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r u o Y e f i L t s e B

1.

t a t i e c a r Emb of t s r u h r a Ced ills H d n a l d Woo

Let now be the time you decide to escape the burdens of homeowning and explore independent living. At Cedarhurst, we promise you a purposeful and fulfilling lifestyle in a community of comfort and convenience. • State-of-the-art wellness programs • Refreshing saltwater pool • Chef-prepared meals in restaurant-style dining • Washer/dryer in apartment • Pet friendly • Spacious outdoor courtyards

You’ve worked hard to get to your retirement years. Come fully enjoy them while maintaining your independence at Cedarhurst of Woodland Hills.

To schedule a tour, contact us at (918 ) 553-5953 or woodlandhills@cedarhurstliving.com. 7345 S. 99th East Ave. | Tulsa, OK 74133 CedarhurstWoodlandHills.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Vol. 34, No. 9 LIFE Senior Services, Inc. Publisher

Kelly Kirchhoff Senior Director of Communications

Dee Duren Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

Emily Fox Associate Editor efox@LIFEseniorservices.org

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Okie Fun Facts

Oklahoma Oddities

Where the Wind Comes Sweeping Down the Plain

From red dirt dyed T-shirts to space debris, learn a few fun facts about what makes Oklahoma a uniquely interesting state.

Delve into fascinating urban legends, spooky stories and unexplained phenomena in Oklahoma.

How Oklahoma's gusty plains are being used as alternative energy sources to help power some of AEP-PSO's customer base.

Bernie Dornblaser Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

Leah Weigle Graphic Designer

Carol Carter Copy Editor

Carrie Henderson Bowen Circulation Coordinator cbowen@LIFEseniorservices.org

dick mccandless Esteban Valencia Community Distribution

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services (a Tulsa Area United Way nonprofit) and helps fulfill LIFE Senior Services’ mission to promote and preserve independence for seniors. This publication is printed and mailed at no charge. Donations of any amount are appreciated and will help offset LIFE Senior Services’ production costs. Free Subscription: www.LIFeseniorservices.org/request

A donation of $25 per year is suggested.

On the Cover Bison at the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve in Pawhuska, OK. Photo taken by 16 Teri James. View more of Teri's Native American Cultural Sites photographs and purchase prints at www.terijamesphotography.etsy.com Oklahoma’s rich history of Native American tribes is commemorated at these 10 museums and cultural centers.

6 Letter from Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner Long-Distance Caregiving 12 Medicare & You Protecting Yourself From Enrollment Fraud 18 Top 8 Oklahoma Dining Destinations 22 Oklahoma Sights You Shouldn't Miss 24 Oklahoma Land Run 28 Dollars & Sense Making Sense of the Census 30 Mindbender & Puzzles 31 Puzzle Partners

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32 The Dinner Belle 33 Business Directory 34 LIFE PACE Healthcare That Puts You First 35 Hiking, A Hands-on Experience: Fun Hiking Adventures with Grandkids 36 Noteworthy 37 Share Your Time & Talent 38 Calendar 39 LIFE EDU 40 People & Places 41 Classifieds 43 Vintage Friends

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org/VintageDonate or call (918) 664-9000. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2020. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 34, Issue 9, March 2020 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 21688494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135-5114.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Letter From eILEEN Dear Vintage Reader: First, thank you to all of you who sent me your love stories! It was fun and often inspiring to read about your romantic journeys. Keep the notes coming! This month, we are covering all things Oklahoma. From hiking trails to cultural sites, we are showcasing our state. Oklahoma is beautiful, with so many opportunities for day trip exploration. We have rolling hills, tallgrass prairies, pristine lakes, fly fishing streams, bustling downtown districts, world class museums and one of the most exciting emerging music scenes in the country. This issue also showcases eight top Oklahoma dining spots. I’d like to add one more to the list. Last weekend, my husband and I traveled with friends to Krebs. About 90 minutes from Tulsa, Krebs has an Italian heritage exemplified by an abundance of excellent Italian establishments. We dined at Pete’s Place, redolent with garlic and a labyrinth of private dining rooms. Every diner is greeted with meatballs, ravioli, and spaghetti in a traditional “Sunday” sauce prepared from family recipes, plus salad and bread. The entrée comes after all of this! It is certainly not the way we eat typically, but the food was good and the experience memorable. Definitely worth the drive.

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing

I have an Irish heritage, and with St. Patrick’s Day approaching, you may want to enjoy a taste of Ireland. I am excited to share my family’s recipe for Irish stew. I would love to see some of your “heritage” recipes; please email me at ebradshaw@lifeseniorservices.org. Enjoy!

ebradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

IRISH STEW Ingredients: • 2 tbs. olive oil, divided • 3 lbs. beef chuck roast, trim off excess fat and cut into bite-sized pieces • Kosher salt and freshly-cracked black pepper • 1 large white or yellow onion, peeled and diced • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced • ⅓ cup flour • 1 (12 ounce) bottle Guinness beer • 4 cups beef stock • 3 large carrots, peeled and diagonally sliced into bite-sized pieces • 1.5 lbs. Yukon gold potatoes, cut into bite-sized pieces

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

• 3 tbs tomato paste • 1 bay leaf • ½ tsp dried thyme • Optional garnish: chopped fresh parsley Simply dust the beef chunks in flour, and brown the beef in a skillet. Add beef and all other ingredients to the crock pot and cook on low for 8 hours. You can add other vegetables such as peas, parsnips or mushroom if you like.

Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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STRAIGHT ANSWERS TO YOUR MEDICARE QUESTIONS. Welcome to Medicare answers.

Let CommunityCare (HMO) help you get more coverage for less cost—as low as $0 per month. And all of our plans are contracted with both Ascension St. John and Saint Francis Health System—two of the area’s premier healthcare systems.

Saint Francis South Bishops Building 10507 E. 91st St. S., 5th Floor Conf. Rm. Tuesday, March 24, 9:30 a.m.

Sand Springs Hampton Inn 7852 W. Parkway Blvd. Tuesday, March 3, 9:30 a.m.

CommunityCare Senior Center 4720 S. Harvard, Ste. 103 Saturday, March 14, 9:30 a.m.

St. John Owasso Medical Office Building 12451 E. 100th St. N., Rm. 170 Thursday, March 26, 9:30 a.m.

St. John Broken Arrow Medical Office Building 800 W. Boise Circle, Rm. 145 Thursday, March 12, 9:30 a.m.

CommunityCare Senior Center 4720 S. Harvard, Ste. 103 Monday, March 16, 5:30 p.m.

CommunityCare Senior Center 4720 S. Harvard, Ste. 103 Sunday, March 29, 1:30 p.m.

CALL OR VISIT US TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION

1-800-843-1887 1-800-722-0353 CCOK.COM/SHP/2020

FROM OCTOBER 1 – MARCH 31, CUSTOMER SERVICE HOURS ARE 8 A.M. – 8 P.M., MONDAY – SUNDAY For accommodations of persons with special needs at meetings, call 1-800-843-1887 (TTY 1-800-722-0353).The Senior Health Plan service area includes all of Tulsa, Creek, Craig, McIntosh, Muskogee, Nowata, Osage, Wagoner and Washington counties. CommunityCare is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Senior Health Plan depends on contract renewal. CommunityCare complies with Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-800-843-1887 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353). CHÚ Ý: Nếu bạn nói Tiếng Việt, có các dịch vụ hỗ trợ ngôn ngữ miễn phí dành cho bạn. Gọi số 1-800-843-1887 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353). H3755_Straight Answers_M

LOOKING FOR ANSWERS? Call LIFE’s SeniorLine Whether you have a simple question about aging services or a complicated family situation, LIFE’s SeniorLine is the first place to call when you need help. Visit LIFE’s website to chat with SeniorLine!

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

(918) 664-9000 or ask questions online at www.LIFEseniorservices.org LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Looking Back

Oklahoma Constitutional Convention in Guthrie, OK, 1906.

Early Oklahoma Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

Want More? See additional pictures in the digital edition of March's LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine at www.LIFEseniorservices.org.

This group is believed to be camping in Indian Territory prior to the April 22, 1889 Land Run in Oklahoma Territory.

Native American students and their teachers in front of the Euchee Mission School near Sapulpa. The school opened in 1894.

Last reunion of Indian Territory Deputy U.S. Marshals in Fort Smith, 1908. Judge Isaac Parker presided over the U.S. Criminal Court located in Fort Smith, AR, from 1875 to 1896. During those years, that court had jurisdiction over Indian Territory. About 200 deputies operated in Indian Territory traveling by wagon, horseback or on foot to cover 74,000 square miles.

This Month in History March 1, 1966: Soviet probe crashed into Venus Venera 3, a Soviet probe launched on November 15, 1965, collided with Venus. Although it failed in its mission to measure the Venusian atmosphere, it was the first unmanned spacecraft to reach the surface of another planet. Four years earlier, the U.S. probe Mariner 2 was the first spacecraft to pass close enough to Venus to take scientific measurements of the planet, discovering surface temperatures in excess of 800 degrees Fahrenheit on its surface.

March 8, 1950: VW bus

went into production

Known officially as the Volkswagen Type 2 (the Beetle was the Type 1) or the Transporter, the bus was a favorite mode of transportation for hippies in the U.S. during the 1960s and became an icon of the American counterculture movement. In 1972, the VW Beetle passed the iconic Ford Model T as the world’s best-selling car, with over 15 million vehicles produced.

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March 12, 1894: Coca-Cola

sold in glass bottles for first time

For the first several years of its existence, Coke was only available as a fountain drink, and its producer saw no reason for that to change. Originally developed as a non-addictive substitute for morphine, then marketed as a non-alcoholic "temperance drink," Coca-Cola was invented by John Pemberton, a druggist in Columbus, GA, in 1886.

March 16, 1802: U.S. Military Academy established

The first military school in the U.S. was founded by Congress for the purpose of educating and training young men in the theory and practice of military science. Located at West Point, New York, the U.S. Military Academy is often simply known as West Point. The academy is now under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army and has an enrollment of more than 4,000 students.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

March 26, 1957: Elvis Presley bought Graceland

Elvis bought Graceland for his parents and himself for $90,000 as his popularity began to soar. The mansion offered more privacy and security from his adoring fans. Today, it is preserved precisely as Elvis left it when he passed away in 1977. His daughter Lisa Marie inherited Graceland, and in the years since then, it has become one of the nation’s most popular tourist attractions.

March 27, 1973: Brando declined Best Actor Oscar

Marlon Brando declined the Academy Award for Best Actor for his career-reviving performance in The Godfather. The Native American actress Sacheen Littlefeather attended the ceremony in Brando's place, stating that the actor "very regretfully" could not accept the award, as he was protesting Hollywood's portrayal of Native Americans in film.

© The History Channel

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Oklahoma residents: Learn how you can get more benefits than Original Medicare. If you have both Medicare and Medicaid, you may qualify for a UnitedHealthcare Dual Complete® LP1 (HMO D-SNP) plan. It’s a plan that offers more benefits than Original Medicare for a $0 premium, including:

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For more information, call today.

1-855-269-0644, TTY 711 UHCCommunityPlan.com/OK Plans are insured through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or one of its affiliated companies, a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract and a contract with the State Medicaid Program. Enrollment in the plan depends on the plan’s contract renewal with Medicare. Y0066_190516_020501_M

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Oklahoma Has a New State Brand Recently unveiled by state officials, the branding campaign includes the tagline “Imagine that,” and the logo incorporates the shapes and colors of the earth, sky, water, agriculture and forest.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Caregiver Corner

Long-Distance Caregiving Common Sense Approaches Long-Distance Caregiving is as unique as each family. While school, careers and marriage scatter families around the country and globe, the need to support aging parents and siblings is innately human and constant. By Mickey Hinds, LIFE's Education Coordinator Until there is a health crisis, such as a terminal diagnosis, fall or stroke, the support offered to aging loved ones is often done by phone and during brief visits together. After a medical event, caregiving from afar takes on new urgency and organizational skills. Long-distance caregiving is defined as caring for someone who lives an hour or more away and can present challenges that are specific to distance. There are some things that a caregiver can do to increase effectiveness. Consider the following: 1 Talk about it. Regardless of distance, family can discuss expectations for care, financial concerns and medical conditions. Ideally, these conversations happen often, and changes are observed and discussed. There are natural opportunities for conversations. For example, during a call, mom says she went to the doctor earlier in the week. This is a perfect opportunity for a caregiver to ask about why a visit was necessary (routine visit or other type), if any tests were performed or if there are any concerns, aches and pains, etc. Talking about and normalizing discussions about health (and life) issues are important aspects of caring. 2 A long-distance caregiver needs the same tools as one living close by. HIPAA releases, powers of attorney and other legal documents should be drafted and on file with doctors. Some long-distance caregivers keep these documents in files on their computer or phone for easy delivery to healthcare professionals via email or text when needed. Long-distance caregivers who have these documents in place are able to have conversations with doctors and staff about their loved one's condition and treatment. 3 Planning a visit can offer insight about the caregiving path. When visiting, observe the household environment. Are the surroundings clean? Is the food in the refrigerator going bad? Is the mail piling up? Are there dings or dents in the car? Are there fall risks in and around the home? Are there more medications than the last visit? Answering yes to any of these questions may be an indication that more support is needed. Additionally, the visit is an opportunity to connect with each other. Follow your loved one’s lead and do some fun things together. As caregiving responsibilities increase, these fun times spent together will take on more profound meanings. 4 Learn about resources. Each community has resources and services to help seniors and caregivers. These services can be delivered through nonprofit organizations, the federally-funded Area Agencies on Aging, faith groups, meal delivery and home care agencies. Learning what the community has to offer can aid in planning as needs change.

Distance puts practical limitations on caregiving. The hope is that each family finds their way with as little stress as possible and utilizes the resources and support available.

5 Plan ahead for an emergency. Identify a local person or agency who can act in the best interest of your loved one in an emergency. Depending on distance, several hours can elapse before a long-distance caregiver gets to the care recipient. Deciding ahead of time who to call can relieve stress. There may be a friend or neighbor who can step in or a long-time friend of the caregiver who is willing to help out in an emergency. Some home care agencies can be hired for emergency help for clients as well. Source: National Institute on Aging

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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DISCOVER ALL OF LIFE’S VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES • One-on-one and small group assistance in LIFE’s Adult Day Health Centers • Sharing your talents, like singing, painting, dancing or knitting with our Adult Day Health participants • Fitness or art instructors at LIFE’s Senior Centers • Small home repairs and handyman projects • Office/clerical support • Medicare Part D counseling • Income tax preparation • Special events and fundraising • Serving on an advisory council To find out how you can volunteer with LIFE Senior Services, call LIFE’s SeniorLine at

Services Included:

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

11


Medicare & You • Beware of people who ask for your Medicare number, Social Security number and/or bank information just to provide you with information. Someone can use this personal information to enroll you in a plan without your permission. Know that plans cannot request this personal information at an educational event and cannot call you to ask for a payment over the phone – they must send a bill. • Watch out for people who threaten you with the loss of your Medicare benefits unless you sign up for their plan. • Be cautious of people who offer you gifts only if you enroll in their plan. Everyone is eligible for a gift, regardless of whether they enroll in a plan or not, and the gift cannot be worth more than $15. • Watch out for people who say they represent Medicare. Plans are never allowed to suggest they represent or are preferred by Medicare or any other government agency.

Protecting Yourself from Enrollment Fraud The Open Enrollment period for Medicare Advantage plans runs from January 1 through March 31 each year. Medicare has a marketing standard that dictates the way Advantage providers may contact you and market their services. Here are some pointers to protect yourself from fraud. By Channing Rutherford Medicare and Tax Assistance Program

1 Know the rules about how plan providers can contact and market to you. Insurance providers can begin marketing as early as October 1 each year and are permitted to contact you through mail or email. Unless you are currently enrolled in the company’s plan, however, they are not allowed to call, visit your home or approach you in public to sell to you without your permission. Agents and brokers are allowed to have educational exhibits at public events, but they cannot try to enroll you in their plan at these events. But, if you sign up for a door prize, you are giving them permission to contact you after the event.

FREE TAX

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2 Know how to avoid potential enrollment fraud. Enrollment fraud occurs when an agent or representative purposefully tricks you into enrolling in their plan, regardless of whether or not it is the right plan for you. They may do this by giving you misleading or false information to get you to enroll. • Watch out for people who pressure you with time limits to enroll in their plan. You can use the entire Open Enrollment Period to make your decision. You will not receive extra benefits for signing up early for a plan. Contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) for trustworthy and unbiased counseling if you have questions about any of your plan options.



• To protect yourself from enrollment fraud, confirm everything that a plan agent tells you before making a final decision about a plan. Ask for everything in writing and call your doctors to make sure that they are in the provider network for the plan you want to join. Never give your Medicare information to anyone but your trusted health providers.

3 Report suspected enrollment fraud and marketing violations. If you feel a plan provider or agent has violated Medicare’s marketing rules, you should save all documented proof, such as an agent’s business card, the plan’s marketing materials and your phone call records. Also, if you think you were enrolled in a plan without your permission, contact (800) MEDICARE or the Medicare Assistance Program at LIFE Senior Services to report it and request assistance. Medicare allows victims of enrollment fraud to makes changes outside of Medicare’s Open Enrollment Period. You can contact MAP at LIFE to learn more, (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189 Sources: www.medicarerights.org www.smpresource.org

The appointment line is open for LIFE’s free tax assistance for seniors age 60 and older who make $56,000 or less annually. Appointments are filling up fast! Call now to reserve your spot at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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DRAWING WILL BE HELD Thursday • March 5, 2020

There will be ONE drawing to win ONE of the trips. The winner has the opportunity to select one of these fantastic get-aways. The drawing will be held at the Celebrate LIFE event on March 5, 2020, and you do not have to be present to win. Raffle tickets are $25 each or $100 for five. Tickets are available online at www.lifeseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

13


Did You Know?

Okie Fun Facts On November 16, 1907, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory merged becoming the 46th state to enter the union. This beautiful state and its "Okies" are a uniquely interesting and bright bunch. by Joey Mechelle Farqué

1 Red Dirt

The bright red soil you can find in about 33 of 77 counties covers around 1 million acres in central and western Oklahoma. The color comes from the iron oxide present in the soil, which is the result of the weathering of reddish sandstones, siltstones and shale of the Permian Geologic Era nearly 300 million years ago. You can find numerous local vendors who sell “red dirt” merchandise, including shirts that have been dyed rusty brown using Oklahoma’s unique soil.

T-shirt artist of OKIE DIRT dying a shirt in a bucket of red Oklahoma dirt. Photo courtesy of www.iloveokiedirt.com

2

3

Good Eats

The Sky is Falling

Many Okies believe that the way to a person’s heart is through their stomach. Did you know that Oklahoma has a state meal? And boy, does it sound delicious! Oklahoma designated its official state meal in 1988. It consists of fried okra, cornbread, barbeque pork, squash, biscuits, sausage and gravy, grits, corn, strawberries (also the state fruit), chicken fried steak, pecan pie and black-eyed peas. Yep, sounds like a normal Sunday meal at my late, beloved nana’s house. The state’s official meal reflects the historic and present-day agriculture and cultural backgrounds of Oklahoma’s citizens. 14

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

In 1997, Lottie Williams, reported being hit by falling space debris while walking through Tulsa’s O’Brien Park. The chance of a person being hit by falling space junk is very slim – so slim that Lottie is the only person to experience this phenomenon. The debris was confirmed by the National Weather Service and NASA as a piece of Delta 2 rocket. Thankfully, postal worker Lottie was unhurt when she was struck on the shoulder by the piece of metal. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


5 Canoodling with Catfish

Pauls Valley is the home of the world-famous Okie Noodling Tournament. Noodling is the practice of getting up close and personal with catfish by wading into muddy lakes and fishing with your bare hands. The Pauls Valley Okie Noodling Tournament attracts visitors from around the world to experience the one-of-a-kind event. Contestants attempt to wrestle the biggest catfish from the muddy depths of area rivers and lakes. The catfish are hauled to the festival to be weighed and ranked. Food vendors, noodling clinics, catfish cookoffs, live music and fun activities line the streets of the festival each year. In 2019, Nate Williams of Shawnee won the big prize with his 85.05-pound catfish.

4 Please Leave a Message

When Tulsan Gordon Matthews visited his business clients in the 1970s, he was concerned about the number of message slips he saw in the trash bins next to the receptionist desks. Soon, he developed a concept for an electronic way to store phone messages. A University of Tulsa graduate, Gordon used his engineering education and aviator and telecommunications background to design and patent the first voicemail system called “Voice Message Exchange.” He sold his first systems to 3M, American Express, Intel, Shell Canada, Kodak and others.

6 What’s in a Name?

Oklahoma is home to 590 cities and towns. Most have average names, some only slightly unusual, but many are straight up odd, even funny. Some of our favorites include: Slaughterville, Rubottom, Moon, Lotsee (the smallest town in the state with only two citizens), Slapout, Nuyaka, Frogville (because at one time it had an abundance of large frogs “big enough to eat small ducks”), Cookietown, Okay, Bowlegs, Bushyhead, Wildman, Slick, Loco, Pumpkin Center and Whizbang. The stories behind some of the town names are quite interesting if you ever have a moment to research.

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7 Tulsa Skyscrapers

The Bank of Oklahoma building in Tulsa is a half-size replica of the former World Trade Center. It was designed by Minoru Yamasia, the same architect who designed the World Trade Center. Contruction was completed in 1976, just three years after the NYC landmark. The tower is almost exactly half the scale of the lost Twin Towers and has 31 steel perimeter columns per side.

This is a short list of a few fun Okie facts – there are thousands more to discover. It is quite enjoyable researching the fascinating and unusual intricacies that make our beautiful state a unique and lovely place to live. Next time you have a free afternoon, visit the Tulsa library or take a road trip and discover the Oklahoma you might be missing.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

15


Pictured is the Chickasaw Cultural Center.

Discover

Photo courtesy of www.chickasaw.tv

Native American Cultural Sites Over the years, 67 Native American nations have called Oklahoma home. You can visit some of these Native American cultural sites to learn more about the history, traditions and contributions of the tribes that call Oklahoma home. By Emily Fox, Associate Editor

Cherokee Heritage Center

21192 S. Keeler Dr., Tahlequah (918) 456-6007 • (888) 999-6007 toll-free The Heritage Center contains numerous displays on 44 wooded acres, including the replica of a 1710 Cherokee village called Diligwa. Visitors can often witness live displays such as basketry, flint knapping and stickball. The exhibits include a moving commemoration of the Trail of Tears, where 5,000 Cherokees died on the arduous trek from their indigenous territory to new land in Indian Territory.

Chickasaw Cultural Center

867 Cooper Memorial Rd., Sulphur (580) 622-7130 Located on more than 100 acres of land, the Chickasaw Cultural Center is one of the United States’ largest and most expansive Native American cultural centers. It encourages visitors to see, hear and even taste traditional Chickasaw life. Interactive exhibits portray the tribe’s ancestors, lifestyles and include a Spirit Forest area where visitors can often watch a traditional stomp dance. No visit is complete without a stop at the Aaimpa Café where diners enjoy such Chickasaw favorites as corn soup, grape dumplings and fry bread.

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Trail of Tears exhibit at the Cherokee National Museum. Photo courtesy of www.docsteach.org

Comanche National Museum and Cultural Center

701 N.W. Ferris Ave., Lawton (580) 353-0404 The museum opened in 2007 with extensive fine art collections, compelling exhibits and interactive displays of the “Lords of the Plains.” Some of the artifacts originated with the Fort Sill Indian School and the military. An exhibit on 17 Comanche code talkers shares the story of how Native Americans helped keep American battle plans and communications a secret and defeat Hitler during WWII.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

Five Civilized Tribes Museum

1101 Honor Heights Dr., Muskogee (918) 683-1701 The museum represents the rich cultural heritage of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole nations. The museum is home to many artifacts, antiquities, fine art and more representing the tribes’ unique history in Oklahoma. It is also host to frequent art shows, lectures and workshops as it continues to explore the artistic and historical impact of the tribes on Oklahoma.

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Muscogee (Creek) Nation Council House

106 W. 6th St., Okmulgee • (918) 549-2434 After the devastation of the Civil War, the Creek Nation worked to establish itself in Oklahoma. The Nation selected Okmulgee as its capital and created a new constitution for governance over the tribe. The Council House was the seat of Creek Nation government. Fire destroyed the original building built in 1867, and the current stone structure was built in 1878. Like other Native American nations, the Creeks had to abolish their government in 1906, and the city of Okmulgee took ownership of the building until 2010. After reclaiming the Council House and much of their historic collection, a $2 million renovation project was completed in November 2018.

Osage Nation Cultural Center (Wahzhazhe Cultural Center)

220 W. Main St., Pawhuska • (918) 287-5632 The Cultural Center provides a perspective on the Osage Nation through educational programs and exhibits. The nearby Osage Nation Museum features examples of Osage artwork and hosts special events throughout the year.

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Seminole Nation Museum

524 S. Wewoka Ave., Wewoka • (405) 257-5580 Artifacts, historic photos, interpretive exhibits, events and stories that shaped the Seminole history are chronicled in a captivating, educational and enlightening experience. Educational programs incorporate story telling and traditional stomp dance to bring the Seminole culture to life.

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Sequoyah’s Cabin

470288 Highway 101, Sallisaw • (918) 775-2413 Sequoyah developed a written alphabet for the Cherokee language. The one-room cabin has been protected and preserved inside a stone memorial structure so visitors can see what it was like when Sequoyah lived there. Displays and exhibits explain the history and basics of Sequoyah’s syllabary and showcase early Cherokee life.

Shawnee Tribe Cultural Center

19 N. Eight Tribes Trail, Miami • (918) 544-6722 The museum opened in 2018 and takes visitors on a self-guided tour of the past, present and future of the Shawnee Nation. Rotating exhibits complement the permanent displays for an ever-changing look at Shawnee culture.

Standing Bear Park, Museum and Education Center

601 Standing Bear Parkway, Ponca City • (580) 762-1514 A 22-foot statue of Standing Bear pays tribute to the Ponca Chief who made a landmark speech before a U.S. District Court arguing for representation and protection of all Native Americans equal to that offered to white men. The 63-acre park contains the monument, a pond, walking trail and shaded memorial grove. The museum and educational center feature tribal displays, traveling exhibits, artwork and more.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Indulge

Top 8 Oklahoma Dining Destinations Looking to explore food destinations around our great state? We’ve picked out eight of the best dining destinations in Oklahoma (in no particular order) to tantalize your taste buds. By Lindsay Morris

Meers Store and Restaurant

26005 OK-115, Meers • (580) 429-8051 Meers is a small town near Lawton – about three hours from Tulsa. Once a bustling town of miners seeking gold in the Wichita Mountains, all that remains of the original town now is the restaurant. The Meers Store and Restaurant is famous for the Meersburger, a seven-inch diameter burger made exclusively from prize-winning Texas longhorn beef raised on the family’s ranch. The restaurant claims their beef is actually lower in cholesterol than chicken. The Meers Store and Restaurant serves a delicious selection of steaks, barbecue and home-baked bread and desserts, including homemade ice cream. While you’re there, you can pick up longhorn beef steaks and hamburger meat for sale in their store, along with barbecued brisket, spareribs, Polish sausage, chicken and thick-sliced bacon.

Rock Café

114 W. Main St., Stroud • (918) 968-3990 On your next trip to Oklahoma City, take a pit stop in Stroud and visit the Rock Café. The historic café, which was a busy local Greyhound bus stop during World War II, originally opened in 1939. In 2008, the restaurant was destroyed during a fire, but reopened in 2009 after extensive repairs by historic preservationist David Burke. Sam & Ella's Chicken Palace Photo courtesy of www.facebook.com/samandellas.com

The homestyle cooking and décor reflect the history of Route 66. One of the favorite menu items is the bison burger. All burgers are served on homemade buns. The chicken fried steak is cooked the Oklahoma way – topped with white gravy and paired with a side of mashed potatoes.

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse

1309 S. Agnew Ave., Oklahoma City • (405) 236-0416 If you’ve never been to Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, it is high time you made a stop there. You are guaranteed some of the best steak in the state in an atmosphere that is elegant, but relaxed.

Eischen's Bar

Cattlemen’s opened in 1910 and has been a popular dining destination in Oklahoma City ever since. There, you can get a high-quality steak and all your sides for about $25. A unique menu item is the lamb fries … let’s just say, it’s a part of the animal you wouldn’t normally think of eating. They are battered and fried, served with a lemon slice and cocktail sauce. Top things off with a piece of their gigantic pie and legendary coffee, and you will be as full as a well-fed cattleman.

Photo courtesy of www.tripadvisor.com

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Hammett House

1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd., Claremore • (918) 341-7333 Hammett House is a staple in Claremore that has been dishing out delicious home-cooked meals for more than 50 years. Hammett House opened in 1969 after almost 20 years of planning by founder LaNelle Hammett. In 1991, Bill and Linda Biard purchased the restaurant and reinvigorated this Claremore landmark eatery. Hammett House features homemade specialties like “mashed potato” rolls, soups and salad dressings. The homemade dressings are truly special – the locals call the spicy garlic “the pink stuff,” and the cilantro lime ranch dressing is also noteworthy. If you tell someone you were in Claremore, they will ask if you had a piece of pie from Hammett House. Their pies are sky-high and include unique flavors such as buttermilk chess, peanut butter chocolate chip and sour cream raisin.

Ike’s Chili

1503 E. 11th St., Tulsa • (918) 838-9410 Ike’s has been a part of Tulsa’s history since 1908. It’s believed to be Tulsa’s oldest restaurant still in existence. The old Ike’s was located on Admiral, but the restaurant moved to its current location in 2012. The recipes that have kept this business rolling for more than a century are not only tasty, but also affordable. With every dish on the menu under $10, you can choose from a variety of burgers (served with delicious waffle fries), chili cheese fries, Frito pie, coneys and three-way chili (served with chili, beans and spaghetti).

Frank & Lola’s

200 E. 2nd St., Bartlesville • (918) 336-5652 A favorite restaurant in Bartlesville, Frank & Lola’s is a whimsical, brickwalled bistro serving upscale American flavors. They pride themselves on serving fresh, never frozen, locally sourced beef that is carefully processed and prepared by McFerron Quality Meats in Nowata. The menu includes entrees such as a rib eye, pork loin and catfish. Their burgers are a popular choice, and you really can taste the quality in the fresh beef. Be sure to save room for the bread pudding – their signature, baked-toorder dessert served with bourbon sauce and vanilla bean ice cream.

Sam & Ella’s Chicken Palace

419 N. Muskogee Ave., Tahlequah • (918) 456-1411 Though the name presents a bit of a quandary, Sam & Ella’s is one of the best pizza places in Oklahoma. One of the most popular pizzas is the Rock Island Red, featuring red sauce, ham, sweet onions, mushrooms, pineapple and honey. Vegetarians will love The Pie Without a Face – bell peppers, red onions, black olives, mushrooms and pineapples. They also feature a selection of tasty subs and salads. Country music superstar Carrie Underwood worked at Sam & Ella’s when she went to college at nearby Northeastern State University.

Eischen’s Bar

109 S. 2nd St., Okarche • (405) 263-9939 Eischen’s is known for being the oldest bar in Oklahoma. About two hours southwest of Tulsa, just west of Oklahoma City in Okarche, Eischen’s was established in 1896. It closed during statehood and prohibition but re-opened shortly after the end of prohibition. While Eischen’s is still a bar, it is better known for its delicious whole fried chicken, fried okra and Frito pie. The exterior and interior of the building are nothing special, but once you taste their fried chicken, you’ll be glad you made the trip.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Tall Tales and Strange Things

Oklahoma Oddities Oklahoma has a variety of urban legends, spooky stories and unexplained phenomena. Mysterious lights, magnetic forces – and the daddy of all Oklahoma legends, Bigfoot – have made their way into the state’s unexplained myths and mysteries. By Karen Szabo

1 Spook Light For years, people have seen a mysterious light appear and disappear on a road in Peoria, located in far northeastern Oklahoma, near the Missouri border. Despite years of numerous sightings and investigations of the mysterious “Spook Light,” there have been no concrete explanations – although there are plenty of theories. In one, a pair of star-crossed Quapaw lovers leapt to their deaths. Another tale tells of a Civil War soldier who was struck in the head by a cannonball. One of the more popular theories is that of a local miner, who tragically lost his head in a mining accident. The Spook Light is from his lantern as he wanders the area searching for his head. Some less chilling theories credit the flickering orbs to gas and mineral deposits or refracted headlight beams, but all have been discredited upon further examination. The only thing known for certain is that the Army Corps of Engineers described the Spook Light as a “mysterious light of unknown origin” in 1946, which has remained the “official” explanation ever since.

2 CryBaby Bridges There are a surprising number of Crybaby Bridges in Oklahoma towns such as Alderson, Moore, Bixby, Kellyville, Lawton and Vinita. Each share one thing in common – a mother either murdered or accidentally killed her baby on the bridge. To this day, anyone visiting the bridge at night can reportedly hear babies crying. The legend of the bridge in Heavener begins on a dark and stormy night. On Friday, June 13, 1924, a young mother was crossing the bridge with her newborn baby in a horse and buggy when a storm approached. Lightning struck and startled the horses, causing them to buck and knock the baby out of her mother's arms. As the storm raged around her, the woman could hear her baby's cries. As she searched the bridge in the dark, she slipped and fell off the bridge, into the water below and drowned. Legend has it you can still hear the baby crying from the bridge every Friday the 13th.

3 Center of the Universe The Center of the Universe in downtown Tulsa is a small concrete circle in the middle of a larger circle of bricks. It’s not much to look at, but the Center of the Universe isn’t for looking – it’s for listening. If you stand in the middle of the concrete circle and make a noise, the sound is echoed back several times louder – but only those inside the circle can hear it. Thought to be the sound reflecting off a nearby planter, there’s no clear consensus on what causes this natural sonic distortion.

4 Magnetic Hill If you park your car at the bottom of the famous Magnetic Hill on Pioneer Road in Springer and put it in neutral, you’ll feel a force "pull" you and the car up the hill as you let off the brake. Locals think that the ghosts of car crashes past are the ones moving your car away from where they died. Other theories include a magnetic force, alien contact or an optical illusion. Located off I-35 between Ardmore and Davis, Pioneer Road is a public road, and it is advised to bring another person to watch for traffic. Do not try to be pulled up Magnetic Hill when roads are wet or during inclement weather.

5 Hex House Alleged Bigfoot tracks in Oklahoma's LeFlore County. Photo Courtesy of Native Oklahoma Bigfoot Research Organization

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

The legend of Tulsa’s Hex House involves Carol Ann Smith and two women found living in her dark and unheated basement. The two women were supposedly hypnotized – or “hexed” – into giving every dime of their paychecks to Smith. Smith had also collected life insurance policies on several people who “conveniently” died, including her father, late husband and housemaid. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


The story broke when Tulsa police searched Smith’s house while investigating a World War II ration book fraud case. They found the women living in cages with barely any food. For seven years, they had been beaten, starved and treated inhumanely while Smith lived a lavish life upstairs. Smith was sentenced to only one year in prison in 1944 and fled the state upon her release.

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I’m Amazing!

Located in the panhandle, Beaver Dunes Park is known as “Oklahoma’s Bermuda Triangle” due to the strange disappearances that have occurred there dating back to the 1500s. Men traveling with the Spanish explorer, Coronado, are said to have disappeared from the sand dunes in paranormal flashes of green lightning. Over the years, many more lives have been lost in the sand dunes without explanation. Theories range from an electromagnetic anomaly (similar to the Bermuda Triangle) to a UFO crash. Allegedly, anyone who learns anything about the phenomenon disappears.

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Although no physical evidence of an octopus exists, cryptozoologists have pointed out that species of jellyfish have been able to adapt from saltwater to freshwater conditions. This same adaptation may have been possible for a giant cephalopod trapped in an inland lake when coastal waters receded.

8 Bigfoot Bigfoot is probably Oklahoma’s most famous mystery. The legend of a creature – half man, half ape, living in the woods – may seem like a tall tale, but many believe Bigfoot is real. For decades there have been Bigfoot sightings across the state in Adair County, Grove, Talihina, Broken Bow and near the Pensacola Dam, to name a few. The most common Bigfoot sightings happen in wooded areas after the sun has set. Bigfoot field investigators recommend nutty bars and marbles to draw him in. Descriptions vary, but the most common Bigfoot attributes include a height of up to 10 feet and a weight between 400 to 1,000 pounds. They are usually black, brown or a reddish color, although researchers in Adair County claim a stark white Bigfoot exists in that area. Adair County is home to the Mid-America Bigfoot Research Center and – according to some researchers – Bigfoot itself. Each year, the center hosts a Bigfoot Symposium featuring vendors, Bigfoot-related artifacts and evidence, and speakers with tales of the famed creature. Broken Bow is another hotspot for Bigfoot sightings. Every year, thousands descend on the area hoping to catch a glimpse of the elusive creature among the tall trees. The Honobia Bigfoot Festival and Conference is a three-day gathering in the heart of Oklahoma's densely wooded Kiamichi Mountains. In addition to arts, crafts and musical performances, the conference features presentations from prominent Bigfoot field researchers, and of course plenty of opportunities to hear tales of Bigfoot from people who claim to have had firsthand encounters.

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7 Three of Oklahoma's man-made lakes – Lake Thunderbird, Lake Tenkiller and Lake Oolagah – are thought by some to hold a species of freshwater octopus that attacks and kills unsuspecting swimmers. According to legend and rumor, the creature is the size of a horse and resembles an octopus with long tentacles and reddish-brown skin.

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NORTHWEST Red Carpet Country

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1 Black Mesa State Park County Rd. 325, Kenton (580) 426-2222 Located in the panhandle of Oklahoma, Black Mesa is Oklahoma's highest point at 4,973 feet above sea level. The park boasts 1,600 acres for hiking, bird watching and some of the darkest nighttime skies on publicly accessible land in the country. The park is adjacent to Lake Carl Etling and offers online reservable RV campsites with water and electric hookups, tent campsites, picnic facilities and more.

Oklahoma Sights You Shouldn’t Miss

2 Great Salt Plains State Park 23280 S. Spillway Dr., Jet (580) 626-4731 In prehistoric times, a massive ocean covered what is now Oklahoma. The ocean is long gone, but its salt deposits remain. The park contains a salt-water lake, with water about half as salty as the ocean. Visitors enjoy hiking, fishing and swimming, but one of the biggest attractions for the park is digging for selenite crystals.

Oklahoma is a land of diversity with beautiful locales. Too many of us who call Oklahoma home have never seen some of our state’s greatest attractions. Check out these Oklahoma sights and see how many you can check off your list. *Please call first to verify hours and admission rates.

Central Frontier Country 3

Grey Snow Eagle House 335567 E740 Rd., Perkins (405) 880-0734 Guests can tour the Iowa Tribe's Eagle rehabilitation facility in Perkins. It's home to bald and golden eagles, many of which are eventually released back into the wild. Guided tours can be booked for Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

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Sam Noble Museum of Natural History 2401 Chautauqua Ave., Norman (405) 325-4712 More than 10 million specimens make up the Natural History Museum’s collections. The exhibits are contained in a variety of halls – The Hall of World Cultures, Hall of Ancient Life, Hall of Natural Wonders and Hall of People of Oklahoma. Check out the dinosaur displays. If you visit before March 15, you can catch A New Moon Rises, a special exhibit created in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institute.

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Tiger Safari Zoological Park 963 County St. 2930, Tuttle (405) 381-9453 The Tiger Safari Zoological Park is home to 170 animals including a variety of big cats, bears, lemurs, deer, kangaroos and more. The general tour includes monkey and deer feeding, and the VIP Experience includes holding selected animals. Book in advance for the experience you want.

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SOUTHWESTERN Great Plains Country 6

Bath Lake 127 E. Lake Dr., Medicine Park (580) 529-2825 With natural flowing waters from the nearby Medicine Creek, swim in the clear waters of the shallow kiddie pool. The temperature remains mild, so swimmers can avoid the initial shock of cold water when jumping in from either the island or red rocks at Bath Lake. In winter months, Bath Lake transforms from a swimming destination to a fishing hotspot, stocked full of trout.

7 Fort Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum 435 Quanah Rd., Fort Sill (580) 442-5123 Built during the Indian Wars, Fort Sill has played a prominent role in every major American conflict since 1869. Several on-base museums highlight its history. The area is also home to the General Tommy Franks Leadership Institute & Museum, a Hobart attraction that houses items from General Franks' career.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

Turner Falls Park. Photo courtesy of www.facebook.com/TurnerFallsParkOK

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NORTHEAST Green Country

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Keystone Ancient Forest 160 Ancient Forest Dr., Sand Springs (918) 246-2661 Step back in time when you enter the Keystone Ancient Forest near Sand Springs. The 1,360-acre nature preserve is home to 500-year-old cedar trees and 300-year-old post oaks, as well as deer, bobcats, eagles and 80 species of butterflies. The hiking trail is open on select Saturdays and takes about an hour to complete. Pets are not allowed except on specific days designated as “hike with your dog” days.

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Tallgrass Prairie Preserve 15316 County Rd. 4201, Pawhuska (918) 287-4803 Oklahoma and surrounding states were once a vast expanse of tallgrass prairies. The 40,000 acres in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is the largest protected area of tallgrass prairie on earth. Visitors may spot eagles, hawks, deer, coyote, bobcats, bison and more. A leisurely drive of the 50-mile drive-thru takes about two hours. Seasonal attractions include prairie chickens booming at sunrise from late March through early May, and the arrival of 600 to 700 bison calves by mid-May.

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SOUTHEAST Ranch Country

South Central Choctaw Country

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Turner Falls Park I-35 & US-77, Davis (888) 718-4253 Turner Falls Park is not only home to Oklahoma’s largest waterfall (77 feet), but also a rock castle, picnic sites, hiking trails, caves and geological formations. The park is a popular summer destination, but the wintertime offers more quiet and great photo opportunities.

Elephants at the Endangered Ark Foundation. Photo courtesy of www.facebook.com/endangeredarkfoundation

Endangered Ark Foundation 2657 E. 2070 Rd., Hugo (580) 317-8470 Endangered Ark is home to many retired circus elephants and is committed to the preservation of Asian elephants through their breeding program. Visitors who book the tours enjoy approximately an hour of elephant education and viewing, including time spent handfeeding an elephant in a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

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Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge 20539 State Hwy 115 Hwy 115 & 49 Junction, Indiahoma (580) 429-2197 A drive through the refuge can bring sightings of bison, elk, prairie dogs, wild turkeys and river otters. Hiking trails and the roadway provide great photo opportunities.

Museum of the Red River 812 East Lincoln Rd., Idabel (580) 286-3616 Located in Idabel, Oklahoma, the Museum of the Red River is the largest cultural institution in a 150-mile radius. Its mission is to preserve and celebrate the world’s artistic heritage, while emphasizing the contributions made by Native American groups. The museum is also home to the Oklahoma State dinosaur.

Museum of the Red River dinosaur skeleton. Photo courtesy of www.facebook.com/motrr.idabel

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Reminiscing

Mary Brett Remembers a Grandmother with Grit Women’s History Month celebrates the significant impact that women have collectively made over the years. One such woman was Bessie Mae (Sammons) Garrison. Her granddaughter, Montereau resident Mary Brett, recalls many stories about Bessie Mae who came to Oklahoma in a covered wagon and lived to see men walk on the moon on her color television. By Nancy A. Moore

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rowing up, Mary listened to her grandmother tell mesmerizing stories about traveling with her family to Indian Territory in a covered wagon following the Civil War. The allure of claiming free land in the Oklahoma Land Run was significant enough for her family to uproot and head to what is now known as Oklahoma with the hope of finding a better life. According to Mary, Bessie Mae was only 12 years old when she watched from “the line” as her father took off running with the hope of securing a piece of land. Unfortunately, participation in two land runs fell short. “In the Run of 1889, Bessie’s father was met by some men who had come from another direction and threatened violence. In the Run of the Cherokee Outlet in 1893, her father claimed school land, which was reserved to support schools and was not available. It was unmarked, but anyone claiming it was left with nothing,” Mary said. “My great-grandfather participated in two land runs and failed to get free land in either. This is the point when the story takes an interesting twist. Occasionally, when seriously bad luck turns into good fortune, one realizes what was previously thought to be a small tragedy is actually a blessing,” she said. What was so lucky in this predicament? Failure to secure land resulted in the family living in Indian territory on the top bank of Cottonwood Creek, an area now known as Stillwater. And while on that land, her father found work with the Cherokee Indians.

"Occasionally, when seriously bad luck turns into good fortune, one realizes what was previously thought to be a small tragedy is actually a blessing.”

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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To make ends meet, Bessie had to help her father earn the family’s income. She was only five years old when she accompanied her father to Mulhall, Oklahoma to collect items dropped off by the train. Bessie and her father would collect lumber, groceries, mail and other goods people had ordered. They earned a decent living transporting those items. Bessie would take the smaller items like groceries and mail, and her father would haul the lumber – delivering goods to surrounding areas including Mulhall, Stillwater and Guthrie. The transportation and delivery business boomed during that time, and the family was able to save some money. With the money, Bessie’s father drilled water wells for people on their land, for which he was compensated. Several years later, a drought hit the Stillwater area, and the farmers who had crops watched them wither away. Mary explains, “A catastrophic drought occurred in 1890 and left the farmers who had gotten land in the land run without food or income from the lack of crops. It was known as the ‘year of the turnip’ because that’s all they had to eat during the winter.” Since Bessie’s family was not in the farming business, they had cash and a cow that provided milk. Her family had to build a fence around their cow to deter hungry children from eating its food. Bessie’s mother would milk the cow and pass around cups of milk to ease their hunger. In recent years, Mary has spoken to children in local schools about her family’s history and the important role her grandmother had in her life. She recalls Bessie being strong in many ways, including physically and emotionally. Bessie's confidence instilled a sense of purpose and prosperity in her daughter (Mary’s mother) that was very impactful. Mary appreciates the sheer grit and strength it took for her grandmother to surrender her childhood to help the family, including her four younger siblings. It was what she had to do to survive and eventually thrive during that time. In later years, Mary was fortunate enough to record her grandmother’s voice as she told hours of stories. One such story was about Mary’s mother. Shortly after giving birth at the age of 16 to Mary’s mother, Bessie and her new baby embarked out on their own. The journey led her to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis where she quickly gained employment. Because she had a baby in tow, she found an orphanage in which Mary’s mother could stay briefly while she worked and saved money. It was also during that time that Bessie saw Will Rogers perform, an event she recalled with great enthusiasm! Recalling these stories, Mary wonders why she didn’t ask her grandparents more questions about their early lives. The answer might have been because she was busy – with her own career and raising children. She holds the recordings close as they are a sweet memory of how her past influenced her future. Bessie Mae was strong-minded and physically active throughout her life – living well into her late 80s. She is a shining example of a woman who worked hard and embraced life – the hardships and the victories – with grace and perseverance.

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A wind farm near Weatherford. Photo courtesy of Travel Aficionado/flickr

Where the Wind Comes Sweeping Down the Plain By Julie Wenger Watson

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f you’ve spent any time in our great state, you know those Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II lyrics weren’t an exaggeration. The wind truly does come “sweeping down the plain.” Fortunately for Oklahomans, those persistent gales are also an excellent source of clean, affordable and renewable energy. Harnessing the power of wind isn’t a new idea. Mariners have used it to fill their sails and propel their ships for thousands of years, and generations of farmers have relied on windmills to provide the energy needed to grind grain and pump water. Modern technology and a need for alternative sources of energy have pushed wind power to the forefront in today’s world. Here in Oklahoma, wind power provides 22% of the energy mix AEPPSO (Public Service Company of Oklahoma) uses to provide electricity to its customer base.

Advantages of Wind Power As with any energy source, there are some challenges that come along with utilizing wind as a power resource. Wind turbines are large. They can be as tall as a 20-story building with

three 200-foot-long blades. Wind farms can have tens and sometimes hundreds of turbines lined up together. Although wind power plants have little impact on the environment when compared to conventional power plants, a field of wind turbines isn’t a particularly pleasing view, and concerns exist over the noise the blades produce. Although the problem has been mitigated through changes in technology, turbine blades can also damage local wildlife, killing birds that fly through the blades. On the positive side, wind power, especially in a state like Oklahoma, is cost effective. It’s sold at fixed price over a long period of time, which helps with cost stability. “One of the terrific things about Oklahoma wind energy is that the price now is very good,” said Stan Whiteford, region communications manager for AEP-PSO. “It’s very competitive.” Whiteford notes that the majority of PSO’s wind energy contracts are for a 20-year term.

“With wind energy, you enter into a contract to pay a certain amount, and it stays that amount,” he explained. “There is no additional cost for wind. There is no fuel cost associated with wind energy. You’re not having to burn natural gas or coal to generate it. You just let the wind blow. You’re really not having to pay for the fuel portion of the generation. You’re just paying for the infrastructure, basically. It really tends to lend itself to add long-term stability to our prices.” The wind industry also creates jobs – “wind turbine technician” is one of the fastest-growing American jobs of the last decade – and it’s a renewable, domestic source of energy. “When you survey Oklahomans, they like wind energy,” Whiteford said. “They love the notion of its being renewable, of being low cost, and it’s ‘home grown.’ You don’t have to bring the fuel in.” In addition, wind is considered to be a clean fuel source that doesn’t pollute the air like power plants that utilize fossil fuels (such as coal), and wind turbines don’t produce damaging atmospheric emissions.

A wind turbine blade on display at the Oklahoma Windy Energy Center. Photo courtesy of www.tritpadvisor.org

For more information, visit www.psooklahoma.com. 26

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Wind Power in Oklahoma PSO is an electric utility company based in Tulsa that serves more than 554,000 customers in eastern and southwestern Oklahoma. The company has resources to generate close to 3,800 megawatts of energy from coal and natural gas-fired facilities. According to Whiteford, PSO began acquiring wind power in 2005, contracting with a wind farm in Weatherford. That contract still provides wind energy to PSO customers, and the overall supply has continued to grow, with PSO customers now getting close to 25% of their energy from wind. Although PSO doesn’t currently own wind energy power plants, they have about 1,137 megawatts of wind energy provided through contracts with Oklahoma wind farms, the majority of which are located in the western part of the state. There are plans to grow those numbers even more. “We have a proposal before the Corporation Commission right now for an additional 675 megawatts of wind energy, and we propose to actually own that,” Whiteford said. “If it’s approved, that would be the first time we would own a wind energy facility in Oklahoma.” PSO believes this proposal would increase wind capacity while lowering customer bills and boosting Oklahoma’s rural economy. Oklahoma also ranks favorably when compared to other states in energy costs. “Compared to the nation, our prices are about 25% less,” Whiteford said. “If you look at the four-state region – Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas – we compare very favorably there, too. Oklahoma is a very low-cost state for electricity overall.”

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The state is also a leader in wind energy production, although it trails behind neighboring Texas, which has plenty of wind sweeping down its plains, too.

A Balanced Energy Mix “We’re working toward a future in which we’re really trying to balance natural gas and renewable resources,” Whiteford said. “We own multiple power plants across the state. Almost all of them are fired by natural gas, except for one, which is coal fired.” In accordance with an agreement between PSO, the state, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Sierra Club, PSO plans to phase out all coal generation by 2026.

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“When I say renewables, we’ll be adding solar energy into the mix in the future, as well,” Whiteford noted. The company hopes to add 300 megawatts of solar power by 2025. “All in all, our renewable future, between wind and solar, is very bright in Oklahoma,” he said.

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Through PSO’s long-term wind contracts, customers automatically receive a portion of their energy through wind. PSO customers interested in receiving more, or all, of their electricity through wind energy can opt into the WindChoice program.

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“Along with all of the wind energy that we just put on the grid for our customers, they also have the option to make a personal choice to have more of their energy come from a green resource: wind,” Whiteford explains.

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The voluntary program is available to both residential and business customers. A cost of about half a cent per kilowatt hour (kWh) is added to the bills of participating customers. For example, for a home that uses 1,200 kWh of electricity per month and is enrolled in 50% WindChoice, the monthly additional cost would be $1.62. Whiteford is excited about the future of renewable energy in this state. “For all of those years, many of us cursed the wind. We now have a completely different outlook,” he laughed. “It’s providing plentiful and reliable wind energy at a low cost to Oklahoma.” www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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These particular questions stem from the list of questions submitted to Congress by the Census Bureau in 2018. Each query provides the government, businesses, communities and nonprofits with key statistics for decision-making. It’s important to note that there is not a question about citizenship status. WHY IS THE CENSUS IMPORTANT? The questions provide information to help pinpoint areas that may need additional community-based services. Information about age demographics shapes decisions about programming for children or seniors in specific areas, and can also be used by businesses when deciding where to open new stores.

Dollars & Sense

Making Sense of the Census 2020 is the year of the Census! It’s that once in a decade time for everyone living in the United States to be counted, regardless of their citizenship status. By Kelsey Holder As mandated by the U.S. Constitution, the United States government must count the country’s population every 10 years. For the last 60 years, the U.S. Census Bureau has diligently tallied up the numbers from the national processing center in Jeffersonville, Indiana. The head count serves as more than just a roll call. Responding is required by law, so it’s important to understand how it works and why it matters. WHO ANSWERS? Every person living in the United States is required by law to answer the Census survey. The 2020 Census will be the 24th time since 1790 that the United States has taken a count of every person living in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the five U.S. territories: Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Part of that includes a list of every residence, which means more than houses, apartments and condos. Consider the other special living situations the Census Bureau must include: senior living communities, dormitories and correctional

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facilities, even people experiencing homelessness on Census Day. Additionally, special instructions are included for babies born, individuals who die, people who move and displaced persons on the April 1 Census Day. When answering the survey, be sure to count each person who lives or primarily sleeps at your home on April 1, 2020. This includes any parent or older relative you may be caring for in your home, as well as any children, nieces and nephews, grandchildren or foster children. Even if the person or child is not living with you permanently, if they are with you on April 1st and not just visiting, they should be included in your survey response. WHAT’S ASKED? The survey asks a series of simple questions: • Number of people in your home • Whether you rent or own the home • Sex of each person in the home • Age of each person in your home • Race of each person in your home • Relationship of each person in your home

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

Understanding the racial and ethnic composition of an area helps the federal government enforce laws prohibiting racial discrimination, like the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act. Creating a picture of family composition enables decisions to fund programs supporting families. Overall, the numbers obtained determine where to allocate services and support, including federal dollars to resources like schools, emergency services and roads. In addition to community resources, the Census helps lawmakers determine where to allocate disaster relief funds. The Census also serves a purpose fundamental to the Constitutional mandate regarding adjustments to the dividing lines of electoral districts based on population. The numbers determine how many seats each state will have in the House of Representatives and the dividing lines for congressional and state legislative districts. TAKING THE CENSUS During the week of March 12 – 20, households will receive official Census Bureau mail with instructions for responding to the Census online, by phone or by mail. April 1 is the official Census Day, and all answers should be based on people living in your home on that day. Ideally, individuals should respond to the Census before May 1. Regardless of when or how you answer the Census questions, your response will no doubt impact decisions made about your city and community for years to come. The short list of questions gives everyone a chance to shape communities by providing simple answers to questions with big impact.

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY

In Oklahoma, each person counted in the census is worth an estimated $1,675 in federal dollars each year, which amounts to $16,750 per person counted over the next 10 years. At a time when the number of seniors is growing faster than ever, it is important for older adults to stand up and be counted. An accurate count ensures that the programs seniors rely upon are fairly funded.

LIFE Senior Services is here to help! We all have a role to play in ensuring that Census 2020 engages not just some individuals, but everyone. If you would like to respond to the Census online but do not have access to the internet or a computer or digital device, call LIFE's SeniorLine at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1184, and we will make sure that you are counted. LIFE staff will help you answer the census questions and will submit information on your behalf to the Census Bureau online.

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Timeline for the 2020 Census:

Census Mailing - March 12 – 20: Households will receive an official invitation in the mail from the U.S. Census Bureau with detailed information about how to respond to the 2020 Census online, by phone or by mail. It is important to know that the Census Bureau will not send unsolicited emails to request your participation in the 2020 Census. Census Day - April 1: Census Day is observed nationwide. By this date, every home will have received a 2020 Census invitation. All Oklahomans can respond by calling a toll-free phone number, by completing a traditional paper questionnaire or for the first time, online. When you respond to the census, you’ll tell the Census Bureau where you and those in your household live as of April 1, 2020.

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Non-response follow-up - May – July 31: Beginning in May, census workers will begin visiting homes that have not responded to the 2020 Census. If you receive a knock on your door, you can verify a worker’s identity by asking to see a valid ID badge, with their photograph, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date. The Census Bureau will never ask for: • Your Social Security number • Money or donations • Anything on behalf of a political party • Your bank or credit card account numbers If you suspect fraud, call (800) 923-8282 to speak with a local Census Bureau representative.

If you have questions about the 2020 census or would like assistance completing it online, call LIFE's SeniorLine at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1184. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

Word search: Discover Oklahoma Find and circle all of the words.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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PUZZLE PARTNERS

Mumbo Jumbo A mumbo jumbo is a list of words/hints for you to unscramble. You then take designated letters from each word/hint to come up with the final word that is associated with each hint you have unscrambled. Unscramble each of the clue words. Take the letters that appear boxes and unscramble them for the final word. in Answers on page 39. PUZZLE THEME: Trees

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BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 39.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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The Dinner Belle

El Rancho Grande A Route 66 Staple By Lindsay Morris Situated in the same spot it has been since the 1950s, El Rancho Grande is one of the nation’s longest-lasting Mexican restaurants. While Mexican restaurants in Tulsa are now as common as QuikTrips, El Rancho Grande is one that has endured the test of time. Its iconic neon sign of a Mexican cowboy and lasso is about as authentically Route 66 as it gets. This legendary restaurant offered many folks who traveled down Route 66 in the ’50s and ’60s their first taste of Tex-Mex. The restaurant has even been recognized for its historical contribution to great Mexican food in America. The restaurant’s Night Hawk Special (two cheese and onion enchiladas covered with chili con carne and cheddar and one soft cheddar cheese taco topped with chili con queso) has been named one of the five greatest Mexican meals in the U.S. by the book “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.” The original El Rancho Grande opened in 1950 on Boulder between 6th and 7th streets. It moved to its current location in 1953. In 1984, the original owners decided to close it. The Walden family who owned the building, however, saw an opportunity to keep a Tulsa original alive. The family worked side-by-side with the restaurant staff to learn the recipes and create the right ambiance. After experiencing El Rancho Grande for the first time about a decade ago, I have become a 32

the El Rancho chimichanga – a flour tortilla filled with cheese and shredded chicken or beef, quick fried, covered with queso and served with guacamole and sour cream. He loved it and kept commenting on how tasty the guacamole was. I tried the Vaquero Special – one cheese and onion enchilada, one beef tamale with chili con carne and one toasted beef taco with lettuce, tomato and cheddar. The biggest surprise on the plate was the taco, of all things. It was definitely one of the best tacos I’ve had. And it was so much food that it also served as lunch the next day. While we didn’t order drinks on this occasion, we have tried their margaritas in the past and have really enjoyed them. They are available both frozen and on the rocks. 1629 E. 11th St. • Tulsa (918) 584-0816 www.elranchograndemexicanfood.com Monday – Saturday • 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.

regular customer. Every time my husband and I visit, we enjoy the spicy salsa, chips, and of course, an order of chili con queso. Their salsa is spicy, but combining it with the queso tones it down a bit. One thing I appreciate about El Rancho Grande’s menu is the variety. There are so many choices, and everything is very reasonably priced. On our most recent visit, my husband tried

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

El Rancho Grande opened an upstairs cantina in 2017, complete with a bar, outdoor patio and private meeting room. The upstairs "Tacos and Tequila" bar boasts its own Mexican street food menu, including street tacos and enchiladas, Mexican shrimp cocktail, chicharrones and a special weekly torta (Mexican sandwich). The bar has a collection of 50 tequilas and mezcals. This is a fantastic restaurant and a one-of-a-kind Route 66 tradition that has been a part of Tulsa’s history for 70 years.

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ENJOY ENGAGING ACTIVITIES Gardening • Line Dancing Pickleball • Music Functional Movement • Tai Chi Creative Writing • Yoga Visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org to learn more about LIFE’s Senior Centers and download an activity calendar. LIFE’s SeniorLine (918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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Enjoy LIFE LIFE’S ADULT DAY HEALTH Friendships flourish in LIFE’s warm, accepting environment where the focus is on wellness. Whether it’s playing bingo, card games, gardening or daily exercise, your loved one will thrive through social connections. Come discover LIFE’s Adult Day Health – a welcome alternative to traditional long-term care.

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Healthcare That Puts You First Older Americans are increasingly choosing to “age in place,” staying in their own homes and avoiding the move to a nursing home or other care facility. By Samantha Blue, Senior Director of LIFE PACE and LIFE's Adult Day Health AARP reports that nearly 90% of adults age 50 and over want to stay in their own home as long as possible. By 2021, the U.S. is projected to have over 55 million seniors (age 65 and over), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. By 2040, that number is expected to jump to almost 80 million. Today, most of the care provided to older adults comes from family members or friends. An estimated 34 million family caregivers help their loved ones continue living at home. Care can include providing assistance with activities of daily living, like bathing, dressing, eating and help with medications. Because most of the care is provided in the recipient’s home, caregivers often assist with tasks around the house as well, such as housekeeping, laundry or heavier chores, like mowing the yard or moving furniture. Family caregivers often struggle to find the balance between work, home and caregiving.

Adding to the struggle is the possibility of their loved one having dementia or Alzheimer’s and requiring constant supervision. It can feel overwhelming and puts the caregiver at risk for developing health issues of their own including caregiver burnout and fatigue. Fortunately, there are alternatives to nursing homes and assisted living facilities that support caregivers while enabling their loved one to continue living at home. LIFE PACE – A Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly – is an alternative to nursing home care. LIFE PACE is the kind of personalized medicine doctors were able to offer in the past, with all of the convenience and support available today. This makes it unique from every other long-term care option. LIFE PACE participants are cared for in their homes and at the LIFE PACE Center by a primary care physician and a team of medical

experts. Since the patient load is smaller, the LIFE PACE doctor is able to invest the time it takes to get to know each individual and their overall health data and health needs. The most effective treatment unfolds in this context of preventative wellness, rather than a narrow consideration of symptoms alone. Services in individual care plans may include: specialty care, transportation to medical appointments, medication coverage, physical, occupational, and speech therapies, social work, in-home support and dietary counseling. Adult day health provides socialization, nutritious meals, activities and respite for caregivers. LIFE PACE serves those who are 55 or older, live in the eligible service area, meet a certain level of care as determined by a registered nurse and are able to live safely in their home with PACE services.

For more information, call LIFE PACE and speak to an intake specialist at (918) 664-9000 ext. 1123 or visit www.LIFEPACE.org. 34

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Hiking, A Hands-On Experience: Fun Hiking Adventures with Grandkids What better way to spend quality time with your grandkids and get in touch with nature than a fresh, invigorating walk in the woods, along a river or a scenic trail? What’s more, family hikes make for fun learning opportunities for grandkids and grandparents alike. So try some of these hiking activities with your youngsters. By Kimberly Blaker

A stone is a stone is a … mineral? Venture out to learn about rocks and minerals. The banks of rivers, creeks and streams offer a variety of stones. Before you go, learn which rocks and minerals are abundant in the area, and choose several to scout for. Take along a small plastic container with dividers, a descriptive rock and mineral guide and a magnifying glass for viewing the colors, layers and details. As you identify stones and minerals, discuss their uses and other neat facts. Sounds of nature Wander through the woods and listen carefully for a variety of bird and animal sounds. Before you go, visit your library for a DVD or audio CD of bird and wild animal calls. Then download an audio recorder on your phone and carry it on your hike to record some of the sounds. Listen to the recording again at home and try to determine the source of the sounds. Photo adventure Capture nature's splendor. Hiking trails provide plenty of photo opportunities, and kids will love snapping the shots. Discuss in advance what each person wants to photograph, such as a huge oak tree, a monarch butterfly, deer tracks or a close-up of a nibbling squirrel. Create a nature scrapbook with the photos that you take to preserve your adventure. Or for a fun twist, bring an instant camera to print photos on the spot.

creatures in the woods is remarkable. Carry an insect book, clear container, tweezers and a magnifying glass for close examination of insects' fascinating features. Bring a journal and track the types of insects you find. Read about insects' defense behaviors and characteristics such as colors that indicate danger to predators.

Scouting for insects is an all-time favorite among kids, and the variety of creepy-crawly creatures in the woods is remarkable. determine direction. Before setting out, choose a trail system that provides maps or make up your own. Take a trail that branches off several times, allowing for plenty of skill-building opportunities. For even more fun, turn the excursion into a treasure hunt. Hide a small prize just off the trail under a bush or pile of leaves, mark the location on your map and let the journey begin.

Animals all around Take a hike in a wooded area with grassy clearings, and see how many animals you meet. Watch for snakes, turtles and geese if there's a Tree tales nearby lake or stream. Also, look for squirrels These giants of nature are not only intriguing playing chase or armadillos rooting for food, birds because of their size but also because of their of prey circling overhead or grazing rabbits and many variations. Borrow some books on trees from your library that describe the unique features deer. Discuss the characteristics of each one and how those qualities help or hinder them. Talk of trees and their history. Use clues such as the about what they eat, their shelters and species they shape of the leaves, texture of bark and size of the are related to. Also, keep eyes peeled for animal trunk to identify the kind of tree. tracks to identify. Which way do we go? Creepy crawly things As you navigate through the trails, teach your Scouting for insects is an all-time favorite grandchildren directional skills such as how among kids, and the variety of creepy-crawly to read a map and use a compass or the sun to

Plant life, old and new Discover the fantastic diversity of plant life. Review some books on plants to spark your grandchildren's interest. On each hiking trip, choose a different trail or area and see what plants grow in certain types of soil, climates and in each season. As you inspect plants, look for their seeds and notice the variations. Discuss how seeds travel by blowing in the wind or catching on the fur of animals. Brush away the ground cover and look for seeds that have sprouted their roots that will develop into a new plant or tree. Learn how individual plants have evolved to have natural defenses to protect against creatures that would otherwise devour them. Before you go For your comfort and convenience, carry a small daypack, extra clothing for cold air along trails and don't forget hiking boots. For your protection, bring along hats, sunglasses, sunblock and insect repellant. Prepare for emergencies by carrying a small flashlight and batteries, watch, map and bandages. Don't forget plenty of water and snacks. Trekkin' tips for tykes When hiking with children, keep these suggestions in mind. • Allow small legs plenty of time for breaks, and know your grandchild's limitations. • Be familiar with potential dangers in the area you’ll explore, and teach your grandchildren trail and animal safety. • Before you embark, inform your grandkids that there may be rules against bringing nature finds home.

Visit www.travelok.com for a list of state parks, hiking trails and scenic areas in Oklahoma’s nature and outdoors. You’ll also find free travel brochures, educational guides, trip planners and many other helpful resources.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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Noteworthy Events to Inspire, Educate and Motivate!

Walter Echo-Hawk to be Inducted in Circle of Honor Musical Mondays, LIFE Senior Services’ four-part concert series, is returning after a one-year hiatus with a star-studded lineup. First up on Monday, April 27, is one of Tulsa’s best known vocalists, Janet Rutland. She will be performing her acclaimed Gershwin show which was originally presented at the Performing Arts Center’s Summer Stage Festival. Rutland focuses on music from the Great American Songbook, both theater style and jazz with a little country thrown in too. She has performed at the Jazz Hall of Fame, Enid’s Symphony Summer Wine series and in concert halls throughout Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and Missouri. She has also appeared with the American Theater Company where her most widely acclaimed role was playing Patsy Cline in the stage musical “Always…Patsy Cline.” Rutland will be accompanied by an accomplished trio with Scott McQuade on piano, Jared Johnson on drums and Nathan Eicher on bass. Other concerts in the series are: • Monday, May 18 – Talk of Tulsa Show Chorus, a high energy, a cappella harmony performance • Monday, June 22 – Richard Miller, Brazilian guitarist • Monday, July 27 – Ryan and Ryan, Tulsa’s beloved father-son piano duo, Don and Baron Ryan Performances are at 7 p.m. in the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center, 2520 S. Yorktown, just south of Utica Square. Tickets are $12 per concert and a subscription for all four concerts is just $40. Groups of 15 or more can purchase tickets for only $8 each.

Tickets Are on Sale! Tickets can be purchased online at www.LIFEseniorservices/MusicalMondays, at LIFE’s central location, 5950 E. 31st St., or by phone at (918) 664-9000, ext.1122.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

Tulsa City-County Library’s American Indian Resource Center will induct Walter Echo-Hawk in the Circle of Honor during a special presentation at 10:30 a.m., on Saturday, March 7, 2020 at Zarrow Regional Library, 2224 W. 51st St. The Circle of Honor award presentation begins a month-long celebration honoring the achievements and accomplishments of Native Americans. Programs will be held throughout TCCL locations during March.

Echo-Hawk has represented various Oklahoma tribes; served as a Justice on the Supreme Courts of the Pawnee Nation and Kickapoo Nation and taught Federal Indian Law at the University of Tulsa, Lewis & Clark and University of Hawaii law schools. He also serves as Board Chair, of the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries and Museums and is on the “Knowledge Givers” advisory board for Oklahoma’s American Indian Cultural Center and Museum.

Celebrate the history, culture, arts and achievements of American Indians The Circle of Honor ceremony through a series of enlightening recognizes an American Indian for his programs at your local libraries. For or her achievements by acknowledging more information about these special the inductee’s contributions that have programs and the Circle of Honor enriched others’ lives and by celebrating ceremony, call the AskUs Hotline, at the inductee’s action in the face of adversity, commitment to the preservation (918) 549-7323 or visit the library’s of American Indian culture and legacy for website, www.tulsalibrary.org. future generations.

Assistive Technology for Dementia The Alzheimer’s Association, Morton Comprehensive Health and Oklahoma ABLE will host a Practical Caregiving for Dementia with Assistive Technology class from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. on Wednesday, March 11, 2020 at Tulsa Tech’s Career Service Center at the Memorial Campus, 3420 S. Memorial Dr. The Alzheimer’s Association will demonstrate effective ways to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia as well as strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of

the disease. Oklahoma ABLE Tech will demonstrate assistive technology in a lab exploration activity for those living with dementia or caring for a loved one with dementia. Morton Comprehensive Health Clinic will present practical dementia caregiving techniques and tips. Following the presentations, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a dementia simulation class and assistive technology lab. To register for this event, call (918) 828-5000 or go to enroll.tulsatech.edu.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Share YOUR TIME & TALENT To submit a volunteer opportunity, contact Associate Editor Emily Fox at efox@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1207.

LIFE Senior Services Tax Assistance Program offers free tax help for low to moderate income seniors age 60 and over and answers questions about pensions and retirement-related issues unique to seniors. During tax season (February through April), there are a variety of volunteer roles, including scheduling appointments, greeting individuals as they arrive for their appointments and providing tax preparation assistance as an IRS-certified volunteer tax preparer. All volunteers receive training. For more information, contact Channing at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1168. LIFE Senior Services is looking for individuals to serve as party planners, decorators and hosts three or four times a month. The volunteers will be helping in the Adult Day Health programs to plan party activities, decorate for parties and holidays and serve as a host during the parties. The opportunities occur on weekdays between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Orientation and training are provided. For more information, contact Jennifer Thompson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1225. LIFE Senior Services is seeking a volunteer crochet instructor for beginner and advanced classes at our Adult Day Health Center in north Tulsa. We would like to offer both classes twice a month. For more information, contact Jennifer Thompson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1225. Sapulpa Historical Society Museum needs volunteers interested in sharing Sapulpa’s history with visitors to the museum located on East Lee Avenue. For more information, call (918) 224-4871 or email sapulpahistsoc@tulsacoxmail.com. The Pencil Box has a variety of volunteer opportunities available. They are located in Tulsa at 2002 E. 6th St. and their mission is to maximize the academic potential of disadvantaged students and equalize the learning experience by offering school supplies, educational tools and incentive items for successful learning. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org. Additional days/times may be available. Current openings include: • Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 6 p.m. – check teachers in and out. • Tuesdays and Wednesdays – scan bar codes and load supplies into bags and boxes. • Mondays and Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. – process supplies and inventory, and prepare store for shoppers. Reading Partners at Tulsa Public Schools needs volunteers to commit to a minimum of one hour a week on a recurring schedule. Most reading centers are open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. There are also some after-school and Friday programs available. All school volunteers must pass a background check. If you have a specific school where you would like to help, RSVP can make the referral. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org.

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At the end of the day, it's not about what you have or even what you've accomplished. It's about who you've lifted up. Who you've made better. – Denzel Washington

Meals on Wheels needs volunteer drivers to deliver meals to older and homebound clients. Most routes take about an hour to complete and help ensure that a neighbor in need isn’t left hungry or alone. Meals on Wheels has multiple Tulsa locations where volunteers meet site coordinators to pack and deliver meals. Most volunteers serve one morning a week for one or two hours. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org. Modus is looking for compassionate volunteers to drive youth passengers to and from medical and social service appointments. Rides take place Monday through Friday, between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. There is no minimum time commitment and volunteers choose what rides to give based on availability. By volunteering for two or three rides a week, volunteers can make a lasting impact on our community’s future generation. Learn more at www.modustulsa.org. To request an application or more information, contact Caitlin at (918) 280-9563 or drive@modustulsa.org. Tulsa Air and Space Museum is looking for volunteers to fill several positions. Docents are needed to conduct museum tours and volunteers are needed whenever they can drop by for an hour or two during open hours to help keep the museum looking its best. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org. The LaFortune Community Center seeks volunteer instructors to expand their community programing during the day, especially on Fridays. They would like to offer a creative writing or memoir class but are open to other ideas from volunteer class instructors. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org. Emergency Infant Services needs help at their new location at 1110 S. Denver Ave. They serve families in emergency or crisis situations who have infants or children through age five. Volunteers receive free drinks, snacks and parking. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org. OSU Medical Center needs front lobby help, especially in the mornings. The remodeled lobby is a great place to volunteer with a friend. Volunteers provide visitor directions while seated at an information desk, but may walk someone to their destination. Lobby hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and volunteers typically work one four-hour shift per week. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org. Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges needs help at the reception desk for an hour or two on Mondays and Wednesdays starting at noon. This is a seated, desk job answering phones, greeting guests and having them sign in. The Center is located at 815 S. Utica Ave. For more information, contact Annette at (918) 280-8656 or annette@rsvptulsa.org.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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CALENDAR Festivals Events Go Red Day at the Capitol

Help raise awareness of heart disease March 3 • 9 a.m. • Free Oklahoma State Capitol Building 2300 N. Lincoln • Oklahoma City NatureWorks Art Show & Sale

March 7 & 8 Saturday • 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday • 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. • $5 Tulsa Renaissance Hotel & Convention Ctr. 6808 S. 107th E. Ave. • Tulsa (918) 749-7378 Chamber Music Tulsa Presents: McGill/McHale Trio

March 8 • 3 p.m. • $35 at door Tulsa Performing Arts Center 101 E. 2nd St. • Tulsa (918) 587-3802 Greater Tulsa Home & Garden Show

March 12 – 15 • Times vary $10/$9 seniors Tulsa Expo Square 4145 E. 21st St. • Tulsa (918) 663-5820 Tulsa Botanic Blooms

120,000 blossoms usher in spring March 12 – April 26 • $8 Tuesday – Sunday • 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tulsa Botanic Garden 3900 Tulsa Botanic Dr. • Tulsa (918) 289-0330 Second Saturday Silents: “The Great K & A Train Robbery” (1924)

March 14 • 11 a.m. • Free Circle Cinema • 10 S. Lewis Ave. • Tulsa (918) 592-3456 • www.circlecinema.com Winter Farmers Market

March 14 & 28 • 8:30 a.m. – Noon • Free Kendall Whittier Neighborhood Lewis Ave. & Admiral Blvd. • Tulsa (918) 636-8419 Tulsa IrishFest

March 13 & 14 Friday • 4 – 8 p.m. Saturday • Noon – 8 p.m. • Free Guthrie Green 111 E. Brady St. • Tulsa (918) 596-2006

To submit a calendar item, contact Associate Editor Emily Fox at efox@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1207. Shamrock the Rose

Entertainment, beer, vendors & food trucks March 14 • 5 – 10 p.m. • Free Rose District • 400 S. Main St. • Broken Arrow (918) 451-4211 Spring Break at Will Rogers Memorial Museum and Birthplace Ranch

March 16 – 20 • 1 – 3 p.m. • Free Monday, Wednesday & Friday 1720 W. Will Rogers • Claremore Tuesday & Thursday - Ranch 9501 E. 380 Rd. • Oologah (918) 341-0719 • www.willrogers.com Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry & C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art

Through July 26 • $8/$6 seniors Tuesday – Sunday • 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Gilcrease Museum 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Rd. • Tulsa (918) 596-2700

Classes, Meetings Seminars Reception & Art Workshop with Chiyoko Myose

March 3 • 5 – 7:30 p.m. • Free McKeon Center for Creativity 910 S. Boston Ave. • Tulsa (918) 595-7339 • RSVP required Understanding Alzheimer’s & Dementia

Presented by Alzheimer’s Association March 5 • 6 – 7 p.m. • Free Tulsa Tech Health Sciences Center, Rm. 3223 3420 S. Memorial Dr. • Tulsa (918) 828-5000 http://enroll.tulsatech.edu Tulsa County Tax Assessor’s Office Presents: Property Taxes

How property is valued, filing exemptions & protesting a valuation March 6 • 11 a.m. • Free LIFE Senior Center at Southminster 3500 S. Peoria Ave. • Tulsa (918) 749-2623 March 24 • 11 a.m. • Free LIFE Senior Center at East Side 1427 S. Indianapolis Ave. • Tulsa (918) 744-6760 Defensive Driving Class

AAA monthly class for drivers of all ages March 7 • 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. • $50 Tulsa Police Department, 10122 E. 11th St. • Tulsa (877) 457-0711

I Can’t Start Seeds with Tulsa Botanic Garden

March 9 • Noon – 12:45 p.m. • Free McKeon Center for Creativity 910 S. Boston Ave. • Tulsa (918) 595-7339 Living with Dementia: Monthly Art Experience

Orbit Initiative

Acting & improv classes for members of LIFE Senior Centers ($40 annual membership fee) Wednesdays • 2 p.m. • Free LIFE’s Senior Center at East Side 1427 S. Indianapolis Ave. • Tulsa (918) 744-6760 Vintage Voices Singing Group

For individuals with early stage Alzheimer’s & their caregivers March 10 • 10 a.m. – Noon • Free Philbrook Museum Villa 2727 S. Rockford Rd. • Tulsa (918) 748-5325 • RSVP required

For members of LIFE’s Senior Centers ($40 annual membership fee) Thursdays • 10 a.m. • Free for members LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster 3500 S. Peoria Ave. • Tulsa (918) 749-2623

Let’s Talk About It Oklahoma: Get Your Reading Kicks on Route 66

Diabetes Empowerment & Education Program (DEEP)

Kurt Lively on “Mother Road” by Dorothy Garlock March 12 • 6:30 p.m. • Free The Museum Broken Arrow 400 S. Main St. • Broken Arrow (918) 258-2616

Free six-week class for seniors with diabetes Contact Ability Resources for locations and times of a class near you (918) 592-1235

Support Groups

Understanding Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Sponsored by the Alzheimer's Association 24/7 Helpline • (800) 272-3900 Free respite with 24-hour notice LIFE’s Adult Day Health at Central March 5 • 5 – 6 p.m. • Free 5950 E. 31st St. • Tulsa Call (918) 664-9000, ext. 1171 for respite LIFE’s Adult Day Health at Broken Arrow March 13 • 10 – 11 a.m. • Free 3106 S. Juniper Ave. • Broken Arrow Call (918) 664-9000, ext. 1510 for respite LIFE’s Adult Day Health at North March 17 • 4 – 5 p.m. • Free 902 E. Pine St. • Tulsa Call (918) 664-9000, ext. 1323 for respite

March 17 • 2 – 3 p.m. • Free Bartlesville Public Library 600 S. Johnstone Ave. • Bartlesville (800) 272-3900 I Can’t Get Published with Tulsa Artist Fellowship

Submitting poems, stories and essays to literary journals March 23 • Noon – 12:45 p.m. • Free McKeon Center for Creativity 910 S. Boston Ave. • Tulsa (918) 595-7339 Monthly Meeting & Program

Presented by Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Indian Nation Camp March 26 • 6:30 p.m. • Free Herman and Kate Kaiser Library 5202 S. Hudson Ave. • Tulsa (918) 663-1228 I Can’t Enjoy Opera with Tulsa Opera

March 30 • Noon – 12:45 p.m. • Free McKeon Center for Creativity 910 S. Boston Ave. • Tulsa (918) 595-7339 LOUD for LIFE

Parkinson’s voice maintenance class Tuesdays • Noon – 1 p.m. • Free Swallowing & Neurological Rehabilitation, Inc. 2121 S. Columbia Ave. • Tulsa (918) 928-4700 • www.tulsasnr.com

Hillcrest’s FREE Program for Adults 60+

LIFE’s Caregiver Support Groups

Alzheimer’s Support Group

March 2 • 5:30 p.m. • Free Boston Avenue United Methodist Church 1301 S. Boston Ave. • Tulsa (918) 583-5181 Tulsa Hearing Helpers Support Group

For people who have lost hearing later in life; program on disaster & weather preparedness March 12 • 10 – 11:30 a.m. • Free TSHA • 8740 E. 11th St. • Tulsa (918) 832-8742 • www.tsha.cc Coffee & Conversation

Bring your loved one for a special planned activity March 17 • 10 a.m. • Free Oxford Glen Memory Care Residence 11113 E. 103rd St. N • Owasso (918) 376-4810 • RSVP

Join Today! Call 918-579-6060 (ext. 2) or visit SilverElite.org.

Members Enjoy: Educational Seminars • In-Hospital Benefits Participating Hospitals: Hillcrest Medical Center, Hillcrest South, Hillcrest Claremore; Hillcrest Cushing, Hillcrest Henryetta, Hillcrest Pryor & Bailey Medical Center

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Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) Support Group

March 17 • 6 – 7 p.m. • Free Swallowing & Neurological Rehabilitation, Inc. 2121 S. Columbia Ave. • Tulsa (918) 928-4700 • www.tulsasnr.com Caregiving Coffee & Conversation

Sponsored by Morton Comprehensive Health Services March 18 • 1 p.m. • Free The Center • 815 S. Utica Ave. • Tulsa (918) 295-6154 OK Parkinson’s Disease Support Group

March 20 • 1 p.m. • Free Prairie House Assisted Living and Memory Care 2450 N. Stone Ridge Dr. • Broken Arrow (918) 747-3747 OK Parkinson’s Disease Support Group

March 25 • 2 p.m. • Free Central Tech in Sapulpa 1720 S. Main St. • Sapulpa (918) 227-1586 Parkinson’s & Caregiver Support Group

March 26 • 1 – 3 p.m. • Free Owasso Community Center 301 S. Cedar St. • Owasso (918) 978-7103 Tulsa Ostomy Support Group

March 26 • 6:45 p.m. • Free University Village 8555 S. Lewis Ave. • Tulsa (918) 446-8542

Dancing

Lake Keystone Square Dance Club

March 6 & 20 • 7:30 p.m. • $4 Memorial Drive United Methodist Church 7903 E. 15th St. • Tulsa (918) 740-5419 Belles & Beaus Square Dance Club

March 10 & 24 • $4 Workshop 7 p.m. • Dance 7:30 p.m. St. Marks Methodist Church 10513 E. Admiral Pl. • Tulsa (918) 437-7277 Broken Arrow Senior Center Dances

Featuring The Round Up Boys Mondays • 6:30 p.m. • $5 1800 S. Main St. • Broken Arrow (918) 259-8377 • www.baseniors.org Clog Dancing Lessons

Presented by Turtle Creek Cloggers Mondays • 5:45 – 8:30 p.m. Thursdays • 6 – 8 p.m. • $4 LaFortune Community Center 5202 S. Hudson Ave. • Tulsa (918) 627-0067 Beginning Line Dancing

Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. • Free Fridays • 1 – 2 p.m. • Free Owasso Community Center 301 S. Cedar St. • Owasso (918) 272-3903

Dance for Parkinson’s Disease

Free classes exploring movement and music for people with Parkinson’s Tuesdays • 2 – 3 p.m. • Free Tulsa Ballet • 1212 E. 45th Pl. • Tulsa (918) 574-8499 Dance with Single Seniors

The GROUP Tulsa singles dance organization(45+) hosts monthly dances & happy hours March 16 • 7 p.m. • $30 The White House Mansion 1 W. 81st St. • Tulsa (918) 724-4022

Fitness

Moderate Yoga with Lucy Weberling

Mondays • 10 – 11:15 a.m. $15/session • $50/month West Oak Village, Craft Room 1002 S. Fairfax Ave. • Skiatook (918) 633-8890 Ballet Barre Balance Class

Mondays • 12:30 – 1 p.m. • Free Owasso Community Center 301 S. Cedar St. • Owasso (918) 272-3903 • Free Sculpt & Tone

For members of LIFE’s Senior Centers; ($40 annual membership fee) Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:30 a.m. • Free (for members) LIFE’s Senior Center at East Side 1427 S. Indianapolis Ave. • Tulsa (918) 744-6760 Rock Steady Boxing

For People with Parkinson’s Tuesdays & Thursdays • 6:30 p.m. $15 class • $85/month Impact Fitness at The Farm Shopping Center 6570 E. 51st St., Ste. A • Tulsa (918) 516-8482 • www.tulsa.rsbaffiliate.com Beginner Pickleball

For members of LIFE’s Senior Centers; ($40 annual membership fee) Wednesdays • 9 a.m. • Free (for members) LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster 3500 S. Peoria Ave. • Tulsa (918) 749-2623 Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance

Presented by Creek County Health Dept. & Creek County Literacy Program Mondays • 10 a.m. • Free Creek County Literacy Program 15 N. Poplar St. • Sapulpa (918) 224-9647

LIFE EDU Senior & Caregiver Community Education Laughter Yoga

Interested in feeling better? Looking for low-impact exercise? Laughter yoga could be the answer. Laughter yoga is an easy, fun exercise that improves physical and mental health. No yoga mat required. Most exercises are chair-based and all exercises can be modified. Wednesdays, March 11 & 25 • 1 – 2 p.m. LaFortune Community Center • 5202 S. Hudson Ave. • Tulsa Free • Reservations Requested • (918) 664-9000, ext. 1181

Cooking Matters: Cooking for One or Two People

Learn how to shop smarter, use nutrition information to make healthier choices and cook delicious and affordable meals. Join the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma for a hands-on cooking demonstration and taste-testing of recipes that serve one or two. Participants will learn cooking techniques, receive recipes and have the opportunity to try them at home. Space is limited. Reservations required. Wednesday, March 18 • 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Legacy Plaza Conference Center • 5330 E. 31st St. • Tulsa Free • Reservations Required • (918) 664-9000, ext. 1181

Diabetes Education and Empowerment Program (DEEP)

Five-week interactive series for people with diabetes or pre-diabetes and those caring for people with diabetes. Topics include risk factors, nutrition, physical activity, as well as using a glucose monitor, working with a care team, accessing community services and handling complications. There will be games and prizes. Thursdays, March 26 – April 23 • 1 – 3 p.m. Legacy Plaza Conference Center • 5330 E. 31st St. • Tulsa Free • Reservations Requested • (918) 664-9000, ext. 1181

Basics of Medicare

This seminar offers education for anyone looking to understand Medicare, anyone who is new to Medicare and anyone who is soon to be eligible for Medicare. The seminar is presented by the Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services and covers the basics of Medicare and what you need to know to make an informed decision about your coverage options. This seminar is intended for Medicare beneficiaries and closed to licensed Life, Accident and Health Insurance Agents, insurance company personnel and anyone affiliated with a Health Maintenance Organization or other conflicts of interest.

Wednesday, March 18 • 10 a.m. – Noon Legacy Plaza Conference Center • 5330 E. 31st St. • Tulsa Free • Reservations Required • (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance

Sponsored by RSVP Tulsa Thursdays (March 12 – May 28) 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. • Free LaFortune Community Center 5202 S. Hudson Ave. • Tulsa (918) 280-8656

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE leaves denote programs that are offered by LIFE Senior Services.

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTERS With two locations in midtown Tulsa, LIFE’s Senior Centers offer a combination of social, creative, educational, fitness and health activities for adults age 50 and older. The centers are open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and membership is only $40 per year. To discover all that LIFE has to offer, call LIFE’s SeniorLine at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1184 or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org/seniorcenters.

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PEOPLE & PLACES

The Parke ladies hosted a lovely afternoon tea. Woodland Terrace residents were so excited to spend some time with a visiting mentoring class.

The ladies at The Parke Assisted Living reading The Autobiography of Santa Claus.

A resident at Baptist Village of Broken Arrow shows off her wreath made with help from a student volunteer.

Residents of Senior Star at Burgundy Place having a good time playing Wii bowling. Residents of Senior Star at Burgundy Place enjoy the raised flower beds out in the garden.

Send Us Your Pictures We Want To See Seniors Smiling & Active

Whether it is your traveling group, tennis buddies or a night on the town, we want your pictures! Submit high-resolution photos to efox@LIFEseniorservices.org by the 1st of every month. 40

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

AUTO REPAIR

Strickland Automotive Strickland Automotive is locally-owned and - operated with over 40 years of auto repair experience. We perform all types of vehicle repair, from computer and electrical problems to engine and transmission overhauls. ASE Certified mechanics.Open six days a week, with towing provided. Call Gary. (918) 832-7072.

CARPET CLEANING

ALL PRO Carpet Cleaning Senior and caregiver discounts. Carpet, furniture, rug cleaning. Pet odor removed and Teflon protectant available. Emergency water extraction. Residential and commercial services. Professional truck mount steam cleaning. Carpet repairs and restretching. Prompt, professional, quality service at a fair price. Certified, insured. Veteran owned and operated. Call Thomas Fink, owner/technician, for free estimate (918) 636-6303.

CEMETERY LOTS

Calvary Cemetery Calvary Cemetery, section 7, Way of the Cross. Two side-by-side spaces lot 204, space 6 and lot 207, space 4. Spaces valued at $6400 for both. Asking pricing is lower at $5,800 for both. Price is negotiable. Blank headstone available. Truly a beautiful view. Call (405) 273-7071 or email lala55king@yahoo.com. Cemetery Lots For Sale Cemetery lots for sale in Memorial Park at 51st and Memorial. 2 sets of 2. 2 sets of 3. One block of 6. Family made other plans. $1,200 up for each. Call Mr. B at (918) 779-4010. Spaces at Memorial Park 12 spaces for sale. Section 34, Lot 416, Spaces 1-12. No burials there and no markers. Current value is $26,400. Will sell all 12 for $25,200 or $2,150 each individually. If interested, contact Oxley.Plots@gmail.com.

COMPUTER SERVICES

Does Technology Frustrate You? Honest, patient, ethical help with your pc, router, wifi, cell phone, email, streaming, camera, password recovery, etc. 30 years of IT experience in Tulsa. Special rates for seniors. References available. Call or email Carmen Armstrong. Carmstrongva@gmail.com (918) 688-7453.

DAYTIME CARE

Daytime care for older loved ones LIFE’s Adult Day Health offers convenient, affordable daytime care at three locations in Tulsa and Broken Arrow. For more information, call LIFE’s Adult Day Health at (918) 664-9000.

ESTATE SALES

2MS Estate Sales ...Tulsa’s Finest! Downsizing? Estate Liquidation? Let us take the worry away and Maximize your return. No out of pocket expense. We specialize in senior transitions, with over 20 years in the senior housing market. My team includes realtors, moving company, senior housing and attorneys if needed. Please contact Michelle Reed (918) 691-5893 or Atulsa@aol.com also Facebook 2MSestatesalestulsa for a Free consultation. Downsizing? Call I Heart Estate Sales Whatever the case, choosing the right Estate Sale Company makes that next step easier. For over 13 years, people from all over Tulsa & Green Country have trusted I Heart Estate Sales for their Estate Sale needs. Call I Heart Estate Sales at (918) 759-1384 for your free, no obligation consultation. www.IHeartEstateSales.com

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE

Medicare Assistance Program The Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services provides accurate information, counseling and assistance relating to Medicare benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives and persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call MAP at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000 or toll-free at (866) 664-9009. Need A New Medicare Plan? The Medicare Supplement Store at Promenade Mall is your “One-StopShop” for Medicare Supplements, Advantage Plans, & Drug Plans. We can give you a quote from top-rated carriers like: Aetna, Blue Cross, Humana, GlobalHealth, UnitedHealthCare, Mutual of Omaha and others. For information, call Bob Archer today (918) 814-5550.

GARDENING/LAWN CARE

AAA Lawns & More Total lawn care. Lawn Mowing. Snow removal. Gutter clean-up. Specialist in fence/property line lawn clean-up. Stump grinding and small tree work. Dedicated to making your lawn look its best. Insured, honest, experienced and dependable. Veteranowned. We are a small company with personal service. References available. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Larry. (918) 361-1299. A Complete Yard Mowing, edging, weed eating, gutter repairs and cleaning, light hauling. Fence and property line cleaning available. Guaranteed at a fair price. Veteran owned. Available for Broken Arrow and Coweta areas. Call (918) 697-4321. Green Hibiscus Lawn & Garden Services Scheduled garden maintenance (weeding, planting, mulching).

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Garden bed design and installation. Hedge & shrub trimming. Tree pruning & removal. Leaf clean up. Hauling green debris. Call Charles (918) 636-0298. Kimble Davis Tree Company Family-owned and operated. Specializing in all aspects of tree care: restoration, pruning/thinning, removal, stump grinding, hedge trimming, firewood available. Serving Tulsa for 25 years. References. Member BBB. Insured. ISA certified arborist. Check us out at www.kdtreeco.com. Call Kimble at (918) 853-5383. Mower Repair / Maintenance All brands - Riders, ZTR's, Walk-behinds, UTV’s / ATV’s. Top Quality work, ASE certified Mechanic. Pick-up and Delivery available. Tulsa and surrounding counties. Maintenance specials include pick-up and delivery 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call Scott (918) 519-3869. New Season Lawn & Tree LLC Always accepting new customers. Fall clean-up available. Mowing, trimming, leaf and debris removal, fence line trim/ cleanup, leaf mulching, flower beds. Tree pruning/thinning and removal. Shrub and hedge trimming/shaping of all sizes. Pressure washing driveway, decks, siding. ISA Certified Arborist. Fully insured with verified references. Best rates, senior discounts. Free Estimates. Call Todd (918) 639-2262. www.newseasonlawnandtree.com.

HOME REPAIR/REMODELING

A Handy Helping Hand Professional home maintenance, painting, and improvements. Whether you’re making overdue repairs, sprucing up your home and garden, or optimizing your home’s “sale-ability” potential, call Joe Surowiak with A Handy Helping Hand. Professional results. Competitive rates. (918) 520-0333.

Allen’s Handyman Services of Tulsa “Your Home Improvement and Repair Specialist.” 19th year serving Tulsa seniors. “One call can do it all.” 10% senior discount. Insured. All work guaranteed in writing. No pay until job is completed. Plumbing, drain cleaning, grab bars, electrical, carpentry, painting, seamless guttering installation/repair/cleaning. Dryer vent cleaning. Roof, tile and drywall repair. Wood siding/trim replacement. Deck repair, power washing, staining. Tree trimming. No job too small. For free estimate, call Allen at (918) 630-0394. Big C’s Plumbing Services Your one stop Plumbing Shop! Call us and I guarantee you will never have to call another plumbing company. Licensed, bonded and insured for your protection....Call (918) 855-9216, tell us you saw us in

the Vintage Newsmagazine receive an automatic 10% discount....call us now. Bumgartner Plumbing Licensed, with over 30 years of experience. Rates are low and based on the job, not the hour. No service call fee or travel time charge. Senior and caregiver discount. Plumbing service and repair our specialty. Honest, professional service you can count on. Lic. # 82750. (918) 355-4747. Burton Painting Specializing in all aspects of exterior and interior home painting. Staining, sealing, and painting faux finishes. Decks, fences, cabinets and floors. Free estimates. 30+ years of experience. Reliable, courteous, professional service. Fully insured. (918) 378-2858. Dave’s Heat and Air, Inc. Licensed, insured, and bonded. Honest and reliable service for over 30 years. Competitive rates. Specializing in heating and air conditioning service and repair. All makes and models. Residential and light commercial. Tulsa metro area. Family-owned and operated. (918) 437-8101. Doc J’s Heat and Air LLC We install, replace and repair all types and brands of heating, air-conditioning and ventilation equipment. Our contractor has over 25 yrs. of experience. We match quality HVAC systems with your preferences. Seasonal maintenance plans. Get personalized service from our local contractor. Lic # 184978. Call (918) 921-4240, info@docjsheatandair.com Free Storm Inspection Do you have a leaky roof? Call for free inspection/emergency tarp service. Small roof repair free for seniors. We provide patient, honest and ethical help through any insurance claims. Call Carmen at (918) 688-7453. Proof Construction, 1924 W. Albany St., Broken Arrow. Other services include patios, outdoor kitchens, etc. Handyman & Construction Services 30 Years Experience! All Handicap Accessories - grab bars, handicap access abilities; Framing, Drywall, Tape & Bed; Texture & Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Tile, Laminate & Wood Floors. Free Estimates, Competitive Rates, Professional Service. Call Craig (918) 892-4168. Housecleaning Solutions & Junk Removal House cleaning, junk removal, furniture moving, clean-ups, hauling, tree trimming. Free estimates. Senior discount. Call Darrell for all your housecleaning and junk removal needs. (918) 644-1776.

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CLASSIFIEDS

New Season Junk Removal LLC Commercial and Residential removal of furniture, yard waste, appliances, construction waste. We will dispose of hot tubs, mattresses, and e-waste. Disposal and Recycling of televisions and refrigerators available. Cleanouts include foreclosure clean outs and garage clean outs. Fully Insured. Discounts available for senior citizens, military, first responders. Call (918) 639-2262 or email NewSeasonJunkRemoval@gmail.com. Visit www.newseasonjunkremoval.com. RDA Remodeling, LLC We offer home repair services, full remodeling and insulation. Call (918) 209-5766. Same Day Services Light Hauling /Light Moving - help you rearrange room furniture, lawns-grass mowing/small paint jobs/cleanup/ fence repair/light construction/sheet rock tile repair - We are honest dependable. References. Call (918) 313-5230. Scrap Metal Haul Off Free haul off/pick up of appliances such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioners, hot water tanks and any scrap metal. Call John at (918) 313-4405.

HOUSING

5400 South Senior Independent Community Affordable 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartment / town homes non-smoking community. Call for a tour (918) 496-9270. Fully Furnished Apartment for Rent Looking for a roommate? One bedroom upstairs fully furnished apartment available. Move-In ready!! Everything is new; bed, cable, washer & dryer, refrigerator, dishwasher, alarm system, premier parking. Nonsmoker, please! $500 per month with $500 deposit (non-refundable). ALL BILLS PAID. Proof of identification required. Call Dwayne (918) 428-8740. House For Sale (Seniors 55+) Stately single-story home in Glenoak, an amenity rich and gated Tulsa enclave. Fantastic f loor plan is ideal for entertaining and everyday living alike with a large living room, formal dining, breakfast room and granite chef’s kitchen. Master suite with private patio. Large front porch and a 400 sq ft climate controlled Florida room. Asking price $444,000. Call Cliff at (918) 742-0550. Overjoyed Not Overwhelmed Some days you want to move, and others, not so much. OVERWHELMED with the process? Let a Certified Senior Housing Specialist (CSHP) guide you through the entire process. One call, One Company, DONE! Licensed and Bonded and BBB Member. Mature Transitions Of Tulsa (918) 728-6543.

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Senior Friendly Duplex For Rent Senior friendly duplex with 2 bedrooms and 2 bath is available. Located at 75th & Birmingham by ORU this updated unit provides necessities for seniors. Washer, dryer, cable, stainless steel appliances, granite counters, vaulted ceiling, medical alert button. 24 hour security. Also, available next door is an oversized Motherin-law Suite. Call for pricing (918) 491-9929.

hour shifts at an affordable cost. Please call Delia at (405) 714-8016 for more information.

Full Service Estate Planning Law Firm Trusts, Wills, Gift and Tax Planning, Powers of Attorneys and more! With offices in Sand Springs and Tulsa. Discount to Veterans and Retired Teachers. Willing to meet you in your place for no extra charge! Call Penni of the Skillern Law Firm at (918) 805-2511. www.skillernlaw.com

Compassionate Senior Services Do you or a loved one need help with grocery shopping? Maybe help with meals? Or maybe just a companion to visit with or play games with? If this sounds like you or someone you know. Please Call, Christie at (918) 934-7986.

LEGAL

Need Legal Help? Call Me First. Ramona Jones, Attorney at Law. Wills, trusts, deeds, advance directives, powers of attorney, divorces, civil, DUI, criminal, guardianships, adoptions and more. Also paperwork for limited scope representation. Credit cards accepted. 1437 South Boulder, Ste. 160, Tulsa, OK (918) 585-2255.

MOBILITY EQUIPMENT/REPAIR

Mobility City of Tulsa We repair scooters, power chairs, lift chairs, wheelchairs, etc. Friendly service at our retail store or at your home with our mobile van. We also rent and sell all types of mobility equipment. Great deals on new and used items. (918) 600-2112.

MOVERS

Tulsa Movers Dependable Movers! Low Rates. Free Estimates. Senior Discounts. Call (918) 734-2181.

OIL AND GAS

Mineral, Oil/Gas Interests Want to purchase minerals and oil/ gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO, 80201

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE

Bobbi and Bob’s Personal & Business Assistance Run errands; grocery and personal shopping; transportation to medical appointments, beauty shop, airport or other local destinations; organize home; handle medical insurance claims; provide administrative and secretarial support; wait for deliveries and repairmen at your home. Call Bobbi Warshaw at (918) 852-5302 email: bobbi.warshaw@att.net Caring Hands Specialized one on one care for you or your loved one from a licensed nurse. Services I provide for you or your loved one: Companionship, sitter, light housekeeping, and preparing meals. I provide 12/24

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

Companion Solutions We are a non-medical care service offering a wide range of services custom tailored to fit your needs. We can help with errands/shopping, drs appointments, meal preparation, light housekeeping, wellness checks, medication reminders or companion care. Contact us today for a free consultation (918) 998-2273 (CARE).

Financial Organizer/Liaison Do you or a loved one need help keeping up with mail, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, making phone calls, organizing or preparing for tax time? I can help! I will work with you or act as a liaison between family members. Call or email me to discuss options. Essential Strategy Consulting, LLC. Gwen Stevens (918) 557-5259, esc9315@gmail.com Take A Break Housecleaning for seniors in Broken Arrow and east Tulsa area. Sorry - no pets. Leave a voice mail at (918) 954-9119, and I will answer ASAP. Available for interview.

PERSONAL SAFETY

EARS Emergency Alert Response Systems. Enjoy living at home while we listen for your safety with our quality personal medical alarm and monitoring service. Affordable with no long-term commitment. Locally owned and operated (918) 298-0500 or toll-free (877) 885-3277. HALO Medical Alarms Worried about falling? HALO provides medical alert services for those at home or on the go who may need help in an emergency. HALO allows you to get help at the push of a button which is worn as a necklace or wristband. We offer a variety of choices to best fit your needs. Check out the HALO products at our retail store - Mobility City at 61st & Sheridan.(918) 392-0566 or 877-747-HALO (4256)

PERSONAL SERVICES

Affordable Hairstyling In-Home or My Shop With 35 years’ experience, I can help with all of your hairstyling needs. I will come to your home, the hospital, rehab or you can come to my shop. In-shop special: haircut $7 for first time customers only and perms for $45. Senior special pricing can’t be beat! Available Tuesday – Saturday. A Mane Event hairstyling, located near 11th and Yale at 937 South Canton. Call Mary Wilkinson at (918) 834-2686.

In-Home Beauty Services of Tulsa We provide beauty services to our clients who are unable to leave their home, disabled, hospice care or independent living. We offer full beauty service for men and women in Tulsa and surrounding areas. Our services include: shampoo & sets, haircuts, perms, pedicures. Licensed and Insured. Visit our website www.inhomebeautyservicesoftulsa.com. Call (918) 630-6274. Manicures & Pedicures by “Patricia” 19 years experience. Available Monday thru Friday “By Appointment”. Regular Manicure $12. Gel Manicure $17. Mini Pedicure $15. Regular Pedicure $20. Paraffin treatment with other service $5. Just paraffin treatment for hands or feet $10. Salon Retro located at 5661 East 41st Street in Highland Plaza Center. Call Patricia at (918) 671-2305. Salon Retro Hair care for men and women, specializing in senior clients. This month’s special - First time customers receive one of the following for $12: Haircut or Style or Manicure. $45 for cut and perm. Pedicures are $20. Very Experienced Hairdressers! Come see us in Midtown at Highland Plaza, 5661 East 41st Street (corner of 41st and Hudson). (918) 742-3440.

PET CARE

Home Veterinary Care Experience Tulsa’s most convenient veterinary service in the comfort of your own home. Our goal is to develop a personal relationship with each of our clients and patients. Contact us today to schedule your house call appointment. Call (918) 892-9382 or email DrFielstra@gmail.com or visit us at www.homevetcaretulsa.com.

SOCIAL/SUPPORT GROUP

Learn American Style Mah Jongg Make new Friends, while strengthening memory function! April Classes forming – 24 hours of instruction, limit 16, Thursdays and Fridays – April 9 thru May 1st. Morning and afternoon classes available. $100 includes Rule Booklet and Player Card. Contact Carol James for more information. mzjojames@gmail.com / (918) 519-5601.

Single Seniors (55+) Are you over 55, single, divorced or widowed? We are a fun loving group of single seniors over 55. We meet every Wednesday,11:15 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the Buffet Palace, 10934 East 21st Street. We eat at 11:15 have a short meeting and then play cards. Join us for great fun and fellowship. Questions, call Beverly at (918) 272-1049.

TRANSPORTATION

HealthRide Transportation Services Let us take you where you need to go. Our Wheelchair Accessible Vans can get you to Dr. Appointments, Church Events or anywhere you

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desire. HealthRide provides wheelchair transportation for Tulsa and surrounding communities. Quality service at a lower cost. Call (918) 404-0038. Website: www.healthridetulsa.org Email: healthride1@gmail.com.

Vintage Friends SUBSCRIBE TODAY

My Driver Transportation Service Let me do the driving. To and from work, airport, shopping, errands, post office, appointments. Also, LIFT VAN transportation available. Able to assist getting to and from bed. Senior sitting. Also, small breed dog boarding. 20 years experience. CLEET certified and licensed. References. Member, Better Business Bureau. (918) 491-9929.

TRAVEL/DAY TRIPS

FREE SUBSCRIPTION!

EXCITING DAY TRIPS IN 2020! The Tulsa Travelers, an active senior travel club, has a full list of day trips (and some longer ones) to fun and affordable destinations within easy reach. For a complete list call David at (918) 494-0649, or email: david@thetravelgroup.biz, or just visit www.thetravelgroup.biz to check out and sign up for any trip from our Web Store. This is your time; don't let it get away!

Name:

Full Address:

VOLUNTEER

Phone Number:

Digital Marketing/Fundraising Position A Digital Marketing/Fundraising position with a Tulsa based, nonprofit serving Oklahoma women. We are looking to expand our donor base and need someone with experience to help us tell our story and build on the integrity of our brand. This is a volunteer position to start, 5 – 7 hours per week desired. Please send your resume to digitalfundraiser1973@gmail.com. Thank you.

Email Address:

Cut out and mail to LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! Sophisticated Seconds, an upscale re-sale shop is looking for volunteers. Join the fun!! Great Incentives. Retail experience helpful, but not necessary. Flexible hours in a fun environment that helps Hospice of Green Country’s patients. Please contact Carol at Hospice of Green Country (918) 388-1321. Enjoy volunteering while helping others!

We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. If there is an error, please call Carrie Bowen at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1205.

Anonymous Jerry W. Albin D. C. and Janice Anderson Tommy and Sharon Austin F. P. Batterton Gloria J. Buehring Marilyn M. Morgan Reuben and Cynthia Bullock Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Cronin Charles Danley Jean Dix Carol A. Fleming Barbara K. Frierson Patricia Fry Ronald and Sharon Gibson Rita L. Gilliam Manuella R. Glore Anita Greiner Gen Hamilton Patricia Z. Higgins Emma Kaye H. Hill Karen J. Jacobs Gene and Kathleen Kaminsky Robert and Sandra Kappus Gerry L. Kemper Clarence B. Keys Patsy A. Kinser Gary and Ann LaGere Angela Larson Susan Norris Carolyn Patrick

Jeanie Payton Robert and Carolyn Powers Daniel and Lynn Riedel Bobby D. Sayre Janet K. Schneider Joanne Sellers Esther B. Semones Church of St. Mary Donna L. Trickel Nancy Uekerman William G. Weaver Orcella Whistler Rita Wilson Sally Wood In Honor of In Honor of Quinton/Morgan Children Marilyn M. Morgan In Honor of Ames Righter Jean Righter In Memory of In Memory of My Mother Sherry Canady In Memory of Alfonso Ferrantino Francis P. Ferrantino In Memory of Theresa Ann Finck Theresa M. Finck and Mary Ann Finck In Memory of Amy Florence Taylor John and Melba Taylor

DONATE TO LIFE

Become a Vintage Friend

LIFE Senior Services is a recognized leader in aging services and an acknowledged voice on aging issues and is proud to be a nonprofit United Way organization.

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE:

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

JUST DO IT! If you've been looking for a way you can make a difference, consider joining the Millennium Hospice team as a volunteer. Caregiver relief is so important during this difficult time. Volunteers provide that by sitting with patients for an hour or so. Training is provided. (918) 493-6555.

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in January 2020.

Please mail your contribution to: LIFE Senior Services 5950 E. 31st St. • Tulsa, OK 74135-5114 Make your donation online: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

MARCH Answers For puzzles, see pages 30-31.

MUMBO JUMBO 1. Fir 2. Pine

3. Spruce 4. Red Oak

Final message: FOREST

BAMBOOZABLES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Over my dead body Right under the nose See eye to eye Looking out for number one Be-line Home is where the heart is

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7 2 6 4 3 8 5 9 1

CLASSIFIEDS

TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: Bernie Dornblaser (918) 664-9000 or bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

3 1 5 6 9 7 2 4 8

5 6 2 7 4 3 1 8 9

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BE A LIFESAVER Every dollar invested stays local to fuel LIFE Senior Services’ mission-related initiatives of promoting and preserving independence for seniors.

Today – Tomorrow – Always. FOLLOW US ON

Donate now by visiting www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | March 2020

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Profile for LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine

LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine - March 2020