help!”


Some others Mike is grateful for include his wife (for being patient during the setup of this process), Assistant Coach Jacki Fox, Walt Parker (who helped Mike start the program), and Candace. “She [Candace] has, by far, been our best acquisition. She is all over the place making sure everything gets done.” There are many others who help contribute to the success of Seminole 6, but all are volunteers passionate about the cause. There are two important components of this program. One is safety. “Football is a contact sport, and I’m teaching the kids why you may not turn a certain way during a play to avoid injury. There are a lot of small details to the sport that, if these players are taught correctly, they can avoid injuries.” The other is maintaining good grades. “I told a kid last week, ‘You can sign a $64 million dollar contract but if you can’t count that money, someone will take it all from you.” When Mike isn’t stressing the importance of safety and grades, he’s instilling values within the kids. During the season, they host fundraising events, like washing cars, to give back to the community. Last year, the team was able to donate 211 book bags filled with supplies to a local school. Some other life lessons he teaches include how to pump gas, how to change tires, how to check oil in cars, how to tie a tie, and more. With all of this, these players are gaining a lot more than practice on a football field. So far, the Seminole 6 have achieved quite an impressive accomplishment, becoming a part of the AAU – Amateur Athletic Union. With a new season starting, there will surely be many more forms of success coming their way. After all, the sky is the limit!

For more info, www.seminole6sports.com, email seminole6sports@gmail.com or call (843) 230-0198.

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Make Our Community Great

LIFESTYLE

CULTIVATE KINDNESS story by Allie Roark Have you ever wondered what makes this place that we refer to as “home” so great? Sure, we have some pretty amazing restaurants, and everyone usually looks forward to our one of a kind happenings like Florence After 5 or Art Fields in Lake City. But, the more I think about it, the clearer I see the bigger picture. It’s the community that makes this place amazing. Whether you have lived here your whole life or you are the new guy in town, I just want to welcome you and tell you that we are so happy that you are here. I say this because you are the reason that the Pee Dee is what it is. I’m not sure why you are here. Maybe it wasn’t your choice, and you are just itching to get out. Just remember, you belong to this community, and together we should hold each other accountable for the roles that we play in it. What do you say? Are you in? Let’s do this.

WHAT ARE YOU CULTIVATING? In other words, what are you pursuing in your life? I think many of us could agree that relationships and friendships take priority in our lives. But, what happens when we don’t have them? Life can seem pretty lonely, right? Being a teacher, my goal for this new school year is to cultivate a classroom of students that display kindness and show love to one another. Social awareness is a huge issue that our society faces, and I believe that if we all work together, we can eliminate the number one thing that jeopardizes our relationships. I was recently listening to a podcast that brought this issue up, and I was introduced to an awesome tip called the 10-foot rule. If you are within 10 feet of someone, you have to make eye contact and speak to them. Yes, this means you need to put your phone down. I have realized how often I avoid 16

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speaking to someone in passing by occupying myself with my phone. I refuse to be that awkward girl. Last year, my students were encouraged to speak to adults in the school and ask them how they were doing. The adults loved it! It became our secret mission to invest in others. If someone came and told me how that student made their day, we earned brownie points. It’s awesome for the little ones, but we adults need a little work as well. I may not be able to give you some brownie points, but I would love it if you would participate in this secret mission too. Let’s stop thinking about ourselves for a minute and ask someone how they are doing and actually stop and listen. Talk with them by asking questions that require more than a yes or no answer. Not only will this help with our social awareness, but it’s an act of kindness that may make someone feel welcome here and a part of this community.


KINDNESS ROCKS I am so excited to share my newest project with you. This year my students will not only be learning about social awareness, manners, and how to be kind, but they will also be making kindness rocks for our area. Each student will design a rock that inspires someone and will drop it off somewhere in the Pee Dee area. How awesome would it be if you stumbled upon it? Tell us, because we want to know if you do. We would love for you to email us where you found the rock, a picture of you with the rock, and how it made you feel. Then we ask for you to drop it off in another location for someone else to find. Not only will this put a smile on your face, but my students will see and hear how one simple act of kindness affected so many people. It’s a chain reaction. We cannot wait to hear from you. Please email it to Stephanie.roark@fsd1. org. Friend, thank you for being apart of a community that loves and serves the people surrounding it. Remember to be intentional with the role that you play in the community and what you are giving to it to make it great. Let’s cultivate a community that people are dying to be a part of. 

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LIFESTYLE

TIPS TO A BETTER THRIFT story provided by Darlington County Habitat for Humanity ReStore

Darlington County Habitat for Humanity ReStores are home improvement stores that offer new and gently used home goods, appliances, clothing, building supplies, vintage, and antique items + more at a fraction of the retail price. Shopping the ReStore isn’t your typical shopping experience. It’s a picker’s paradise! A few thrifted pieces can be just what you need to tie your space together. The focal point? That conversation piece? Bring a naturally curated look to your home and tell a story with one-of-a-kind pieces you just can’t find at big-box stores. When should you visit the ReStore? Thanks to our generous donors, inventory changes daily. Stop by early in the day and as often as you can when you have time to browse. ( We have shoppers who stop by every day! ) Christmas/New Year, Spring, and Back-to-School are all great times of the year to shop as people usually tend to clean out their home/office/storage spaces then. Mondays and Tuesdays are great days to shop as weekend donations are typically sorted and on the floor by then.

How should you shop the ReStore? Enter the ReStore with a plan, but do keep an open mind. Scan the store first and then choose a section to begin. The best treasures are found when you take your time to browse every section with an open mind. Do be mindful that items can be easily misplaced by other shoppers, so don’t only look in one place! Look for “Mr. Jack”, Hartsville ReStore manager, he is always happy to lend a friendly, helping hand if you are on the hunt for a specific item.

TIPS FOR FINDING A TREASURE • HARDWARE, type of wood, joints, nuts, bolts, and nails will all tell you the age of furniture. For example, examine the wood inside drawers and along the backside of your piece. If it’s solid wood, it is older and of higher quality than those made with particle board to cut cost. Look under furniture and open drawers. Stamps, labels, and signatures will give you more information about a piece. • IN VINTAGE ARTWORK, look for brushstrokes and cracks on the surface. If the art is a print of small dots, it is a reproduction. There will typically be a manufacture’s sticker on the back of new art. • SILVER VS. SILVER PLATE, Whether it’s a beautiful bowl or sets of utensils, if you are looking for true sterling silver, bring a magnet. The magnet test is the quickest way to decipher between the two! True sterling is not magnetic. • To tell the difference between GLASS and CRYSTAL, tap the side. It will ring if it’s crystal. It will thud if it’s glass. • Look for single letters, numbers, initials or symbols on CHINA and PORCELAIN. Most collectible/valuable pieces have markings. More often than not, we have complete sets of china donated.

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What should you look for at the ReStore? Everything in the ReStore may not be in perfect condition. Look beyond a piece in horrid condition and think of the possibilities. New hardware and/or a fresh coat of paint, stain or fabric covering can hide numerous imperfections and bring new life to that very piece. If you see a piece that has potential, take it home. It may not be around the next time you shop! For example, an old headboard/footboard can be transformed into a bench. That side table with a missing drawer can become a cozy new pet bed. Mirrors, windows, doors - old and new line our shelves. There are multiple ways to repurpose them. We also have a beautiful assortment of books. Use them not only to read but to style those empty shelves you have or tear beautiful pages from them and frame for instant art on your walls! Don’t miss our glassware, china sets, silver and kitchen wares. We have collectible items donated weekly. Our Darlington Restore manager has found cutting boards are for more than their original purpose! She says, “They are great for monogramming and make perfect serving boards! Also a great gift idea!” With prices starting at only $1.00 and all pieces carefully inspected, our clothing department offers something for everyone. From vintage to new and name brand, all seasons and sizes of clothing are carefully organized and available year-round. Who doesn’t love to save a dollar on clothes?   Why should you shop the ReStore? We are more than great prices and a fantastic find. Purchase what you love, and just by shopping, you are supporting our mission of a world where everyone has a decent place to live. Because of the continued support of our community, we have helped families achieve the American dream of homeownership since 1996. That’s almost 50 families who can pay an affordable mortgage and rest safe and sound in the comforts only home can bring.

You never know what you will find! Habitat Restore Piece Repainted

ReStore Locations

120 W. Washington Street, Hartsville 10a – 6p 1106 S. Main Street, Darlington 10a – 5:30p Get social with us and share your ReStore finds!

@DarCoHabitat #DarCoHabitat

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AROUND TOWN: LAKE CITY’S WINE DOWN WEDNESDAY

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Wine Down Wednesday

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Guests at Visit Lake City, SC’s Wine Down Wednesday enjoyed light refreshments while perusing Sumter native Caroline Cromer’s art hanging throughout the newly renovated office. The added artwork was full of vibrant colors making the space dance with happiness. “The canvas, for me, is a place for release,” says Caroline. “I relate my work to the journey of being alive and never knowing what tomorrow might bring, but whatever it is, I continue to feel it all with praise, hope, and faith!” If you find yourself wandering downtown Lake City, take a moment to stop by the Visit Lake City, SC office for a free cup of coffee and an uplifted spirit, thanks to Caroline’s art. To see her work online, visit CarolineCromerArt.com. 1 Patricia McCutcheon, Teresa McDonald & Meika McDonald | 2 Shady Rogers, Seth Kines & Greg Alexander 3 Justin & Caroline Cromer (artist) | 4 Emily Holloman & Anna Howell | 5 Pam Player & Tracy Daniels 6 Michelle Cantey & David Holladay | 7 Janice McCutcheon, Linwood Turner & Carla Angus 8 Susanne Masters & Catherine Masters

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BUCKET LIST

Murrells Inlet Marshwalk story by Zach Hughes

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Growing up, it was a huge part of my childhood to spend weeks at the beach with my family. Even to this day, our first instinct when we have a free day is to make our way down 544 to find our toes in the sand in Garden City or Surfside. If we want a nice secluded day on an old-growth untouched beach, we find ourselves a little further south at Huntington Beach State Park. For as long as I can remember, there has been something about the south strand of Myrtle Beach that has felt like a home away from home. It doesn’t matter whether you stay for a week or a weekend, there is one thing that always calls to you after a long day in the sand, and that is seafood. Crab legs at Crabby Mikes or a platter at the Conch Cafe are always good places to get your fill of good food. However, there is one strip of restaurants that will always be the number one destination to get our seafood fix - Murrells Inlet Marsh Walk.  Just as you're making your way over from Garden City I swear you can almost smell the buttery battered seafood once you pass Booty Brothers Outdoors. A little further through the trees and your line of sight is filled with multicolored signs all showcasing each restaurant. I always find it easiest to park on the right side of the street and walk across, especially during the busy months. 

Zach Hughes resides in Florence with his wife Alexis and their newborn son Christopher. Zach is a local entrepreneur, and has spent most of his time working around the automotive industry. In his spare time, Zach enjoys discovering South Carolina and dabbling in journalism.

As soon as you make your way onto the marsh walk, the first thing I always notice is how the smell of the salty inlet greets you. The slightly aged boards carry you over the edge of the Inlet Marsh. I love how you can see across the water to Garden City and Marlin Quay Marina as

you make your way down the boardwalk. Down below the boardwalk, I love the variety of boats that fill the slips along your walk. During the afternoon you will even see offshore fishing guides carrying off their catch and cleaning their fish for everyone to see. Now, here comes the hardest part of going to Murrells Inlet, deciding where to eat. There are so many good choices that it can sometimes be hard to choose wrong. The one thing I can admit is, each restaurant brings a unique flair to what you may be looking for in food. It is easy to stay at the beach and return to Murrells Inlet multiple times and not run out of amazing places to eat. My favorites include Creek Rats for some fried oysters and good music, Claw House is the place to get your fix of crab legs or lobster with an elevated view of the inlet, Bovines at the end of the boardwalk has delicious brick oven pizzas, and if you are craving sushi, Wicked Tuna never disappoints.  I will say that one of the biggest draws of Murrells Inlet is how good food meets a relaxing view. I can't help but remember each evening I have spent gazing over the water as it changes with the tides, all while relaxing with family and friends. It’s a place you know you will always have a good time. Even on any given weekend, it can feel like a vacation.  From the Marshwalk, the sunset is nothing short of breathtaking, with the sky changing to a rich orange and blue color, you feel like your life belongs in a painting. Then even after the sun has set, Murrells Inlet comes alive with a fun wholesome nightlife. 

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HOME

Life's Sweet Ingredient...

Sweet Potato story by Doug Smith

Each Saturday I get inspired by walking around my local farmers market. The people you meet, the stories you hear, and the passion for their craft is evident. Harold is a local farmer I see each week and he always has a story to tell me. Sometimes it’s about a dish he made using something from the farm or that someone gave him a dish to try using a secret ingredient. This week he told me about the different varieties of sweet potatoes he grows on his farm just down the road. Harold took the time to explain each variety to me telling me its name, where it came from, how it tasted, and of course, how to best prepare each one.  Now, I know a lot about sweet potatoes. I have loved them all my life. We even celebrate this delicious vegetable each year in Darlington at the Sweet Potato Festival. Back in the day, I can remember hanging out all day on the square enjoying the various activities until it concluded with the annual Yam Jam that night. I always thought it was funny to call it the “Yam Jam” because we all know that the Sweet Potato isn’t a

yam. In fact, it’s not even a potato, it’s the root of a Herbaceous plant. Plainly said: It’s a vegetable. Some would even call it a superfood because it’s a rich source of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants. Not only is this little gem good for you, but it’s also very versatile. You can eat them raw, baked, fried, mashed, candied, roasted...well, you get the picture.      Here’s a little tidbit of information for my friends that are type 2 diabetic: Sweet potatoes aren’t potatoes, so nutritionally they don’t count as a starch. That’s right. Sweet potatoes count as a vegetable. Now a word of caution, if you load it down with butter and sugar this superfood will not be as good for you as it once was. I have had a lot of fun over the last few weeks trying new recipes that let the sweet potato shine. Not only could I not narrow this down to my favorite recipe, I couldn’t even decide on just one variety. They were all different and good in their own way. What I did decide is how blessed we all are to live in an area that has access to high-quality fresh fruits and vegetables.      Thank you to all the people that had a vision for the local farmer's markets. If you live in the Pee Dee as I do, then you have multiple choices to get local fresh fruits and vegetables. The benefits run deep and wide whether you’re the small farmer having access to the market or the young family trying to get healthy options for dinner. I would encourage you to go visit the market near you. I will be at our new City Center Farmers Market when it opens in downtown Florence this month planning what's for dinner!

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METHOD 1. Take the chicken out of the fridge so it can come up to room temperature and preheat your oven to 350°F.

Baked Chicken with Sweet Potato INGREDIENTS 4 free-range chicken breasts 2 strips of smoked bacon 6 small potatoes quartered, I like Yukon Gold 3 Purple Skin sweet potatoes Sliced with skin on 3 fresh green onions 4 cloves of garlic whole  Olive oil 12 oz chicken stock 4 oz heavy cream Freshly shredded parmesan cheese 1/2 stick unsalted butter 1 lemon

2. Finely chop the bacon, then scrub and quarter the potatoes and slice sweet potatoes. Slice the onion and garlic. 3. Use a wide casserole-type pan or a roasting tray and add the bacon, all the sliced veg, and garlic. Add a lug of olive oil and a good pinch of sea salt and black pepper and toss everything together. 4. Pour the chicken stock into the pan, then put into the oven for 30 minutes so the potatoes can begin to soften and soak up the stock. 5. Take the potatoes out of the oven and add the cream. Sprinkle with a little more black pepper and shredded Parmesan. Then use a spoon to make little nests in the vegetables for the pieces of chicken to sit in. Place the chicken in these nests and dot little dabs of butter on and around the breasts. Squeeze the lemon over the top. 6. Return the tray to the oven to cook for 35 minutes, or until the chicken is golden and cooked through and the potatoes are delicious. To check if your chicken is cooked through, simply stick a sharp knife into the thickest part. If the juices run clear, you’re good or test with a thermometer, the temperature should be above 160˚F. 7. Serve straight away with a nice simple green or a salad and enjoy.

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HOME

Sweet Potato Soup INGREDIENTS 1 tablespoon flour 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 1/2 cups chicken broth (or vegetable broth) 1 tablespoon light brown sugar 1 1/2 cups cooked Heirloom (Envy) sweet potatoes 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 cup milk  Sea salt

METHOD 1. Bake the sweet potato for an hour at 350ºF. 2. In a heavy sauce-pot, over medium-low heat, cook the flour and butter, stirring constantly until roux achieves a light caramel color. 3. Add the broth and brown sugar, bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer.  4. Stir in the sweet potatoes and spices, bring to a simmer again, and cook for 5 minutes more.  5. Puree the soup. Add the milk. Season with salt and pepper. 6. Ladle into warm soup bowls and serve, garnish with Greek yogurt.

Doug's Baked Sweet Potato Special INGREDIENTS 2 jewel sweet potatoes (most common) Olive oil 1/2 a lemon 2/3 cup plain yogurt 1 small pinch of ground turmeric 1 small pinch of ground cumin 1 carrot 4 radishes 1 small red onion 1 pear  Extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons of pecans  Maple syrup  4 oz microgreens 

METHOD

1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes, pat dry, then rub with a little olive oil and season with sea salt and black pepper. Bake on a tray for about 40 minutes, or until cooked through (fork tender). 3. Add the yogurt to a small mixing bowl, zest 1 lemon, add a pinch of turmeric and a pinch of cumin and mix well. Leave at room temperature until needed. 4. Scrub the carrot and the radishes, peel the onion and core the pear. Coarsely grate the carrot, radishes, red onion, and slice the pear into bite-size wedges by hand, then tip into a bowl. 5. Mix the carrot, radishes, onions and pear with the lemon juice, 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil and a good pinch of salt and pepper. 6. A few minutes before your potatoes are ready, toast the pecans in a small frying pan on medium heat for 2 minutes. At this point, add 1 tablespoon of maple syrup and let it bubble until it starts to thicken then take off the heat. Carefully pour onto a sheet of greaseproof paper, leave to cool and don’t touch! 7. Cut a cross in the top of your cooked potatoes and gently break them open with a fork, mashing a little of the inside as you go. 8. Add a dollop of the spiced yogurt, followed by the vegetables. Serve over a bed of spinach with microgreens and pecans scattered on top.

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HOME

Would you like to be a part of the 31st Annual

River Sweep? Saturday, September 21 9:00 am until noon

Each year Beach Sweep/River Sweep is coordinated by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, and once again we invite you to join the Sweep. It is the largest one-day litter cleanup of our state's waterways and beaches, and it’s the volunteers, like you, who make it happen.

How to be involved? • Site Captains are the key people who make

the cleanups happen at specific locations. Site Captains are local leaders who choose a location to cleanup and organize a group of volunteers to get the cleanup job done. See our website for more explanation.

• Regular volunteers can join an existing group by contacting a site captain who is looking for additional help.

Inland Sweep (Inland Counties): To organize or join an inland cleanup, at inland counties on inland rivers, lakes, or wetlands. Go to the DNR’s BSRS website for more information http://www.dnr.sc.gov/bsrs/. Contact the Inland Coordinator at marshallb@ dnr.sc.gov or phone at 803-734-9096 to ask questions.

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Register for the Inland Sweep here www.dnr.sc.gov/bsrs/captains. html - DNR's website allows you to register as a Site Captain for the Inland Sweep. Fill-in the electronic form, submit your information and DNR will follow with a response.

September 2019

Follow The Sweep on Facebook!


Where They Come From Where They Hide by Phillip Gardner Welcome to this fictional version of Darlington, South Carolina - a town full of characters who are rough, down-on-their-luck, and beautifully flawed. This fictional town provides a backdrop for the tragedies and comedies of life to unfold. If you linger in these stories for awhile and belly-up at the Paradise Lounge, the local watering hole, you’ll meet Vapor, a man without a face, Coach, a washedup former high school football coach who becomes a hero of sorts, and Pete Hump and his best friend, Russ, who are both hopelessly in love with the same fiery woman. These connected stories blur time and narrative to construct complicated characters that challenge stereotypical conceptions of the rural workingclass. In the end, what emerges are the tales of the depth of human joy and suffering. Local author Phillip Gardner, an awardwinning writer that has published four other short stories, grew up learning to love music and reading. For most of his life music has been his hobby and short fiction his love. Gardner is also a professor emeritus at Francis Marion University where he taught for thirty years. He lives with his lovely wife Tressa in Darlington.

Gardner

Where They Come From Where They Hide can be purchased at Barnes & Noble. To see more of Garner’s work, visit www.phillipjgardner.com. December 2018

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Did You Know...

First 50 Years of Tobacco in Lake City: The Second Largest Tobacco Market in South Carolina story by Kent Daniels

The first tobacco planted in Lake City was hauled with great effort to Timmonsville, the nearest market at that time. In 1895, three businessmen of Lake City - Henry Nachman, Charles M. Kelly, and Jeff Cameron decided to conduct a tobacco market in Lake City. They built a warehouse and leased it successfully that year to Messrs. Moore and Gray. The following year these men returned as buyers and Mr. Nachman managed the warehouse. Realizing that they knew nothing about the marketing of the weed the owners decided to sell the warehouse. Col. O.T. Hall, the pioneer tobacco man of this section, was the purchaser, and he was the first prominent warehouseman in Lake City. He made this his home, invested in property here, built and then rebuilt a large warehouse, the Star Warehouse is a monument to his memory here. Accurate records of the early tobacco market in Lake City are difficult to obtain. It is known, however, that warehouses were in operation before 1901, when the first representatives of the major tobacco manufacturing companies came to Lake City to buy for the large companies. According to Mrs. L.O. Holloway of Lake City, her late husband came to Lake City as a representative of the American Tobacco Company to begin buying in 1901. At the same time, it was believed that L.A. Winston came as a representative of the Imperial Tobacco company and these two men are regarded as the first buyers from major companies to start the market here. Among the first warehouses of which there are any definite records or memory are: O.T. Hall warehouse and another warehouse known as Stanley and Moore warehouse, both built in 1901. They believed to have contained about 15,000 square feet each. This is in contrast to the floor area on the market in 1949, which was nearly threequarters of a million square feet. According to reliable reports, Dr. A.H. Williams either built or financed the

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building of a warehouse to promote the market. Older residents here recall that about the beginning of the century a market also was operated in Scranton, just three miles north of Lake City. It was not uncommon to note buyers following the Lake City market and as soon as sales were over, they got in a buggy to hasten to Scranton to participate in the sales there. The market in Scranton closed in 1904 and the warehouse was put up for sale in 1905. The next warehouse in Lake City was built by J. J. M. Graham in 1903, and leased to J. D. King and T. S. Graham and Sons. T. S. Graham continued with the warehouse for three years and left Lake City to return in 1924 and built another warehouse and operated under the name T. S. Graham and Sons. Mr. King continued to operate the warehouse built by Mr. Graham and purchased it from him only to see the building destroyed by fire in 1911. Mr. King rebuilt it in 1913 and sold the building to L. O. Holloway and G. R. Bowen. This was when Mr. Bowen began his career as a warehouseman on the same spot where the huge Bowen warehouse of 175,000 square feet stood, which was on the corner of Church Street and Sauls Street. Mr. Bowen operated a small warehouse just across Church street for one year before his beginning with Mr. Holloway in 1914. Mr. Bowen said he recalled the Lake City market sold 4,387,000 pounds of tobacco in 1913 and the second year, 1914, sold around 6,500,000 pounds. The four warehouses in Lake City in 1914 were O.T. Hall warehouse known as the “Star Warehouse,” Holloway and Bowen, Glenn and Joyce, and M. R. Gravely warehouses. The Star Warehouse of Lake City also had an interesting history. The Star Warehouse No. 1 began under the name of Star Warehouse back in 1906, when it was operated by O. T. Hall. Mr. Hall died in 1915 and the building was destroyed by fire in 1916. A corporation known as the Star Warehouse Corporation promoted largely by J. C. Young was formed and the building was rebuilt in 1917 and leased to Frank Edmunds and Ed Hodges for two years. Wesley W. Singletary, who ranks next to G. R. Bowen in years of service as a warehouseman, began his career with the Star Warehouse in 1919, associated with Ed Hodges. Mr. Singletary and Mr. Hodges continued with the Star Warehouse until it was leased to a cooperative pool in


Tobacco District Aerial View of Lake City (Looking North) - 1955

1922. Mr. Singletary returned to the warehouse business after the ill-fated “pool” was discontinued. Mr. Singletary and Mr. Hodges again took over the Star Warehouse. Norman Epps joined Mr. Singletary in 1932 and continued with him until 1948. Star Warehouse No. 2 was built by W. A. McClam in 1937 on the corner of Church and Main Streets and the first year was leased to the Carter Brothers of Virginia as the Dixie warehouse. The next year it was leased to the Star Warehouse Corporation to be operated by Singletary and Epps. The third building, bearing the name of the Star Warehouse No. 3, was built by Wesley Singletary and sons in 1946 and was leased to the Star Warehouse Corporation to be operated by Singletary and Epps. Star No. 3 was changed to Singletary’s warehouse for the 1949 season and was operated by Singletary and Son; while Star Nos. 1 and 2 were operated by Norman Epps and Willie Lynch. Graham warehouse was built in 1924 by T.S. Graham and Sons and it was the second time the late Mr. Graham opened a tobacco warehouse here. After the death of Mr. Graham, his sons continued to carry on the warehouse business and it was operated by his family, G. Settle Graham, Roscoe Graham, Celeste Graham, and C.W. Graham. The warehouse has been enlarged and modernized several times. The New Home warehouse was built in 1928 by a local corporation and controlling interest held by W. Lee Flowers. It was operated for a few years by J.H. McElveen, Norman Epps, and Clarence Holloway. After several years, it was leased to Le Roy Bishop, C.H. Bobbit, and Hayden Iglehart, who continue to operate it under the same name. Additions to the warehouse buildings of Lake City were the Independent warehouse constructed in 1948 by F.R. Fryar and was operated by Willie Lynch and L.F. Fryar. The name was changed in 1949 to the “New Independent” and was operated by L.F. Fryar. Also, the Planters warehouse

was ready for the 1949 season. This warehouse was built by Jack Stewart and Robbie Askins and was operated by them. The 1949 season was the first time this warehouse was used. The Bowen warehouse, the largest in Lake City, was operated by the Bowen family consisting of G.R. Bowen, A.M. Bowen, A.M. Bowen, Jr., E.D. Bowen, and D.G. Bowen. The largest crop sold on the Lake City market was in 1946 when a total of 36,177,268 pounds was sold for a total of $17,288,131.76 or an average of $47.78 per hundred. The market in 1948 sold 26,626,328 pounds for $13,077,471.31 or an average of $49.11 per hundred. The lowest average price was $7.02 per hundred in 1915. Lake City boasts of three large plants for redrying and packing leaf tobacco. They are Imperial Tobacco, T.S. Ragsdale (dealers in leaf tobacco), and James I. Miller Tobacco. The companies which maintain prize rooms here for packing tobacco and shipping to their respective factories or resale are American Tobacco Company, Liggett and Myers, Reynolds, Imperial, Export Tobacco, Winston Leaf, T.S. Ragsdale, James I. Miller and the Henderson Tobacco Company. Kent Daniels, Lake City native, retired teacher, and now Director of the Lynches Lake Historical Society.

Continue to follow Kent in future issues of Vip as he sheds some light on the history of Lake City. (This article first appeared in the New and Courier on August 9, 1949.) September 2019

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SEPTEMBER sunday

monday

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Neptune Island Labor Day Luau Hartsville

Bojangles' Southern 500 Darlington Raceway

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tuesday

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wednesday

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U.S. Bowling League Day

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thursday

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Trivia Seminar Brewing, Florence

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Lake City Farmers Market

12 Downtown Block Party Hartsville

SC Grassroots Tour Breakfast SiMT

National Grandparent’s Day

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Small Business Roundtable Hartsville Chamber

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Patriot Day and National Day of Service and Remembrance

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Mom & Me: Paint Night Coach TB Thomas Center, Hartsville

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National Apple Dumpling Day National Tackle Kids Cancer Day

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23 National Great American Pot Pie Day

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SC Tobacco Festival begins Lake City

26 Downtown Block Party Hartsville

Open Mic Night Dolce Vita, Florence

Bringing Downtown Alive! Concert Darlington

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SC Bridal Showcase Florence Center Dreamgirls Auditions Florence Little Theatre

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National Women’s Health & Fitness Day

National Ice Cream Cone Day

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National Cheeseburger Day

National Play-Doh Day

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September 3-21 Florence Restaurant Week National Chewing Gum Day


Put this on your calendar! friday

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saturday

7 Moore Farms Beer Fest Lake City Fiesta Friday Lake City

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Tap Into Downtown Florence

Matilda Florence Little Theatre I Love This Town Event Hartsville

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Florence Farmers Market Downtown Florence

14 Hartsville Farmers Market Zumba Summer Fest Dolce Vita, Florence

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Nutcracker Ballet Auditions Center Theater, Hartsville

CareSouth Carolina 5k Hartsville

Heroes for Health Golf Classic Darlington Country Club

Power Comicon SiMT

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Florence After Five RadioVibe Hoof & Hound, Hartsville

Golden Leaf Festival Mullins Hispanic Heritage Festival Lake City Eat Smart Move More Festival Florence

Send in your events to heather@vipmagsc.com!

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LIFESTYLE

THE ULTIMATE

FOOTBALL FAN

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1 Lillie K's Collections Gameday T-shirts 218 S Main St, Mullins, 843.430.7870 2 Rivals Gamecock Polo Shirt 2320 Trade Ct, Florence, 843.667.1767

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3 Minnie's Giftique Gamecock Coffee Cup 142 E Carolina Ave, Hartsville, 843.383.6380 4 Main Street Mercantile Metal Straws 111 E Main St, Lake City, 843.374.2333 5 Seven Boutique Boggs' Bag 130 E Main St, Lake City, 843. 374.7777 6 L. Mae Boutique Pom Pom Hoops 111 W Evans St B, Florence, 843.472.5224

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HEALTH + BEAUTY

Keeping up with Medications story by Donna Tracy, Communications Coordinator, HopeHealth

As we settle into our fall schedules and adjust for the back-to-school traffic changes and fewer evening daylight hours it may be a good time to assess one important schedule that more than half of all Americans struggle with – taking medications on time and the right way. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), up to half of all patients are nonadherent with their medications at any given moment. Some never fill the prescription, some take the medication incorrectly by delaying, missing, or increasing doses, others stop taking the medications without discussing the decision with their prescribing provider. Most people aren’t intentionally non-compliant about taking their medication. Instead, they forget once or twice, then forget again, and suddenly realize they haven’t taken it at all! Often, people don’t even remember they should be taking their medication until their next refill or doctor’s appointment reminder. The top reasons for not being compliant? • forget to take the medication or refill the prescription • away from home or too busy • unable to afford the medication • unwanted side effects or just didn’t like taking it • the medication didn’t seem to be working or didn’t feel it was needed • confusion about how and when to take the medication • difficulty keeping up with multiple medications and complex dosing schedules What’s so bad about not being compliant with your medications? Well, as former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said, “Drugs do not work in patients who do not take them.” The CDC reports that not only does noncompliance cost up to $300 billion every year, but it also accounts for at least one third – and up to 69 percent – of hospital admissions. “Taking your medications as directed by your provider to meet health goals is very important for treating both chronic and temporary conditions, and for long-term health and well-being,” said Stephan Orander, RHM, HopeHealth director of pharmacy. Tasked with improving patient medication compliance, Orander said it is essential to understand the consequences of not taking medication as prescribed.

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“The price of not taking medications properly could mean missing out on its benefits and quality of life improvements, and losing protection against future illness. It can even lead to serious health complications or death,” said Orander. “For example, not taking your blood pressure medication as directed can cause uncontrolled blood pressure and could lead to heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure.” The key to medication compliance is knowing why the medication is needed and how it works: Is it taken on an empty stomach? Should it be taken with a meal? Does it interact with other medications or even certain foods? “The more you understand how the medication works to treat your condition, the more likely you are to be compliant,” said Orander. Keeping your scheduled appointments with your providers is also important. This allows not only for your provider to assess your health and how your medications are working, but also gives you the opportunity to address any concerns. Open and honest conversation about your reasons for any non-compliance can have a great impact on your health outcomes. If there are side effects, perhaps the dosage can be adjusted or another medication prescribed. Orander said developing a personal connection with both your provider and your pharmacist can also help create safe environments where you can comfortably ask questions and express concerns you have about your medications and potential side effects. “Make it a team effort and talk honestly to your provider and your pharmacist about your medication compliance,” he said. “We can work with patients and their insurance companies to synchronize medication refills when allowed for patients’ convenience. This improves the patients’ ability to be compliant and when possible, allows them to receive 90-day supply of multiple medications with a single office visit and one co-pay per medication,” said Orander. Not keeping your appointments reduces the opportunity to ensure your medications are working as intended and also limits the ability to provide the best care possible to all patients. “Before going to your doctor or the pharmacy, write down your questions and concerns so you can resolve any issues and improve your medication compliance. This is the beginning of empowering and motivating yourself to manage your health.”


Are you Compliant? Ask yourself these questions about each of your medications to determine if you are medication compliant: • Do you take your medication as scheduled? • Do you take the dose as prescribed? • Does how you take your medication match what is written on the label? • How often do you miss taking your medication? Why do you miss taking it? • When was the last time you took your medication? • Have you stopped taking your medication? Why? • Have you noticed any adverse effects from any of your medications?

Tips for improving compliance • • • • •

The key to medication compliance is knowing why the medication is needed and how it works....

Use a pill box to manage your dosages and schedule Keep your medications in a visible area Work your medication schedule into your daily routine Set an alarm or timer Ask someone to help remind you • Take advantage of technology o If you have a smart phone set labeled reminders for each medication o Invest in a smart pill bottle, such as Medikyu or the Pillsy Pill Reminder, that can track when you take each dose and notify you when it is time for the next

360 NORTH IRBY ST. FLORENCE 843.667.9414 | HOPE-HEALTH.ORG

September 2019

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BUCKET LIST

Today’s senior centers are a vibrant action-packed combination of Spanish classes, group exercise class, card games, Bible study, educational presentations, group trips, painting classes, local fitness center, volunteering headquarters, transportation hub, and tasty dining sites. This year’s national theme, Senior Centers: The Key to Aging Well emphasizes the tremendous potential that senior centers unlock in their communities, including programming that empowers older adults to grow, learn, give, and connect. During (September) National Senior Center Month, the Senior Citizens Association (SCA), Leatherman Senior Center, Lake City Senior Center and the City of Lake City are celebrating these shared experiences that unlock the keys to aging well for older adults. From financial planning workshops to cooking classes and dances to technology classes, Leatherman and Lake City Senior Centers are the community nexus where seniors find friendship, meaning, and purpose. To share the

power of these connections, Leatherman and Lake City Senior Centers have planned special events to celebrate National Senior Center Month, including SCA Open house day “Taco Bout an Open House” from 9 am to 2 pm on September 26th, 2019, 600 Senior Way, Florence. SCA, Florence County Parks and Recreation and other senior related businesses have partnered to host an array of events that will feature lots of activities, speakers, Taco Bar for lunch, scavenger hunt and bingo. “Eleanor Roosevelt said, ‘The purpose of life is to live it,’ and our members are doing that every day,” said Linda Mitchell Johnson, Executive Director of the Senior Citizens Association. “They demand the opportunity to continue growing, learning, giving, and connecting. We serve them and this com¬munity the best we can with fun and engaging programs, while also providing practical tools and resources to help them stay healthy and independent.” The Senior Citizens Association also provides hot nutritious homebound meals, congregate meals and activities, volunteer placement, telephone reassurance, transportation, lunch programs and other programs that enhance the quality of life. SCA/ Leatherman Lunch program is open to the public and is a $5 meal with drink included.

To learn more about your local senior center, congregate nutrition sites or join a senior center call 843-669-6761, like us on FaceBook or visit www.seniorcitizensassociation.com. 42

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September 5 11:30 am to 1:00 pm - Labor Day lunch Celebration ($5 lunch per person) open to the public-purchase lunch ticket in advance at the Leatherman SC. **September 11 9:30 am- 9/11 Memorial Breakfast-Breakfast sponsored by Agape Hospice, First Responder presentations and balloon release sponsored by SCA September 12 1 pm- Diabetic and Non Diabetic Wound Care presented by MUSC **September 13 3 pm to 4:30 pm - Grandparents Day with Reptiles and popcorn bar for the kids sponsored by SCA and Florence Co. Parks & Rec. **September 18 10 am to 11 am - Thin and Healthy Insta Pot cooking Demo. September 20 10 am to 11 am - Coffee and Yogurt Brunch Bar September 24 12 noon – Drama Club Sneak Peak at lunch ($5 lunch per person) open to the public- purchase lunch ticket in advance at the Leatherman SC. September 26 9 am to 2 pm – “Taco Bout an Open House” Fiesta Family and Friends Day. Includes taco lunch, scavenger hunt, bingo, educational speakers, fun activity demonstrations, coloring Contest, crochet display, card game presentations, door prizes and enter to win ONE FREE MEMBERSHIP, along with many more prizes and activities. Bring a friend and come out for a fun filled day. Open to the public- register by phone 843-669-6761 September 28 430 pm- Saturday Night Cabin Fever Murder Mystery Dinner presented by the Leatherman Seasoned Players- limited seating so stop by the Leatherman Senior Center today and purchase tickets for $20 per person **Events require membership card. Please stop by our office and become a member today for only $35 a year and receive a free gift.

**September 6 1:30-3:00 pm- Price is Right sponsored by Agape Hospice. **September 13 1:30-3:00 pm- Ice Cream Social- sponsored by Embrace Hospice. **September 1 11:30 am - 12:00 pm - 9/11 Memorial September 19 or 26 1:00-2:00 pm - Wound Care Presented by MUSC Florence Campus- Open to public- register by calling Lake City **September 20 Trip to Augusta GA-Petersburg Boat Cruise on the Augusta Canal/Historical Sites/Dinner- Please call Fannie for cost and to sign up. September 24 1:00-2:00 pm - Shingles presented by MUSC Health Express Care, Lake City, Judy Morris NP- open to public- register by calling Lake City **Events require membership card. Please stop by our office and become a member today for only $35 a year. Call Lake City Senior Center 843-394-2432 for more details. September 2019

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HEALTH + BEAUTY

CBD Oil

Medical Uses, Benefits and Risks story by Bryan Ziegler, PharmD, MBA Clinical Compounding Pharmacist, Moss Compounding Pharmacy

Not a day goes by that I don’t receive calls or questions about CBD Oil. There is much interest about the potential medical benefits, proper use, and how to find a good quality product. Due to this interest, I have conducted extensive research into these products to identify what makes a quality product, what are the potential medical benefits, and what are the risks with the products. I’ll share some key highlights in this article.

What is CBD? CBD is a cannabinoid that is extracted from the flowers of the cannabis sativa (hemp) plant. Over 100 cannabinoids have been identified in the hemp plant. The extracted CBD oil is then produced in a variety of dosage forms such as capsules, sublingual tinctures, and topical salves. CBD products that are indicated as “full spectrum” are produced in a manner to extract and capture all the cannabinoids from the hemp plant. Early medical research on CBD points to full spectrum products having a more beneficial effect over products that only contain a select few cannabinoids (also called “isolates”). I routinely get questions about the difference between medical marijuana and CBD oil. There are a few distinct differences. Marijuana is produced from cannabis plants that have high concentrations of THC (usually in the range of 2030% THC concentration) and lower concentrations of CBD. This higher level of THC is what produces the “high” or psychoactive effect of marijuana. CBD oil on the other hand contains a trace amount of THC (<0.3% is what is required by law) but has higher concentrations of CBD. CBD oil therefore does not produce a “high” or psychoactive effect, even at high doses. CBD oil products are also available THC-free as well. 44

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What is CBD being used for? The higher CBD concentration appears to produce the medical benefits throughout the body by impacting the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The endocannabinoid system is extremely complex and plays important roles in many vital processes, and it holds promise as a treatment target for many debilitating conditions. The ECS helps to regulate sleep, appetite, digestion, hunger, mood, motor control, immune function, reproduction and fertility, pleasure and reward, pain, memory and temperature regulation. The most common reasons we have recommended CBD oil to patients is for pain, inflammation, anxiety, and insomnia but there are numerous other potential uses for these products that researchers are continuing to study.

How do I find a quality product? Finding a quality CBD Oil product is quite challenging. At our pharmacy, we spent months researching numerous products and companies before identifying the best options to stock and recommend. The challenge in the marketplace is that CBD oil is classified like a dietary or food supplement. This means that these products are not required to go through safety and efficacy testing by the FDA and will contain language on the packaging indicating it “has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, and this product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.” This is the same statement that is found on other dietary supplements and herbal products routinely used by patients. There are a growing number of companies producing CBD products, with very loose regulations on the quality of these products. A recent research article analyzed a large sample of CBD products to evaluate what these products actually contained compared to what was listed on the package labeling. The results….. less than 30% actually contained what was listed on the label. Therefore, it is very important that you purchase a quality CBD oil product from a reputable source.


When evaluating a CBD oil product, I personally recommend asking the following questions: 1. Does the product have a lot number and expiration date on the package? This is a minimum expectation of a good quality product that follows good manufacturing processes. 2. Does the company test (preferably with an outside lab) every product lot to confirm ingredients are accurate with product label? The higher quality products will test every batch and make this information easily available to the public. 3. Is the cannabis grown in the US? The government registers and regulates farmers growing hemp and has some restrictions in place that help ensure a higher quality product than crops grown outside the US. 4. Is the cannabis produced without the use of harmful pesticides and fungicides? Cannabis plants absorb these harmful substances, which can be present in the final CBD oil product. A quality product will have outside lab testing on every product batch indicating the product is free of any of these contaminants. 5. What is the actual concentration (ie. strength) of the final product? Just because the box label indicates a strength, doesn’t mean that all products with the same label strength are equivalent. The key is to understand the concentration of the active CBD ingredients. The extraction processes used by CBD oil producers vary and this can impact the concentration of active CBD in the final product (ie. a more or less potent product). This greatly impacts that dosing of the product and is why you can’t easily switch between brands of CBD and get similar results with the same dose.

Lastly, it can be dangerous to seek medical advice from non-healthcare providers. All too often I hear from individuals that have been provided no information (or in some cases incorrect information) on proper CBD oil use. There are many issues to consider before using CBD oil including: • your medical conditions, • other medications being used, • potential issues with drug screening/testing, and • proper use of the CBD product for optimal benefit while reducing the risk of harmful effects. It is especially important to check with your local pharmacist regarding potential drug interactions with CBD oil. There are some commonly used medications that can have interactions that increase the risk of side effects and toxic drug levels if combined with CBD oil. Overall, CBD oil has the potential to provide benefit for a variety of conditions. Individuals do need to be cautious before using a product to minimize the risk of harm by fully evaluating the quality of the product and seeking knowledgeable medical advice on proper use.

2500 Hoffmeyer Road, Florence (843) 773-2821 • mosscompounding.com

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FUN FACT

HEALTH + BEAUTY

GI, SILENT, BABY BOOMERS, GEN X, GEN Y, GEN Z

THE 6 LIVING GENERATIONS EXPLAINED... According to Wikipedia, a generation is defined as "a cohort of people born within a similar span of time (15 years at the upper end) who share a comparable age and life stage and who were shaped by a particular span of time (events, trends and developments).” When it comes to generational cohorts, common confusion comes when labeling generations by their age. Generational cohorts are defined (loosely) by birth year, not current age. As of 2019, here is the breakdown:

GI GENERATION • Born between 1901 and 1926, currently 92+ years old, 1.9 million in the U.S. • These are the WWI generation and fighters in WWII, they were born when teamwork paved the way to overcome and progress. A time where there was no "retirement," you worked until you died or couldn't work anymore and marriages lasted forever.

• Born between 1965 and 1979, currently 40-54 years old, 82 million people in U.S. • Members of Gen X are approaching the middle of their working careers and potential peak-earning years.

GEN Y/MILLENNIALS • Born between 1980 and 1994, currently between 25-39 years old. This cohort is very large and is typically broken down into two halves. • Gen Y.1 = 25-29 years old (31 million people in U.S.) • Gen Y.2 = 29-39 (42 million people in U.S.) • Generation Y is thought to be more familyoriented and willing to sacrifice career advancement for a better work/life balance, though they are still ambitious and seek out meaningful work.

SILENT

GEN Z

• Born between 1927 and 1945, currently 74-91 years old, roughly 20 million in U.S.

• Born between 1995 and 2015, currently between 4-24 years old, nearly 74 million in U.S.

• This generation is named "silent" because children of this era were expected to be seen and not heard. Their choice of music was Big-Band and Swing. They are disciplined, self-sacrificing, and cautious.

• Gen Z has never known life without technology and makes up the latest wave of young professionals entering the workforce.

BABY BOOMERS • Born between 1944 and 1964, currently 55-75 years old, 76 million in U.S. • With more health and energy—and their children now adults—boomers who can afford it expect to spend at least early retirement fulfilling travel 46

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Being informed of the values, beliefs, lifestyle, and behaviors of generational cohorts is beneficial in the development of effective marketing and communications strategies, but can also help in bridging the workplace generational gap. Take the time to research the key differences between the generations.


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BUSINESS

Helping to Secure Your Financial Freedom

photo by Fred Salley

JESSICA CARNEY Jessica Carney, Director of Employer Retirement Services at WebsterRogers Financial Advisors (WRFA), has always had a desire to teach and help people. A career in helping a person achieve their financial goals and securing financial freedom for their future have offered Jessica an opportunity to fulfill that desire. Jessica has an undergraduate degree from Francis Marion University and an MBA from Baker College. Out of school, she started with First Union National Bank as a personal banker where she was first exposed to investments and earned her securities licenses. Jessica realized how much she enjoyed educating people about planning for their financial future. She later worked for Lincoln Financial where she covered McLeod Health 401k employee education. This transition

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reinforced her need to educate and help secure financial futures. When she was approached about joining WebsterRogers after six years with Lincoln, she saw it as an opportunity to continue what she loved and to grow professionally. Having the increased responsibilities of leading the 401k part of the business was a challenge she was ready to take on! Jessica has been with WRFA for four years now. Her position with Employer Retirement Services provides guidance and solutions for medium and mid-sized companies who provide 401k’s for their owners and employees. “WRFA has always done a good job with the management and administration of 401k’s. Where I think we distinguish ourselves is in the coaching we give plan sponsors and the education we provide for the employees,” explains Jessica.

“Since I have joined, we have expanded our overall service offering to the plan sponsors and employees. Those expanded services are something I am really proud of. It goes back to education for me. This is an area where I can help people understand something very important in simple terms, to assist them in reaching their goals." Jessica recently obtained her AIFA designation. As an Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analyst, she can provide fiduciary audits of 401k plans. The audits are fiduciary assessments measuring how well investment fiduciaries are fulfilling their duties to a defined high standard of care. “This is important because it ensures the plan is taking the highest level of responsibility in providing retirement benefits to their employees,” says Jessica. “With so many rules and regulations impacting retirement plans, it is important to have a qualified second set of eyes. I feel very fortunate I am in a position where I can use what I have learned to help people achieve their financial goals.” When Jessica was asked what she loves most about working for WebsterRogers, she said, “No question, the clients and the people. Doing something you love with people you like—you really can’t ask for more.”

With one deadline behind them, WR is still working diligently on client projects. Given the new tax laws, they have been planning with many of their clients since late last year as there are a myriad of changes impacting individuals and businesses. Taxpayers are impacted in different ways. Fortunately, WR has the expertise and experience to navigate the most complex issues.

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BUSINESS photo by Nancy Devon Coward

The CONTINUUM Q & A WITH JEANETTE ALTMAN, Executive Director Have you ever met someone and as they began telling you about a passion project, it became infectious? That’s what it’s like when you meet with Jeanette Altman, Executive Director of The Continuum in Lake City. The Continuum is a new regional center for education and training in innovative and technical skills and workforce development, created through the collaboration between The Darla Moore Foundation, Florence-Darlington Technical College and Francis Marion University. The center offers area students pathways to meaningful careers and employers statewide a much-needed stream of skilled employees. Read below as Jeanette shares some insight with us about the facility and how it will help support the economic growth in our community. Can you tell us how the Continuum came about? “The conversation for the Continuum first began because of a shift in people being able to attend a 4-year college. This shift is largely due to the expenses related to college. In addition to that, some businesses and industries aren’t able to find the workers needed. There are a lot of industries within a 35-mile radius of Lake City. If we offer education in the right areas, we can meet those needs and change the trajectory of all of these students.  “With that being said, the Continuum was meant to be an economic anchor in the master plan for economic growth in our community. ArtFields brings tourism into the area, that’s where the hotel, restaurants, and businesses come into play. Festivals like Rhythm & Q’s or the events Moore Farms hosts bring people to the area also increasing tourism. But tourism is only one piece of the plan and it can be temporary. The Continuum changes the

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landscape of the community allowing industries to build here which will help our community grow and encourage those tourists to stay. The classes offered here will allow students to earn solid wages upon graduation or receiving certifications. We want to position ourselves to where we can educate and train a workforce that can meet the needs of small to medium businesses.” As Executive Director, what are your day-to-day activities at the Continuum? “My day-to-day changes depending on the time of year. Back in December when I was hired, it was much different than now. We offer dual enrollment classes through both Francis Marion University and Florence Darlington Technical College. (Dual enrollment allows high school students to be enrolled in college courses where the credits apply both to their high school diploma requirements and college graduation requisites.) When you’re talking about high school, depending on the size of the school, they start scheduling classes as early as January. During that time, I was visiting all of the area high schools with Anna Todd, the Director at FMU, and Celeste Nunn, the Director at FDTC. We went to high schools in Marion, Kingstree, Darlington, Florence, etc. Because the Continuum is so new, I spend a lot of time doing presentations for school boards and rotaries to get the word out. One very important part of my job is working with economic development partners. With the Florence Economic Development office, the first order of business was to establish that relationship. Then they have businesses in an industry that they work with trying to help decide if they want to move into the area. Of course, now the Continuum is a very big part of that decision. Knowing


that this facility is here offering high school students the skills needed for these industries and also how this facility can be used as a continuing education facility will help our community grow economically.” What area does the Continuum recruit students from? “We are currently working on recruiting students from Florence County, Marion County, Darlington County, and Clarendon County. When we look at who we are going to approach, it’s a matter of what their needs are. We currently have students from all five of Florence school districts. These districts have seen a great need and taken advantage of what we are offering." 

What has been an unexpected exciting part of this project? “The involvement of the community. Even when we didn’t have an infrastructure to call home, we were embraced. As everyone saw the building come together, they wanted to know what they could do to help. Everyone is showing excitement for what will come from the Continuum.”

Are there any other facilities close by that are similar to the Continuum? “The partnership and collaboration behind the Continuum is certainly one of a kind. No other comprehensive four year university and technical college in the state has a relationship quite as collaborative and unique as the one that exists between FMU and FDTC here at the Continuum. Add in the support from the Darla Moore Foundation in this state-of-the-art facility, and many believe the economic impact of the Continuum programs and offerings are unprecedented.”

208 W. Main Street, Lake City (843) 374-4200 www.thelccontinuum.org

Now the Executive Director of The Continuum, Jeanette Altman was most recently the principal at J. Paul Truluck Creative Arts & Science Magnet School in Lake City. Altman is a 1999 graduate of Clemson University where she earned a B.S. in Industrial Engineering. She worked for Michelin Tire Corporation in Lexington, S.C. as an industrial engineer for three years before moving to Lake City, and pivoting to the world of education. She was a teacher and assistant principal before assuming the principalship at the Truluck magnet.

Why should students attend the Continuum when many schools have a career center that offers dual enrollment opportunities? “When deciding on certifications and courses that would be offered at the Continuum, we took what area schools offered into consideration. For instance, Lake City High School has a great career center, but the classes offered here through FDTC are not offered at Lake City High. When it comes to career technology education, which are the classes FDTC is offering, there’s no duplication there. Even within Florence 1, the only duplication with their career center is welding. Welding is very popular, so we’ve even been asked if some F1 students could attend here because the classes are full in there.” Can you tell us more about the Business Incubator? “The Business Incubator is managed by FMU and provides dedicated business incubation, general small business assistance, and community professional development training for the surrounding communities. We are providing businesses a place to foster within a collective community of support and resources for one year to help clients effectively build and grow their business. FMU will also act as a mentor, business plan assistant and resource identification for clients. In addition, we will host a variety of workshop topics to engage and grow area businesses." September 2019

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BUSINESS

Storm Thurmond's

Last Laugh

In 1972, Joe Biden was a 29-year old father of three when he ran as a Democrat for the United States Senate in Delaware. Improbably he defeated the Republican incumbent by 3,162 votes. Biden only turned 30-years old, the minimum age for service in the Senate, 2 weeks after his election. One month later, tragedy struck the Biden family. His wife and children were involved in a car accident which took the life of his wife and daughter. Biden’s two sons survived the accident. Biden was sworn into the office on January 5, 1973, in the hospital where his son was still recovering.   The United States Senate in 1973 was a much different institution than it is today. Democrats controlled the Senate with 57 seats; however, there was not the partisan ideological divide that exists today. There were still regional differences among the states, typically southern and western concerns versus northeast and midwestern concerns. There were strong urban versus rural differences as agricultural interests remained dominant in many states. Civil rights issues sharply divided the Senate; however, it was not along party lines. Ideologically there were liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats. The only African American in the Senate was Edward Brooke, a Republican from Massachusetts. Nearly every Senate Committee was chaired by a southern Democrat.   Biden, a lawyer, sought an appointment to the Senate Judiciary Committee. By 1977, Biden had joined the Committee as a junior Democrat. The ranking Republican on the Committee was Senator Strom Thurmond. Biden and Thurmond served together on the Judiciary Committee for nearly 25 years. Thurmond served as Chairman of the Committee from 1981 through 1987 with Biden serving as the ranking Democrat. When the Democrats retook control of the Senate in 1987, Biden replaced Thurmond as Chairman and Thurmond became the ranking Republican. Biden served as Chairman until 1995.

Thurmond & Biden

Despite their differences in age and ideology, Thurmond and Biden developed a close friendship. Some have speculated one reason was that they both were widowed after their first wives’ deaths, both eventually remarried, and despite their age differences, their children were fairly close in age. For many years, their offices were adjacent to each other in the Russell Senate Office Building.   Thurmond was a member of the Senate in 2002 on his 100th birthday. When Thurmond died 6 months later, many were surprised to learn that Thurmond had requested that Joe Biden deliver the eulogy address, maybe none more so than Biden. In his opening remarks, Biden declared that this may be “Strom Thurmond’s last laugh.” Biden declared in his eulogy, “Strom represented actually where he came from … In the end, he made his choice and moved to the good side … I disagreed deeply with Strom on the issue of civil rights … but we became good friends.”   Biden attempted to put Thurmond’s 75-year public career in perspective, “Strom knew America was changing … He also saw his beloved South Carolina changing as well … He knew the time had come to change himself.” Biden, recalling a particularly partisan eruption against his leadership of the Judiciary Committee, recalled Strom’s support for his embattled colleague. “When partisanship was a winning option, he chose friendship.”    

story by Mark W. Buyck, III

248 West Evans Street | Florence, SC | 843.662.3258 2050 Corporate Centre’ Drive, Suite 230 Myrtle Beach, SC | 843.650.6777

Business Law, Litigation, Real Estate, and Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys 52

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BUSINESS

Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce Member of the Month

DORIS LOCKHART When you need talent with the skills to meet the unique needs of your organization, you need a staffing partner that really understands your business and hiring criteria. AccuStaff is a staffing firm with a reputation for connecting quality talent to rewarding career opportunities. Their clients range from small to large companies in the Pee Dee, Horry, and Georgetown counties. Doris Lockhart, owner of AccuStaff, has been with the company for 36 years. Doris’ interest in staffing goes back many years. “I believe my desire to help others has been in my DNA as a child and growing up being the youngest of 13 siblings,” she shares. “The staffing industry allows me the opportunity to help others, as well as help clients, fill a need so they can focus on their core competencies running their business.” Doris has also held many board positions within the community throughout the years. She is a partner in MiLadies 182 Ladies boutique in Florence and serves on the Advisory Board of BB&T Bank and the Florence County Planning Commission amongst many others. At AccuStaff, the job placement specialists have built solid relationships with the companies within the community in order to give an immediate advantage in their job search. “Our staff is truly committed to satisfying our clients and talent.

"Obviously, in this industry you may encounter talent that won't always follow through on an assignment with our clients. AccuStaff takes the position that an apology and fixing the situation should be the first professional response. Our clients and talents are our responsibility." "We believe AccuStaff goes over and beyond our duty to fix and find replacements for our clients.”

Doris is grateful for the support she receives from her husband, Nathaniel. When not wearing her multiple hats at the office, she enjoys spending time with her daughter, Natalie, and grandson, Brandon. She is member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

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AccuStaff has sustained and contributed to the economic growth of the area for 30 plus years. “We are grateful for the support and we appreciate this community,” says Doris. 100 W Evans St, Florence 843.665.0515 flochamber.com


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NEWSWORTHY BUSINESS: GREATER HARTSVILLE CHAMBER MEMBER OF THE MONTH

Fest da Ville

to maximize a communal experience

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 10AM-10PM YMCA of the Upper Pee Dee and the City of Hartsville have teamed up to host the YMCA’s Fest da Ville on Saturday, October 5th, 2019, from 10am-10pm in Hartsville, SC at Burry Park. This festival reinforces friendships in our community, promotes our thriving local businesses, and showcases what makes Hartsville stand out as a community with significant history and vibrancy. The festival will begin the day with our annual YMCA Loop da Ville Bike Ride at 9am, followed by the family fun ride at 10am. This ride will begin and end at the YMCA winding through the beautiful, historic streets of Hartsville. Once the bikers return from their scenic route, they will be able to enjoy a multitude of vendors, food, and music while enjoying a post-ride beverage from Retro Sip-n-Seat. Our bike ride registration includes a multipurpose bike tool and a free lunch! The YMCA welcomes Swift Creek Band & Terence Lonon and the Untouchables to the live music lineup on the main stage! Swift Creek Band will start us off 3:00pm and Terrence Lonon and the Untouchables will begin at 6:30pm. Local vendors and businesses are in full support of the festival, displaying a wide array of arts, crafts, food, adult beverages, etc. The whole family will be able to participate in our family fun area with games, activities, and contests. This will be a fun filled day for everyone! The night of the festival there will also be a 5k run, put on by the Y and our local Police force, and 1 mile walk in honor of our LIVESTRONG program here at the Y. The 12 week LIVESTRONG program offers adults affected by cancer a safe, supportive environment to participate in physical and social activities focused on strengthening the whole person. This program is offered at no cost to the participant.

Visit our Facebook for more information on how to participate as a vendor, volunteer, or sponsor and for a schedule of events for this special day. 56

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LIFESTYLE

Streaming platforms offer thousands of movies and show options and sometimes it can be tough to know what to choose. Looking for recommendations? You no longer have to #askfacebook because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to help!

Comedy/Romance TV Series Available on Hulu

Four Weddings and a Funeral Maya, the young communications director for a New York senatorial campaign, receives a wedding invitation from her college schoolmate now living in London. She leaves her professional and personal life behind, in favor of traveling to England and reconnecting with old friends and ends up in the midst of their personal crises. Relationships are forged and broken, political scandals exposed, London social life lampooned, love affairs ignited and doused, and of course, there are four weddingsâ&#x20AC;Śand a funeral. Main stars include John Reynolds, Zoe Boyle, Emilio Doorgasingh.


NEWSWORTHY

Something to Celebrate... DONNA ISGETT NAMED CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER FOR MCLEOD HEALTH

THE SIDEWALK BUTTLER THEY DON’T DEGRADE, McLeod Health has announced the promotion of Donna Isgett to the role of Chief Operating Officer. She will report to President and CEO Rob Colones and have oversight of administrators at all seven hospitals in the McLeod Health system, which serves 18 counties, from the Midlands of South Carolina to the Coast. Isgett will continue to support administration of McLeod Physician Associates. Isgett replaces Ron Boring, who recently retired from McLeod. Isgett’s appointment follows a national search that attracted 100 external and internal applicants from across the country. Isgett has worked at McLeod since 1997, most recently serving as Corporate Senior Vice President of Quality and Safety, as well as McLeod Physician Associates.

OPENING OF

IN LAKE CITY

On Friday, August 9th, Lake City celebrated the opening of the CrossRoads Coach Resort - an RV park nestled in the heart of Lake City. The large level pads have full hookups and park wide WiFi and is adjacent to the ROB making it easily accessible while attending weddings and events. It’s also an easy walk to Lake City’s fine art galleries, museums, the upcoming Rhythm & Q’s event and the 2020 ArtFields competition. For more information, visit www.lakecityrv.com.

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THEY POLLUTE. Statistics are hard to come by in the world of cigarette litter and that is what we are trying to change with our cigarette receptacle. Cigarette butts are the last socially accepted form of litter. A good number of people still think cigarette butts are biodegradable because the filters are cotton, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Cigarette filters are actually made of cellulose acetate, a synthetic compound derived from the acetylation of the plant substance cellulose and they capture over 4,000 chemicals that are introduced into the environment just by being tossed. These pollutants include cigarette particulate matter (tar) and mainstream smoke—including carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, nitrogen oxides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ammonia, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, phenol, argon, pyridines and acetone, over 50 of which are known to be carcinogenic to humans—one can clearly see a huge health impact brewing. And these toxins eventually leach into the ground and our waterways. A bigger issue than you may think. Waste from smoking constitutes an estimated 30% of the total litter (by count) on U.S. shorelines, waterways, and on land. Cigarette butts are usually the most common piece of litter collected along waterways during the Ocean Conservancy’s yearly International Coastal Cleanup. In fact, over 2 million cigarette butts were picked up during the 2009 cleanup. If you would like to have a Sidewalk Buttler placed at your restaurant or public space in Florence, visit keepflorencebeautiful.org.

If you are celebrating a positive achievement or have been awarded for a newsworthy accomplishment, email Heather Page at heather@vipmagsc.com.


SERVICE DIRECTORY

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LIFESTYLE

BLACK DEMURE

COCKTAIL INGREDIENTS:

2 oz Wild Turkey 81 Proof bourbon 1/4 oz Massenez créme de mure 1/4 oz Cointreau 3/4 oz Fresh lemon juice 1/4 oz Simple syrup

DIRECTIONS:

Add all ingredients into a shaker with ice and shake. Strain into a glass over ice. Garnish with a blackberry and orange slice.

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Profile for VIP Magazine

September 2019  

September 2019  

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