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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Vol. 35, No. 13 EILEEN BRADSHAW President & CEO of LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE & Vintage Housing

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From Horses to Horsepower: The Automotive Industry in Tulsa

Plug It In: Hybrid and Electric Cars

Ever heard of the Tulsa Four? The short-lived auto factory produced passenger cars and an “oil field roadster.” Follow the progress as Oklahomans moved from horses to horsepower.

American vehicles are going electric, but what does that mean for drivers? Learn more about your options in electric vehicles and how to keep them running.

KELLY KIRCHHOFF Senior Director of Communications

DEE DUREN Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

BERNIE DORNBLASER Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

LEAH WEIGLE Graphic Designer

CAROL CARTER Copy Editor

DICK MCCANDLESS ESTEBAN VALENCIA Community Distribution

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Smiles Per Gallon: Car Clubs Bring Auto Enthusiasts Together

Trips on a Tankful

Northeastern Oklahoma has a variety of collector clubs where car owners meet to swap stories, hit the race track, check under the hood and enjoy their shared enthusiasm.

26 Ride Service 101

Tired of the expense and hassle of car maintenance? Want to spend time downtown without the hassle of parking? Here a few alternatives now available.

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There’s nothing like the feel of setting off on the open road, and many of us are ready to travel. Choose from among these not-sodistant attractions this summer.

6 Letter From Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner Trip Tips: Ways to Hit the Road With Ease 12 Medicare & You Medicare and Behavioral Health 17 Remember These Vintage Car Commercials? 21 LIFE PACE 24 Save a Life: Buckle Up. Every Trip. Every Time. 25 Lease or Buy? 27 In the Spotlight 28 Healthy Living 29 LIFE EDU 30 Mindbender & Puzzles 31 Puzzle Partners 32 Bunkering With Books 33 Noteworthy 34 Share Your Time & Talent 36 People & Places 37 Classifieds 39 Vintage Friends

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services (a Tulsa Area United Way nonprofit) and helps fulfill LIFE Senior Services’ mission to promote and preserve independence for seniors. This publication is printed and mailed at no charge. Donations of any amount are appreciated and will help offset LIFE Senior Services’ production costs. A donation of $25 per year is suggested. To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 35, Issue 13, June 2021 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 2168-8494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135-5114.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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LETTER FROM EILEEN Dear Vintage Reader, In this issue, you will have the opportunity to read about cars, from their history in our state to clubs for those who share an affinity for particular makes and models. I have to admit that I am not a car enthusiast. I appreciate my car, but I appreciate the fact that it gets me around with minimal issues. I do not appreciate its amenities. I am somewhat offended that my car wants to communicate with me beyond the emphatic “CHECK ENGINE” light of early driving days.

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing eileen.bradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

I have not always been so cavalier about my vehicles. I remember my parents’ beaming faces as they told me we were about to be the proud owners of a brand new 1968 Ford Galaxy 500, our family’s first truly new car. I promptly burst into tears at the thought of abandoning our well-loved Dodge into the care of strangers. “What will happen to it? Who will get it?” I wailed. Despite my objections, my parents moved forward. I have never forgotten how perplexed the salesperson at Fred Jones Ford was when I had to be carried out of the transaction, sobbing once again. Apparently, at that point, I really connected with my cars!

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

Despite my early misgivings, that new car would become integral to my childhood memories. I shared the spacious back seat with my older brother and Mickey, a frequently carsick cocker spaniel, as we crossed the country on annual family vacations. I can almost still hear the tinny sound of the Major League Baseball games

being narrated on AM radio. When we got out of range for one team, my father would almost certainly find another game to pick up where we left off. I entertained myself with low-tech sewing cards, weaving animal shapes on the colorful cardboard patterns. I stared at thousands of stars, saw my first glimpse of the ocean and my first peak of a mountain from those rear windows. My husband and I took our children on similar trips, though the portable DVD player had replaced sewing cards as entertainment by the time they were traveling. We certainly had some territorial squabbles in our back seat, and my youngest daughter managed to stick something up her nose somewhere in Mississippi, requiring an unscheduled stop at urgent care. Despite some misadventures, we also had some great conversations and sang along with some wonderful songs. Being encapsulated for hours on end together in a car provided memories that I will always cherish. I still love to travel by car. I think there is a sense of possibility and adventure not offered by airplanes. Striking out on the open road requires a sense of optimism and faith in oneself. As you read this car-centric issue, I hope it evokes some happy memories and perhaps inspires some new adventures! My best, Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

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Looking Back

A man and two women pose in a car parked on Bird Creek Bridge south of Owasso, between 1907 and 1913.

This Plymouth Belvedere was sealed in an underground vault in downtown Tulsa in 1957. Excavated 50 years later, "Miss Belvedere" was badly rusted due to a leaky time capsule.

Motoring Around Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

Obdueler Justice opened the Soul Brothers Automatic Car Wash at 125 N. Peoria Ave. in August 1973.

An electric car displays the logo for Public Service Company of Oklahoma, c. 1979.

This Month in History JUNE 1, 1980: First 24-Hour News Network Debuts

Ted Turner, known as the “Mouth of the South,” launched his brainchild Cable News Network (CNN). The world’s first 24-hour television news network, CNN signed on from Atlanta. Now available in more than 160 million homes worldwide, CNN launched in fewer than 2 million U.S. residences. The network gained traction with live coverage of the Persian Gulf War in 1991 as cable TV increased in popularity.

JUNE 6, 1944: Allies Invade

Northern France

D-Day was the largest amphibious military operation in history, led by General Dwight D. Eisenhower. Troops, 155,000 strong, were met with heavy resistance at Omaha and Juno beaches. By nightfall, the American, British and Canadian forces took all five Normandy beaches and were said to have turned the tide of World War II. Within three months, northern France was freed and the Allies prepared to enter Germany.

JUNE 10, 1752: Benjamin Franklin Flies A Kite

Inventor, businessman and statesman Benjamin Franklin demonstrated the connection between lightning and electricity by capturing an ambient electric charge in a jar. He accomplished the feat by tying a wire and a house key to a kite flown during a thunderstorm. Franklin invented the lightning rod and coined the words "battery," "conductor" and "electrician." He received a prestigious Royal Society award for his “curious experiments and observations on electricity.”

JUNE 12, 1987: Reagan

Challenges Soviets To ‘Tear Down’ the Berlin Wall

President Ronald Reagan stood in front of the Berlin Wall challenging Soviet Union Leader Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down this wall” in the name of peace and prosperity. Reagan’s famous speech was given in the Cold War era and foreshadowed the destruction of the barrier two years later. The Berlin Wall was erected by the East German government in 1961 to prevent citizens from escaping to the west.

JUNE 20, 1975: Movie "Jaws" Released in Theaters

Steven Spielberg’s film “Jaws” was released in the summer, leaving many viewers afraid of going into the water. The movie depicts a great white shark attacking swimmers at a New England resort town as suspenseful music warned the audience of approaching danger. “Jaws” starred Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw and was a breakthrough for the then 27-year-old Spielberg. It won three Oscars, including Best Original Score.

JUNE 23, 1992: Mafia Boss John Gotti Sentenced

Hundreds of supporters stormed a courthouse in Brooklyn after Mafia boss John Gotti was sentenced to life in prison. Gotti, known as the “Teflon Don” for dodging previous criminal charges, was found guilty on 14 counts of conspiracy to commit murder and racketeering. Gotti headed the Gambino family after authorities say he ordered the murder of its former boss. His reign ended when "Sammy the Bull” Gravano testified against him. © The History Channel

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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CAREGIVER CORNER

Considerations When Choosing a Vehicle

Ways to Hit the Road With Ease BY KIMBERLY BLAKER

When you care for someone with physical or mental challenges because of age or disability, you might find regular transportation is more complicated. A traditional car setup may be difficult or even dangerous for those with limited mobility or safety concerns. Yet, the ability to get out and go places is necessary – not just for appointments or to run errands, but also to retain some freedom and engagement with the world.

CAR ACCESSORIES TO IMPROVE ACCESSIBILITY 1. SWIVEL SEAT CUSHION

Many helpful gadgets and accessories can increase your current car's accessibility. Consider what specific parts of your vehicle or aspects of traveling present challenges for your passenger. This will ensure their needs are met, allowing them more independence while also making travel easier and more comfortable.

2. VEHICLE SUPPORT HANDLE

Getting in and out of a car seat can be very difficult for those with limited mobility. A swivel seat cushion makes it easy to sit and turn without straining or having to twist the body. Many swivel seat cushions are also much softer, making car rides more comfortable.

A portable support handle can be kept in the car or a bag. It hooks into the door's latch to support users while pulling themselves up to rise from their seat and out of the vehicle independently with less risk of injury or strain.

Sojoy iGelComfort Deluxe Gel Swivel Seat Cushion has a 16-inch diameter and memory foam inside for increased comfort.

Able Life Auto Cane Vehicle Support Handle is a small 1-pound, 6.5-inch long support handle. It stores easily in the car and works in any door latch.

3. BUCKLE RELEASE AID

Pushing the small release button on the seat belt can be difficult for those with arthritis or limited hand or finger strength. Release aids are designed to reduce the amount of force and fine motor skills needed to unbuckle.

4. BUCKLE COVER

If you have concerns about someone with dementia, Alzheimer's or another disability who may try to escape from the car, you don't want it to be easy to unbuckle the seat belt. There are buckle covers that require a small device to slide through a slot to press the release.

Bucklebee is a small release aid that can stay on the seat belt for convenience.

Buckle Robot is a universal and simple seat belt cover with a release key that can attach to a keychain.

If you're choosing a new car, it may require additional considerations to find a vehicle that's more accommodating. So it can be a bit trickier than the average car shopping experience. You'll want to think about the basics like your budget, mileage, reliability and desired features or technology. But it's also important to consider the more specific needs of your passenger. Think about the person or people you'll be driving and what accommodations are needed to ensure their comfort and safety and provide them appropriate accessibility and convenience. Common Features Caregivers May Find Helpful in a Car  arge cargo space for hauling L equipment and other items  ow floor but higher seats for L an easier time getting in and out  pacious interior with S plenty of room in the front and back seats  ower doors that can open by P pressing a button on the remote and a touch-activated back door for easy loading and unloading  emote start to heat or cool the R car before entering  ower windows and locks with P child safety locks in the back Don't hesitate to ask for advice from salespeople at car lots for cars that fit your specific needs. A salesperson might offer suggestions you hadn't considered and have a better idea of what type of cars will work best for your situation.

We support caregivers.

Ask us about our Stay At Home program.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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Free Prescription Delivery ORGANIZE YOUR MEDICATION AT NO ADDITIONAL COST

Announcing LIFE Senior Services’ New Program

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Club LIFE welcomes individuals diagnosed with early memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other related disorders. Club LIFE is designed to enhance memory, improve physical strength and balance, stimulate brain function and provide social support. In addition, Club LIFE supports caregivers through personal consultation, education about early memory loss and support groups.

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTERS Get Fit, Have Fun, Make New Friends

To arrange a tour, call (918) 744-6760

Nuture your mind, body and spirit for a healthier, happier LIFE at LIFE Senior Services’ Senior Centers for active adults.

Both Southminster and East Side Senior Centers are now open!

Line dancing, Pickleball, Tai Chi, Creative Writing, Sculpt & Tone, Chair Exercises, Zumba, Wii Bowling, Wii Golfing and More!

View a calendar of events at www.LIFEseniorservices.org

HOURS & LOCATION Monday – Friday 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Christ Church 10901 S. Yale Ave

Call LIFE’s SeniorLine

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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MEDICARE & YOU

MEDICARE & BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

BY CHANNING RUTHERFORD, MEDICARE AND TAX ASSISTANCE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR

Medicare covers many benefits related to mental well-being, including psychological counseling, preventive screenings and outpatient treatment programs. Here is an overview of Medicare’s mental health coverage.

BENEFITS COVERED UNDER ORIGINAL MEDICARE PART A

BENEFITS COVERED UNDER MEDICARE PART B

Original Medicare Part A covers inpatient mental health services received in a general hospital or a psychiatric hospital that specializes in the treatment of mental disorders. Your provider should determine which hospital is right for you. Medicare covers up to 190 days of inpatient care in a psychiatric hospital in your lifetime. If you have used your lifetime days but need additional mental healthcare, Medicare may cover additional inpatient care at a general hospital.

Outpatient mental healthcare includes the following services: • Individual and group therapy • Substance abuse treatment • Tests to make sure you are getting the right care • Occupational therapy • Activity therapies, such as art, dance or music therapy • Training and education (examples: training to inject a needed medication or education about your condition) • Family counseling to help with your treatment • Laboratory tests • Prescription drugs that you cannot administer yourself, such as injections a doctor must give you • Annual depression screening received in a primary care setting

Be aware that you will have the same out-ofpocket costs with Original Medicare whether you receive care in a general or psychiatric hospital. For inpatient mental health services, you pay: • A one-time hospital deductible for each benefit period ($1,484 for each benefit period in 2021) • Days 1-60: No coinsurance amount for each benefit period • Days 61-90: A coinsurance amount per day of each benefit period ($371 per day of each benefit period in 2021) • Days 91 and beyond: A coinsurance amount for each “lifetime reserve day” after day 90 of each benefit period (up to 60 days over your lifetime; $742 for each "lifetime reserve day" in 2021) • Beyond lifetime reserve days: all costs

The depression screening is considered a preventive service, and Medicare covers depression screenings at 100% of the Medicareapproved amount. One depression screening is covered per year. The screening must be done in a primary care doctor’s office or primary care clinic that can provide follow-up treatment and referrals. Speak to your doctor or primary care or primary care provider for more information. Original Medicare covers the remaining outpatient mental health services at 80% of the Medicare-approved amount. This means that as long as you receive services from a provider

who accepts assignment (meaning they accept Medicare’s approved amount as full payment for a service), you will pay a 20% coinsurance after you meet your Part B deductible. Medicare Part B also covers partial hospitalization for mental health treatment for people who meet coverage requirements. Partial hospitalization programs provide care that is more intensive than other forms of mental health care but less intensive than inpatient care. If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan, your plan must cover the same inpatient and outpatient mental health services as Original Medicare, but they may impose different rules, restrictions and costs. If you need information about a plan’s costs and coverage rules, or if you are experiencing problems, contact your Medicare Advantage Plan. BENEFITS COVERED UNDER MEDICARE PART D Medicare Part D covers prescription drugs you may need to treat a mental health condition. Medicare drug plans are required to cover all antidepressant, anticonvulsant and antipsychotic medications (with limited exceptions). If you or a loved one are feeling anxious, depressed, experiencing caregiver stress or any other behavioral health concerns, call LIFE’s SeniorLine at (918) 664-9000. LIFE Senior Services has a licensed therapist on staff who can provide guidance.

The Oklahoma Insurance Department’s Medicare Assistance Program is partnering with several other agencies to help protect you and your loved ones from scammers. Don’t miss the Hoodwinked Webinar Series on June 3, 10 and 17.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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• • • • • •

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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Greenlease-Ledterman, Inc. Distributors of Cadillac and Oldsmobile were located at South Boston Avenue at 11th Street. Photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

From Horses to Horsepower The Automotive Industry in Tulsa BY STEVE CLEM

The automobile altered American life like no other invention. Oklahoma's love affair with the internal combustion engine began early in the 20th century. “A dramatic societal shift occurred between 1910 and 1925,” said historian Jim Hinckley, author of “Jim Hinckley’s America.” “In 1909, the U.S. produced several million horse-drawn vehicles and only about 825,000 automobiles. In 1929, we produced less than 20,000 horse-drawn vehicles and around 5 million automobiles.” FROM HORSES TO HORSEPOWER

Indeed, a 1910 photograph of downtown Tulsa shows dirt streets with horse-drawn buggies and wagons, while a 1920s image has mostly cars. Hinckley said the importance of vehicles can be summed up by one statistic: “In the 1920s, more people had automobiles than had indoor plumbing.” A rare, completely restored 1918 Tulsa Four Runabout is parked in the permanent collection at Tulsa Historical Society & Museum.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

The Ford Model T dominated early car sales, benefiting from Henry Ford’s revolutionary assembly-line

techniques. “The fact is, there was a lot of diversity in the marketplace at that time,” Hinckley said. “There were lots of companies making cars. Every town in America wanted to get in on the action, including Tulsa.” EARLY DAYS OF THE AUTO INDUSTRY

In 1917, a group of Tulsa businessmen set out to make a rugged vehicle for work in the oil fields that would also appeal to the average man. Marketed as the Tulsa Four, models were produced between 1918 and 1923. They came in three body styles: the five-passenger touring, two-passenger roadster and the oil field roadster – a small truck with a special rack to carry drill bits. Three hundred cars were produced in 1919, priced at $995. The 1920 and 1921 models were $1,334. Of the few hundred that were made, only a couple are known to have survived. One, a completely restored 1918 Tulsa Four Runabout, is parked in the permanent collection at Tulsa Historical Society & Museum. FROM HORSES TO HORSEPOWER continued on page 16

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Join LIFE’s Senior Centers for the Writers’ Symposium. Four celebrated writers will share their experiences in a series of events. Don’t miss these chances to connect with the creative community and fuel your writing ambitions!

LEGACY PLAZA EAST | 31st between Yale and Sheridan Limited Seating

Find out more about LIFE’s writing contest on our website.

EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

BARRY FRIEDMAN JUNE 10 | 10:00 A.M.

RABBI MARC FITZERMAN JULY 29 | 10:00 A.M.

JUDY ALLEN AUGUST 12 | 10:00 A.M.

WRITERS’ SYMPOSIUM PANEL DISCUSSION | SEPTEMBER 26 | 4:00 - 6:00 P.M. Attend in person at Legacy Plaza East, 5330 E. 31st St. in Tulsa, or view on LIFE’s Facebook page. All in-person events will have limited attendance and follow safety recommendations. RSVP to reserve your spot! Call LIFE’s Senior Center at (918) 744-6760 or online www.LIFEseniorservices.org.

LIFE PACE Coordinated Care for Senior Adults

LIFE PACE is a holistic approach to healthcare offering primary and specialty medical care, rehabilitative therapies, mental health services, medications and a full range of home and community-based assistance to help seniors stay safely in their homes.

Call (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Español) to speak to a LIFE PACE specialist. Recognized as a Medicare & Medicaid Program

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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FROM HORSES TO HORSEPOWER continued from page 14

Oklahomans making their first car purchase 100 years ago could choose from brands that are still cruising today – including Buick, Chevrolet, Dodge and Cadillac – and others that, figuratively speaking, ran out of gas! The Lexington Minute Man Six advertised more usable power on hills. The new Overland, Franklin and Packard motor cars were also offered in Tulsa. The early dealerships were clustered on the south end of downtown Tulsa, roughly between 6th and 15th streets, from Detroit Avenue to Denver Avenue. Eventually, car lots spread out on 11th Street along Route 66. Fred Jones, then 24, began working at the Ford assembly plant in Oklahoma City in 1916. He opened his first Ford dealership in 1922, on his way to becoming the largest Ford dealer in America. Jones had a big presence in Tulsa on Boston Avenue, between 12th and 14th Streets. MODERN INNOVATIONS

One can’t help but wonder what innovators such as Henry Ford and early sellers, like Fred Jones, would think of today’s cars, with their computerized systems, advanced safety features and hybrid technology. And what would they make of the changes that loom around the next curve? Jared Glover is someone who knows the world of car dealerships well. Glover grew up in his dad’s dealership business, paying his dues in various roles, before becoming dealer and general manager at Jim Glover Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram FIAT in Owasso. Glover sums up Tulsa-area buying preferences in a word: “Trucks! Chevrolet has the new Suburban and Tahoe out that are incredibly popular. In Owasso, the Jeep brand is on fire,” Glover said. Glover described some of the latest safety options that have taken some of the guesswork – and risk – out of

the driving experience. Many new cars now have four cameras that make backing up a breeze. For people pulling a trailer, an extended blind zone warning considers the length of the trailer when alerting the driver about the blind zone, he said. A potentially life-saving option is available for highway driving. “If you’re approaching something that’s stopped or driving slower than you, it’ll audibly warn you and even apply the brakes if you’re at imminent risk of being in an accident,” Glover said. Glover claims the reaction time of the computer, nine times out of 10, will be faster than the driver would be able to hit the brakes. WHAT’S NEXT?

This begs a question about driverless cars. Glover believes driverless cars may work in certain scenarios, such as highway driving. “But as far as stopand-go driving, there are millions of vehicles being driven by humans that are going to be on the road at the same time. And the blend of those two things, I don’t know how well it can ever go over," he said. So, what about the future of the internal combustion engine? “That’s the million-dollar question,” Glover said, laughing. “I think electrification is an inevitability. It allows silence and reduced emissions.” Glover touts the hybrid technology behind the new Jeep Wrangler 4xe, where the driver has the option of electric or gasoline. “You can drive to your destination on gasoline and do all your off-roading electrically – which from a torque standpoint, is fantastic. It’s instant. It’s silent,” he said.

Potential customers check out a new Chevy Bel Air during a car show at Mid-West Chevrolet in Tulsa on January 19, 1952.

“It’s interesting to contemplate what the automobile landscape will look like 25 or 30 years from now,” Glover added. “It’s pretty exciting!”

“It’s interesting to contemplate what the automobile landscape will look like 25 or 30 years from now. It’s pretty exciting!” – Jared Glover

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Owner D.B. Winchell (far left) and other employees are pictured at Mid-West Chevrolet, located on the northwest corner of South Cincinnati Avenue and 8th Street in Tulsa, c. 1940.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

A view of Greenlease-Ledterman, Inc., distributors of Cadillac and Oldsmobile vehicles, c. 1950. The dealership was located on South Boston Avenue at 11th Street in Tulsa.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Billy Parker, retired country musician and KVOO disc jockey.

Senior living, with promise.

REMEMBER THESE VINTAGE CAR COMMERCIALS? BY STEVE CLEM

Local automobile dealerships are among the most active advertisers on TV and radio. Typically, a TV campaign runs for a few weeks, promoting an event such as a 4th of July sale, and then is quickly forgotten. However, some commercials are still remembered 50 years later. They are recalled fondly on websites such as Tulsa TV Memories and in Facebook nostalgia groups. Perhaps the most mentioned vintage TV car ad is for Chick Norton Buick. In the commercial, someone takes a sledgehammer to the windshield of a new Buick. The tag line was “Chick Don’t Care.” Some recall the slogan for Cox Chrysler/Plymouth in the 1960s and 1970s. Bill Cox ended his commercials by pointing his finger at the camera and stating, “I want to sell YOU a car.”

Covenant Living at Inverness | Tulsa, OK 3800 West 71st Street Limited availability! • Independent & Assisted Living Skilled Nursing • Memory Care • Rehabilitation To schedule a tour today, call (877) 478-8455, or visit us online at CovLivingInverness.org.

“Try Tink,” was the catchy slogan of D.B. “Tink” Wilkerson of Wilkerson Chevrolet, another vintage dealership with a big media presence. One TV commercial featured a large billboard with Wilkerson’s likeness. In the ad, a family drives by the billboard and the portrait winks at them. In 1972, a young country musician and KVOO AM1170 disc jockey began writing and voicing radio and TV commercials for Ernie Miller Pontiac. That relationship, with Billy Parker pitching Pontiacs, continued for an astounding 45 years, making Parker Tulsa’s longest-running car spokesperson. Parker said he composed the slogan that was sung or spoken in those car ads, “Learn with Ern, he’ll wheel you a DEAL!” Parker says his agreement with Miller was never in writing. “I know things are different now,” he said, “but Ernie and I never had a contract. We never needed it! I trusted him, and he trusted me!”

Covenant Living of Bixby | Bixby, OK

Although Miller passed away in 1995, and Parker retired from commercials a few years back, he said he purchased his current vehicle from the dealership. “Ernie’s son Marc owns it now, and they no longer make Pontiacs,” Parker said. "But, I bought a Buick SUV.”

To schedule a tour today, call (877) 312-3248, or visit us online at CovLivingBixby.org.

If you are tempted to think that Parker’s loyalty is due to some kind of discount for being their spokesperson for all those years, then you don’t know Billy Parker. It is because of a gentleman’s code. One that says words spoken nearly 50 years ago, never even committed to paper, still mean something.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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Covenant Living is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. For information, visit CovLiving.org.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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PLUG IT IN HYBRID & ELECTRIC CARS BY LINDSAY MORRIS

CONSIDERING AN ELECTRIC OR HYBRID VEHICLE?

Take a look at the cars around you, and you’ll be amazed at the increasing number of Teslas, Chevy Volts and other electric and hybrid cars zooming around northeastern Oklahoma. Hybrid and electric cars are becoming increasingly popular, and with several options now available, this may be the right time for a switch. Driving a vehicle powered by electricity reduces fuel costs, cuts petroleum consumption and reduces tailpipe emissions compared to conventional vehicles.

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

THE CHEVY VOLT

ALL-ELECTRIC VEHICLE

TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID VEHICLE

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Electric vehicles, or EVs, can be charged using an off-board electric power source. There are two basic types of EVs: all-electric vehicles and plugin hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs, or simply, hybrids). All-electric vehicles include battery electric vehicles and fuel cell electric vehicles. They both charge in part from the electrical grid, and both types are charged partially by regenerative braking, which generates electricity from some of the energy normally lost when braking. All-electric vehicles run solely on electricity. A typical all-electric range is 80 to 100 miles, while a few luxury models can go up to 250 miles. When the battery dies, it can take from 30 minutes to nearly a full day to charge it, depending on the type of charger and battery.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

FINDING NEARBY CHARGING STATIONS You might be surprised at how many charging stations are right here in the Tulsa area. Check out this brief list of GPS-enabled websites and apps that help EV drivers locate nearby charging stations. 1. PLUGSHARE – A free EV driver's app and website, allowing users to locate charging stations, leave reviews and connect with other EV owners. 2. SYGIC – The world's first navigation app with an integrated charging stations database and navigation. 3. FRANCIS ENERGY – This mobile app helps EV drivers view charging station information, the number of chargers available, charger type, price and directions.

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Since this limitation to long-distance drives can be a hindrance to some drivers, a plug-in electric vehicle is preferred by some. Hybrids run on electricity for a short range (6 to 40 miles), then switch to an internal combustion engine running on gasoline when the battery dies. Hybrids use gasoline as the primary source of power, letting drivers use electricity when possible while having gasoline as a safety net when needed. Hybrids may also use hydrogen in a fuel cell, biofuels or other alternative fuels as a backup instead of gasoline. There are two primary types of hybrid cars: standard hybrid and plug-in models. Neither requires that you plug in the car to an electric source; however, with a plug-in hybrid, you have the option to do so. Standard hybrids do not need to be plugged in. A standard hybrid uses both a gasoline engine and an electric motor to help offset fuel costs and increase gas mileage. When the battery is depleted by electric motor usage without a lot of braking, the internal combustion engine picks up the slack while the battery recovers.

HOW TO CHARGE

Electric vehicles have different battery sizes and charge at different speeds. Therefore, the same vehicle will experience varying charge times at different chargers. The slowest way to charge is on a standard 120-volt outlet, which adds just a few miles of range per hour. While this can seem like a huge hassle, most EV owners are charging while they’re doing other things, like working or sleeping. So, a 10-hour charge can typically give a car about 50 miles. Level 2, 240-volt chargers, are the next step up. The speed of the charge time varies, but 15 to 25 miles added per hour spent charging is typical. Some businesses offer Level 2 chargers for employees, which means staffers have plenty of time to charge up before heading out for lunch or the commute home. For trips that involve hundreds of miles in a single day, drivers typically rely on DC fast chargers. These chargers – which are much more expensive to install, and thus rarer – use direct current, rather than alternating current, to charge much more quickly. Not all DC chargers are equally fast. A 50kw charger is on the slow end of the scale, while next-generation chargers have 250kw or 350kw capabilities – well beyond what most vehicles are currently capable of accepting. Direct current fast chargers can be free, pay-as-you-go or subscription-based, with prices set by networks or property owners. Some automakers, such as Hyundai, Nissan and Tesla, may provide complimentary public charging at certain chargers.

CAR MANUFACTURERS ADAPT

Electric cars today are the fastest-growing segment of the auto industry, but they still make up a small portion of new car sales: about 3% of the global total, according to the International Energy Agency. Electric vehicles are purchased mainly by affluent early adopters who are drawn to the luxury models made by Tesla, which dominates the business, and by environmentally-conscious consumers. However, despite getting a relatively slow start, it appears that hybrid and electric vehicles are here to stay. Nearly every car manufacturer is producing some sort of alternative for fuel-efficiency. In January, General Motors announced that it plans to phase out petroleumpowered cars and trucks and sell only vehicles that have zero tailpipe emissions by 2035. Other manufacturers have made similar promises. Daimler, which makes Mercedes-Benz cars, has said it would have an electric or hybrid version of each of its models by 2022, and Volkswagen has promised an electric version for each of its models by 2030.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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SMILES PER CarGALLON Clubs Bring Auto Enthusiasts Together

BY A.W. WEBB

Auto enthusiasts can find a wide variety of car clubs to join in northeastern Oklahoma. They'll enjoy camaraderie with a group of like-minded people engaging around a common interest. Rod Nordstrom, president of the Cimarron Region Porsche Club of America, said he realized a lifelong dream when he joined the group of Porsche fans 12 years ago. "Pretty quickly, everybody knows everybody," Nordstrom said. "The second I stepped into the room and felt the joy and passion of the people around me, I felt at home."

CIMARRON REGION PORSCHE CLUB OF AMERICA

TULSA VETTE SET

OKLAHOMA MUSTANG CLUB

GREEN COUNTRY CLASSIC MUSTANGS

www.cimarronregionpca.org

www.tulsavetteset.com

www.okmustangclub.com

www.gccmustangs.com

Open to gearheads, leisure drivers, racers or people who are just interested in Porsches, the Cimarron Region Porsche Club of America hosts many social, competitive and educational events. Members can learn to pick the perfect line around the track, gain better technical knowledge of their Porsche or just share a meal with like-minded car enthusiasts.

Tulsa Vette Set aims to bring together Corvette enthusiasts to help grow friendships, share technical skills and knowledge and provide Corvette-centric social gatherings. Tulsa Vette Set hosts various events such as “Vettogethers,” car shows, dinners and cruises. While there are many one-day cruises, Tulsa Vette Set also hosts overnight trips and at least one extended cruise a year.

Oklahoma Mustang Club (OMC) dedicates itself to the care, preservation and celebration of Mustangs from vintage to current day models. The OMC hosts car shows, cruise-ins and “pony drives,” giving Mustang owners and supporters a chance to enjoy and learn about Mustangs in a family-friendly environment. Mustang ownership is not a prerequisite for club membership.

NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA MIATA CLUB

ANTIQUE AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF AMERICA – TULSA REGION

NEOKLA SCCA

TULSA CHEVY CLASSICS

www.neomiata.com

www.tulsa.aaca.com

http://www.neoklascca.org

www.tulsachevys.com

While based in Tulsa, the Northeastern Oklahoma Miata Club includes Miata owners and enthusiasts throughout northeastern Oklahoma. The Northeastern Oklahoma Miata Club hosts monthly meetings, club drives, and dinners.

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The Tulsa Region Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) is for owners and enthusiasts of all vintage automobiles. The club even expands its definitions to include motorcycles, scooters, buses and race cars. The Tulsa Region AACA hosts meetings, tours and other activities to build fellowship in the antique automobile community.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

NeOkla SCCA, the Northeastern Oklahoma Chapter of the Sports Car Club of America, is a club for people who want to drive fast (legally). Covering Tulsa, Green Country and all of northeastern Oklahoma, NeOkla SCCA organizes competitions, ranging from track events, road competitions and autocross.

Green Country Classic Mustangs is a regional branch of the Mustang Club of America. Green Country Classic Mustangs is dedicated to the preservation and enjoyment of Mustangs of all kinds. Green Country Classic Mustangs hosts club meetings, “show ‘n' shines,” cruises and high-speed touring events.

Tulsa Chevy Classics works to promote interest, preservation and restoration of Chevy cars and trucks from 1911-1972. They host monthly meetings and activities, like car shows, club cruises, parades and picnics. Tulsa Chevy Classics hosts a car show in conjunction with the Bluegrass & Chili Festival. Chevy ownership is not necessary for membership.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


STAY FIT WITH

LIFE PACE BY ADRIAN ROLLE, INTAKE COORDINATOR

LIFE’S ADULT DAY HEALTH Safe, affordable daytime care for older adults. Call (918) 664-9000 for more information or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Adult Day Health is following active safety protocols.

Most people have either received physical therapy (PT) at some point or know a loved one who has. Typically, people receive physical therapy at an outpatient clinic, in the hospital immediately following surgery or during a required stay at a skilled nursing facility. Physical therapy within a PACE program is just a little bit different. LIFE PACE – a Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly – is a comprehensive, coordinated senior healthcare program that uses a team approach to provide a variety of services: medical, skilled therapies (physical, occupational and speech therapies), behavioral, dietary, nursing, medications, transportation, social, recreation, hospitalizations, caregiver training, basic health supplies and durable medical equipment. One of the primary benefits of the PACE program is accessibility to all the services mentioned above. With the natural aging process of our physical selves, PT is a must-have. Anyone who has struggled to get out of bed in the morning, experienced chronic pain or simply felt a tweak in their back by climbing a staircase can attest to this. As a participant of LIFE PACE, you receive an initial PT assessment where a physical therapist evaluates your situation and provides a customized plan of care to help you achieve your best possible health. You will then receive as many physical therapy sessions as needed, as well as regular progress evaluations to help find out what is working best and what needs to be added to your plan of care. Things such as home exercise programs, modalities for pain, caregiver training, patient education on pain management, body mechanics, etc. are all included in the care you receive. Physical therapy at LIFE PACE focuses not only on improving and correcting impairment, but also on preventing issues that may occur down the road. Physical therapists can also assess the need for assistive devices and order the most appropriate equipment for each participant. LIFE PACE therapists provide one-on-one training on how to make the best use of each device. Furthermore, when equipment gets old, it's replaced at no cost to you. Finally, PT at LIFE PACE is based on necessity, progress and results. You have a team of professionals giving you advice on what exercises or activities could help you, or if you have a problem that requires some physical therapy. And if you do need physical therapy, you get as many sessions as you need without having to count the number of sessions authorized by your insurance company. With LIFE PACE, you can receive the care you need without limitations...the way it should be.

Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly

PACE If you or someone you care about could benefit from LIFE PACE, contact a LIFE PACE specialist at (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Español).

www.LIFEPACE.org www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

21


TRIPS on a TANKFUL BY KAREN SZABO

As more Oklahomans get vaccinated, many of us are ready to travel – just maybe not so far away. With these trips on a tankful, you can hit the open road and explore interesting and entertaining destinations!

CRYSTAL BRIDGES

Bentonville, Arkansas (479) 418-5700 • www.crystalbridges.org Located in nearby Bentonville, Arkansas, Crystal Bridges is a popular destination for many Oklahomans. The museum’s permanent collection spans five centuries of American artwork from early American to the present and is always free to view. You can download the museum’s free app to your Apple or Android device for an audio tour of the exhibitions or check out a device with the app pre-loaded from guest services in the main lobby at no cost. The app offers interactive trail maps, art and plant guides and audio-tour information about many of the fascinating features of Crystal Bridges’ grounds. The museum also offers temporary exhibitions, along with year-round programming for all ages, so be sure to check their website when planning your trip.

TALLGRASS PRAIRIE PRESERVE Pawhuska, Oklahoma (918) 287-4803 • www.nature.org

SEEKING MORE ADVENTURES? For additional Oklahoma destinations to visit, check out the 2021 Oklahoma travel guide online or order a free copy at www.travelok.com.

The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve near Pawhuska spans 39,000 acres and is home to one of the largest buffalo herds in the country, as well as other wildlife like white-tailed deer, bobcats, beavers and more. The scenic drive takes you through the heart of the preserve and adjacent private ranches. Starting and ending in Pawhuska, the complete route is about 50 miles and takes around two hours with time for stopping. Take an easy walk through the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve’s self-guided nature trail or check out the longer 2-mile trail.

WOOLAROC WILDLIFE P

Bartlesville, Ok (918) 336-030

Woolaroc is a 3, for Frank Phillips Company. The p animals, includin to 1926. Woolar features painting and W.R. Leigh. baskets from ab dating back to p see Frank Phillip petting barn and


TURNER FALLS PARK AND THE ARBUCKLE MOUNTAINS

Davis, Oklahoma (580) 369-2988 • www.turnerfallspark.com The town of Davis offers several outdoor treasures to discover within the Arbuckle Mountains. Home of the popular Turner Falls Park, Davis attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors every year with its magnificent natural beauty. You’ll find the tallest waterfall in Oklahoma – the stunning 77-foot Turner Falls – along with swimming holes, climbing spots and hidden caves. Be sure to visit the 1930s Collings Castle inside Turner Falls Park and explore the maze-like ruins of this former private home. Take a walk – or drive – on the wild side at the 200-acre Arbuckle Wilderness Park. You’ll see an eccentric collection of wild animals, including white rhino, giraffes, camels, llamas, zebras, emu and much more. Explore in your own vehicle along the drive-through safari road or join a bus tour before visiting the petting zoo.

C RANCH, MUSEUM & PRESERVE

klahoma 07 • www.woolaroc.org

,700-acre property built in 1925 s, founder of Phillips Petroleum preserve hosts diverse varieties of ng a bison herd that dates back roc’s 50,000-square-foot museum gs by Thomas Moran, John Clymer Other exhibits include pottery and bout 40 American Indian tribes, some prehistoric civilizations. Visitors can ps' eight-bedroom lodge, visit the d hike property trails.

GREAT SALT PLAINS STATE PARK

ALABASTER CAVERNS STATE PARK

One of Oklahoma’s most unique state parks, Great Salt Plains State Park features huge, barren salt flats leftover from a vast ancient ocean that covered Oklahoma in prehistoric times. Visitors can hike, bike, swim or enjoy a day of fishing and boating on the Great Salt Plains Lake – where the water is about half as salty as ocean water. From April 1 to October 15, you can dig for the unique hourglassshaped crystals that are only found here. The area also is one of the best locations in Oklahoma for birding, with more than 300 species of protected birds.

Alabaster Caverns State Park is home to the world’s largest natural gypsum cave, the only one of its kind in the U.S. Daily guided tours take visitors through these magnificent caverns every hour, on the hour, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. If you feel like delving deeper underground, you can try wild caving, a form of spelunking, in four of the caverns which are reserved for this purpose. No matter the season, make sure to bring a sweater or jacket when touring the caverns. Without sunlight, temperatures in the caves can be quite chilly.

Jet, Oklahoma (580) 626-4731 • www.travelok.com

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Freedom, Oklahoma (580) 621-3381 • www.travelok.com

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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SAVE A LIFE

BUCKLE UP.

E V E R Y T R I P. E V E R Y T I M E . BY KAREN J. O’BRIEN

When people started driving motor vehicles in the late 1800s, those vehicles didn’t reach speeds much faster than the horses more commonly in use. Drivers pushed for faster vehicles that could travel farther in shorter times. Increases in speed brought increased – sometimes fatal – consequences when things went wrong. By the 1930s, physicians became aware of the benefit of lap belts in reducing injuries. Doctors installed the restraints in their own vehicles and urged manufacturers to make them standard equipment in automobiles. PUBLIC AWARENESS

By 1955, the National Safety Council, American College of Surgeons and the International Association of Chiefs of Police supported the installation of lap belts in all automobiles. But their serious use in vehicles only started after actor James Dean died in a traffic accident that same year. Publicity about his death brought to the public eye the potential of lap belts to curb fatalities. In 1963, the United States government issued mandatory standards for seat belts sold in interstate commerce, and by 1964 about half of U.S. states required seat belts in front seats. The National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA) required lap shoulder belts in all new cars starting in 1968. Air bags were required beginning in 1998. LIFE-SAVING CAMPAIGNS

Evidence shows that wearing a seat belt every time motorists get into vehicles not only reduces fatalities, it also often reduces the severity of injuries. With federal funding from NHTSA, the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office and local law enforcement groups take part in focused safety programs throughout the year to help save lives and increase seat belt use in the state. “Click It or Ticket” is a national campaign that reminds the public to use their seat belts. Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Eric Foster said the “Click It or Ticket” campaign takes place every summer through Labor Day and includes an emphasis on impaired driving called ENDUI.

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“The number of Oklahoma unrestrained occupant injuries in collisions has slowly diminished over the last 10 years,” he said. In 2009, 300 of the 507 fatalities in passenger vehicles were unrestrained, but in 2019, 208 of the 407 fatalities were unrestrained passengers, a reduction of 8.1% over 10 years, according to Foster. Recently, the Oklahoma Department of Transportation and Oklahoma Turnpike Authority launched a year-long safety education initiative, “Make Safety Stick: Everybody Click,” to educate drivers and encourage behaviors that reduce crashes and save lives on state roadways. The effort focuses on all aspects of safe driving with increasing seat belt usage statewide as the main goal. CONVINCING EVIDENCE

According to The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, without proper seat belt use, occupants can be thrown from the vehicle causing injury and death. Car occupants are twice as likely to die if they are ejected from a vehicle in a non-rollover crash and four times as likely to die if ejected from a vehicle in a rollover crash, compared to those not thrown from vehicles.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

Having unbelted passengers poses risks to everyone in a vehicle during a crash – even if the other occupants are belted in. Studies show unbelted passengers in back seats increase risks to the driver and front-seat passengers in frontal crashes, and to each other in side-impact crashes. Unbelted occupants increase the risk of injury or death to other occupants in the vehicle by 40%. In frontal crashes, an unbelted back seat passenger behind the driver increases the risk of driver fatality by 137% compared to a belted passenger. Wearing seat belts is the single most effective way to prevent serious injuries and save people from dying in vehicle crashes. It's also the law. Under the Oklahoma Mandatory Seat Belt Use Act, you can get pulled over just for not wearing your seat belt, and both the driver and front-seat passenger must wear seat belts at all times. If cited for a seat belt violation, you can expect to pay a fine from $20 to $73. But remember, the real cost for not wearing a seat belt could be your life, so buckle up – every trip, every time.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


TSON GER WA

WEN BY JULIE

gly increasin ant n a is r a ca ho w Leasing ion for those w ars. ye opt popular ehicle every few r you. a new v ight be right fo m See if it

A car is a significant purchase. Kelley Blue Book analysts report the average new vehicle costs an estimated $41,066 in 2021. No wonder most people choose to use a lease or a conventional car loan to finance the acquisition. Depending on your goals, each method offers pros and cons. A good understanding of both is key to selecting the best option. THE BASICS

From a financial standpoint, many experts would tell you the best way to buy a car is to pay cash for a pre-owned vehicle to avoid both interest and immediate depreciation. However, most people simply aren’t in a position to pay cash for a purchase of this size, and auto loans or leases are the only options available. Which method you choose depends on priorities. For some, it’s a simple matter of dollars and cents. For others, it comes down to vehicle use and personal preference. In general, leasing a car is similar to renting it from the dealer for a certain length of time, usually 36 or 48 months. Once the lease period ends, you have the option of returning the car to the dealer or buying it at a pre-determined amount, which is defined in the lease contract. While you typically get lower monthly payments with a lease, you never own the vehicle, and you’re subject to mileage limits and the obligation to maintain the car’s condition throughout the lease. If you buy a car with a loan, you own the vehicle after the loan is paid off. AUTO LOANS

Buying a vehicle with a conventional auto loan is fairly straightforward. You borrow money from a lending institution, like a bank or credit union, www.LIFEseniorservices.org

and make monthly payments for a number of years. Part of each payment is interest, and the rest is principal. A higher interest rate means a higher payment. As you repay principal, you build equity. At the end of the loan, the car belongs to you. Advantages to buying a car with a loan include the fact that you own the vehicle once the loan is paid off, and you can keep it as long as you like. You can sell or trade in your car at any time, and money from the sale can be used to pay off the loan balance or finance a new purchase. Although it can affect the resale or trade-in value of your car, you’re free to drive it and maintain it as you choose. There are no annual mileage limitations and you don’t have to worry about wear and tear. On the other hand, loan payments are usually higher than lease payments because you’re paying off the entire purchase price of the car, plus interest and other finance charges, taxes and fees. LEASES

If you’re a business owner who can deduct certain vehicle expenses, leasing may make sense. It can also be a good choice if you simply want to drive a new car every three years, and the cost is worth it to you. Lease payments depend on several factors, some of which are negotiable. They include the sales

price, the length of the lease, expected mileage, the residual value of the vehicle and taxes and fees. Some fees vary depending on the dealer and leasing company. An acquisition or bank fee is similar to points on a mortgage. It’s commonly due when you sign the lease. Some leasing agencies charge a disposition fee that comes due at the end of the lease if you don’t purchase the vehicle. Benefits of leasing a car include lower monthly payments. You also get the latest technology with a new car. This can include updated safety, connectivity and entertainment features. Your car always has warranty coverage, unless you have an unusually long lease term, and trading it in is simple. Disadvantages include the fact that you never own the vehicle, and you always have a car payment. At the end of the lease term, you own nothing. You’re subject to mileage limitations, and you have to maintain and return the car in good shape. Generally speaking, you’re also required to use “factory parts” in maintaining and repairing the vehicle. A lease is a binding contract, and it can be difficult to obtain if you have bad credit. Leasing can be complicated, and lease deals are limited and usually restricted to shoppers with excellent credit.

From a financial perspective, for savings over the long haul, it’s better to buy used and pay cash. However, for many people, whether by choice or necessity, obtaining a vehicle means a lease or a loan. Consider your goals and desires; arm yourself with information and shop around to make the best decision for your unique situation. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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RIDE SERVICE

GETTING AROUND TOWN

BY JOEY MICHELLE FARQUA

There are many options that get you from A to B. If you or your family are concerned about your driving, consider getting an assessment or checking out these alternatives.

Many of us have been driving for 40-plus years and may view driving as a major aspect of maintaining our independence. Everyone ages differently, and there is no set cutoff for when someone should stop driving. Older adults are more likely to be involved in traffic offenses and accidents. But why?

coordination, flexibility, strength and memory, which can impact one’s ability to safely control a car. Our reaction times can slow with age; neck pain and stiffness can make it more difficult to check blind spots, and joint pain can make it difficult to move our foot from the gas to the brake.

As we age, slower motor reflexes, vision and hearing weaknesses and worsening health conditions can become a problem. Aging also tends to result in a reduction of

With all of this said, aging does not automatically mean we should stop driving or even that our driving abilities will weaken. There are many things you can do to continue

driving safely, including addressing the physical issues that can interfere with driving. Still, it’s important to know the limitations and not be shy about admitting them to ourselves and others. We can still enjoy our independence with or without driving. Helpful Tip – AAA and AARP offer safety programs designed for drivers age 50 or older. See Driving Assessments and Resources in the Community Services section of LIFE's Vintage Guide to Housing & Services.

THE COST OF DRIVING According to AAA, the cost of gasoline, car maintenance, insurance, license and registration, loan finance charges and depreciation costs the average person

$8,849 PER YEAR. By using ride services, you may have extra money to spend on other items and activities that you value – like gifts for your grandkids or even yourself.

Statista reports that the national average

UBER RIDE IS $25. Even if you take six Uber rides a week at the national average of $25 a ride, you will still spend less than $8,000 a year.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

Many communities in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and surrounding areas, provide public transportation, ride-sharing and special programs that can get you around town to doctor’s appointments, the grocery store and even to leisure activities like visiting friends. 1. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION – Tulsa Transit runs throughout Tulsa and lists schedules online. Reduced fares and senior programs are available to those who are on a fixed income. Broken Arrow Connection is a fixed route, but it offers some locations not on the fixed route with advanced reservations. It will connect to the express bus to downtown Tulsa. Tulsa Transit also offers the Lift Program – a curb-tocurb paratransit service for Tulsa-area residents who have a disability. Appointments are required, and it’s only $3.50 one way. Cimarron Public Transit System covers Bartlesville, Bristow, Pawhuska, Ponca City and Sapulpa. KI Bois Area Transit System covers rural public transportation in Adair, Cherokee, Haskell, Hughes, Latimer, LeFlore, McIntosh, Okmulgee, Okfuskee, Pittsburg, Sequoyah and Wagoner counties. Pelivan Transit offers transportation in Craig, Delaware, Mayes, Ottawa, Rogers and northern Tulsa counties. Discounted fares are available for people age 60 or older. 2. RIDE-HAILING – Lyft and Uber provide on-demand transportation using your smartphone. Both have wheelchair-accessible vehicles and drivers. Lyft users needing accessible transportation can use Access Mode to request these services. Riders are billed for services provided, and the cost depends on the accessible services, time of day and distance. Helpful Tip – If you do not have a smartphone, Go Go Grandparent, (855) 464-6872, will connect you to Uber and Lyft. Their operators are available 24/7. 3. MEDICAL TRANSPORT AND MORE – Healthride is a non-emergency medical transport that is wheelchair-accessible and will transport you to and from doctors appointments, church events and longdistance transfers. SoonerRide is a non-emergency transportation service for Medicaid recipients only. Reservations are required, and you must make them three days in advance. Morton Comprehensive Health Services offers transportation services for seniors 60 and older – including rides to grocery stores and pharmacies. Indian Health Care Resource Center offers curb-tocurb transportation to medical appointments Monday through Friday and round-trip transportation from Tulsa to Claremore Indian Hospital on Monday. You must be Native American with a CDIB card or other tribal documentation. The Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma, Koweta Indian Health Facility and Osage Nation Transportation Services offer similar transportation services. The American Cancer Association offers free transportation to doctor appointments and cancer treatments. Ernest Childers VA Outpatient Clinic offers a daily shuttle to service to and from the Muskogee VA Medical Center. Helpful Tip – For additional transportation services, see Transportation Resources in the Community Services section of LIFE's Vintage Guide to Housing & Services.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


SPOTLIGHT Email your spotlight-worthy stories to Dee Duren at dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org.

according to the regional branch of the Red Cross.

Tulsa Healthcare Worker Honored by Red Cross The American Red Cross recognized the work of Tulsa medication aide Lashon Moses who saved a senior living resident from choking on food. It was the second time the 54-year-old woman had been honored for saving the life of a person in her care,

Moses was working at University Village Assisted Living in February 2020 when she heard people calling for help from the dining room. She calmly administered the Heimlich maneuver on a 96-year-old resident, dislodging the obstruction to their trachea before going about her shift. “It just came natural to me,” said Moses. “It was just like part of my job. If something happens, you just have to stay calm in that situation.” Moses said she first received Red Cross training years ago and has updated it to maintain her professional certification. She is currently caring for a family member at home.

"When Lashon was employed here, she was a great asset to our team and always made sure her residents received exceptional care,” said Ryan D. Alsup, administrator of University Village Assisted Living. Alsup nominated Moses for the American Red Cross Lifesaving Award, which was presented to her this spring. American Red Cross Regional CEO Alice Townsend said it’s important to honor the actions of heroic individuals like Moses. “She serves as an inspiration for others at a time when it is especially important that we take care of one another,” she said. Townsend encouraged others to enroll in Red Cross safety classes.

For more information on first aid and other training programs offered by the America Red Cross, go online to www.redcross.org/take-a-class or call (800) REDCROSS.

creatively at age 56. He has published two books on poetry, “Lookin’ at Life” and “Still Lookin’,” as well as several volumes of poetry.

Late-Blooming Writer Appointed Oklahoma Poet Laureate A self-described cowboy poet is Oklahoma’s poet laureate for 2021-22, Governor Kevin Stitt’s office announced. Joe Russell Kreger of Tonkawa assumes the role most recently filled by Tulsan Joy Harjo. Kreger is a farmer and rancher who began writing

“It is an honor to appoint Joe Russell Kreger as the 20212022 Oklahoma State Poet Laureate,” said Governor Stitt. “Joe’s journey to creative writing shows that it is never too late for new ventures, and I look forward to this rancher turned ‘cowboy poet’ carrying on our Oklahoma tradition and promoting his work across the state.” Kreger earned a bachelor’s degree in animal science and a master’s in agricultural education at Oklahoma State University. He now devotes his time to writing and Kreger Ranch, a commercial beef operation. 

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“Over the next two years, school children and other audiences across Oklahoma will have opportunities to find themselves absorbed in the stories Joe conveys in his poetry,” said Oklahoma Arts Council Executive Director Amber Sharples. “Joe’s work as a cowboy poet is filled with the wisdom gleaned from a life defined by a strong work ethic, a humble nature and the heartbreaks and blessings encountered along the way. His connection to the land and the inspiration he draws from it are defining trademarks that will speak to the hearts of Oklahomans everywhere.”

Native American Naval Officer Remembered Pictured above is Lt. Commander Ernest E. Evans at the commissioning ceremony for USS Johnston in 1943. The Naval History and Heritage Command recently honored the memory of Commander Ernest Evans, a Native American from Pawnee, Oklahoma who was awarded the Medal of Honor for giving his life in the Philippine Islands on October 25, 1944. Evans was the commanding officer of USS Johnston, a World War II destroyer that was lost in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Wreckage from his ship was recently discovered in a mission sponsored by undersea technology company Caladan Oceanic and led by retired naval officer Victor Vescovo. Images from the site show the ship’s hull number 557, confirming its identity. “USS Johnston was sunk at the World War II Battle off Samar when she and a small group of destroyers took on and stopped a Japanese flotilla made up of much larger battleships, cruisers and destroyers,” said Rear Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison, historian. “This action allowed MacArthur to retake the Philippines.” Evans and his crew were outgunned and outmanned when they charged into a massive line of Japanese warships to protect the American landing force attempting the liberate the Philippine Islands, according to the Naval History and Heritage Command. Despite being heavily outmatched, Evans gave the order to attack a major portion of the Japanese fleet that was targeting a U.S. escort carrier. “Commence firing on that cruiser, draw her fire on us and away from Gambier Bay,” Evans ordered his crew. After more than two hours, the Johnston was surrounded by enemy ships and Evans ordered his crew to abandon the ship. Shortly afterward, the destroyer rolled over and began to sink. Out of the crew of 327, only 141 survived. Evans was fatally wounded and received the Medal of Honor posthumously. He was the first Native American in the U.S. Navy and one of only two destroyer captains in WWII to be so honored. Evans enlisted in the Navy after high school and was accepted into the Naval Academy’s Class of 1931.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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HEALTHY LIVING

HIT THE ROAD Virtually With These At-Home Workouts

Five Hazards of Sharing the Road

BY KIMBERLY BLAKER

Exercising outdoors is great, but face it – it isn't always a possible or safe option. Allergies, inclement weather, too much traffic or too little time are just some of the reasons working out indoors might be appealing. You may be recovering from an injury or need to work out at a time you don’t feel safe being outdoors alone.

pedals, most closely simulates the feel of pedaling an outdoor bicycle and is in the lower range of cost. An air bike is a type of upright bicycle with a fan to add resistance and replicate the feeling of wind experienced when bicycling outdoors. More expensive models have electronic controls like the machines commonly found in gyms.

EXERCISE EQUIPMENT TO SIMULATE OUTDOOR EXERCISE

Recumbent bikes are lower to the ground and put the rider in a reclined position. The pedals are positioned out in front of the seat with a seat back to provide back support. It's more laid back and suitable for a variety of fitness levels. Recumbent bicycles may be safer for those who are more out of shape, overweight or new to bicycling. Recumbent bikes do take up more space because of their design.

When you wish you could get out on the road, there are ways to replicate the experience at home. Popular brands of at-home exercise equipment include NordicTrack, ProForm, Peloton and Echelon. Many others are available as well, offering varying options and price points.

1. Stationary Bicycles

Suppose you're temporarily unable to bicycle outdoors because of an injury or weather or prefer a safer option. In that case, you can replicate the feeling of cycling outdoors with an indoor stationary bike. There are many options for indoor bicycles depending on your wants and needs. Costs vary depending on the type of bike and features and range from around $200 to $2,000 or higher for more advanced equipment. Upright bicycles are the most similar to outdoor bikes offering a smaller seat above the pedals. They tend to be lighter weight and have a smaller footprint. You can adjust the resistance and even stand up to change up your workout. A stationary bike with a flywheel, a weighted disc connected to the

Dual-action stationary bikes are combined with another type of exercise equipment like an elliptical or stair-climber to add variety to your workout. Bike trainer stands like the BalanceFrom Bike Trainer Stand ($99) can temporarily convert an outdoor bicycle for indoor use when you can’t take it out on the road. This is a much less expensive option but does take a bit more effort if you use the same bicycle you commonly ride outside. Interactive bikes, such as those from Peloton that are connected to apps like iFit, come equipped with screens to incorporate a virtual aspect to your ride but tend to be more expensive.

TYPES OF STATIONARY BICYCLES

UPRIGHT

Similar to outdoor bikes, smaller seat above the pedals

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RECUMBENT

Lower to the ground, placing riders in a reclined position

DUAL-ACTION A bike combined with another type of exercise equipment

BIKE TRAINER

Temporarily converts an outdoor bicycle for indoor use

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

INTERACTIVE

Attached screen with an app providing a virtual experience

Exercising outdoors has many benefits, but sharing the road with vehicles comes with increased risk. 1. UNSAFE TERRAIN – Streets may not have bike lanes or sidewalks. They may also have hazards like potholes, pebbles, debris, grates or train tracks. Trails may be washed out or have uneven footing and other tripping hazards. 2. ACCIDENTS OR CRASHES – Motorists and others on the road may be distracted or impaired. People also may not know or adhere to proper safety protocols or laws for bicyclists or pedestrians. 3. ANIMAL ATTACKS – Dog attacks are a risk for cyclists and runners or walkers. Exercising outdoors also exposes you to other animals that may pose a threat. 4. RISK OF INJURY – A head injury, from a small cut to traumatic brain injury, is the most common injury for outdoor cyclists. The highest rate of fatalities while bicycling outside is among adults aged 50-59. Also, outdoor exercise is often harder on your body, increasing the possibility of injury or strain. 5. OTHER SAFETY CONCERNS – When exercising outdoors, especially solo, there's also increased concern of being a victim of violent crime. In a study by Wearsafe Labs, 34% of people said they feel afraid when working out alone outdoors, especially in the dark.

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LIFE’S VIRTUAL PROGRAMMING June 2021

Follow LIFE Senior Services on Facebook for video outreach, news, local events and resources for seniors. Find the following content and more at www.facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices during June.

Zwift is an example of a virtual fitness adventure program. 2. Treadmills and Ellipticals

If you enjoy running, hiking or walking outdoors, treadmills and ellipticals are indoor options that can give you a similar experience. Treadmill costs vary significantly depending on features and brands, from the low to mid-hundreds. They can cost $2,500 or more for higher-end products. Ellipticals have a similar range, with many of the best products for at-home use ranging between $1,000-2,000. There are basic treadmill models which can fold up or fit into small spaces for walking and slow jogging. More advanced treadmills and ellipticals can better replicate outdoor changes in elevation. They can sync to actual trails and roads, automatically changing the machine's elevation or resistance to match the outdoor environment.

3. Immersive Programs

iFit is an interactive fitness program compatible with many different stationary bikes, treadmills and other indoor workout equipment from several companies. There are live and recorded workout videos. iFit offers a large number of immersive experiences. In these, you feel like you're biking or trekking through far-off places around the globe or even on your own path traced on Google Maps. If you have compatible equipment, it can adjust the resistance, incline and speed to match the environment. The yearly family plan is $396, or $39 per month. An annual individual plan is $180. Zwift is a virtual fitness adventure program app for $14.99 a month. You create an avatar that travels through one of the virtual courses in France or Zwift's own created world, Watopia. There are options for either running and walking or bicycling. You can earn badges and complete challenges to increase motivation. There are also community events where you complete routes with other users. Peloton offers an all-access membership app and their own stationary bikes and treadmills with screens for home-based workouts. There are both live and recorded classes with a trainer and scenic rides that let you virtually travel real-life destinations using recorded video. Bikes start at $1,895, treadmills at $2,495. Digital membership is $12.99 a month (can be used without a Peloton machine) and $39 a month for the allaccess membership for those with a Peloton machine. Want the virtual experience of being outdoors while cutting costs? Look for videos on YouTube or other streaming services that simulate the experience of bicycling, hiking, walking or running all around the world. When shopping for exercise equipment, check the listings on Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist and other sites where people sell used items. Second-hand equipment comes “as is,” but a careful shopper may find a good deal.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

“Ask SeniorLine” With Sarah Tronnier, Lead Case Manager Fridays, June 4, 11, 18 and 25 • 2 p.m.

Join Sarah, LIFE’s lead case manager for SeniorLine, most Fridays at 2 p.m. Sarah enjoys connecting with and encouraging LIFE followers while sharing tips on senior living, family caregiving, senior resources and the latest news regarding COVID-19 and vaccines. Special topics this month are: • June 11 – Signs Your Loved One May Need More Assistance • June 25 – Caregiver Stress Syndrome

“Medicare Advantage Plans and Medigap Policies” Thursday, June 3 • 10 a.m. Kelly McEver of Community Care will explain the differences between Medicare Advantage plans and Medigap policies. Community Care is a presenting sponsor for the 2021 Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair.

“Alzheimer’s Research in Tulsa” Tuesday, June 8 • 10 a.m.

Central States Research of Tulsa focuses on medical research and conducts clinical trials primarily related to Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Avery Jackson from CSR will update us on their latest research and medical trials for those with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, as well as a trial looking at preventative Alzheimer’s treatment for individuals 55+ experiencing no memory issues.

LIFE’s Senior Centers Writers’ Symposium Barry Friedman, “You Don’t Know Jack” Thursday, June 10 • 10 a.m.

Fuel your writing ambitions at the second installment of LIFE’s Writers’ Symposium. Author, journalist and comedian Barry Friedman will be live from Legacy Plaza East, 5330 E. 31st St. He will discuss his popular blog featuring his 94-year-old father and give insight into his approach to writing. Reserve your spot at www.LIFEseniorservices.org or by calling (918) 744-6760. A video of his talk will be available on LIFE’s Facebook page. For more information, see page 15.

“Beware of Current Scams in Oklahoma” Tuesday, June 15 • 10 a.m.

Ray Walker from the Oklahoma Insurance Department will tell viewers about scams currently targeting Oklahomans, including some directly related to COVID-19. This eye-opening presentation could save you a lot of headaches and money. Oklahoma Insurance Department is a presenting sponsor of the Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair.

“Why Is There a Critical Need for Affordable Senior Housing?” Tuesday, June 22 • 10 a.m.

Having trouble finding a place to live that meets your budget? You are not alone! Sarah Tirrell from LIFE’s Vintage Housing and Dee Goodall from Wilhoit Properties will discuss some of the factors impacting the need for affordable senior housing as well as available options.

“Keys to Healthy Aging” Tuesday, June 29 • 10 a.m.

Melodie Powders, coordinator of LIFE’s Senior Centers, has witnessed the difference staying active can make in both the health and quality of life of older adults. She will be sharing tips for healthy aging that she’s learned from members of LIFE’s Senior Centers at East Side and Southminster.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

WORD SEARCH: AUTOMOBILES Find and circle all of the words.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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PUZZLE PARTNERS

MUMBO JUMBO A mumbo jumbo is a list of words/hints for you to unscramble. You then take designated letters from each word/hint to come up with the final word that is associated with each hint you have unscrambled. Unscramble each of the clue words. Take the letters that appear boxes and unscramble them for the final word. in Answers on page 39. PUZZLE THEME: A vessel powered by a combustion or electric engine, transporting people to a selected destination.

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Nobody Cares for Residents Like

Saint Simeon’s.

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stop in the kitchen. Here, everybody’s job is whatever our residents need.”

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BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 39.

“I make sure our residents love what they eat. That’s why I take extra time to make purées for those who can’t eat solid foods look just like the regular entrées. But it’s more than a job for me. It’s taking care of family. I watch football with a particular resident on Sundays. I play chess with another. Everybody knows ‘Mr. Larry’ and I know them. I love our residents.” See more at: SaintSimeons.org/Join

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Interested in exploring senior living options with exceptional resident care? Call Donna at: 918-794-1902

Saint Simeon’s is a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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Recommended Reads

Bunkering With Books LOVE AND MARRIAGE AND CONTRIBUTING FACTORS BY CONNIE CRONLEY James Thurber, one of my favorite authors, wrote “Love is blind, but desire just doesn’t give a good damn.” To challenge that thesis, here are books about love and marriage – and the powerful influences of finances, religion, ambition and society.

world. Martha was accused of being a coquette and unworthy as a missionary’s wife. Such an impugned reputation ruined any hope of marriage or teaching position. Her very soul was endangered because breaking an engagement was tantamount to adultery, one theologian told her.

A history professor’s new nonfiction book with the long title “Doomed Romance: Broken Hearts, Lost Souls, and Sexual Tumult in NineteenthCentury America” seemed unlikely to be riveting reading. Wrong! It rivals a thrilling novel.

The scandal escalated to involve church leaders, the Dartmouth College president and the powerful Foreign Missions Board. It threatened to topple the Protestant evangelical movement. It shook the accepted notion of manhood for young men charged with shaping female character and challenged the fledgling liberation of educated young women.

Christine Leigh Heyrman, an award-winning author of two books about religion in history, came across the story of a titillating 19th century New England love triangle. “Years spent in the company of high-minded people have given me a taste for low gossip,” she wrote, “and that’s how this book began.” Missionaries were the rock stars of the mid-1800s. Young male theological students aspired to become daring missionaries to exotic locations; young women longed to marry them and share the glory. Enter adventurous Martha Parker, a 21-yearold schoolteacher. She may, or may not, have accepted the marriage proposal of Thomas Tenney, a gloomy schoolmaster training for the ministry. Along came charismatic Elnathan Gridley, a Yale graduate headed for a missionary assignment to the Ottoman Empire. Martha changed her mind about Thomas and accepted Elnathan. Spurned Thomas raised a fuss that rocked the hard-core Calvinists of their small

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To my surprise, two part-Cherokee young men from Oklahoma played a role. Cousins John Ridge and Elias Boudinot, students at the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, married white women from that community. This caused such an outrage, on the heels of the Martha-Thomas-Elnathan love triangle, the school was closed. As I read about this 1820 romantic drama, I

watched Autumn de Wilde’s movie “Emma” with its imaginative depictions of Emma by Anya Taylor-Joy (“The Queen’s Gambit”) and Mr. Knightly by Irish singer Johnny Flynn. I liked it so much, I reread my battered copy of Jane Austen’s 1815 novel and discovered deeper meaning. As Louis Menard points out in “For Love or Money” in The New Yorker (Oct. 5, 2020), Austen tells us how much money each of her

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

characters has because it drives their behavior. The average annual income in Britain then was 30 pounds, what Jane Fairfax might earn as a governess. Five hundred pounds a year, and no dependents, offered a comfortable lifestyle. Jane Austen’s father was an Anglican priest and teacher with an income of about 500 pounds a year, but he had a wife and eight children. Jane earned a total of 684 pounds for the four books published in her lifetime. Jane’s characters on the marriage market wanted more than that. The combined incomes of the loathsome Mr. and Mrs. Elton might near 1,000 pounds a year, which would pay for three female servants, a coachman, a footman, a carriage and horses. Emma had her own money of 30,000 pounds, and Mr. Darcy in “Pride and Prejudice” had a whopping 10,000 pounds a year. Fay Weldon’s book “Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen” (1984) reports that 70% of women in Austen’s time were unmarried because they had no dowry to give their husband to “offset their keep.” No wonder Mrs. Bennett in “Pride and Prejudice,” with no savings and the home entailed to a male relative, was desperate about the future of her five unmarried daughters. How spunky was Elizabeth Bennett initially to reject the wealthy Mr. Darcy. Emma’s father, Mr. Woodhouse, is comical in his concern about health, but death raged from infection, tuberculosis and childbirth. Sex, money, health, religion, women’s rights – issues of 200 years ago that are still in the news today.

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free assessments will be done on June 16, July 21 and August 18 at 7318 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa.

United Way Food Drive Set for June 25 The Tulsa Area United Way will hold a community-wide food drive Friday, June 25 as part of its Day of Caring events in 2021. The United Way is continuing to hold Day of Caring events quarterly this year, a process that started to address the urgent needs and challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Last year, the United Way was able to collect 50,000 pounds of food for people struggling with food insecurity. More than 2,000 donors in the community, including 144 companies, helped make an impact for thousands of people in the Tulsa area.

Tulsa Research Group Offers Free Memory Screenings Central States Research in Tulsa is offering free memory assessments one day each month in June, July and August. Central States Research is a dedicated medical research site that conducts clinical medical trials, primarily for those with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The memory assessment takes about 20 minutes and involves a quick interview with questions that will give insight into an individual’s memory performance. The

Ready to help meet that need in 2021? There will be several drop-off locations across Green Country for non-perishable food items, including one at LIFE Senior Services. The most needed foods include canned fruit, peanut butter, meal kits and canned protein. Please check your donations to make sure they are not past their expiration dates.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

To learn more about the memory screening and clinical trials, call (918) 645-5400 or visit www.centralstatesresearch.com.  

LIFE EDU ON FACEBOOK

Avery Jackson, Central States Research, gives an update on their latest research and medical trials for those with Alzheimer's. Watch Tuesday, June 8 at 10 a.m. on LIFE's Facebook page, www.facebook/LIFEseniorservices.

The exhibit is intended to foster education about the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre by making materials and resources available to children and adults, to build empathy by encouraging people to reflect on the human cost of racism and to promote healing through sharing the stories of Race Massacre survivors with a larger audience.

The following locations will accept food items from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, June 25. You don’t even have to leave your car! • LIFE Senior Services – 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa • Hilti – 5400 S. 122nd E. Ave., Tulsa • Hutcherson YMCA – 1120 E. Pine St., Tulsa • Jim Norton Toyota – 9809 S. Memorial Dr., Tulsa • Tulsa CARES – 3712 E. 11th St., Tulsa • Tulsa Area United Way – 1430 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa • Spirit Bank Bristow – 601 N. Main St., Bristow • Broken Arrow Neighbors – 315 W. College St., Broken Arrow • First Oklahoma Bank – 100 S. Riverfront Dr., Jenks • Owasso Community Resources – 109 N. Birch St., Owasso • Sand Springs Community Services – 114 W. 4th St., Sand Springs • Caring Community Friends – 12 W. Burnham Ave., Sapulpa • BancFirst Wagoner – 111 S. Casaver Ave., Wagoner

Several trials are enrolling now at CSR for those with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s, as well as a trial of preventative Alzheimer’s treatment for individuals 55 or older who are not experiencing memory issues. There may be compensation for time and travel, and all scans, treatment and physician visits are free for the participant.

Tulsa Library Commemorates 1921 Race Massacre The Tulsa City-County Library (TCCL) has opened a new exhibit called “TCCL Remembers – Commemorating Tulsa’s Race Massacre with Education, Empathy and Healing,” at Rudisill Regional Library, 1520 N. Hartford. The walkthrough exhibit is free for all ages during library hours through at least mid-June, according to TCCL.

The new exhibit spans three rooms and will allow visitors to discover the history and businesses that existed in Black Wall Street before 1921, a detailed timeline including firsthand accounts of the events of May 31 and June 1, 1921, and progress made toward healing in the 100 years since the massacre. There will be firsthand accounts from survivors filmed by author Eddie Faye Gates in the 1990s, as well as interviews with current Greenwood business owners. You can also watch videos featuring authors Hannibal Johnson and Clifton Taulbert, Kimberly Johnson, CEO at TCCL and Keith Jemison, Rudisill manager.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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SHARE YOUR TIME & TALENT To submit a volunteer opportunity, contact Dee Duren at dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1215.

 he Center For Individuals With T Physical Challenges The Center For Individuals With Physical Challenges has ongoing volunteer needs. The Center provides a variety of rehabilitative fitness, adaptive sports, recreation programs and community outings for people with physical challenges. Art studio and fitness center volunteers are needed Monday through Friday to help participants under the guidance of instructors. The Center also needs volunteers to help with horticultural programming, either during classes Monday through Friday or working in the garden area outside class times. The Center For Individuals With Physical Challenges is located at 815 S. Utica Ave. in Tulsa. To volunteer, go to the “How to Help” section at www.tulsacenter.org or contact Margie Crossno at (918) 794-4510.

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Unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly and most underrated agent of human change. – Bob Kerrey

 aint Francis Tulsa Tough S Join hundreds of volunteers helping with three days of cycling at Saint Francis Tulsa Tough, June 11, 12 and 13. Thousands of cyclists from all over the world attend the events, which include professional races, bicycle tours through the countryside and fun events for kids of all ages. Volunteers are needed before, after and during the Tulsa Tough weekend. Events take place in the Blue Dome District on Friday, Tulsa Arts District on Saturday and River Parks on Sunday. Race volunteers are needed to

help with registering riders, handing out water and handling race-day equipment. There are many jobs available during the touring rides as well, including manning rest stops, working the reception tent or helping with skilled positions like bike repairs and HAM radio operations.

Will Rogers Memorial Museum Will Rogers Memorial Museum wants you to become a Roper! Ropers greet museum visitors, introduce them to the museum, give directions, tours and more. All volunteers will go through detailed training by museum staff. To become a Roper, you will need to work at least two fivehour shifts per month, have a passion for sharing the life and legacy of Oklahoma native Will Rogers with others and undergo a background check. The museum is located at 1720 W. Will Rogers Blvd. in Claremore. Contact Harriet Kuykendall, volunteer coordinator at hkuykendall@sbcglobal.net. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

River Parks Authority The River Parks Authority maintains and develops the Arkansas River and adjacent land areas in Tulsa County for the economic and cultural benefit of the community. They need volunteers to work at numerous events held to build awareness of and encourage use of River Parks. Volunteers are needed at these events to sell beverages, check IDs and make guests feel welcome. In return, volunteers get free admission to the event and enjoy all kinds of entertainment while meeting others who love the city’s parks system. To volunteer, sign up at www.riverparks. org/volunteer, call (918) 596-2001 or send an email to staff@riverparks.org.

Volunteers will receive a Tulsa Tough T-shirt, snacks and beverages and the satisfaction of helping thousands of people have a great time. Sign up at www.tulsatough.com/volunteer.

If you would like more information on any of these opportunities, please contact the RSVP office at (918) 280-8656.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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PEOPLE & PLACES

Basketball team members from LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster are looking sharp as they prepare to hit the courts. LIFE Senior Services case managers pick up laundry baskets full of household items to deliver to area seniors. Thanks to Assistance League Tulsa for the donations!

Rain didn’t stop residents of The Linden at Stonehaven Square from experiencing the power of live music when the Union Renegade Regiment performed at Signature Symphony.

Margo, a resident at The Linden at Stonehaven Square, tries her hand at glassblowing during a visit to the Tulsa Glassblowing School at 7440 E. 7th St.

Two women experience part of the Tulsa City-County Library’s 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre exhibit at Rudisill Regional Library, 1520 N. Hartford.

Send Us Your Pictures Whether it's your traveling group, tennis buddies or a night on the town, we want your pictures. Submit high-resolution photos to dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org by the 1st of every month.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

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CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

AUTO REPAIR

Strickland Automotive Strickland Automotive is locally-owned and – operated with over 40 years of auto repair experience. We perform all types of vehicle repair, from computer and electrical problems to engine and transmission overhauls. ASE Certified mechanics. Open six days a week, with towing provided. Call Gary (918) 832-7072.

BIBLE STUDY

Weekly Bible Reading Session Join us in reading, explaining and discussing the bible on Tuesday nights 7:00 p.m. CST and 8:00 p.m. EST. Questions are always welcome. Perfect for those who cannot get out of the house. Call (918) 872-1400.

BOOKS

THE MOMENT I SAW YOU This internationally acclaimed 256 page book of poetry for lovers of all ages creates for the readers feelings and emotions all have known in their lives. Relive those experiences by reading the beautiful love poems in this book. The Moment I Saw You: Poetry for Lovers by W. Blaine Wheeler is available on Amazon.com.

CARPET CLEANING ALL PRO Carpet Cleaning Senior and caregiver discounts. Carpet, furniture, rug cleaning. Pet odor removed and Teflon protectant available. Emergency water extraction. Residential and commercial services. Professional truck mount steam cleaning. Carpet repairs and restretching. Prompt, professional, quality service at a fair price. Certified, insured. Veteran owned and operated. Call Thomas Fink, owner/technician, for free estimate (918) 636-6303.

CEMETERY LOTS 2 Plots in Memorial Park 2 plots for sale in Memorial Park Cemetery. Lot 33 in Section 39, spaces 4 & 5 offer those visiting a view from a hill. Priced to sell at $2,500 for both plots. Call Tim at (918) 695-7162. 3 Spaces – Memorial Park

Memorial Park 3 Spaces. Section 6, Lot 11, Spaces 1, 2 & 3. Value is $7,200, will sell for $6,900. Call (918) 341-0372. Adjacent Spaces at Memorial Park Two adjoining spaces in Section 57, Lot 260, Memorial Park Cemetery (51st and Memorial, Tulsa). Will sell for $3,300. Text or leave Voicemail at (918) 204-3350. Beautiful Floral Haven – Broken Arrow Side-by-side spaces 1 and 2, Lot 25-C, in the Masonic Garden. Masonic affiliation not necessary. Convenient location. Valued at $3,400 each. Asking $5,000 for both. For more information please call Carole at (918) 850-2913 or email clcbarnes1@sbcglobal.net.

Calvary Cemetery Calvary Cemetery, section 7, Way of the Cross. Two side-by-side spaces lot 204, space 6 and lot 207, space 4. Asking pricing is $4,500 for both. Truly a beautiful view. Call (405) 273-7071. Floral Haven in Broken Arrow Floral Haven, Garden of Devotion. Standard single lot, or doubledepth interment for two persons, or cremated remains of two persons. $2,300. Call (816) 304-7664 or bjward521@gmail.com. Floral Haven - Broken Arrow, OK Two plots for sale in the Sermon on the Mount, Lot 2, Block 9, spaces 1 & 2. Can be used for cremation or traditional burial. Retail value is $5,500 each. Asking price is $4,500 each. Call (214) 498-2990. Individual Selling Memorial Park Spaces Spaces 1,3,4 in Lot 297 in Section 28. Asking $2,150 per space. Serious offers considered. Will sell individually or together. Email deedunn34@yahoo.com. Contact Sarah Stegall at Memorial Park for map. Lots in Memorial Park Tulsa Dead Tired Bones? Lay them to rest here! Great location – 2 spaces together! Section 30 Lot 106 Spaces 4 & 5 close to the road. Retail Value $1,975.00/space. Asking $1,400 each. Contact Kay at locke_n_go@yahoo.com Memorial Park Crypts, Tulsa Two crypts, $5500 each. Includes bronze crypt nameplate and perpetual care. Mausoleum location near lake, Sec 27-2, crypt E, rows 53 & 54. A 2021 retail value of $7325 each. Contact Clark Duffe at clark.duffe@yahoo.com or (405) 760-3108. Memorial Plot for Sale Memorial Park Cemetery Plot in Tulsa, Ok for sale Section 56, Estate 110 Space 1. Price includes plot, opening and closing plus title transfer. $3,260 not negotiable. Please contact David or Joyce at (918) 322-3010 after 5:00 pm for more info. Spaces at Memorial Park Multiple spaces for sale. Section 34, Lot 416. No burials there and no markers. Current value is $2,200/ea. Will sell for $1,900/ea. If interested, contact Cindy Taylor at Oxley.Plots@gmail.com or (281) 990-6223. Three Spaces, Memorial Park Cemetery, Tulsa Section 9-A, "Pleasant Valley North", Lot 423, spaces 4, 5, and 6, in older, beautiful section near Carillon Bell Tower. Section allows lawn-level granite or bronze memorial markers. Cemetery listing price $2445 each. Price reduced to $1,200 each or $3,500 for all three. Negotiable. Buyer pays small transfer fee. Contact Mary at (512) 468-5020 or (417) 271-1273 or email whistonmary@yahoo.com.

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COMPUTER SERVICES

GARDENING/LAWN CARE

Does Technology Frustrate You? Honest, patient, ethical help with your pc, router, Wi-Fi, cell phone, email, streaming, camera, password recovery, etc. 30 years of IT experience in Tulsa. Special rates for seniors. References available. Call Carmen Armstrong (918) 688-7453.

AAA Lawns & More Total lawn care. Lawn Mowing. Leaf removal. Gutter clean-up. Specialist in fence/property line lawn clean-up. Stump grinding and small tree work. Dedicated to making your lawn look its best. Insured, honest, experienced and dependable. Veteran-owned. We are a small company with personal service. References available. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Larry. (918) 361-1299.

DAYTIME CARE Daytime Care For Older Loved Ones LIFE’s Adult Day Health offers convenient, affordable daytime care at three locations in Tulsa and Broken Arrow. For more information, call LIFE’s Adult Day Health at (918) 664-9000.

ESTATE SALES

2MS Estate Sales ...Tulsa’s Finest! Downsizing? Estate Liquidation? Let us take the worry away and Maximize your return. No out of pocket expense. We specialize in senior transitions, with over 20 years in the senior housing market. My team includes realtors, moving company, senior housing and attorneys if needed. Please contact Michelle Reed (918) 691-5893 or Atulsa@aol.com also Facebook 2MSestatesalestulsa for a Free consultation.

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE Medicare Assistance Program The Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services provides accurate information, counseling and assistance relating to Medicare benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives and persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call MAP at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000 or toll-free at (866) 664-9009. Need A New Medicare Plan? The Medicare Supplement Store at Promenade Mall is your “One-StopShop” for Medicare Supplements, Advantage Plans, & Drug Plans. We can give you a quote from top-rated carriers like: Aetna, Blue Cross, Humana, GlobalHealth, UnitedHealthCare, Mutual of Omaha and others. For information, call Bob Archer today (918) 814-5550. WORRIED ABOUT FUNERAL EXPENSES? Preferred Rates, Standard Rates, Guaranteed Issue Plans, Permanent Whole Life Rates never increase. Issue up to $40,000. Benefits paid to beneficiary of choice or assignment to any funeral home. We can give you quotes from top rated carriers, Mutual of Omaha, American Amicable, and AIG. Call or text Michael Moore Insurance Agency (918) 557-5665 for RATES or email ineedlifeinsurance@sbcglobal.net

FOR SALE Dog House For Sale Heated dog house for sale. This dog house is like no other! The house is heated with an attic and on skis for easy change of location within your yard for your large or small fur baby. Call Tim at (918) 695-7162.

Aardwolf Leaf & Lawn Care Mowing, weed eating, edging,hedge trimming, garden tilling, gutter cleaning and lawn clean-up. Free Estimates! Call Patrick Mills. (918) 814-0973. Green Hibiscus Lawn & Garden Services Scheduled garden maintenance (weeding, planting, mulching). Garden bed design and installation. Hedge & shrub trimming. Tree pruning & removal. Leaf clean up. Hauling green debris. Call Charles (918) 636-0298. Kimble Davis Tree Company Family-owned and operated. Specializing in all aspects of tree care: restoration, pruning/thinning, removal, stump grinding, hedge trimming, firewood available. Serving Tulsa for 25 years. References. Member BBB. Insured. ISA certified arborist. Check us out at www.kdtreeco.com. Call Kimble at (918) 853-5383. Mower Repair / Maintenance All brands – Riders, ZTR's, Walk-behinds, UTV’s / ATV’s. Top Quality work, ASE certified Mechanic. Pick-up and Delivery available. Tulsa and surrounding counties. Maintenance specials include pick-up and delivery 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call Scott (918) 519-3869. New Season Lawn & Tree LLC Now accepting new customers. Spring clean-up available. Mowing, trimming, leaf and debris removal, fence line trim/cleanup, leaf mulching, flower beds. Tree pruning/ thinning and removal. Shrub and hedge trimming/shaping of all sizes. Pressure Washing driveway, decks, siding. ISA Certified Arborist. Fully insured with verified references. Best rates, senior discounts. Free Estimates. Call Todd (918) 639-2262. www.newseasonlawnandtree.com. New Season Tree Masters Specializing in tree removal and stump grinding. Tree trimming service available. Certified arborist on staff. Serving all of metro Tulsa with over 20 years’ experience. Fully insured. BBB accredited. Free estimates. Contact us at info@newseasontreemasters.com or call Todd at (918) 934-4868. www.newseasontreemasters.com.

HOME REPAIR/REMODELING A Handy Helping Hand Professional home maintenance, painting, and improvements. Whether you’re making overdue repairs, sprucing up your home and garden, or optimizing your home’s “sale-ability” potential,

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CLASSIFIEDS call Joe Surowiak with A Handy Helping Hand. Professional results. Competitive rates. (918) 520-0333. Allen’s Handyman Services of Tulsa “Your Home Improvement and Repair Specialist.” 21st year serving Tulsa seniors. “One call can do it all.” 10% senior discount. Insured. All work guaranteed in writing. No pay until job is completed. Plumbing, drain cleaning, grab bars, electrical, carpentry, painting, seamless guttering installation/ repair/cleaning. Dryer vent cleaning. Roof, tile and drywall repair. Wood siding/trim replacement. Deck repair, power washing, staining. Tree trimming. No job too small. For free estimate, call Allen at (918) 630-0394. Big C’s Plumbing Services Your one stop Plumbing Shop! Call us and I guarantee you will never have to call another plumbing company. Licensed, bonded and insured for your protection....Call (918) 855-9216, tell us you saw us in the Vintage Newsmagazine receive an automatic 10% discount....call us now. Bumgartner Plumbing Licensed, with over 30 years of experience. Rates are low and based on the job, not the hour. No service call fee or travel time charge. Senior and caregiver discount. Plumbing service and repair our specialty. Honest, professional service you can count on. Lic. # 82750. (918) 355-4747. Burton Painting Specializing in all aspects of exterior and interior home painting. Staining, sealing, and painting faux finishes. Decks, fences, cabinets and floors. Free estimates. 30+ years of experience. Reliable, courteous, professional service. Fully insured. (918) 378-2858. Dave’s Heat and Air, Inc. Licensed, insured, and bonded. Honest and reliable service for over 30 years. Competitive rates. Specializing in heating and air conditioning service and repair. All makes and models. Residential and light commercial. Tulsa metro area. Family-owned and operated. (918) 437-8101. Doc J’s Heat and Air LLC Avoid costly repairs and breakdowns with our yearly maintenance plan. We are factory authorized dealers for reliable, best value Bryant, heating and air conditioning equipment. Service, repair, and installations, we do it all. Financing, free estimates and senior discounts. Call Doc J today (918) 921-4240, docj@docjsheatandair.com Free Storm Inspection Do you have a leaky roof? Call for free inspection/emergency tarp service. Small roof repair free for seniors. We provide patient, honest and ethical help through any insurance claims. Call Brian Morris at (918) 734-4444. Proof Construction, 1924 W. Albany St., Broken Arrow. Other services include patios, outdoor kitchens, etc. www.proofok.com or www.patiobrothersok.com.

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General Home Maintenance Cyrco Renovation is here for all your General Home Maintenance and/ or Remodeling needs. Well over 30 years of experience. We are your one stop for quality and professional contracting. Fast, Clean, Courteous and Reliable. Please Call Phillip Cyr (918) 693-5121. Handyman & Construction Services 30 Years Experience! All Handicap Accessories – grab bars, handicap access abilities; Framing, Drywall, Tape & Bed; Texture & Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Tile, Laminate & Wood Floors. Free Estimates, Competitive Rates, Professional Service. Call Craig (918) 892-4168. Home Improvements Energy Efficient Windows. We offer custom made replacement windows to make your home comfortable and reduce your energy bills. Interior/ exterior painting, general remodeling and home improvements. 15% discount to those over 55. Free Estimates. Call Richard Johnson (918) 261-9999. Junk Removal Solutions Junk removal, furniture moving, clean-ups, hauling, tree trimming. Free estimates. Senior discount. Call Darrell for all your junk removal needs. (918) 644-1776. Same Day Services Light Hauling /Light Moving – help you rearrange room furniture, lawns-grass mowing/small paint jobs/cleanup/ fence repair/light construction/sheet rock tile repair – We are honest dependable. References. Call (918) 313-5230. Scrap Metal Haul Off Free haul off/pick up of appliances such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioners, hot water tanks and any scrap metal. Call John at (918) 313-4405.

HOUSE CLEANING

Window Cleaning. House Cleaning. Window Cleaning. House Cleaning. Deep Cleaning. Organization. Light Fixtures. Dependable and Honest. Call Jan at (539) 664-1986. Live Beautifully! You Deserve It! Here at Moore Cleaning; we want your house to be beautiful. We have over 19 years experience; and references from our loyal customers. Also offering window cleaning and organizing. We customize our cleaning to meet your needs. Safely cleaning with masks and social distancing if preferred. Reasonable rates. Please call today to set up your appointment. Marybelle Moore (918) 671-5065. Marybellemoore111@gmail.com.

HOUSING New Construction Wheelchair Accessible Home New ADA/wheelchair accessible home, specifically designed for wheelchair use from the garage to kitchen, to bath/shower, to living space. View pics on ZILLOW.com 1211 N. 147th E. Ave, Tulsa. Credit check required. This large two bed/two bath home is a wonderful alternative for senior living! Call Sharon (918) 613-6395.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | June 2021

SHOULD I MOVE, OR SHOULD I STAY? Can't decide whether to Age in Place, or move? Feeling Overwhelmed? We can help. We are your One Source for Downsizing, Moving, Aging in Place, Estate Sales, Selling Home, Selecting a Community, Etc. www.MatureTransitionsOfTulsa.com. (918) 309-6120

LEGAL

Full Service Estate Planning Law Firm Trusts, Wills, Gift and Tax Planning, Powers of Attorneys and more! With offices in Sand Springs and Tulsa. Discount to Veterans and Retired Teachers. Willing to meet you in your place for no extra charge! Call Penni of the Skillern Law Firm at (918) 805-2511. www.skillernlaw.com Need Legal Help? Call Me First. Ramona Jones, Attorney at Law. Why travel when we can do a video conference? Wills, trusts, deeds, advance directives, powers of attorney, probate, divorces, civil, DUI, criminal, guardianships, adoptions and more. Also paperwork for limited scope representation. Credit cards accepted. (918) 585-2255. Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy. Attorney Brian Crain can assist you through the legalities of all the big events in your family's life. Estate planning, probate, trusts, adoption, guardianships, real estate, elder exploitation and more. Call (918) 627-4400 or visit www.brianacrain.com.

MOVERS

Tulsa Movers Dependable Movers! Low Rates. Free Estimates. Senior Discounts. Call (918) 836-3225.

OIL AND GAS

Mineral, Oil/Gas Interests Want to purchase minerals and oil/ gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO, 80201

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE Bobbi and Bob’s Personal & Business Assistance Personally assist in driving to beauty shop, medical appointments, and other destinations; provide accounting, secretarial, and specialized administrative assistance; help with businessrelated matters; serve as liaison with physicians/healthcare personnel; resolve Medicare and medical insurance issues. Bobbi Warshaw, MPH and Bob Warshaw, MBA (918) 852-5302, bobbi.warshaw@att.net Compassionate Senior Service Do you or a loved one need help with grocery shopping? Maybe help with meals? Or maybe just a companion to visit with or play games with? If this sounds like you or someone you know. Please Call, Christie at (918) 934-7986. Financial Organizer/Liaison Do you or a loved one need help keeping up with mail, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, making phone calls, organizing or preparing for tax time? I can help! I will work with you or act as a liaison between

family members. Call or email me to discuss options. Essential Strategy Consulting, LLC. Gwen Stevens (918) 557-5259, esc9315@gmail.com Kind Hands Home Care, LLC We are a team of dedicated health care professionals who work hard in order to keep our clients in their homes safely and well taken care of. 12 to 24 hour shifts available. For information please call or message Delia at (405) 714-8016. Ms Pac Ma'am Need help packing or organizing? I can pack boxes for moving, downsizing or decluttering. I can help organize rooms, closets, attics or garages providing you more space. Flexible hours – day or evening. Lots of experience. References available. Jacki (918) 922-9558.

PERSONAL SAFETY EARS Emergency Alert Response Systems. Enjoy living at home while we listen for your safety with our quality personal medical alarm and monitoring service. Affordable with no long-term commitment. Locally owned and operated (918) 298-0500 or toll-free (877) 885-3277. HALO Medical Alarms Worried about falling? HALO provides medical alert services for those at home or on the go who may need help in an emergency. HALO allows you to get help at the push of a button which is worn as a necklace or wristband. We offer a variety of choices to best fit your needs. Check out the HALO products atour retail store - Mobility City at 61st & Sheridan (918) 392-0566 or (877) 747-HALO (4256)

PERSONAL SERVICES Affordable Hairstyling In-Home or My Shop With 35 years’ experience, I can help with all of your hairstyling needs. I will come to your home, the hospital, rehab or you can come to my shop. In-shop special: haircut $7 for first time customers only and perms for $45. Senior special pricing can’t be beat! Available Tuesday – Saturday. A Mane Event hairstyling, located near 11th and Yale at 937 South Canton. Call Mary Wilkinson at (918) 834-2686. Following CDC Guidelines – masks worn, temperature taken, safe environment. Salon Retro Hair care for men and women, specializing in senior clients. This month’s special - First time customers receive one of the following for $12: Haircut or Style or Manicure. $45 for cut and perm. Pedicures are $20. Very Experienced Hairdressers! Come see us in Midtown at Highland Plaza, 5661 East 41st Street (corner of 41st and Hudson). (918) 742-3440.

PET CARE

Home Veterinary Care Experience Tulsa’s most convenient veterinary service in the comfort of your own home. Our goal is to develop a personal relationship with each of our clients and patients. Contact us today to schedule your house call appointment. Call (918) 892-9382 or email DrFielstra@gmail.com or visit us at www.homevetcaretulsa.com.

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Ready To Downsize? I will help you sell your current home and help you look for that smaller place that fits your needs. Whether it’s independent living or assisted living, let me help you through the process. Honest, patient and ethical help along the way. Carmen Armstrong, Solid Rock Realtors, (918) 688-7453. www.solidrockrealtors.com/realtors/ carmen-armstrong

Vintage Friends

SOCIAL

Single Seniors (50+) Are you over 50, single, divorced or widowed? We are a fun-loving group of single seniors over 50. We meet every Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the Buffet Palace, 10934 East 21st Street. We eat at 11:15, have a short meeting and then play cards. Join us for great fun and fellowship. Questions, call Beverly at (918) 272-1049.

SENIOR LIVING GUIDE

TRANSPORTATION My Driver Transportation Service Let me do the driving. To and from work, airport, shopping, errands, post office, appointments. Also, LIFT VAN transportation available. Able to assist getting to and from bed. Senior sitting. Also, small breed dog boarding. 20 years experience. CLEET certified and licensed. References. Member, Better Business Bureau. (918) 491-9929.

VINTAGE PUBLICATIONS DIGITAL EDITIONS Did you know that LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE’s Vintage Guide to Housing & Services are online?

VOLUNTEER

JUST DO IT! If you've been looking for a way you can make a difference, consider joining the Millennium Hospice team as a volunteer. Caregiver relief is so important during this difficult time. Volunteers provide that by sitting with patients for an hour or so. Training is provided. (918) 493-6555.

View the digital editions at www.LIFEseniorservices.org

JUNE ANSWERS

For puzzles, see pages 30-31

We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. Due to publication deadlines, acknowledgment of gifts may take up to 60 days in Vintage Newsmagazine. If there is an error, please call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

Jerry and Katie Abercrombie Sara M. Allen Anonymous Syble Atherton D.J. Barnett Billie S. Barnett Charlene Bassett Eugenia M. Bomford Margaret H. Burnett Nancy Cain Central States Research The Mary K. Chapman Foundation Charities Aid Foundation of America Sametta L. Chiles Church of St. Mary Angela Cozort Charles Danley Lynn Dillard Fellowship Lutheran Church Don Ferrell First Physicians Capital Group Forbes Foundation Rhonda Frailey Manuella R. Glore Ann Goodman Ruth Clydelle Haug Gene and Gertie Henson Nancie Sue Hix Independent Therapy Partners Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa Cleo Justus Bill G. King Kirchner Investments LLC Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma, Inc. Laurel Madland Marker Funeral Homes The Metropolitan Environmental Trust Mobility City

NALP Advisors Joy Nickle Janet Oleary OsteoStrong Tulsa The Oxley Foundation Jim and Donna Ogez Lillian Reynolds R.L. Robertson Saint Simeon's Episcopal Home Jan Simpson Anna P. Smith Southern Hills Rehabilitation Center Connie L. Stephens Donna L. Trickel Dick Webster Joan Whitmire Rickye Dixon Wilson Doris Wood WPX Energy, Inc. Maxine and Jack Zarrow Family Foundation The Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation

IN MEMORY OF: Francis P. Ferrantino In Memory of Alfonso Ferrantino Theresa M. Finck and Mary Ann Finck In Memory of Theresa Ann Finck Ella Jean Greeman In Memory of Devern Eubanks Teresa Pax In Memory of Dana Doll Mary Reilly In Memory of Louise Little David and Carrie Zenthoefer In Memory of Tom Williams

IN HONOR OF: Constance M. Haney In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart

DONATE TO LIFE Become a Vintage Friend

MUMBO JUMBO 1. Engine 2. Radiator 3. Oil

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in April 2021.

LIFE Senior Services is a recognized leader in aging services and an acknowledged voice on aging issues and is proud to be a nonprofit United Way organization.

4. Muffler 5. Battery 6. Horn

PLEASE MAIL YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO: LIFE Senior Services 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 • Tulsa, OK 74135-5114 Make your donation online: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

Final message: Automobile

BAMBOOZABLES CLASSIFIEDS

TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: Bernie Dornblaser (918) 664-9000 or bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Two by Four Getting Up in the Morning Tennis Match No Time for You The Eyes are Bigger Than the Stomach 6. Just in Case

SUDOKU 2 8 5 1 7 6 4 9 3

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

3 6 1 2 4 9 7 8 5

9 7 4 3 5 8 1 2 6

6 9 7 5 2 4 3 1 8

4 1 2 8 6 3 5 7 9

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Join us for a Medicare seminar. If you’re turning 65 this year, you are eligible to enroll in Medicare. Whether you know a lot or very little about Medicare and your

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insurance options, CommunityCare is here to answer any questions you may have. Our seminars give you the opportunity to learn more about Medicare and Senior Health Plan (HMO). Our plans include everything Medicare covers as well as essential benefits not covered by Medicare, such as prescription drugs, dental and vision care, and much more—with monthly premiums as low as $0. Plus, we have the only Medicare health plans contracted with Saint Francis Health System and Ascension St. John for in-network benefits.

Visit ccokadvantage.com to find an in-person Medicare seminar near you, or call our Medicare team at 918-594-5272 to learn about our plans. Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (TTY 1-800-722-0353).

ccokadvantage.com

For accommodations of persons with special needs at meetings, call 918-594-5272 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353). CommunityCare Choice is an HMO and PDP plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in CommunityCare Choice, Inc depends on contract renewal. The Senior Health Plan service area includes Tulsa, Craig, Creek, Mayes, Muskogee, McIntosh, Nowata, Okmulgee, Osage, Pittsburg,

Rogers, Wagoner and Washington Counties. Other providers are available in our network. Please call Customer Service for assistance at 918-594-5323 (TTY: 1-800-722 0353), Monday – Sunday and some holidays from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. October 1 - March 31 and Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. April 1 - September 30.

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Profile for LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine

LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine - June 2021  

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