__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

FREE Subscription: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/request


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Vol. 35, No. 12 EILEEN BRADSHAW President & CEO of LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE & Vintage Housing

KELLY KIRCHHOFF Senior Director of Communications

14

18

DEE DUREN

Collectors Embrace the Thrill of the Hunt

Step Into the Past at Area Museums

Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

Many people find the search for desired collectibles adds color and meaning to their lives. Meet four Oklahoma collectors, and hear what drives their hobby.

Ever dream of traveling in time? You’ll find the next best thing at these area museums that invite visitors to join in recreating the past.

BERNIE DORNBLASER Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

LEAH WEIGLE Graphic Designer

CAROL CARTER Copy Editor

KRISTEN HARRIS Communications Coordinator

DICK MCCANDLESS ESTEBAN VALENCIA Community Distribution

22

26

Seeking Reconciliation Through the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial

Antiques & Collectibles Shopping Guide

Members of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission are working to commemorate a tragic time in the city’s history. Learn how their efforts are strengthening community ties in the present.

On the Cover

Alicia Latimer and Dr. Dewayne Dickens of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission are pictured in the heart of the Greenwood District.

You never know what you’ll find on the shelves of Tulsa-area antique and collectible stores – and that’s part of the fun! Check out this guide to start your treasure hunt.

6 Letter From Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner Spring Cleaning for a Healthy, Happy Home 12 Medicare & You Medicare and Home Healthcare 29 LIFE PACE 30 Mindbender & Puzzles 31 Puzzle Partners 32 Dollars & Sense Want to Donate Your Collection to a Museum? Read This First 34 The Dinner Belle 35 LIFE EDU 36 Noteworthy 37 Share Your Time & Talent 38 Bunkering With Books Native American Authors & Books 39 Business Directory 40 People & Places 41 Classifieds 43 Vintage Friends

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services (a Tulsa Area United Way nonprofit) and helps fulfill LIFE Senior Services’ mission to promote and preserve independence for seniors. This publication is printed and mailed at no charge. Donations of any amount are appreciated and will help offset LIFE Senior Services’ production costs. A donation of $25 per year is suggested. To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 35, Issue 12, May 2021 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 2168-8494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135-5114.

Photo by Valerie Wei-Haas

4

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Glenwood Apartments 10221 E. 34TH ST. • TULSA, OK

GLENWOODAPTSTULSA@GMAIL.COM

(918) 663-7797 Retirement Living for Seniors Age 62+ & Adults with Disabilities

• • • • • • •

All Bills Paid 24-hour On-site Staff Laundry Facilities Library & Fitness Area Planned Activities & Bingo Emergency Pull Cords On-site Beauty Salon

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Free Prescription Delivery ORGANIZE YOUR MEDICATION AT NO ADDITIONAL COST Simplify and organize your medications with prescription packaging. One package contains all the medication you need to take at any given time, automatically refilled at the same time each month per your request. • Organized by date and time

• Securely sealed

NO PILL BOXES

• Cleary labeled • Helpful to caregivers

NO BOTTLES

• Ideal for travel and everyday • Easy to open

NO BOTHER

444 S. Sheridan • (918) 835-9577 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

5


LETTER FROM EILEEN Dear Vintage Reader, I hope this issue finds you well. Friendly reminder – if you have not yet been vaccinated against COVID-19, or need to get your second dose, LIFE can help! We can schedule an appointment and arrange transportation to and from that appointment. Please call us at (918) 664-9000 and we will get going on your behalf.

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing eileen.bradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

The year 2021 has loomed large on our city’s calendar. It is the centennial of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, and as it has crept closer, we have all had the opportunity to learn more about this terrible event in Tulsa’s past. In this issue, there is an article on the history of those events, as well as a piece about Greenwood Rising history center and the hope it represents to our community. I am embarrassed to admit that even though I am a Tulsa native, my knowledge of this tragedy was almost non-existent until my children read Rilla Askew’s “Fire in Beulah,” while studying at Carver Middle School. I was incredulous as I read that book. I

set about trying to learn all I could about the real events behind this work of fiction. The more I learned, the more saddened I became. I also became more confused that I knew so little and understood even less. It was a tragedy hiding in plain sight. To say that I am happy that the massacre is now being widely acknowledged and explored sounds odd; there can’t really be any happy attached to this. However, I do appreciate that it is being discussed broadly in places of business, places of worship, schools and dinner tables. I am looking toward the centennial and the opportunities it will bring for a greater understanding of the event and of each other. The project director for the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission, Phil Armstrong, puts it this way, “All of this history leads to a healing place.” I look forward to all of us being in that healing place together.

Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

Architectural renderings of Greenwood Rising, the new history center in the historic Greenwood District.

Welsh & McGough, PLLC Experienced attorneys providing effective and aggressive representation. Guardianship Elder Law Estate Planning Probate

Trust Litigation Family Law Adoption Medicaid Planning

(918) 585-8600

2727 East 21st Street, Ste. 600

www.tulsafirm.com

6

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


LEGACY PLAZA EAST

FREE ADMISSION LIMITED SEATING

31st between Yale and Sheridan

Join LIFE’s Senior Centers for the first annual Writers’ Symposium. Four celebrated writers will share their experiences in a series of events starting in May. Don’t miss these chances to connect with the creative community and fuel your writing ambitions! LIFE is thrilled to announce a fabulous line-up where you can meet and greet with your favorite local writers. Sessions with individual authors will take place once a month on Thursday mornings, moderated by LIFE’s CEO Eileen Bradshaw. Books will be available for signing. The series will culminate in a panel discussion this fall and a writing contest.

CONNIE CRONLEY

BARRY FRIEDMAN

MAY 13 | 10:00 A.M. Stories from Real Life

JUNE 10 | 10:00 A.M. You Don’t Know Jack

RABBI MARC BOONE FITZERMAN JULY 29 | 10:00 A.M. My Writing Life: On (and Off) the Pulpit

JUDY ALLEN

AUGUST 12 | 10:00 A.M. Cooking and the Changed World

WRITERS’ SYMPOSIUM PANEL DISCUSSION | SEPTEMBER 26 | 4:00 - 6:00 P.M. Champagne Reception

EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Attend in person at Legacy Plaza East, 5330 E. 31st St. in Tulsa, or watch live on LIFE’s Facebook page. All in-person events will have limited attendance and follow safety recommendations.

RSVP to reserve your spot! Call LIFE’s Senior Center at (918) 744-6760 or online www.LIFEseniorservices.org.


Looking Back

The Tulsa Historical Society & Museum archives The Tulsa Historical Society & Museum is located in the historic are a repository of all things Tulsa and northeast Sam Travis Mansion at 2445 S. Peoria Ave., just south of Oklahoma. Boxes of documents, photographs Woodward Park. This photo is circa 1920s. and objects are pictured.

Behind the Scenes Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

A donated baby carriage, c. 1900, is pictured in the Tulsa Historical Society & Museum’s general artifact storage room.

Donations from the public help the Tulsa Historical Society & Museum tell the story of the city's past through exhibits and educational programming. The Tulsa Historical Society is especially interested in donations of Indian Territory era artifacts, pre-1915 city directories, first-hand accounts of historic Tulsa, Greenwood District and Route 66 materials.

This Month in History MAY 1, 1840: First Adhesive Postage Stamp Sold The world’s first pre-paid stamp with a “glutinous wash,” or adhesive glue on the back, was sold in England. Before that time, recipients of letters had to pay postage upon delivery, and the amount varied depending on the distance the letter had traveled. The first adhesive stamp was known as the Penny Black and featured the profile of Queen Victoria. Even today, British stamps use the monarch’s image and do not feature the country's name.

MAY 11, 1934: Massive Dust Storm Hits the Great Plains

A massive storm sent millions of tons of topsoil flying from the parched Great Plains states to as far east as New York. Increasing demand for wheat and the newly invented tractor had exhausted fields in the 1920s. After a severe drought in 1931, the number of dust storms increased during the early 1930s. Thousands of families migrated from the plains to California where they were known as “Okies,” no matter what state they were from.

8

MAY 17, 1875: First Running of the Kentucky Derby

Some 10,000 people attended the first Kentucky Derby which featured a field of 15 thoroughbreds. The winning horse was named Aristides, and the winning jockey was Oliver Lewis, an African American. The race was started by Meriwether Lewis Clark Jr., grandson of famed explorer William Clark. He was inspired by horse races he’d seen in Europe and raised the money to build Churchill Downs on land donated by his uncles.

MAY 19, 1935:

Lawrence of Arabia Dies Legendary war hero, author and scholar T.E. Lawrence died at age 47, following a motorcycle wreck in England. The Welsh-born archaeologist became an intelligence officer in the war between Britain and the Ottoman Empire. He aided the Arabians as they fought against the Turks, and was captured and tortured before escaping. Lawrence later joined the Royal Air Force under an assumed name and became famous after publishing his memoirs.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

MAY 22 OR 28, 1888:

Jim Thorpe Born

Though the exact date is uncertain, Native American athlete James Francis Thorpe was born near Prague, Indian Territory – now Oklahoma. Thorpe was an All-American football player who won two gold medals in the 1912 Olympic Games but had to return them after it was learned he was paid to play baseball in 1909-10. The versatile athlete went on to excel in Major League Baseball and the National Football League.

MAY 25, 1977: ‘Star Wars’ Opens in Theaters The George Lucas blockbuster “Star Wars” opened in American theaters on Memorial Day to incredible success. An extensive marketing campaign inspired “a new order of geeks” to camp out and stand in line to experience the film, according to actress Carrie Fisher. The film made Fisher and co-stars Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford into overnight stars and spawned a series of films, toys, video games, books and other products.

© The History Channel

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


ACT NOW

ONLINE

Visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org and click the education and resources tab.

BY MAIL

Complete and mail in the attached subscription renewal form to the address listed on the form. CUT OUT AND MAIL TO: LIFE Senior Serivces 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 Tulsa, OK 74135

City/State/Zip _______________________________________________________________

Address ____________________________________________________________________

Name ____________________________________________________________________

q

Yes, I want a free subscription to LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine.

DONT MISS A SINGLE ISSUE

LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine is free, but your renewal helps us qualify for special postage rates.

RENEWAL OPTIONS:

BY PHONE

(918) 664-9000, ext. 1215


CAREGIVER CORNER

BURIED IN TREASURES It’s easy for almost anyone to fall victim to having too much stuff. Caregivers may have merged a loved one’s possessions with their own – inadvertently becoming the keeper of items abandoned by more than one family member. Or you may be frustrated in your attempts to help your loved one clean out their home if they still live independently from you. If a caregiver is concerned that they or their loved one has crossed the line from a need to downsize to a hoarding problem, know there is help available.

SPRING CLEANING

There are good reasons people get motivated to take part in spring cleaning. The sun is out, drawing attention to cobwebs on ceiling fans and the dust that has accumulated during the long winter months. Many people find their energy levels renewed and are ready to take a good look at what needs to be done. There are also longer daylight hours in which to get things accomplished.

BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR AND LINDSAY MORRIS

Caregivers have additional reasons to be motivated by the energy of spring. When faced with the responsibility of caring for another’s needs as well as your own, it’s all too easy to put off tasks like disposing of out-of-date medications and unused household products like cleaning supplies or paint. Clutter doesn’t just detract from the enjoyment of a home, it often makes us feel weighed down by the burden of too many possessions. Putting off tasks like replacing lightbulbs or batteries in a smoke detector can pose safety risks for everyone living in the home.

For a Happy, Healthy Home

Declutter and Detoxify

The Centers for Disease Control offers the following tips for making a home healthier for you and your loved one. 1. DUST Do deep dusting by cleaning ducts and vents to cut down on exposure to pollens and other airborne allergens. Don’t forget to replace air conditioning and heating filters as needed.

10

2. DEEP CLEAN Use non-toxic products to deeply clean bathrooms and any areas of your home that may become damp, ridding surfaces of any mold and mildew. Get rid of any toxic products you no longer use like old cans of paint, solvents, yard chemicals, etc.

3. DISCARD UNUSED MEDICATIONS Are there expired prescriptions or medications you or your loved one no longer take? Safe disposal – not by flushing – will lessen the chance of taking the wrong medication which could have serious health consequences.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

4. DECLUTTER WALKWAYS Check to be sure there aren’t any objects on the floor that could trip up your loved one. Keep doorways clear and make sure rugs on bare floors have non-skid backing. Rugs with corners that stick up or move underfoot can be fall risks.

5. REPLACE BATTERIES If you haven’t done it already, change the batteries in your smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector.

Hoarding is a psychological condition often tied to other disorders, according to Deborah Tommey. Tommey is a licensed professional counselor and behavioral health consultant for LIFE Senior Services. She leads the Tulsa-area group, Buried in Treasures. “Many times, people with hoarding tendencies can have depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder,” Tommey said. People with hoarding tendencies have a perceived need to save things. “It causes them distress to discard things because they see them as part of their identity.” Many people with hoarding tendencies grew up in a hoarding household. Hoarding can begin as early as the teenage years, Tommey said. According to www.mayoclinic.org, problems with hoarding gradually develop over time and tend to be private behaviors. Often, significant clutter has developed by the time it reaches the attention of others. It’s important to note that hoarding can put those living in the home in danger. For example, in the case of a fire or medical emergency, it can be difficult for emergency personnel to navigate the home. "They can't see very well because of the smoke. Their equipment may get stuck in cluttered hallways and rooms," Tommey said. "It’s important if you have a hoarding individual, to let them know that they need an open path for emergency personnel to navigate." If you or a loved one has symptoms of hoarding disorder, talk with a doctor or consider seeking out a mental health professional to work through a plan of action.

Call LIFE's SeniorLine at (918) 664-9000 for more information. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Northeastern Oklahoma’s newest, premier skilled nursing and long-term facility, located in Broken Arrow, OK.

We Offer Rehabilitation Respite Long-Term Services Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy Call us today to see how we can make a difference!

1251 W. HOUSTON STREET • BROKEN ARROW, OK 74012 539.367.4500 • 539.367.4510 (F) • WWW.ASPENHEALTHREHAB.COM

At University Village, we offer all-inclusive retirement living in a great south Tulsa environment you will be proud to call home. Our assisted living apartments are nice and spacious but won't break your budget. Plus our local Tulsa ownership and our warm and caring staff, provides our residents a quality and affordable retirement experience. Come join us in a lifestyle rich with peace of mind, security, amenities, privacy, and the services you need to make your retirement the best it can be!

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

11


MEDICARE & YOU

Get care from a home health agency that contracts with your plan (in-network).

Request prior authorization or a referral before receiving home healthcare.

MEDICARE AND HOME HEALTHCARE By Channing Rutherford, Medicare and Tax Assistance Program Supervisor

M

home health services. A doctor or other provider must order your care, and a Medicare-certified home health agency must provide it.

MEDICARE-COVERED SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES For Medicare to cover skilled nursing facilities, you must first spend three medically necessary inpatient days in the hospital for a related illness or injury. Upon release from the hospital, your doctor must certify that inpatient skilled nursing care is necessary to maintain or improve your current condition and prescribe daily skilled care (such as intravenous fluids or physical therapy) which is not practical to receive in your home.

You pay nothing for covered home health services. However, for Medicare-covered durable medical equipment, you must pay 20% of the Medicareapproved amount. The Part B deductible applies.

ost Medicare beneficiaries are surprised to learn that Medicare does not pay for long-term custodial care expenses such as assisted living, nursing home care or full-time home health assistance. There are, however, certain circumstances where Medicare will cover these expenses.

Under Original Medicare, you pay nothing for skilled nursing care for the first 20 days of each benefit period. For days 21-100, you would be responsible for a coinsurance amount per day. After day 100, Medicare pays nothing and you are fully responsible for all costs. If you have an Advantage Medicare plan, sometimes the three-day hospital stay is not required. Check with your plan for their specific coverage details. HOME HEALTH SERVICES UNDER ORIGINAL MEDICARE Original Medicare will cover home health services under Part A and/or Part B. Medicare covers medicallynecessary part-time or intermittent skilled nursing care, and/or physical therapy, speech-language pathology services or continued occupational therapy. A doctor or other healthcare provider must see you face-to-face before certifying that you are homebound and need

12

Home health services may also include social services, part-time or intermittent home health aide services, durable medical equipment and medical supplies for use at home. Medicare will only pay for a home health aide if you need skilled nursing or therapy services.

If you have additional questions about coverage details under Original Medicare, visit www.Medicare.gov or call (800) 633-4227 toll-free. HOME HEALTH SERVICES AND MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS All Medicare Advantage Plans must provide at least the same level of home healthcare coverage as Original Medicare, but they may impose different rules, restrictions and costs. Depending on your specific plan, you may need to: • Get care from a Home Health Agency that contracts with your plan (in-network). • Request prior authorization or a referral before receiving home healthcare. • Pay a copayment for your care (Original Medicare fully covers home health). If you need information about the costs and coverage rules for home healthcare, or if you are experiencing problems, contact your Medicare Advantage Plan.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

2020 Tax Filing Season Extension The IRS has extended the 2020 tax filing season until May 17, 2021, and LIFE’s Tax Assistance Program (TAP) has extended its hours to meet the need. If you are age 60 or older, and your household income is $57,000 a year or less, TAP can file your taxes for FREE!

If you haven’t already filed or made an appointment for your 2020 taxes, call LIFE's Tax Assistance Program at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Northeastern Oklahoma Senior Retirement Communities BIXBY

Autumn Park 8401 E. 134th St. S. (918) 369-8888

BRISTOW

Woodland Village 131 E. 9th Ave. (918) 367-8300

BROKEN ARROW

Hartford Villas 714 N. 14th Street (918) 251-0399

Kenosha Landing 2602 W. Oakland Pl. (918) 258-0331 Vandever House 3102 S. Juniper Ave. (918) 451-3100

COLLINSVILLE

Cardinal Heights 224 S. 19th St. (918) 371-9116

COWETA

Carriage Crossing 28530 E. 141st St. (918) 486-4460

GLENPOOL

Redbud Village 14900 S. Broadway St. (918) 322-5100

JENKS

Pioneer Village 315 S. Birch St. (918) 298-2992

OWASSO

Prairie Village 12877 E. 116th St. N. (918) 371-3221

SAND SPRINGS

SAPULPA

Hickory Crossing 2101 S. Hickory St. (918) 224-5116

SKIATOOK

West Oak Village 1002 S. Fairfax Ave. (918) 396-9009

TULSA

Brookhollow Landing 2910 S. 129th E. Ave. (918) 622-2700 Cornerstone Village 1045 N. Yale Ave. (918) 835-1300 Country Oaks 5648 S. 33rd W. Ave. (918) 446-3400

Heartland Village 109 E. 38th St. (918) 241-1200

Heritage Landing 3102 E. Apache St. (918) 836-7070

River Ridge 5202 S. Hwy. 97 (918) 245-4131 55 and older

Park Village 650 S. Memorial Dr. (918) 834-6400

Free Rides to Vaccination Appointments LIFE’s SeniorLine can help you register for the Oklahoma State Department of Health’s COVID-19 Vaccination Registration Portal and schedule a FREE RIDE to and from your appointment.

Call (918) 664-9000 Transportation is available to adults 55 and up and disabled.

Looking for Answers? Call LIFE’s SeniorLine (918) 664-9000

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

13


COLLECTORS

EMBRACE L L I R H T E H T OF THE

HUNT "I’ve got gadgets and gizmos a-plenty I’ve got whozits and whatzits galore. You want thingamabobs? I’ve got 20…" 'The Little Mermaid'

For some Tulsa-area residents, collectibles make life more colorful. From toys to autographs of famous athletes, collections can run the gamut. The hunt to find desired objects is a big part of the fun. Some collectors have stood in line for hours to gain a precious item. Others have taken part in competitive eBay or live auctions. Still others have searched far and wide for items at garage sales, flea markets and antique stores. Here are a few Tulsa-area collectors’ stories and what led them to their collectibles of choice.

14

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

PEZ Y A-PLENT

SCOTT SHEPHERD

As a kid, did you gobble up PEZ candies and treasure the fun containers they came in? PEZ containers seem to be available with just about any animated character or celebrity depicted on the flip-top of its dispensers. LIFE Senior Services Board Member Scott Shepherd’s unintended collection of PEZ dispensers has grown over the years to more than 300. Shepherd began acquiring PEZ when his daughter was young. “PEZ were one of those impulse buys at the checkout that seemed to always jump in the cart,” he said. “Before long, we had accumulated quite a few, and before long, the collection became mine.” PEZ candies started in the 1920s in Austria, originally marketed as a smoking substitute. The candies were sold in metal tins and later flip-top dispensers. When they were introduced in the United States in the 1950s, sales were poor for what were then plain dispensers. PEZ reinvented itself with the nowfamiliar three-dimensional heads atop the

BY LINDSAY MORRIS

dispensers. The company also introduced more flavors that would appeal to children, and sales took off. Over the years, Shepherd said PEZ dispensers became common gifts under the Christmas tree and in his stocking. When he started displaying them, he received even more as gifts from friends. Now he has more than 300 different types. A few years ago, Shepherd and his wife were driving through Connecticut and noticed a sign for the PEZ Museum. “I think I gasped,” he said. “I had never heard of the PEZ Museum.” The PEZ Visitor Center is located at the factory in Orange, Connecticut, where 65 million PEZ dispensers are produced every year. Shepherd says the favorite dispensers in his collection are the band KISS, the Disney princesses and the presidents of the United States. LOCAL COLLECTORS continued on page 16

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Considering a Hip Replacement? Avoid the Hospital at our Outpatient Surgery Center. Save money and return home sooner. Ask us about hospital-free joint replacement.

FOLLOW US ON

918.392.1400

www.LIFEseniorservices.org (918) 664-9000

Searching for a new apartment?

TULSABONEANDJOINT.COM

ts ll Pe Sma me o Welc

Sheridan Terrace

Independent Senior Living • All bills paid

• Inside hallways

• Quiet location

• Emergency call system

• Small pets welcome

• Subsidy available

(918) 835-7072 1937 S. 68th E. Ave. | Tulsa, OK (NE of 21st and Sheridan)

Sheridan Terrace does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTER Get Fit, Have Fun, Make New Friends

Masks, Social Distancing and Temperature Checks Required

Nuture your mind, body and spirit for a healthier, happier LIFE at LIFE Senior Services’ Senior Center for active adults. Line dancing, Pickleball, Tai Chi, Creative Writing, Sculpt & Tone, Chair Exercises, Zumba, Wii Bowling, Wii Golfing and More! To arrange a tour, call (918) 744-6760

View a calendar of events on www.LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

15


CYNTHIA MARCOUX D TOYLAN

Cynthia Marcoux is an artist working at Philbrook Museum whose colored pencil drawings are featured in local galleries. It was a natural fit, then, when her large toy collection became part of the Tulsa Treasures exhibit at Philbrook in the summer of 2020. “I started collecting old toys as models for drawings, but then once you have two or three of something, it kind of turns into a collection,” Marcoux said. Some of Marcoux’s toys have been with her since childhood, including original early ‘60s Barbies, Kens and Midges, plus all of their clothes and accessories. “How could anyone ever get rid of things like that?” Marcoux asked. A great deal of her toy collection has been acquired through trips to flea markets and estate sales. Since she uses toys to inspire her drawings, she is sometimes on the hunt for a particular item.

FAMOUESS' ATHLETURES SIGNAT

It all started when Land worked at the Tulsa Baseball Card Store in the early ‘80s. He met several noteworthy athletes at shows that the store hosted at the Tulsa Convention Center, including guests such as Mickey Mantle, Stan Musial and Larry Sanders. Before the era of the cell phone “selfie,” autographs were proof that a person had met a celebrity. Some of his treasured autographs are from unforgettable interactions he had with Willie Mays, Bob Gibson, Arnold Palmer, Whitey Herzog, Tommy Lasorda and Johnny Logan. One of Land’s favorite items in his collection is a replica Olympic torch signed by Muhammad Ali. “He told me, ‘Stay cool, man,’” Land recalled. Land’s collection is tied to an art form he has perfected over the years, he said. “It is a wild hobby. I compared it to hunting and fishing

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

Some of her favorite pieces include a taxidermied penguin, a Star Trek pinball machine, a 1940s ventriloquist dummy and a Tom Corbett space cadet uniform that perfectly fit a little boy mannequin she just happened to have. For Christmas a couple of years ago, a friend gave her an old amusement park scooter car reputedly from Bell’s Amusement Park. Can you recall that one toy you always wished for as a child but never received? Marcoux gets a thrill when she finds something she either had or coveted as a child. “Last year, I came across an old Water Wiggle, which was something that you would attach to the hose to make it jump all over. It probably smashed a lot of kids in the face, which is why they fell out of favor, but I’ve got one now!”

JOE LAND

Over a lifetime, Joe Land has personally acquired more than 1,000 autographs of famous sports figures.

16

“If I have a specific idea for a drawing and need a particular item, I’ll look on eBay or other online auctions, but finding something at a flea market that you didn’t know you need is lots more fun,” she said.

because there is that rush of trying to get an autograph.” For example, if Land was trying to get an athlete’s autograph at a golf tournament, he knew to wait until the athlete had walked three strides before sticking out the item for an autograph. Many of his autographs were acquired at Southern Hills Country Club. Nowadays, Land’s hobby takes place mostly at Oklahoma City Thunder games, where he enjoys teaching the younger generation the art of getting the autograph. “I teach them proper etiquette – to say ‘please’ and ‘thank you.’ I tell them to remember to keep your pen cap on so your pen isn’t as dry as dirt.” Land said Kevin Durant is one of the nicest athletes he has ever met. He knew Durant was a big Washington Redskins fan, so he brought the former Thunder star a Redskins 1950s era bobblehead and gave it to him once before a game. “Durant said, ‘You don’t have to do this.’ He would always take his time to interact with the fans,” Land said.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


BRENDA BELSHE

Senior living, with promise.

Covenant Living at Inverness | Tulsa, OK 3800 West 71st Street Limited availability! • Independent & Assisted Living Skilled Nursing • Memory Care • Rehabilitation

Y POTTERS E PRIZ

Brenda Belshe’s collection of Frankoma pottery happened somewhat by accident. Growing up in Sapulpa, she was well-acquainted with Frankoma pottery, which was made in Sapulpa from local clay. However, for a good portion of her life, Belshe had no interest in the pottery. “I had always considered Frankoma pottery to be heavy dishes that chipped too quickly,” she said. An estate sale in the ‘90s was pivotal in altering Belshe’s interests. She spotted a card table with a sign that said, “Dogs: $1.” A blue, unmarked clay dog caught her eye, and she bought it. She eventually found out the piece was Frankoma Pottery, and she sold it for $300. Since that time, Belshe has become an expert at buying and selling Frankoma pottery and helping others do so. Her husband, Tom, joined in the hobby, and they rent a sales table at the Tulsa Flea Market once a month.

To schedule a tour today, call (877) 478-8455, or visit us online at CovLivingInverness.org.

“I’m the person that people call when they’re looking for something,” she said. She has spent an extensive amount of time learning about the pieces. She even helped a lifelong collector sell more than 200 cases of pottery. While Belshe mostly enjoys the buying and selling process, she has a collection of some favorite items that she has kept over the years. As a member of the Cherokee Nation, she cherishes the Frankoma Indian masks and dancing Indian chief sculptures. Since Frankoma makes items in so many different colors, her goal is to collect a chief in every color. Other prized pieces include a rare tiki bowl and Council Fire, a piece by Orville Knight that features the faces of Indian chiefs. Belshe has created two Facebook pages to help people who are interested in Frankoma pottery. Frankoma Treasures Available is for those interested in buying and selling, while Frankoma Pottery Fans is for education purposes and functions as a digital show and tell.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Covenant Living of Bixby | Bixby, OK 7300 East 121st Place South Available now! • Independent & Assisted Living Excellent service, worry-free living • No buy-in fee! To schedule a tour today, call (877) 312-3248, or visit us online at CovLivingBixby.org.

Covenant Living is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. For information, visit CovLiving.org.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

17


You don't have to be a time traveler to enjoy history. Fortunately, numerous places in eastern Oklahoma bring history to life by recreating the past.

Tulsa Historical Society & Museum Photo courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

1.

PRAIRIE SONG PIONEER VILLAGE MUSEUM

Prairie Song Pioneer Village, located east of Dewey, features 32 hand-hewn log buildings and recreates an Old West town from the second half of the 19th century. The replica frontier community boasts a two-story saloon, schoolhouse, train depot, general store, jail and chapel – each complete with authentic period furnishings. Many are locally acquired items from the late 1800s.  he schoolhouse replica at Prairie Song Pioneer T Village Museum with authentic period furnishings. Photo courtesy of www.TravelOK.org

Adding to the authentic Old West atmosphere are cattle that can be seen grazing nearby. The entire village is a scratch-built project of Kenneth and Marilyn Tate and sits on land allocated to Marilyn's Cherokee grandmother. It started as one building Kenneth raised on his working ranch and grew one structure at a time. Marilyn says the village has been a passion for both of them. "He did the buildings and I did the furnishings," she said. "It's a must-see for people, adults, and kids, to have an opportunity to use their imaginations."

 ar-Ber Village has H many interactive exhibits such as weaving. Photo courtesy of Har-Bervillage.com

" The Guns of Hollywood Made Famous" exhibit at the J.M. Davis Arms & Historical Museum.

"Everybody's got something where they throw their money away," Kenneth said in a 2008 interview. "I'm building a town." The site also hosts special events like Western Days and weddings.

2.

HAR-BER VILLAGE

Har-Ber Village sits on the eastern shore of Grand Lake O' The Cherokees in Grove. Established by Harvey (Har) and Bernice (Ber) Jones, it welcomed its first visitors in 1968. Folks can step back in time while exploring more than two dozen period structures and buildings. Nearly 100 exhibits recreate a timeline from 1850 through the 1920s. Half of the village is composed of antique collections, such as the popular display depicting the evolution of the telephone. Interactive exhibits abound, such as one where visitors can try their hand at mining for their own minerals, gems and arrowheads. Weaving and nature activity workshops are also popular. The grounds include a chapel and picnic pavilion which have hosted weddings and receptions. A two-mile nature trail is nearby, and the view of Grand Lake is one of the most remarkable features of Har-Ber Village.

For more information on museum admittance, pricing and days of operation, visit the museum websites or call ahead.

Photo courtesy of www.themuseum.com

18

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


3.

TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

The Tulsa Historical Society & Museum is a good example of a place where history is brought to life both indoors and outdoors. Its eight galleries occupy a structure originally built as the Travis Mansion in 1919 that was renovated extensively in 2007. The museum's exhibits have included "Fashionably Tulsa" featuring early 20th century dresses, hats, shoes and accessories from the Janis Updike Walker Collection. Another exhibit, titled "Tribune: The Story of a Newspaper," documents the history of the landmark news source. The museum has 200,000 photographs, books, maps and other artifacts of Tulsa history. Its online collection of digital photos is available for research or just nostalgic browsing. Visitors can stroll through the vintage gardens where objects of historical importance are found, including the Five Moons bronze sculptures depicting Oklahoma's five internationally renowned Native American ballerinas. The museum conducts walking tours of downtown Tulsa and has hosted Chautauqua education programs. The museum also has a traveling exhibit about the Greenwood area and Tulsa Race Massacre. Director of Exhibits Maggie Brown points out many of the museum's exhibits have focused on Tulsa decade by decade. "We aim to share a lot of stories of the past, personal stories," she said. "Every person who walks in the door finds something meaningful to them."

4.

J.M. DAVIS ARMS AND HISTORICAL MUSEUM

The J.M. Davis Arms and Historical Museum in Claremore has the largest privately held firearms collection in the world. Davis was a local businessman and collector who decked out his Mason Hotel with firearms and memorabilia. Over time his expansive collection grew in fame. By 1965 he joined with the state of Oklahoma on plans to secure a permanent home for his trove. In 1969, a 40,000-square-foot museum was completed two blocks north of the Mason Hotel. Although Davis died in 1973 and the old hotel was torn down in 1986, his vast collection continues to amaze visitors at its new home. A Walker Bulldog tank greets visitors as they park and enter the museum. Once indoors, visitors will see just about every type of firearm made, including flintlocks, a Gatling gun, firearms of the Old West and weapons from almost every war. The collection even includes BB guns and a Buck Rogers toy ray gun. Curator Jason Schubert points out the museum has 11,000 pieces. "It shows up close a tool man has used for centuries to provide food and safety for his family and safety for his country," he said of the museum's historic significance. The collection also includes swords and knives, arrowheads, World War 1 posters, beer steins and John Rogers statuary.

8.

SAND SPRINGS CULTURAL AND HISTORICAL MUSEUM

One work of art visitors to the Sand Springs Cultural and Historical Museum find impressive is the building itself. Dedicated in 1930 as a library to honor Sand Springs founder and philanthropist Charles Page, the structure transitioned to a full-time museum in 2001. STEP INTO THE PAST AT AREA MUSEUMS continued on page 20

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

19


STEP INTO THE PAST AT AREA MUSEUMS continued from page 19.

Plan Your Trip Into the Past HAR-BER VILLAGE 4404 W. 20th St. • Grove (918) 786-6446 • www.har-bervillage.com Special events include a Spring Gardening Festival May 15, working blacksmiths on Father’s Day weekend, Annual Pioneer Days September 24-26, Haunted History Hayrides in October and Santa’s Ozark Mountain Village in December. The public is invited to watch as artist Carlos Barboza paints this large-scale mural on the exterior of The Museum Broken Arrow during the first three weeks of May. The museum is located at 400 S. Main St. in Broken Arrow. Photo courtesy of The Museum Broken Arrow

330 N. J.M. Davis Blvd. • Claremore (918) 341-5707 • www.thegunmuseum.com The world’s largest private collection of firearms on Route 66 in historic downtown Claremore.

The building, designed by Otis Floyd Johnson, arises from a hillside in downtown Sand Springs north of a statue of Page. The classic example of Art Deco architecture has bronze doors, lamps and fixtures, and marble walls and floors. Spacious windows climb to a 40-foot ceiling.

TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUM 2445 S. Peoria Ave. • Tulsa (918) 712-9484 • www.tulsahistory.org Located in the historic Travis Mansion, THSM is focused on building, preserving and presenting collections of Tulsa history with eight rotating exhibit galleries featuring stories from Tulsa past.

The town's unique history fills the east gallery with displays telling the story of Page's children's home for orphans and colony for widowed mothers and their children. Also showcased are artifacts from Sand Springs' days as a leading regional industrial hub, along with items linked to the Sand Springs railway and lake park.

THE MUSEUM BROKEN ARROW 400 S. Main St. • Broken Arrow (918) 258-2616 • www.brokenarrowmuseum.org Located in downtown Broken Arrow, The Museum Broken Arrow’s mission is to keep history alive and bring the community together to explore it. During early May, watch artist Carlos Barboza paint a large-scale mural on the building. Other May events include a stained-glass mosaic exhibit.

Past exhibits in the rotating west and north galleries include the art of George Rodrigue and Ed Galloway, World War II and the Civil War, tools through the years and classic toys and lunch boxes.

6.

THE MUSEUM BROKEN ARROW

The Museum Broken Arrow captures the unique story of this Muscogee Creek settlement which evolved into an agricultural hub and then a thriving metropolitan community. Located near the site of the original Katy train depot, the three-story museum is being adorned by artist Carlos Barboza with a sweeping mural depicting the diverse heritage of Broken Arrow. Visitors can expect to see him creating the artwork during the first three weeks of May. Once inside, visitors enter the Barbara Brown Kimbrough Exhibit Hall where they enjoy rotating presentations such as Rachel Rose's "Lake Valley.”

PRAIRIE SONG PIONEER VILLAGE

T  he Sand Springs Cultural and Historical Museum is housed in the former Page Memorial Library. The building was dedicated in 1930 and is a beautiful example of classic Art Deco architecture. Photo courtesy of www.wearesandsprings.com

The third floor offers rental space with a scenic view of downtown Broken Arrow. Executive Director Julie Brown points out the museum incorporates multi-media for many of its exhibits and uses audio guides to supplement in-person tours.

The second floor brings the town's history to life with permanent exhibits, including a full-size cabin "Some people say we're a hidden treasure, but we don't want to be hidden anymore," she said. complete with period furnishings dating from 1861. The Rooster Days, Muscogee Creek Tribal display, Old Town Hall Jail and Railroad Depot are detailed exhibits recreating the past. 20

J.M. DAVIS ARMS AND HISTORICAL MUSEUM

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

402621 W. 1600 Rd. • Dewey (918) 440-7033 • www.prairiesong.net This recreated Old West Town features a saloon, post office, general store, jail and more. Call for escorted and unescorted tours and reservations. The attraction was built and operated to preserve and honor the heritage of pioneers, cowboys and Native American cultures of Oklahoma.

SAND SPRINGS CULTURAL AND HISTORICAL MUSEUM 9 E. Broadway St. • Sand Springs (918) 246-2509 www.sandspringsok.org/178/Sand-Springs-Museum

This museum is located in the historic Art Deco Page Memorial Library Building constructed in 1929 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


FREE RIDES for SENIORS

Free Rides To Vaccination Appointments Shuttle service is available for adults 55 and up or disabled. Drivers will pick you up, safely transport you to your appointment, then wait and take you home. LIFE Senior Services’ transportation service is funded by the Indian Nations Council of Governments (INCOG) and the Federal Transit Coronavirus Response and Relief Appropriations Act of 2021.

Call LIFE’s SeniorLine (918) 664-9000 to schedule a transportation appointment.

48-HOUR NOTICE IS RECOMMENDED.

• • • • • •

All bills paid Inside hallways Emergency call system Subsidy available Quiet location Small pets welcome

(918) 455-8400 5001 S. Hickory • Broken Arrow, OK (SE of 111th St. & 161st E. Ave.)

Treetops Apartments Independent Senior Living

Treetops does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

ADVERTISE IN

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine has been educating and engaging audiences for more than 30 years. It has built an outstanding brand that is recognized and trusted for excellence and value – the very qualities advertisers seek.

Free Subscription: www.LIFeseniorservices.org/request

Medical Staffing & Home Care Specialists

SERVICES INCLUDE:

Nurses - RNs, LPNs • Home Health Aides Companions • RN Supervision Intermittent Visits or Hourly Care Home IV Therapy • Sitter Service Call us. We can help.

Advertising in LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine associates your company with these qualities and puts your message in front of LIFE’s diverse audience.

For additional information or to place an advertisement, please contact: BERNIE DORNBLASER bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org • (918) 664-9000, ext. 1206

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

I’m Amazing!

SM

24 Hour Service 7 Days a Week

(918) 665-1011 www.My-FirstCall.com

All employees are screened, fidelity bonded, liability insured, and drug tested.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

21


CELEBRATING OLDER AMERICANS MONTH

COMMUNITIES OF STRENGTH Seeking Reconciliation Through the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial BY JULIE WENGER WATSON May is “Older Americans Month,” and the theme for 2021 is “Communities of Strength.” According to the Administration for Community Living, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, this month’s focus is on celebrating the strength of older adults, with special emphasis on the power of connection and engagement in building strong communities. This theme is particularly appropriate for our own community as we commemorate the centennial of the 1921 Race Massacre. One hundred years after one of the worst incidents of racial violence in U.S. history, Tulsa is still coming to terms with its difficult and complicated past. We’re a community seeking reconciliation, healing and understanding with the hope of building a better future for all of its members.

TROUBLED HISTORY

In the early 1900s, Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood was home to a thriving business district known as “Black Wall Street,” one of the most commercially successful and affluent Black communities in the country. Greenwood was also home to the majority of the city’s Black residents. All of that changed overnight on May 31, 1921, when one of the deadliest episodes of racial violence this country has ever experienced devastated the area. More than 1,400 homes and businesses were burned to the ground, leaving some 10,000 people homeless and an estimated 300 individuals (mostly Black residents) dead.

The massacre began during Memorial Day weekend “We’re still fighting after 19-year-old Dick many of the same Rowland, a Black battles today, in shoeshiner, was accused our country and of assaulting Sarah Page, a in our city." 17-year-old white elevator – Alicia Latimer operator, at the Drexel 2001. While much has been Building in downtown done in recent years to raise Tulsa. Rowland was taken into awareness, promote understanding custody, and rumors of a lynching and strive for reconciliation around began to circulate. A confrontation the events that took place in this city a century took place between a group of Black men who ago, the work is ongoing. This year’s centennial had offered to help guard Rowland and a larger commemoration is an opportunity to strengthen group of white men. Members of both groups our community as we move forward into the next were armed, and 12 men were killed in the brawl 100 years. that ensued. This incident lit the fuse for the violence and destruction that followed. White rioters rampaged through Greenwood that night Alicia Latimer is the manager and coordinator and the next morning, killing residents and burning and looting stores and homes. Thirty-five for the African-American Resource Center at Tulsa’s Rudisill Regional Library. She’s been with city blocks lay in charred ruins. the library for 15 years, and she’s also a member Following the destruction of the Tulsa Race of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Massacre, Greenwood was totally rebuilt and Commission. Rudisill’s Resource Center has an became prosperous once more. Most Tulsans extensive collection of material that documents grew up oblivious to this horrific chapter in the and honors Black American experiences, culture city’s history. and history. This year, the library is offering a range of programming, both virtual and In 1997, the Oklahoma State Legislature in-person, focused on the Centennial. authorized what is now called the 1921 Race Massacre Commission, which researched the events of the Tulsa Race Massacre and submitted COMMUNITIES OF STRENGTH a report of its findings and recommendations in

AFRICAN-AMERICA

BUILDING RESOURCES

continued on page 24

22

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


HISTORY AND HEALING AT GREENWOOD RISING BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

PHIL ARMSTRONG Project Director of the 1921 Race Massacre Centennial Commission

ALICIA LATIMER, MANAGER AND COORDINATOR FOR THE AN RESOURCE CENTER AT TULSA’S RUDISILL REGIONAL LIBRARY

When Phil Armstrong moved to Tulsa in 1997, he was shocked to discover he knew more about the Tulsa Race Massacre than people who were born and raised here. He spent a semester studying the history of Black Wall Street as a college student in Ohio. Now project director for the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission, Armstrong is overseeing the construction of Greenwood Rising, the history museum located in the heart of the Greenwood District. The museum will honor the legacy of Black Wall Street and provide a starting point for locals and tourists to experience the past.

“Greenwood Rising will be a catalyst for a number of things,” he said, “for telling the full history of this vibrant community of Black entrepreneurs at the turn of the century. To talk about how Greenwood came to be and to look at the entire scope of Black Americans in Oklahoma – prior to the massacre and then postmassacre.” Crews are working long hours to open the museum to the public on June 2, but its impact on the city will last much longer. Visitors to Greenwood Rising will learn about the massacre and the resilience of survivors and their descendants. A final exhibit called "The Journey to Reconciliation" will encourage discussions about the current state of race relations and what each of us can do to help.

AFRICAN–AMERICAN RESOURCE CENTER AT TCCL www.LIFEseniorservices.org

“All of this history leads to a healing place,” Armstrong said. “Let’s get to the heart of why we think the way we think about people who are not like us, to really get on this path to racial healing. Greenwood Rising is going to change peoples’ hearts and minds.”

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

23


JOIN THE HISTORIC CELEBRATION Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Events

Interested in knowing more about the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre? This month is full of opportunities to learn and participate. For an overview of activities, visit www.tulsa2021.org/events.

AUTHOR CLIFTON TAULBERT – TULSA LIBRARY ZOOM EVENT May 11 • www.tulsalibrary.org/events The Tulsa Library has organized numerous events this month, both in-person and virtual. Noted Tulsa writer Clifton Taulbert, author of “Eight Habits of the Heart: Embracing the Values that Build Strong Communities,” will participate by Zoom in a Community Read Event, entitled “Friendship Mattered Then! Friendship Matters Now!”

JEWELL PARKER RHODES – MAGIC CITY BOOKS

May 4 • www.tulsalibrary.org/events Magic City Books will host a virtual author visit on May 4 with Jewell Parker Rhodes in celebration of the reissue of her novel, “Magic City."

TULSA IN HARMONY

May 21 • www.gatheringplace.org Gathering Place will host this free two-night event featuring national Gospel artists and local community choirs.

THE JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

May 26-29 • www.jhfnationalsymposium.org The conference offers both an in-person and virtual option. Speakers include Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist Isabel Wilkerson, author of the book “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontent,” and Cornel West, a professor and philosopher.

CENTENNIAL BLACK WALL STREET HERITAGE PARADE May 29 • www.greenwoodartproject.org The parade begins at 11 a.m. in Tulsa’s Greenwood District and is hosted by the Greenwood Art Project with Color Me True.

GREENWOOD RISING

June 2 • www.tulsa2021.org/rising Tulsa’s new Black Wall Street History Center, will hold its official unveiling and dedication on June 2. This state-of-the-art facility will honor the legacy of Tulsa’s Black Wall Street before and after the Race Massacre of 1921.

"TIM REID’S GREENWOOD FILM SERIES" – CIRCLE CINEMA

June 4 • www.circlecinema.org Actor and Director Tim Reid and author Clifton Taulbert will host the event.

“DREAMLAND AGAIN" – ONEOK FIELD June 5 • www.tulsasymphony.org This event is a multi-genre experience featuring the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra that uses the power of music to unite and heal the greater Tulsa community.

24

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

“When you look at the community at large, there's reconcilation work to be done. We need to deal with that today." – Dr. Dewayne Dickens

DR. DEWAYNE DICKENS, BOARD MEMBER OF TULSA’S JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN CENTER FOR RECONCILIATION AND DIRECTOR OF CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE PRACTICES AT TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITIES OF STRENGTH continued from page 23

“I’m very proud to be working with the 1921 Race Massacre Commission to do the work to make sure that education goes on,” Latimer said. “The library has many, many resources about what happened in 1921. I’m very proud that we’re saying, ‘We did this thing. It was wrong. I want to know what happened.’ It’s important that it’s talked about so we can work through it so that nothing like that happens again.”

SEEKING RECONCILIATION

Reconciliation is generally understood to mean a “restoration of friendly relations,” “to bring into agreement or harmony,” or “making consistent or compatible.” This process, in all its definitions, is especially important when talking about the Tulsa Race Massacre.

“We’re looking to the past in order to understand the future,” said Dr. Dewayne Dickens, a board member of Tulsa’s John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation (JHFC) and Director of Culturally Responsive Practices at Tulsa Community College. The JHFC will host its 12th annual Reconciliation in America National Symposium May 26-29. The virtual and inperson event features keynote speakers from several different disciplines and attracts participants from across the globe. The title of this year’s symposium is “The Future of Tulsa’s Past: The Centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre and Beyond.” Dickens hopes the Symposium, as well as the events planned around the Centennial, will help spark positive change in our community.

“If people are coming to these events saying, ‘I want my participation in the 100-year commemoration to change me, to help me find direction, to help me help others find direction, to help me connect with others so that we can move toward a more just future,’ then change will happen,” he said. Dickens said even though people are now more informed about the events of 1921, the need for reconciliation continues. “I’m going to emphasize reconciliation work. Not necessarily reconciling with the descendants of the survivors, which needs to happen, but that’s a totally separate issue,” he said. “When you look at the community at large, there’s reconciliation work to be done. When you look at the families who suffered a loss, there’s reconciliation work. We need to deal with that today. The city and the general community need to look for tangible, concrete ways of creating reconciliation for that loss.” This month, Tulsa has a unique opportunity to reflect, listen and learn during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial. It’s also a chance to grow stronger as a community in the years to come, but it will take work. “We’re still fighting many of the same battles today, in our country and in our city,” said Latimer. “There are the same divisions, the same misunderstandings, the same failure to really come together with people who aren’t like us. It’s all based on something that happened generations ago that people haven’t even really stopped to examine in their own minds. ‘Why am I feeling that? Why do I think that? Is that really true?’”

For more information, visit www.tulsa2021.org www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Communities of

Strength In tough times, communities find strength in people – and people find strength in their communities. In the past year, we’ve seen this time and again in Tulsa as friends, neighbors and businesses have found new ways to support each other. In our community, older adults are a key source of this strength. Through their experiences, successes, and difficulties, they have built resilience that helps them to face new challenges. When communities tap into this, they become stronger too. Each May, the Administration for Community Living leads the celebration of Older Americans Month (OAM). This year’s theme is Communities of Strength, recognizing the important role older adults play in fostering the connection and engagement that build strong, resilient communities.

Strength is built and shown not only by bold acts, but also small ones of day-to-day life: a conversation shared with a friend, working in the garden, trying a new recipe or taking time for a cup of tea on a busy day. And when we share these activities with others – even virtually or by telling about the experience later – we help them build resilience too. This year, LIFE Senior Services will celebrate OAM by encouraging community members to share their experiences. Together, we can find strength – and create a stronger future.

1. LOOK FOR JOY IN THE EVERYDAY – Celebrate small moments and ordinary pleasures by taking time to recognize them. Start a gratitude journal and share it with others via social media, or call a friend or family member to share a happy moment or to say thank you.

2. REACH OUT TO NEIGHBORS – Even if you can’t get together in person acl.gov/oam right now, you can still connect with your neighbors. Leave a small gift on their

When people of different ages, backgrounds, abilities, and talents share experiences – through action, story, or service – we help build strong communities. And that’s something to celebrate! Please join LIFE Senior Services in strengthening our community – tell us some of the ways you help and are helped on our Facebook page.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

HERE ARE SOME WAYS TO SHARE AND CONNECT

doorstep, offer to help with outdoor chores, or deliver a home-cooked meal.

3. BUILD NEW SKILLS – Learning something new allows us to practice overcoming challenges. Take an art course online or try a socially distanced outdoor movement class to enjoy learning with others in your community. Have a skill to share? Find an opportunity to teach someone, even casually. 4. SHARE YOUR STORY – There’s a reason storytelling is a time-honored activity. Hearing how others experience the world helps us grow. Interviewing family, friends, and neighbors can open up new conversations and strengthen our connections.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

25


ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SHOPPING

GUIDE

BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

Does your heart beat a little faster when you drive by a garage or estate sale sign? Do you plan your road trips around antique store hours? If so, you may be a collector!

I-44 Antique Mall

I-44 Antique Mall

O

klahoma is fortunate to have ample antique and collectible shops to keep the most avid collector busy year-round. Even if you haven’t started up a collection of Victorian hat pins or Depression glass, you might be surprised at how much fun it is to roam the tables at the Tulsa Flea Market or stop at the shops that dot Main Streets in many northeastern Oklahoma towns. “I don’t know what this is, but I think I need it,” one young man said as he checked out an eclectic booth at Jenks’ popular River City Trading Post. The dealer who had stocked the shelves had an eye for toys with a 1950s toy kitchen and a host of plastic figures ready to take on the galaxy. That’s the thing about multi-dealer malls – you never know what you’ll find, and you might be surprised at who is doing the shopping. Yes, there are the expected middle-aged or older couples and singletons reminiscing about Aunt Kay’s Pyrex dishes they wish they still had. Sharp-eyed eBay experts are hoping to find an underpriced treasure “in the wild.” But you’re just as likely to find teens in search of classic vinyl and obsolete electronics. Here’s an introductory guide to “junking,” or roaming the shelves at antiques and collectibles stores for second-hand goods. If you’re new to the hobby, it may help save you time and effort. If you’re an experienced junker, you can see whether you agree with the categories.

I-44 ANTIQUE MALL 5111 S. Peoria Ave. • Tulsa (918) 712-2222

A large, multi-dealer shop with around 60 dealers, this mall has a great selection of art, pottery, glass, jewelry, military, sports items and holiday treasures. Shoppers will also find dealers that specialize in Frankoma pottery and other collectibles once made in the Sooner state. The one-story space is easy to navigate with Brookside restaurants just a short drive away.

26

Antique Stores and Malls The top tier in the junking world is where you’ll find items that were made when the oldest of us were young or considerably earlier. Smaller stores may focus on a particular era while the larger malls rent out booth space to many different dealers. Antique stores are great places to learn about the objects people have made and valued over the years. Dealers usually have a good idea about the value of items they are selling. When shopping for antiques, however, knowledge is your best protection against overpaying or buying reproductions.

TULSA ANTIQUES, LLC 4305 E. 31st St. • Tulsa (918) 935-3355

This charming shop is set in a small strip mall that also houses one of Tulsa’s best hardware stores and P.J.’s Sandwich Shoppe. Though you won’t find row after row of dealers, you’ll see beautiful objects from the 18th to early 20th century to add to your collection or gift to a friend. Some of their specialties are American and European art glass, porcelain and ceramics.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

Additional Antique Stores and Malls  he Antiquary Ltd. T 3024 E. 15th St. • Tulsa (918) 582-2897 Generations Antique Mall 4810 E. 11th St. • Tulsa (918) 834-7577 Sailor Antiques & Collectibles 422 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Claremore (918) 341-4838 Olde American Antique Mall 2720 S. 32nd St. • Muskogee (918) 687-8600

MISS McGILLICUTTY'S ANTIQUES

 TILLWATER ANTIQUE S AND COLLECTIBLE MALL

Jenks is a fun stop on any collector’s shopping tour, and Miss McGillicutty’s is located in a booming and accessible downtown. Find antiques from around 60 dealers in a historic building that has surprises around every corner. You’ll find the usual home items plus dealers who specialize in Native American artifacts, fishing lures and furniture.

Though getting to this shop involves a little driving, it’s a chance to visit Cowboy country and the college town of Stillwater. You’ll find more than 60 dealers in a two-story building that was once an Opera House. The store generally has a wide selection of American antiques, primitives, furniture and, of course, sports memorabilia.

106 E. Main St. • Jenks (918) 298-7997

116 E. 9th Ave. • Stillwater (405) 372-7833

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES continued on page 28

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


CALL FOR SPONSORS AND EXHIBITORS

LIFE’S VIRTUAL PROGRAMMING May 2021

Follow LIFE Senior Services on Facebook for video outreach, news, local events and resources for seniors. Find the following content and more at www.facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices during May. “Ask SeniorLine” With Sarah Tronnier, Lead Case Manager

Join Sarah, LIFE’s lead case manager for SeniorLine, Fridays at 2 p.m. Sarah enjoys connecting with and encouraging LIFE followers while sharing tips on senior living, family caregiving and senior resources.

LIFE’s Senior Centers Present the 2021 Writers’ Symposium Eileen Bradshaw, CEO of LIFE Senior Services Tuesday, May 4 • 10 a.m.

Tuesday, July 13, 2021 Exchange Center at Expo Square 9:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Oklahoma’s premier senior event features exhibitors that promote health and safety, active aging and retirement lifestyles and interests. The senior stage will feature News On 6 anchor Lori Fullbright emceeing the day’s entertainment, activities and presentations. Plus, Assistance League of Tulsa will present a fashion show. Other highlights will include a free shredding truck and an Rx TakeBack event with the Coalition Against Prescription and Substance Abuse of Tulsa (CAPSAT).

Safety protocols as established by the CDC, Tulsa Health Department and the City of Tulsa will be followed.

Showcase your business or organization at this one-of-a-kind event! Register online at www.LIFEseniorservices.org/seniorsafetyfair or contact Carol Carter at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1219 or ccarter@LIFEseniorservices.org

Thanks to a grant from the Oklahoma Arts Council, LIFE Senior Services invites you to take part in its first ever Writers’ Symposium. LIFE CEO Eileen Bradshaw will share details about the symposium including featured authors and the writing contest that will go along with the series. Events will be held both in-person for a limited number of people and virtually via LIFE’s Facebook page.

LIFE’s Senior Centers present Connie Cronley “Stories from Real Life” LIVE from Legacy Plaza Thursday, May 13 • 10 a.m.

This first installment of LIFE’s Writers’ Symposium features Connie Cronley, columnist for LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and TulsaPeople. Her latest book, “A Life on Fire,” is the biography of Kate Barnard, a fiery political activist during Oklahoma’s early statehood days. Cronley will share “Stories from Real Life,” about how writers draw material from their life experiences. The event is made possible through a grant from the Oklahoma Arts Council. It will be live at Legacy Plaza for a limited number of people, but open to all via LIFE’s Facebook page.

“Interdisciplinary Teams in Geriatrics: A Better Approach to Healthcare” Dr. Lori Arney, D.O. with LIFE PACE Thursday, May 20 • 10 a.m. (Live via Zoom)

Meet the newest member of the LIFE PACE medical staff and learn about the Interdisciplinary Team (IDT) approach to healthcare. IDTs are considered ideal for geriatric patients who typically have complex, chronic health conditions. The approach is proven to offer more personalized, holistic care, resulting in improved health outcomes and independence in older adults. To register, please contact Carol Carter at ccarter@LIFEseniorservices.org or 918-664-9000, ext. 1219.

Why Behavioral Health Is an Important Part of Your Overall Wellness Karen Orsi, Oklahoma Mental Health and Aging Coalition (OMHAC) Tuesday, May 25 • 10 a.m.

May is both Older Americans Month and Mental Health month. Karen Orsi, director of the Oklahoma Mental Health and Aging Coalition, will discuss ways to successfully support both mental and physical health, and how the two go hand-in-hand.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

27


ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES continued from page 26

Collectibles Antique and collectibles shops allow dealers to bring in more items that are considered “vintage” or even relatively new. While you’ll still see objects from days long past, you may also find decorator items that were on the shelves of retail stores in the last few years. Some dealers also sell new lines of chalk paint or candles, crafts and kitsch. The great thing about collectibles shops is that there’s something for everyone. If your shopping partner isn't enthusiastic about antiques, they may be excited to find a new line of contemporary jewelry or homegrown pecans. And who knows – you might find a treasure the dealer thinks is new that you know is rare and valuable.

Additional Antique and Collectible Shops

LOVE ME TWO TIMES Be sure to check out the ‘60s mural on the north exterior wall of this shop. It reflects the freewheeling spirit of that decade that inspired both The Doors’ song and the store’s name.

River City Trading Post

Tulsa Flea Market

Jade Antique & Vintage Boutiques



Dog & Duck Antiques and Gifts 21 E. 2nd St. • Sand Springs (918) 514-0370 Rod’s Books & Relics 121 N. Main St. • Sand Springs (918) 245-6884 The Yesterday Shop 121 N. Main St. • Sand Springs (918) 245-6884 Red Beard’s Treasure Chest 15325 S. Memorial Dr. • Bixby (918) 364-2555

RIVER CITY TRADING POST

301 E. Main St. • Jenks (918) 299-5998

Be prepared to spend some time at this mall – it’s large, with around 300 vendors. Fortunately, there are resting spots scattered throughout the store and candy and baked goods that can fuel your progress. If an item has ever been sold by a retailer, you just might find it here. Dealers bring in antiques, garage sale finds, homegrown art and handmade linens, with one booth dedicated “solely” to cowboy boots.

28

JADE ON MAIN

1639 S. Main St. • Broken Arrow (918) 872-7931

JADE TREASURES

711 W. Washington St. • Broken Arrow (918) 994-6355

Denise and Matt Johnson own and operate two shops in Broken Arrow that are easy stops on your antiquing run. Shoppers will find a broad array of vintage objects and furniture plus an assortment of brands that are distributed from the stores that might be of interest, including gifts and cosmetics.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

LOVE ME TWO TIMES 1740 S. Harvard Ave. • Tulsa (918) 934-3138

Love Me Two Times is a very accessible and upbeat place to hunt for antiques, collectibles, vintage clothing and more. Baby Boomers will find vintage items from their childhoods and older items their parents or grandparents owned. The wide aisles were set up with older shoppers in mind, according to owner Michael Easter. If you have an interest in collecting succulents, you will find a large selection upon entering the store.

TULSA FLEA MARKET Tulsa County Fairgrounds 4145 E. 21st St. • Tulsa (918) 744-1386

The Tulsa Flea Market has been a Saturday shopping tradition since 1972. The family-owned and operated flea market attracts vendors from Oklahoma and surrounding states. Regular items include antiques, collectibles, primitives, furniture, jewelry, books and crafts. You may also go home with fresh produce, local honey or a delicious dessert. Check their Facebook page or website as the exact building location varies depending on other indoor events at the fairgrounds. The flea market takes an occasional break but will return Saturday, May 15.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


TULSA TOWN HALL ANNOUNCES 2021-2022 SPEAKERS KAL KALLAUGHER – OCTOBER 8, 2021 "Daggers Drawn" • First resident cartoonist for The Economist • Portfolio includes over 8,000 cartoons and 145 magazine covers • Lecturer for TED, Harvard, Pixar, Google “Kal” Kallaugher has been the man behind The Economist’s satirical cartoons since 1979. During his interactive and highly entertaining talks, Kallaugher illustrates on stage while sharing observations on current events, politics and the economy. With hilarious “spot on” caricatures of leaders such as Margaret Thatcher, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, Kallaugher has delighted audiences the world over.

DAVID BROOKS – NOVEMBER 12, 2021 The Atkins-Pritchard Foundation Speaker "What Matters Most" • Canadian-born op-ed columnist • Political and cultural analyst • Best-selling author

Long considered one of America’s most influential thought leaders, David Brooks will discuss his most recent book, "The Second Mountain," which will inspire us to consider our commitment to four core values: family, faith, vocation and community. Brooks is currently a columnist for The New York Times, as well as a commentator on The PBS News Hour, NPR's All Things Considered and NBC’s Meet the Press.

KARL ROVE – JANUARY 14, 2022

The Sandra West Memorial Speaker "America's Challenges" • Former Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush • Fox News contributor and Wall Street Journal columnist • New York Times best-selling author With four decades in the political arena, Karl Rove is a skilled strategist, known for intensity and attention to detail. He is a presidential historian and author of "The Triumph of William McKinley: Why the Election of 1896 Still Matters." From a current and historical perspective, Rove looks at the nation’s future political course and the bigger challenges America faces in the new decade.

NICK BUETTNER – MARCH 4, 2022

The Helmerich Trust Speaker “Blue Zones: The Making of a Healthy City” • Explores Blue Zones, where people live longer, better • Lifestyle lessons from around the world • Collaborates with Good Morning America, CNN and TED Nick Buettner has led more than 17 expeditions around the world to places where people routinely live to be 100, known as "Blue Zones." What are "Blue Zones" and what do they have in common that make them great places to live, work and play? Learn how they lower healthcare costs, improve productivity and warrant national attention. With National Geographic photography, Buettner introduces intriguing communities, cuisines and cultures.

HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR. – APRIL 1, 2022

"Finding Your Roots" • Founder of PBS genealogy series "Finding Your Roots" • Award-winning filmmaker • Chaired professor at Harvard University Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, literary scholar and journalist, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. has authored 21 books and created 15 documentary films. Host of the popular show, "Finding Your Roots," Gates is both a compelling commentator and formidable intellectual force on multicultural and African issues. recipient Program of American All Inclusive Care The for the Elderlyof over 50 honorary degrees, he is currently an English and Literature professor and African American researcher at Harvard University. SEASON TICKETS FOR THE 2021-2022 SPEAKER SERIES ARE ON SALE NOW. For more information on upcoming speakers and to purchase your tickets, visit www.tulsatownhall.com or call (918) 749-5965.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE PACE

BUILDING STRONGER COMMUNITIES BY ADRIAN ROLLE, INTAKE COORDINATOR

Every May, the Administration for Community Living leads our nation’s observance of Older Americans Month. When Older Americans Month was established in 1963, only 17 million living Americans had reached their 65th birthday. About a third of older Americans lived in poverty, and there were few programs to meet their needs. Interest in older Americans and their concerns was growing. A meeting in April 1963 between President John F. Kennedy and members of the National Council of Senior Citizens led to designating May as Senior Citizens Month, now known as Older Americans Month. The theme for 2021 is “Communities of Strength,” with an emphasis on the power of connection and engagement in building strong communities. LIFE PACE – a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly – is a comprehensive, coordinated senior healthcare program that uses a team approach to provide medical, social, nutritional, personal and home care services. LIFE PACE allows individuals in need of skilled care to remain in their homes or community setting while receiving the care they need. One of the essential components of LIFE PACE is the Adult Day Health Center, which provides care for seniors in a safe, friendly and supportive setting. The Center offers a variety of enriching programs, ranging from planned trips to recreational programs and activities, special meals and more. These activities and outings are designed to help LIFE PACE participants learn new activities and do what they enjoy to the best of their abilities while keeping any activity limitations or barriers in mind. Exercise and movement activities are designed to help participants maintain and even improve their strength, balance, mobility and flexibility. More importantly, Adult Day Health gives seniors the opportunity to form close bonds with their fellow seniors, fostering a sense of belonging and building a community. They also have concerned and interested care staff to interact with each day they attend. Loneliness and social isolation in older adults are serious public health risks affecting a significant number of people in the United States, putting them at risk for dementia and other serious medical conditions. Adult Day Health, along with the PACE team, can help seniors build a strong community – both of peers and medical professionals – to help them stay healthier, longer.

PACE If you or someone you care about could benefit from LIFE PACE, contact a LIFE PACE specialist at (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Espanol).

www.LIFEPACE.org LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

29


MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

WORD SEARCH: COLLECTING Find and circle all of the words.

Antique Appraisal Armoire Bottles Cards Cars

Classics Clocks Coins Collection Colorful Comic

Condition Demand Display Dolls Donate Exhibition

Fashion Furniture Games Glassware Hobby Invest

Items Jewelry Lend Market Memorabilia Museum

Nostalgia Object Paintings Pieces Popular Posters

Preserve Quality Rare Records Restoration Rocks

Spoons Sports Stamps Storage Timeless Treasures

Trinkets Unique Value Viewing Watches Worth

S E C

E J S

H R B

C O S

T A T

A Y R

W G O

I B P

N I S

V J O

E T I

S S R

T U M

F T C

N D P

O H I

I T E

T R C

I O E

D W S

N S L

O O C

C S A

A R M

C O M

S G N

K

O

D

O

L

L

S

N

R

E

N

S

S

E

L

E

M

I

T

O

I

T

S

O

I

I

L

P

L

Q

S

P

L

A

X

I

M

Q

H

J

T

O

O

D

R

S

R

T

A

I

C

T

A

A

X

L

K

K

G

U

T

D

Y

A

Q

B

A

I

O

F

S

E

E

G

P

R

G

N

E

I

S

F

E

E

C

U

J

E

A

M

G

O

V

N

U

A

A

K

Z

R

Z

E

Y

I

F

X

L

I

T

C

R

O

W

M

L

E

V

G

A

L

L

S

N

E

H

O

B

B

Y

A

S

A

H

I

A

E

T

D

R

A

P

R

I

T

L

C

U

I

U

S

P

C

R

E

D

P

D

J

S

I

B

R

K

I

R

N

S

A

E

T

U

R

R

Q

E

O

Z

I

G

I

M

C

R

E

E

H

B

A

P

R

O

D

I

W

W

L

E

T

I

L

S

P

O

O

N

S

U

L

O

L

R

W

I

I

R

P

A

N

D

S

I

S

T

N

T

T

S

D

R

A

C

Q

S

O

C

E

W

A

E

O

T

O

A

M

Q

S

N

T

U

T

E

N

S

T

A

M

P

S

E

C

E

N

D

Z

R

L

N

I

M

Q

P

A

G

S

O

R

I

Q

U

A

L

I

T

Y

U

K

R

D

Y

X

K

A

R

D

O

E

Z

L

U

B

S

O

E

V

R

E

S

E

R

P

M

S

R

A

L

U

P

O

P

Y

F

N

M

G

M

J

C

Y

J

G

O

E

U

Q

I

T

N

A

R

E

S

T

O

R

A

T

I

O

N

J

X

Z

N

O

S

T

A

L

G

I

A

K

Z

W

SUDOKU Difficulty Level: 1 2 3 4 5 Answers on page 39.

3

4

1

7

8

9 9 1 4

8 7

5

4

8 7 2

5 4

6 6

9 8

3

9

8 2

2 6 7

5

30

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


PUZZLE PARTNERS

MUMBO JUMBO A mumbo jumbo is a list of words/hints for you to unscramble. You then take designated letters from each word/hint to come up with the final word that is associated with each hint you have unscrambled. Unscramble each of the clue words. Take the letters that appear boxes and unscramble them for the final word. in Answers on page 39. PUZZLE THEME: The act of accumulating objects that are gathered for study and admiration.

PAISAPRLA REPERSVE HYBOB DMDEAN CESIPE GWIVENI SCAR IYQTAUL O

L

G

© 2013 Wuzzles & Puzzles

BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 39.

B

R A

THING=THING THING=THING THING=THING THING=THING

I

N

did i know

TROUi'mBLE

don't bet

IT

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Hand It

NOW LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

31


DOLLARS & SENSE

WANT TO DONATE YOUR COLLECTION TO A MUSEUM? READ THIS FIRST BY KAREN SZABO Before you bequeath a beloved collection to a museum, be sure you understand the ins and outs of charitable giving.

I

f you have an extensive collection of art or antiques, you may be considering donating them to a museum. Perhaps you’re downsizing, or you’ve decided to leave your collection to your favorite museum upon your passing. Melodie Powders, manager of LIFE's Senior Centers, and her husband have designated Woolaroc Museum and Philbrook Museum of Art in their wills as recipients of their collection. The collection includes a pipe organ, a Rolls Royce Silver Spirit, a classic MG convertible and crystal. “My husband and I do not have children to inherit our collections and felt it appropriate to donate our things,” she said. “Bob Phillips, Frank Phillips grandson, was a very good friend of mine, and he was the one who suggested donating to museums.”

“Make certain that your other family members and friends understand your wishes in writing so there is no confusion as to your decision to donate,” – Melodie Powders

1. PUT IT IN WRITING

Charitable giving is a key part of estate planning for many people. Because the top federal capital gains rate for art and other “collectibles” is 28%, donating art is particularly effective. However, the rules surrounding donations of art can be complex, so it’s important to contact your attorney or tax advisor with any questions. Tulsa estate planning attorney Brian Crain recommends making sure you have title to the artwork and can document it. “The museum should be consulted prior to making the bequest and be agreeable to the donation,” Crain said. “Further, they may want certain documentation as to authenticity, provenance documents, artist name, materials used, recent appraisal and dimensions. These documents will also be important when filing your taxes.” One of the most important things you can do is communicate your plans while you’re still living. “Make certain that your other family members and friends understand

your wishes in writing so there is no confusion as to your decision to donate,” Powders said. “We have taken photos of everything that we wish to donate along with our will.”

2. LEARN THE TAX IMPLICATIONS

Donations above $5,000 require appraisals and need to be reviewed by the Internal Revenue Service, according to Art Business. Consult with your tax attorney or accountant – or have curators recommend appraisers or tax specialists – who can explain tax benefits to you and help you file the appropriate forms. Be sure the value is up-to-date and done by an experienced appraiser. You and your appraiser can be penalized for misstating values in a donation.

3. A TWO-SIDED DECISION

According to Artwork Archive, museums generally have a committee that reviews gifts and decides whether they are a positive addition to their current

$89.95 05/31/21

32

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


collection. If your gift is accepted, it may be placed in storage and not displayed. Art consultant Alan Bamberger of Art Business explained that the most common complaint from donors is that museums don't show their donations, but rather assign them to various storage facilities where they sit and gather dust. “When a museum accepts donated art, that art becomes part of what is referred to as the museum's ‘permanent collection,’” he said. “Most donors assume that the permanent collection is made up of all the art in a museum, including donations, and that every piece of that art remains in the collection for all time. This is not necessarily the case. The permanent collection exists as a continually changing and evolving body of art, and in many cases, individual pieces in that collection remain there only as long as they're relevant to the collection as a whole.”

PRESERVING THE PAST Most of the Tulsa Historical Society and Museum’s collection has been donated a few items at a time by people or organizations, according to Director of Exhibits Maggie Brown. “Few museums have a budget to purchase artifacts and rely on the community to help provide them with pieces of important history that the museum will then preserve for future generations,” she said.

If you have specific requirements, such as displaying your art, including your name or seeing your piece in a certain wing, you must specify this in the donation agreement. It’s also important to remember that some heirlooms are best kept in the family. “Most museums are very particular and do not accept family photos, old newspapers, etc.,” Powders said.

5. UNCONDITIONAL GIFTS

“It is not uncommon that donors want to keep their collections displayed together, as that shows people their vision,” said New York City art lawyer Susan Duke Biederman. “Donors like to show the fact that they were collectors.”

The Tulsa Historical Society and Museum received a grant for a special hanging system to hang framed artifacts like portraits, paintings and photographs.

Museums, however, are increasingly reluctant to agree to prospective donor demands because curatorial interests and goals change over time and restrictions may handcuff the museum when circumstances change. Bamberger explained that museums prefer that donors not make specific requests regarding their donations. An unconditional gift means you are giving up all rights to the artwork, and there are no stipulations the museum has to abide by. Your pieces can be displayed wherever the museum chooses, stored wherever and whenever – or sold at any time. It’s also important to understand that your collection may not be displayed in a group or that the museum may only be interested in specific works and accept parts of your gift.

4. DONATE OR SELL?

With about 15,000 objects, 50,000 documents and 100,000 photographic prints and negatives, only a small percentage of the museum’s collection is on exhibit at any one time. When not on display, objects are stored in special archival boxes and folders or on open shelves.

You’ve put a lot of time, emotion and love into collecting your art and other treasured items. If you run into too many roadblocks in finding a new home for all or portions of your collection, you can explore selling it. Selling can be just as rewarding because new collectors will be able to live with and enjoy the art that has enriched your life for so many years.

The museum also has an extensive collection of historic publications. They are interested in receiving donations of pre-1915 city directories, diaries, journals and first-hand accounts of historic Tulsa. They are also seeking yearbooks for most years of Tulsa elementary, middle and high schools.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

33


THE DINNER BELLE

ARNOLD'S OLD-FASHIONED HAMBURGERS

The atmosphere of Arnold’s is part of the fun with collectibles, music from the ‘50s and ‘60s and outgoing staff.

FOOD Step back in time and enjoy a hamburger like mom made.

Come Hungry, Leave Happy! BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

I had no shortage of volunteer Dinner Belles when we decided to review Arnold’s Old-Fashioned Hamburgers this month. There were four of us in my party who went to enjoy the west Tulsa tradition in its new location. Another group went separately, so you’ll be reading the combined opinions of six of us in all! As their website notes, Arnold’s isn’t the place to go when you’re craving a salad. Owners Frank and Vicki Arnold have found a recipe for success by specializing in what they do well. The menu is limited to hamburgers and chicken sandwiches (fried, grilled or club), accompanied by french fries or onion rings.

34

You can wash it down with pop, root beer in a mug, cherry limeade, shakes or a malt. Most of us opted for the single patty burger. Two other Dinner Belles chose the grilled chicken sandwich. Not to keep you in suspense – it was all very good. It’s no wonder the place was bustling with loyal customers who followed the restaurant to its new location in the Crystal City Shopping Center on Southwest Boulevard/Route 66. Being on the Mother Road is a natural fit for the all-American burger joint decorated with classic lunchboxes, vintage license plates, model cars, neon, music memorabilia and a jukebox.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

PRICE Burgers From $2.09 to $6.99 Main Dishes From $1.49 to $2.79 Desserts From $1.39 to $3.09

VERDICT Come hungry, leave happy!

ARNOLD'S OLD-FASHIONED HAMBURGERS

4253 Southwest Blvd. (Route 66) • Tulsa Monday – Saturday 10:45 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. • Restaurant 10:45 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. • Drive-thru (918) 445-4633 www.arnoldsoldfashionedhamburgers.com

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


A TULSA TRADITION

Arnold’s first started serving customers in 1986, and the old diner was a fixture for 33 years at 1722 W. 51st St. There was a public outcry in 2019 when Arnold's had to relocate, and the old building was demolished almost exactly two years before our visit. When the wrecking ball did its work, there was a crowd of supporters in attendance and coverage by local news outlets. The Arnolds confirmed something I’d already suspected – that the move, though not particularly welcome at the time – was a positive one. They now have a larger restaurant where they feed from 800 to 1,000 people a day. It’s actually two restaurants in one. There is a separate building with its own kitchen that serves as a drive-thru location in the same parking lot. “We’ve been blessed,” Vicki Arnold told us. “We were able to almost double our business – we serve about a cow a day.” That’s not to say it hasn’t been an occasionally bumpy ride. They had just reopened at Crystal City when COVID-19 shut them down. Fortunately, with the drive-thru and many regular customers, the Arnolds and their employees survived and are busily flipping burgers Monday through Saturday, from 10:45 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Service is fast, friendly and efficient. One thing that hasn’t made a re-appearance is the restaurant’s annual car show. Frank said they started the car show at their 30th-anniversary blowout and draw several hundred entries each year. The Arnolds canceled the show for 2021, but look forward to its eventual return.

give the gift of

fun and friendship

CELEBRATE YOUR MOM OR DAD

HOT, FRESH BURGERS AND SIDES

Now, back to the food. The grilled burgers were fresh and delicious, served with mustard, onion, tomato, lettuce and pickle or custom garnished at the customer’s request. The patties are the way I like them, on the thin side and crispy on the edges. If you want more beef, you can order a double or triple helping. The fries were also good – thin, soft on the inside and crisp on the outside. The amount of seasoning on both burgers and fries was tasty and not overwhelming. After trying my coworkers’ onion rings, I will get those next time – golden brown and flavorful. I ordered a chocolate malt, and the small was very generous. I meant to just try a few sips to report on the quality. It was a little sweet for my taste, but still good. I have to admit the glass was somehow empty when I left. My coworkers also enjoyed their food. Another kept her commitment to giving up red meat for Lent and said her chicken sandwich was delicious, grilled to perfection with wonderful spices and a soft bun. A third coworker lives in Red Fork and got her customary single burger with rings. Just writing about the meal makes me want to return to try out the drive-thru! The atmosphere of Arnold’s is part of the fun with the collectibles, music from the ‘50s and ‘60s and outgoing staff. Vicki told us she eats a burger every day, and though it’s hard to believe it by looking at her, Frank confirmed it was the truth. During the hour or so we were there, she rarely paused from her work of cleaning and sanitizing chairs and tables, which may be how she keeps fit.

Purchase an annual membership to LIFE's Senior Center for just $40.

Call (918) 744-6760 for more information or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org

It’s great to see hard-working and personable owners who care deeply not just about their business, but the community they serve. Restaurants can suffer when the management loses enthusiasm for what must be a demanding way of life. The Arnolds said they considered relocating to the former Steak & Shake location at 61st and Memorial. Instead, they kept their commitment to the southwest side of town and to selling a classic American meal for a reasonable price. Here's to many more years of old-fashioned quality ahead!

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

35


developing osteoporosis and can identify risk of potential bone fractures. “I really wanted to offer free screening to all patients who needed it – to raise awareness of bone health and to give back to this community that has been so supportive of us,” said Dr. Webb. “Unfortunately, government and insurance regulations actually won't allow us to do that, so our focus is really for uninsured patients who need bone density testing.”

1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission Events One hundred years after the Tulsa Race Massacre struck the Greenwood District of Tulsa, commonly known as “Black Wall Street,” the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission has planned a series of events to educate all citizens and commemorate the centennial this May. “It takes courage to be transparent about our history, including both famous and infamous events. We must address and discuss the facts as they have happened so we can ultimately stand together across racial, geographical, political and cultural lines. The call for unity can facilitate education and enable greater understanding for future relations among competing and complementary interest,” said Senator Kevin L. Matthews, chair of the Commission. Below is a list of just a few events that the Commission is hosting – a complete list and details of each event can be found at www.tulsa2021.org/events.  ULSA OPERA PRESENTS – T GREENWOOD OVERCOMES May 1, 2021 • 7:30 – 11:30 p.m. In a special concert featuring works for voice and piano by living Black composers, Tulsa Opera will honor the resilience of Black Tulsans and Black America one hundred years after the Tulsa Race Massacre.

J OHN HOPE FRANKLIN NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM May 26 – May 29, 2021 The 12th Annual Reconciliation in America National Symposium will be held on May 26 through May 29, 2021. The theme is "The Future of Tulsa's Past: The Centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre and Beyond.”  EDICATION OF PATHWAY OF HOPE D May 28, 2021 • 9:21 – 10:21 a.m. The official Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the "Pathway to Hope" walking path that connects Greenwood District to the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park.  AITH STILL STANDING – UNITY DAY F May 30 – June 10, 2021 • 7 a.m. The public is invited to a joint sermon and faith walk with local churches through historic Greenwood.  EMEMBER + RISE R May 31, 2021 • 6:21 – 11:21 p.m. Nationally televised event to commemorate the centennial with key speakers, musicians and special guests at ONEOK Field.

36

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

Protect Your Bone Health

Did you know that May is National Osteoporosis Month? As we age, the health of our bones becomes increasingly important to our overall health. In honor of the month and to increase access to professional care, local bone health expert Dr. James Webb is offering free bone density scans to qualified patients in the month of May. Bone density scans compare density results to the bones of an average healthy young adult. This can determine the chance of having or

Mayfest Returns

Tulsa International Mayfest returns in 2021! A tribute to art, music, food and community, Mayfest is a beloved tradition in Tulsa. The event began in 1973 and was originally called “Jubilee ‘73” before becoming Mayfest a few years later. A fun fact: Sammy Davis Jr. performed at “Jubilee ‘73.” Although the festival has seen many art and music style changes over the years, the mission stays the same: To promote knowledge and education of the arts and humanities. Now an event of ahha Tulsa art organization, Mayfest also helps to further ahha’s mission to “keep Tulsa creative.”

Determining the likelihood of fracture and your bone density levels is the first step in better bone health. “The key is to catch it as early as possible and then treat it medically to reduce the risk of future fractures,” he said. Appointments will be scheduled for May 12, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., with additional days to be added based on demand. If you are interested in this opportunity for yourself or a loved one, call Dr. James Webb & Associates at (918) 260-9322 for a pre-screening. The office is located at 6550 E. 71st St., Suite 200, Tulsa.

A safety plan has been approved for the event by the Tulsa Health Department and can be read in full on Mayfest’s website. It includes one-way traffic flows, physical barriers, required masks and more. The festival will be held May 7-9 and is located in downtown Tulsa’s Arts District and Historic Greenwood District. Admission is free to the public. For a complete lineup of events, performances and a map of the festival, go online to www.tulsamayfest.org. Mayfest also regularly updates their Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ tulsainternationalmayfest.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


SHARE YOUR TIME & TALENT To submit a volunteer opportunity, contact Dee Duren at dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1215.

What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make. – Jane Goodall RSVP and IRONMAN Tulsa Tulsa has been selected to host the IRONMAN North American Championship racing event this year, an amazing opportunity for the city and volunteer group RSVP. If RSVP has 10 volunteers sign up online, the group will be eligible to apply for a grant from the IRONMAN Foundation in the spring. The athletic event needs 4,000 volunteers, and there are many different types of opportunities available. The event date is May 23, 2021. To register, Google “Volunteer for IRONMAN” and click on the Tulsa link. Each participant gets a T-shirt, bag, snacks and of course, a face mask and gloves. Let the RSVP office know you have registered by calling (918) 280-8656 or email joan@rsvptulsa.org.

 he 2021 KitchenAid Senior T PGA Championship Volunteers are needed for the Senior PGA Championship coming to Tulsa! The tour will be at Southern Hills Golf Course, 2636 E. 61st St. This is a great opportunity to experience the championship. Volunteers will be provided with access to the grounds of the club for the duration of the event to complete their scheduled shifts and act as PGA ambassadors during unscheduled times. You will receive a personalized, nontransferable volunteer credential which will provide access to the grounds all six days of the 81st annual championship. To apply, visit www.srpgachampionship.com, click on the volunteer tab and fill out the registration form.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Reading Partners Reading Partners is looking for volunteers for their virtual tutoring program. Help children in grades first through fourth to become lifelong readers! Volunteers become mentors, friends and positive role models to the children they work with. Working one-on-one with a student is a fun, effective way to change a life – maybe even your own. This is a virtual opportunity at present. Training and curriculum are provided by Reading Partners. Volunteers must have a laptop and regular access to Wi-Fi. Volunteer info and sign-up can be found at www.readingpartners.org/volunteer-tulsa.

Gathering Place Gathering Place has 365 days of programming and endless volunteer opportunities to fit any schedule. From regular daily scheduled events to large festivals, concerts and more, there is something for everyone to volunteer with at Gathering Place! The event lineup for the summer of 2021 and applications for volunteers can be found online at www.gatheringplace.org/volunteer. For group opportunities, email volunteer@gatheringplace.org.

If you would like more information on any of these opportunities, please contact the RSVP office at (918) 280-8656.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

37


Recommended Reads

Bunkering With Books Native American Authors and Books BY CONNIE CRONLEY Don’t you love it when wishes come true? I read so much praise for “Braiding Sweetgrass” by Robin Wall Kimmerer, it was on my wish list. Then, one bright morning, a friend showed up with a copy as a gift, not for any special occasion, but “because I know this is a book you will love.” Another friend, an artist and teacher, believes that most women are weavers with an innate gift of weaving together people, ideas and organizations. That is similar to how Kimmerer describes “Braiding Sweetgrass,” a braid of three strands: spirit (indigenous knowledge), science and story. Kimmerer is a botanist, a professor and an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Some of her family stories are set in Oklahoma. She writes lyrically about the land, Native creation stories and things such as strawberries and pecans to illustrate a joyful relationship with the Earth. She connects strawberries, Fragaria virginiana, with the human choice of perception, to show us the natural world as a gift. With gratitude and reciprocity, both plant and animal are transformed and the land murmurs, “Ohhh, here are the ones who know how to say thank you.” It is a lovely, wise and thoughtful book for people who care about the environment and the rest of the living world.

38

It pulled me to books by Nebraska native Mari Sandoz (1896-1966), one of the nation’s most acclaimed writers about the American West and Plains Indians. Sandoz fascinates me because of her subject matter and because some of Jay Cronley’s family knew her. What a hard life she had, first as a girl on a cruel prairie and then struggling to become a writer. Her famous book “Old Jules” is celebrated as the definitive account of homesteading in western Nebraska, but it was painful to read because her father, Jules Sandoz, was so brutal to his family, and their lives were arduous anyway. Compared to that harsh book, I was captivated by more stories of her Nebraska youth in her slim book of collected essays “Sandhill Sundays and Other Recollections.” Sandoz writes with the clarity of a sparkling brook, honest and without self-pity. As a child, she got to know the Sioux who camped near their homestead. She saw the difference between the Indians, who never punished their children, and her own family. “I remember the stern, distant faces of the Sioux when, in the swift heat of his temper, our father whipped us. Indians consider the whites a brutal people who treat their children like enemies – playthings, too, coddling them like pampered pets or fragile toys, but underneath always like enemies, enemies

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

that must be restrained, bribed, spied upon and punished. They believe that children so treated will grow up as dependent and immature as pets and toys, and as angry and dangerous as enemies within the family circle.” The essays led me to her classic biography “Crazy Horse: The Strange Man of the Oglalas.” She spent decades researching and interviewing Indians who knew this mystical, invincible warrior and leader. I have never been so immersed in another culture. No wonder it is called a book of genius. She clarifies the relationships and differences among the Oglala and Brule Sioux and the other five sub-bands of the Teton Sioux (Lakota). Here I saw their rich and structured social orders; their systematic but nomadic lifestyles of hunting, trading and visiting; their raids against traditional enemies, the Crow, Shoshone, Pawnee, Blackfeet and Arikara; the white invasion like a swelling flood along the Oregon Trail; the soldiers of the U.S. government, some kind and understanding, many vicious, and most with canyon-size ignorance of the Native culture. Example: White soldiers laugh when a young Cheyenne mother weeps over her baby, dead of measles. Look at her, they say, trying to be like a white woman. The late author Vine Deloria Jr. invites us to read history as biography and biography as history. “Crazy Horse” shows us how to do that. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


BUSINESS DIRECTORY SENIOR CARE ONLY BETTER

GET YOUR DREAM KITCHEN THIS NEW YEAR! With our custom pull-out shelves, you can always find more space, access, and joy in your existing cabinets

Our caregivers and certified Home Health Aides stand ready to serve your family’s needs with: • Personalized in-home companion, sitter & personal care • Alzheimer’s & dementia care • Transportation assistance & medication reminders

GET YOUR 7TH FREE!*

*Limit one offer per household. Must purchase 6+ Classic/Designer Shelves. EXP 7/30/21.

seniorhelpers.com

WE ’

FOLLOW RE

®

Complimentary design consultation:

ES

(888) 491-6191 | shelfgenie.com

IN

SA

C

*all caregivers are bonded & insured

All rights reserved. Senior Helpers locations are independently owned and operated. ©2019 SH Franchising, LLC.

CD

Licensed Home Care Agency (No. 7926)

G IN

|

918.574.2273

BUY 6 SHELVES

FET

Y GUID

EL

Reliable, safe, affordable and courteous transportation in Tulsa

(918) 404-0038

Rates Vary Depending on Location

www.healthridetulsa.org

• Ambulatory, wheelchair and stretcher transports • A ride to your destination upon hospital discharge • Medical appointment transportation

After hours phone system utilized

WE HAVE THE WIDEST RAMPS IN THE STATE!

Announcing LIFE Senior Services’ New Program

Mobility One Transportation

Free Consultation

Club LIFE welcomes individuals diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease or other related disorders. Club LIFE is designed to enhance memory, stimulate brain function and provide social support.

HOURS & LOCATION Monday – Friday 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Christ Church 10901 S. Yale Ave.

Call LIFE’s SeniorLine

(918) 664-9000

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

mobilityONEtransportation.com

Located At 61st And Sheridan

918.437.4488

14720 E. Admiral Pl., Ste. A Tulsa, OK 74116

Come and Test Drive a Scooter in Our Store! Easy disassembly for most scooters Rental option available

Need Repair? We Come to You.

(918) 600-2112

www.mobilitycity.com/tulsa

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

39


PEOPLE & PLACES

Martha Wells of Hummingbird Fine Craft, a Tulsa artist cooperative, helps a customer at Tulsa Garden Center’s Springfest 2021 gardening festival. Hummingbird Fine Craft is located in the Pearl District at 4th and Trenton.

Senior Star at Woodland Terrace celebrated 100 years of life with their resident, Elsie! In this picture, she shared some life advice.

There’s nothing like a good game of dominos with friends! Gentlemen from The Linden at Stonehaven Square spent time together playing and enjoying each other’s company.

The Parke celebrates with Ila for winning the Sweet Tart in a jar guessing contest!

Paul, resident of The Parke Assisted Living, enjoying a virtual visit with family.

Tax Assistance Program volunteer, Harvey, hard at work to complete taxes for local seniors through LIFE Senior Services.

On a beautiful day, residents at Country Club at Woodland Hills went for an outing to the Tulsa Air and Space Museum.

Send Us Your Pictures Whether it's your traveling group, tennis buddies or a night on the town, we want your pictures. Submit high-resolution photos to dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org by the 1st of every month. 40

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

AUTO REPAIR

FOR SALE

COMPUTER SERVICES

GARDENING/LAWN CARE

BIBLE STUDY

DAYTIME CARE BOOKS

ESTATE SALES

CARPET CLEANING

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE

CEMETERY LOTS

HOME REPAIR/REMODELING

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

41


CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL

PERSONAL SAFETY

MOVERS PERSONAL SERVICES HOUSE CLEANING

42

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Vintage Friends

LIFE’S ADULT DAY HEALTH Safe, affordable daytime care for older adults. Call (918) 664-9000 for more information or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org.

LIFE’s Adult Day Health is following safety protocols. Masks, social distancing and temperature checks are required.

MAY ANSWERS

For puzzles, see pages 30-31

MUMBO JUMBO

Marion Parks James C. Powell Public Service Company of Oklahoma Betty J. Reed Roy Reid Carol Rhodes Right at Home Bernard and Marcy Robinowitz Bob and Denise Rock Annette Sandberg Marla Schaefer Scissor-Tail Construction LLC Joanne Sellers Senior Helpers Denzle and Peggy Shafer Mrs. Sarah Shaver Phil and Lonnie Snyder Charles C. Stanford Paul Stevenson Melanie Stewart Catherine Tatum John and Diane Terral The Mary K. Chapman Foundation Roberta Todd Herb and Mary Sue Whitney Rickye Dixon Wilson Jennifer Yoder Larry and Sue Young Margie Young Young Living

IN MEMORY OF

Francis P. Ferrantino In Memory of Alfonso Ferrantino Theresa M. Finck and Mary Ann Finck In Memory of Theresa Ann Finck Norma Hollaway In Memory of Bert Hunsicker Joseph L. Jones In Memory of Beulah Jones Rev. Richard and Peggy Ziglar In Memory of Tom Campbell

IN HONOR OF

Laurel Madland In Honor of Reba Harvey The William K. Warren Foundation In Honor of Angela Larson Cozort

PLEASE MAIL YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO: LIFE Senior Services 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 • Tulsa, OK 74135-5114 Make your donation online: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

Scatter Brained Little Did I Know All Things Being Equal I'm In Trouble Don't Bet On It Hand It Over Now

SUDOKU

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

A G Equipment Company Advocacy 4 Seniors Anonymous Armstrong Hearing Aid Center, Inc. Sharon Atcheson Syble Atherton Douglas and Virginia Baldridge Bank of Oklahoma Jodie and Benjamin Benner Lila Blair Bruce and Nancy Bolzle Jean Bouse Brookdale Senior Living, Inc. Oleta Calvert Sherry Canady CaptionCall Inell Ceasar Norman Centenarians of Oklahoma Colleen Childers Church of St. Mary Samuel R. Clammer Charles R. Cobb MD Richard and Linda Cotner Angela Cozort Robert and Susan Cronk Brad and Leslie Dalton Charles Danley Mary L. Dell Jerry and Barbara Elliott John and Marge Gaberino Jim and Debbie Gipson Glenn Supply Company, Inc Manuella R. Glore John and Deborah Hale Nequita K. Hanna Susan K. Harris Health Care Service Corporation Heartwood Commons Cohousing JJ and Alissa Hurley INCOG Area Agency on Aging Butch and Carolyn Knoll KWB Oil Property Management, Inc. Edward and Eileen Long Sherry Marcum Matrix Service Company Montereau, Inc. Nancy L. Neal Ruth K. Nelson

LIFE Senior Services is a recognized leader in aging services and an acknowledged voice on aging issues and is proud to be a nonprofit United Way organization.

BAMBOOZABLES

3 8 6 9 1 4 7 5 2

We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. Due to publication deadlines, acknowledgment of gifts may take up to 60 days in Vintage Newsmagazine. If there is an error, please call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

DONATE TO LIFE Become a Vintage Friend

1. Appraisal 5. Pieces 2. Preserve 6. Viewing 3. Hobby 7. Cars 4. Demand 8. Quality Final message: Collecting 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in March 2021.

2 9 1 3 5 7 4 8 6

4 5 7 6 2 8 1 3 9

6 4 9 8 7 3 2 1 5

1 3 8 2 4 5 9 6 7

7 2 5 1 9 6 3 4 8

8 7 2 4 6 1 5 9 3

5 6 4 7 3 9 8 2 1

9 1 3 5 8 2 6 7 4

Every dollar invested stays local to fuel LIFE Senior Services’ mission-related initiatives of promoting and preserving independence for seniors.

Today – Tomorrow – Always. FOLLOW US ON

Donate now by visiting www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | May 2021

43


Profile for LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine

LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine - May 2021  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded