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LIFESAVING An Easy Way to Live Longer

Carotid Artery Evaluation

According to the American Heart Association, many people experience no symptoms before having a heart attack or stroke.

Accesses your risk for stroke.

A series of simple screening tests by trained experts in cardiovascular disease can identify problems before symptoms develop, preventing issues down the road.

Abdominal Aorta Evaluation

The cost is low. The tests are simple and fast. Aren’t you worth it?

Cardiac Calcium Score

Cardiac Function Evaluation Screens for heart failure.

Screens for abdominal aneurysms.

Ankle/Brachial Index Screens for peripheral artery disease.

Measures risk for heart attack.

Call or schedule online today for your appointment

918-416-0899 oklahomaheart.com/lifesavingscreenings


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Vol. 3, No. 1 EILEEN BRADSHAW President & CEO of LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE & Vintage Housing

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Fashion After 50: What to Wear to Dress With Style

Trends in Men's Grooming

Your body may not be quite the same as it was 30 years ago, but that’s no reason to give up on fashion. Local and celebrity stylists have advice for pulling together a great look.

Whether you visit a traditional barber or go to a salon, find out what looks are influencing men’s hairstyles. You may be surprised to learn what old style is making a comeback.

KELLY KIRCHHOFF Senior Director of Communications

DEE DUREN Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

BERNIE DORNBLASER Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

LEAH WEIGLE Graphic Designer

CAROL CARTER Copy Editor

MICHAEL SMITH Communications Assistant

DICK MCCANDLESS ESTEBAN VALENCIA Community Distribution

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Local Fashionistas

Embracing the Gray: Women Increasingly Choose to Ditch the Hair Dye

Celebrate three women of fashion: a successful entrepreneur and philanthropist, a retired educator whose look went viral, and a former member of Tulsa Ballet Company.

A growing number of women decided to ditch the dye during the height of the pandemic. Hear from stylists who think the very model of salon visits is evolving.

2021

29 2021 Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

The Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair presented by LIFE Senior Services is back, and we couldn’t be happier. This exclusive Event Guide contains a list of exhibitors, the schedule for entertainment including a fashion show by Assistance League Tulsa, free health screenings, presentations on aging issues and more! 4

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

6 Letter From Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner Adaptive Clothing for Dressing With Ease 12 Medicare & You Put Prevention Into Practice 13 Puzzle Page 19 Noteworthy 20 Mature Skin Makeup Tips 21 LIFE's Virtual Programming 23 LIFE PACE 27 Sharp Dressed Men 28 Bunkering With Books 50 Mindbender & Puzzles 51 Puzzle Partners 52 Table for Two Look and Feel Your Best With a Heart-Healthy Diet 54 Dollars & Sense Affordable Cosmetics to Protect and Highlight Your Natural, Mature Beauty 56 People & Places 57 Classifieds 59 Vintage Friends

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services (a Tulsa Area United Way nonprofit) and helps fulfill LIFE Senior Services’ mission to promote and preserve independence for seniors. This publication is printed and mailed at no charge. Donations of any amount are appreciated and will help offset LIFE Senior Services’ production costs. A donation of $25 per year is suggested. To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 36, Issue 1, July 2021 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 2168-8494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135-5114.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


YOUR MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE FOR OLDER ADULTS Saint Francis Health System provides behavioral health services for adults aged 55 and older throughout eastern Oklahoma. Our compassionate team of mental health professionals provide inpatient and outpatient care for depression, dementia, anxiety and many behavioral health issues that impact your daily life. For more information, please call one of our locations listed below.

LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL Senior Behavioral Health Services 6655 South Yale Avenue | Tulsa, Oklahoma 74136 918-502-5000

SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL VINITA Renaissance Program 735 North Foreman | Vinita, Oklahoma 74301 918-256-9201

SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE Senior Behavioral Health Services 211 South 36th Street | Muskogee, Oklahoma 74401 918-681-6835

A GOOD PLAN NOW IS A GOOD DECISION SPROUTING.

Grow your confidence for your senior living search. Join us on the Patio for a tour and a chat. Our weekly Patio Party gives you a quick, friendly introduction to our community.

PATIO PARTY

Meet you on the Patio for conversation and a community tour.

10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

EVERY WEDNESDAY

7345 S. 99th East Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74133 RSVP • (918) 553-5953 or email woodlandhills@cedarhurstliving.com

WHAT BLOOMS FOR YOU TOMORROW DEPENDS ON WHAT YOU DO TODAY. *Cedarhurst Promise™ program is only available at advertised community. Not applicable for respite or other short-term stays. Refund is available only if move out is a result of dissatisfaction with Cedarhurst community as documented throughout stay. Complete refund includes base rent, level of care charges, and community fee. Ancillary services fees (ex. additional transportation, pet fees and laundry charges) do not qualify for refund. Additional terms and conditions may apply. Please contact community for additional details. Void where prohibited.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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LETTER FROM EILEEN Dear Vintage Reader: This issue of Vintage is one of our biggest ever, our style issue. Its pages are packed with good information, including a guide to our Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair, coming up on July 13 at the Exchange Center at Expo Square. The event is free of charge and we will provide shuttles from the parking lot to the building, so there is no good reason not to check it out!

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing eileen.bradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

I love the fact that we do a “style issue,” underlining the fact that fashion is not only for the 20-somethings. Some of the most elegant, stylish people I know are past 60, and many are well past 80. Style is such an amorphous quality, and hard to pin down or define. When you see it, you recognize it. Yet what is stylish on one person might constitute a huge style miss on someone else. It is a highly personal quality. When I think of stylish, mature women, my two grandmothers come to mind. Both were born in the year 1900, and both owned retail stores, yet they were very different in their styles. My paternal grandmother, Marie Ryan, had “Ryan’s Style Shop,” a collection of dress shops throughout small towns in Central Illinois. Her hair was always platinum blond. From my earliest memories of her until she died in her mid-80s, I never saw a strand of gray. Tall and slim, she favored pencil skirts and columnar dresses. Purse and shoes were always dyed to match. Her jewelry was usually sparkly, which appealed to my young sensibilities. To me, she always seemed to be glamorous.

My maternal grandmother, Lucie Farrell, was equally stylish but so very different. She had owned a children’s store in downtown Tulsa and loved her trips to market in Chicago. She never colored her hair, and so it was a progression of silver into gray through my memories. (Her hairdresser did once put a “rinse” on her hair, which turned it an Easter egg lavender for a bit, but that was a one-off !) She was shorter and a tad rounder than my other grandmother. Her signature style included Shantung dresses, pearls and cardigans with crewel embroidery. I can still smell her perfume, and I have a collection of her brooches. Even when she was older, and home most of the time, she stayed fashionable. She adopted the floral caftan of the ‘70s and rocked that look. I still remember the batwing caftan sleeves enveloping me in a hug each day when I came home from school. I thought she looked like a movie star. Forgive my reminiscing, but it does have a point, I promise. Mature women are often the most stylish not because of what they wear or their hair color, but because they know who they are. They have lived long enough to be secure in themselves, and their look reflects what makes them unique. There are always fun beauty tips and tricks to read about and try, but there is no “one style fits all” approach to aging with grace and style. As both of my grandmothers used to tell awkward teenage me, “Beauty lies within." So true! Best,

Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

Welsh & McGough, PLLC Experienced attorneys providing effective and aggressive representation. Guardianship Elder Law Estate Planning Probate

Trust Litigation Family Law Adoption Medicaid Planning

(918) 585-8600

2727 East 21st Street, Ste. 600

www.tulsafirm.com

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Join LIFE’s Senior Centers for the Writers’ Symposium. Celebrated writers share their experiences in a series of events. Don’t miss these chances to connect with the creative community and fuel your writing ambitions!

LEGACY PLAZA EAST 31st between Yale and Sheridan

You can view both Connie Cronley and Barry Friedman’s interviews on our website at www.lifeseniorservices.org.

Glenwood Apartments

RABBI MARC FITZERMAN

JUDY ALLEN AUGUST 12 10:00 A.M.

JULY 29 10:00 A.M.

EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

10221 E. 34TH ST. • TULSA, OK

Find out more about LIFE’s writing contest on our website.

(918) 663-7797

WRITERS’ SYMPOSIUM PANEL DISCUSSION SEPTEMBER 26 | 4:00 - 6:00 P.M.

GLENWOODAPTSTULSA@GMAIL.COM

Retirement Living for Seniors Age 62+ & Adults with Disabilities

• • • • • • •

All Bills Paid 24-hour On-site Staff Laundry Facilities Library & Fitness Area Planned Activities & Bingo Emergency Pull Cords On-site Beauty Salon

Attend in person at Legacy Plaza East, 5330 E. 31st St. in Tulsa, or view on LIFE’s Facebook page. RSVP to reserve your spot! Call LIFE’s Senior Center at (918) 744-6760 or online www.LIFEseniorservices.org.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Free Prescription Delivery ORGANIZE YOUR MEDICATION AT NO ADDITIONAL COST Simplify and organize your medications with prescription packaging. One package contains all the medication you need to take at any given time, automatically refilled at the same time each month per your request. • Organized by date and time

• Securely sealed

NO PILL BOXES

• Cleary labeled • Helpful to caregivers

NO BOTTLES

• Ideal for travel and everyday • Easy to open

NO BOTHER

444 S. Sheridan • (918) 835-9577 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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Looking Back

Performers in a Go-Go Fashion Show held in 1965. Go-go boots and go-go dancers were two fashionable terms in the 1960s.

Classic Tulsa Style Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa

A model wears a dress by Norman Hartnell in the 1956 Cinderella Ball sponsored by Vandever's.

All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

Models from New York disembark for a Vandever's Department Store fashion show in 1954.

William Vandever of Vandever’s Department Store supported the Tulsa Philharmonic Orchestra by hosting fundraising fashion shows and auctions in the Mayo Hotel Ballroom in the 1950s and 1960s. Special guests over the years included Elizabeth Arden, Marcella Borghese and jeweler Harry Winston.

This Month in History JULY 4, 1776: Declaration of Independence Adopted

The Declaration of Independence, written largely by Virginian Thomas Jefferson, was formally adopted by 12 of 13 colonies. Members of the Continental Congress declared the colonies a separate nation with a document that includes a long list of grievances against the British government. The Declaration also made it possible for the United States to be recognized and helped by friendly countries including France. New York made the signatures unanimous on July 19.

JULY 6, 1957: Althea Gibson

Won Wimbledon

Althea Gibson took the women’s singles tennis title at Wimbledon, England, becoming the first Black athlete to win a championship at the tennis club. She was named Female Athlete of the Year in 1957 and 1958 after also winning the singles title at the French Championship (now the French Open) and the U.S. Open in 1956 and ‘57. Gibson, who was 5'11", went on to tour with the Harlem Globetrotters.

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JULY 10, 1925: Scopes Monkey Trial Began

John Thomas Scopes, a young high school science teacher in Dayton, Tennessee, was charged with teaching evolution in violation of a state law that had passed a few months before. The state had made it illegal to teach any theory that contradicted the Biblical version of creation. The famous trial ended with Scopes convicted of the misdemeanor crime. The Tennessee Supreme Court overturned the verdict on a technicality two years later.

JULY 19, 1799:

Rosetta Stone Found

A French soldier in Napoleon Bonaparte’s Egyptian campaign discovered a black basalt slab inscribed with ancient writing about 35 miles east of Alexandria near the town of Rosetta. The stone had writings in ancient Greek, Egyptian hieroglyphics and Egyptian demotic – or common tongue. The stone was the key to unlocking the mystery of hieroglyphics, pictorial writing that had been “dead” for almost 2,000 years. A French Egyptologist cracked the code.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

JULY 26, 1775: U.S. Postal System Established

The Second Continental Congress established the U.S. postal system with Benjamin Franklin as its first postmaster general. Franklin had been postmaster of Philadelphia and a postmaster general for the colonies but was fired by the British for his revolutionary activities. Franklin set up more routes and cut delivery times, also standardizing costs. He served for a little more than a year when he was sent to France as a diplomat.

JULY 29, 1958: NASA Got Its Start

The U.S. Congress established a civilian agency responsible for America’s activities in space, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The U.S. was responding to the Soviets who launched two satellites into space in 1957. NASA was part of the U.S. drive to win the space race and protect the country from a remote attack. The U.S. was the first to put a man on the moon in 1969. © The History Channel

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Northeastern Oklahoma’s newest, premier skilled nursing and long-term facility, located in Broken Arrow, OK.

We Offer Rehabilitation Respite Long-Term Services Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy Call us today to see how we can make a difference!

1251 W. HOUSTON STREET • BROKEN ARROW, OK 74012 539.367.4500 • 539.367.4510 (F) • WWW.ASPENHEALTHREHAB.COM

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTERS Get Fit, Have Fun, Make New Friends Line dancing, Pickleball, Tai Chi, Creative Writing, Sculpt & Tone, Chair Exercises, Zumba, Wii Bowling, Wii Golfing and More!

Both Southminster and East Side Senior Centers are now open!

View a calendar of events on www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Searching for a new apartment?

ts ll Pe Sma me o c Wel

Sheridan Terrace

Medical Staffing & Home Care Specialists

SERVICES INCLUDE:

Nurses - RNs, LPNs • Home Health Aides Companions • RN Supervision Intermittent Visits or Hourly Care Home IV Therapy • Sitter Service Call us. We can help.

Independent Senior Living • All bills paid

• Inside hallways

• Quiet location

• Emergency call system

• Small pets welcome

• Subsidy available

(918) 835-7072 1937 S. 68th E. Ave. | Tulsa, OK

Sheridan Terrace does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

(NE of 21st and Sheridan)

I’m Amazing!

SM

24 Hour Service 7 Days a Week

(918) 665-1011 www.My-FirstCall.com

All employees are screened, fidelity bonded, liability insured, and drug tested.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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CAREGIVER CORNER

ADAPTIVE CLOTHING BY KIMBERLY BLAKER

Get Dressed With Ease

As a caregiver, if you're assisting your family member with dressing, you may be in search of clothing options that make the process easier or allow your loved one more independence. In the past, adaptive clothes were hard to find, offered limited choices and focused on function without consideration to style. Now many more options are available to fit specific needs or fashion preferences.

Tommy Hilfiger Magnetic Bomber Jacket

Velcro Side Fastener Bra

$90

$50

1. ALTERNATIVE FASTENERS

Traditional clothes fasteners like buttons and even zippers can be difficult for older adults and even for a caregiver trying to help them. Common alternatives to simplify this both for caregivers in assisting and for individuals to dress include velcro and magnet fasteners along the seam. • Tommy Hilfiger has an adaptive line with many features, including a whole section for easy closures like magnets, velcro, and one-handed zippers. • Buck & Buck is an adaptive clothing line that includes shirts for men that look like button-ups but use velcro in the front and even have velcro cuffs. • Target has adaptive clothing, such as the Velcro Side Fastener Bra with front closure for ease.

Buck & Buck Snap Back Sweat Top

2. OPENINGS ON THE BACK AND SIDE

$30

As a caregiver, it can be easier to dress someone when the fasteners are on the back or sides, providing the wearer more privacy. In addition, clothes that open on the sides or back are much easier to put on and take off, even when the wearer is seated or lying down. • Silverts has Alzheimer’s Kits for women and men that include anti-strip jumpsuits with closures on the back. • Ovidis has adaptive pants with back panel access, like the Sophie pants for women. • Buck & Buck has a large selection of all types of clothing with closures on the back.

Women's Adaptive Open Back Gabardine Pants $51

3. WORKAROUND MEDICAL DEVICES

Seniors may require specific medical devices like braces, catheters, monitors or wheelchairs which interfere with traditional clothing. Specially designed clothing makes dressing and undressing easier and more comfortable while not interfering with medical function or needing to check devices.

Silverts Women's Adaptive Open Back High-Low Top $45

Buck & Buck Short Sleeve Sport Shirt with VELCRO® $38

NIKE Flyease $68 – $200

Silverts Womens Zipper Easy Access Shoes $116

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

• Silverts has wheelchair-specific clothing, like the Wheelchair Gabardine Pants for Men. These allow you to dress from a seated position and are designed to be comfortable and keep everything covered while sitting. • Elder Wear and Aids also has a wheelchair-friendly adaptive clothing section with pants, dresses, shirts, and more. • Buck & Buck offers urinary catheter clothing, which allows for easier access when emptying or checking the collection bag.

4. ADAPTIVE FOOTWEAR

Proper footwear that's easy to get on and off and is also comfortable is essential. Shoes should have a wide opening and have a simple fastener. They should also have enough room for potential swelling, be stable and non-slip, padded to reduce foot stress, easy to walk in and fit around braces or any other devices around the foot. • Nike has an adaptive sneaker line called Flyease that is easy to get on and off one-handed. • Zappos is a large shoe retailer which has a section where you can filter for all the adaptive shoe brands they offer in one place. • Those with diabetes may benefit from Silverts diabetic footwear.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Looking for Answers? Call LIFE’s SeniorLine (918) 664-9000

LIFE’S ADULT DAY HEALTH Safe, affordable daytime care for older adults.

• • • • • •

All bills paid Inside hallways Emergency call system Subsidy available Quiet location Small pets welcome

Call (918) 664-9000 for more information or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org LIFE’s Adult Day Health is following active safety protocols.

(918) 455-8400 5001 S. Hickory • Broken Arrow, OK (SE of 111th St. & 161st E. Ave.)

Treetops Apartments Independent Senior Living

Treetops does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

Announcing LIFE Senior Services’ New Program

Call LIFE’s SeniorLine

(918) 664-9000

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Club LIFE welcomes individuals diagnosed with early memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other related disorders. Club LIFE is designed to enhance memory, improve physical strength and balance, stimulate brain function and provide social support. In addition, Club LIFE supports caregivers through personal consultation, education about early memory loss and support groups. HOURS & LOCATION Christ Church 10901 S. Yale Ave

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

Monday – Friday 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

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MEDICARE & YOU

Put Prevention Into Practice

By Channing Rutherford, Medicare and Tax Assistance Program Supervisor One simple way to manage your health is to practice preventive care. Because preventive services can detect health problems early, when treatment generally works best, it’s a crucial step in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. With Medicare, you have access to a variety of preventive services, such as screening for diabetes, high cholesterol and cancer, as well as vaccinations, at no cost. They also include programs for health monitoring, counseling and education to help you take care of your health.

Free “Welcome to Medicare” Preventive Visit If you’re new to Medicare, you get a one-time free “Welcome to Medicare” preventive visit during your first 12 months of Part B coverage. This visit is a great way to get up-to-date on important screenings and shots, talk to your doctor about your family history and review your current health. During the exam, your doctor will do the following: Record your family history Check your height, weight and blood pressure Calculate your body mass index Give you a simple vision test

Annual Wellness Visits If you have had Medicare Part B for longer than 12 months, you can get a yearly wellness visit to develop or update a personalized prevention plan based on your current health and risk factors. The visit includes the following: Review of medical and family history A list of current providers and prescriptions Height, weight, blood pressure and other routine measurements A screening schedule for appropriate preventive services A list of risk factors and treatment options

When visiting your doctor or another provider, you might want to bring a list of questions to ensure you get the most from your visit. One suggestion to help with this is the Medicare publication “Questions to ask about Medicare Preventive Services.” This publication can be accessed on Medicare’s website at www.medicare.gov through the publications link at the bottom of the home page. You can also call the Medicare Assistance Program at LIFE Senior Services at (918) 664-9000 ext. 1189 to have a copy emailed or mailed to you.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

What is the difference between a preventive and a diagnostic service? Preventive services are healthcare services meant to prevent illness or detect a medical condition at an early stage, sometimes even before you show obvious symptoms. Examples of preventive services include breast cancer screenings, colon cancer screenings and heart disease screenings. Diagnostic services are used to treat or address symptoms or conditions you already have. Diagnostic services may include the treatment for cancer, heart disease or a medical condition that was previously diagnosed by your doctor. Medicare coverage of healthcare services differs, depending on whether the care is preventive or diagnostic. For example, charges may apply if your doctor needs to investigate or treat a new or existing health problem during your annual wellness visit. Similarly, if you get a preventive colonoscopy screening and your doctor removes a polyp during the procedure, Medicare will consider the polyp removal to be a diagnostic service. Therefore, the colonoscopy will no longer count as a preventive service under Medicare rules, and costs may apply. Keep in mind that while many preventive services are covered under Medicare at no charge, additional treatment given during or after the preventive services will likely come with a fee. For example, charges may apply if your healthcare provider detects a problem and recommends additional services or treatment. Medicare covers preventive and diagnostic services whether you have Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage plan, as long as you meet certain rules and requirements. Original Medicare is the traditional Medicare program administered directly through the federal government. Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare private health plans, are offered through private insurance companies.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


A cryptogram is a message written in code. Your challenge is to decode this message. Each letter has been swapped with another letter. Using the keyboard below first choose the coded letter then choose the letter you think it stands for. Six hints have been given in the keyboard for each of the two puzzles. All letters may not be represented. The answers are listed on page 59.

CRYPTOGRAM Code

A

Answer

M

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NWAIPWQWCF WN CYT ZTFMRCT R O K P P C L S T T P T V K M Q T. – COCO CHANEL Code

A

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F

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SMG GHHGRIG ZA HSCQG KH U HKEXQG D U C Z A H U C K R O H Z E G S M K R O I Z E X Q G P. – GIORGIO ARMANI

PHOTO DIFFERENCE

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Find 10 differences in the bottom photo from the top photo. The answer is displayed on page 59.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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2021

OKLAHOMA DELL WILSON

PRESENTED BY Dell Wilson sailing his shot down the fairway

I was born in Pittsburg, Texas in the winter of 1950. School sports were one of the few things that caught my interest in the small town. I worked myself into positions in football, basketball, track and baseball. Early one Saturday morning, my father got me out of bed and took me to our local 9-hole country club. I and six of my 8-year-old classmates were given a golf club starter set and told to play. We were terrible, but soon we were hooked on this new adventure because we could compete against one another. My competitive desire for golf extended through high school, college and my adult life. I was very successful, but when I became a senior, there seemed to be nothing left to accomplish.

Dell Wilson with his Senior Games medals

In 2008, I came across something I didn’t know existed – the Senior Olympics. Boy, did that catch my interest! There was only one more opportunity to qualify for the 2009 Olympics in California. The local director told me only one spot was available and asked if I would attend the finals if I qualified. “Absolutely,” I said.

I won the Kansas golf tournament and quickly learned how tough the competition was at the finals. I have gone on to attend the local, state and national tournaments. Seniors who don’t participate are missing out on an opportunity. The tournaments are professionally organized, and participants are extremely talented. Competing in these events is the main reason my health is now close to the peak I had while young. I practice and try harder to keep in shape to be as good as I can be. It makes me happy. Win or lose, I look forward to seeing the friends I’ve made over the years and anticipate making new ones. I have won a bronze and silver at the nationals and gold in 13 straight state titles in three different states. That’s secondary to the fun and friendship I’ve acquired through the Senior Games – what a terrific thing for seniors.

BUCK & JANET THORNTON

Buck Thornton, Professional Boxer

Buck and Janet Thornton

BUCK THORNTON I played sports in high school, but my main interest was boxing. I fought in the Golden Gloves until I turned pro at the age of 25. My pro record was 34 wins and 2 losses. In 1968, I tried out for the Olympics and missed the cut by one fight. During those years I also competed in the Toughman Contest and weightlifting competitions. As a young boy, I caddied at a golf course and learned to play. To this day, golf has provided me with exercise and social interactions. JANET THORNTON After my third son was born I heard someone say that anyone could run a mile. At the age of 29 I thought, “OK, I can run a mile.” I did that and also started playing racquetball. When I was 40, my friend Monika encouraged me to run and ride bikes. We became two of three women who qualified for an organization where you had to be over 40, run a marathon, ride a bike 200 miles in two days, swim a mile and climb a mountain over 14,000 feet. This opened up a whole new life for me.

JANET AND BUCK We knew each other from high school, and in 2006, we were reunited and married. In that year we received a card about the Senior Games. Buck started playing in the golf tournament and participated in the weightlifting competition. For the next 12 years, we traveled around the country where Buck competed in golf. He has over 50 medals. Janet competed in bike riding one year and won a gold medal. We are now 82 and 79 years old – but still playing! We both play new sports, cornhole and bowling, that we started this past September. Our plans for 2021 are for Buck to compete in golf, and both of us to compete in cornhole and bowling. Over the years we have held onto these words: “You don’t quit playing because you get old. You get old because you quit playing.”


SENIOR GAMES ELIZABETH WILLIAMS ARNETT

Elizabeth Williams Arnett

Dancing has always been my thing. I started early with ballet lessons, and I still dance wherever the music plays. I played a little basketball in high school, but I was never serious about practice or competing. At 29, I bumped into tai chi. After one look, I was sold. I began lessons in Tulsa, and while living in San Francisco, I was a student of Master Choy Kam Mon. I have practiced for 50 years, even teaching. In my mid-30s, I carried building materials up a mountain path, building a cabin in the woods. I also built myself a stronger body. At 46, with the encouragement of my son David, I trained and participated in three triathlons, placing fourth in one.

Elizabeth dancing on the beach

About 10 years ago, I started shooting baskets with some high school girlfriends and my sister-in-law, Monika. We remembered our skills from long ago. We had accepted the warnings that come with aging, and our main concern was falling. After a few weeks,

we forgot our fears and began fully enjoying our time on the court and each other. Once we heard about the Senior Games, we got serious and took five wonderful road trips for the Happy Hoopers to compete in the national games. We had lots of fun and made new friends. There were some disappointments, but there was an abundance of the joy of living. About the same time basketball showed up, so did pickleball, which is a great sport for anybody and everybody. If you've never heard of it, check it out. I like to call it "easy tennis" for seniors and kids. In 2019, I was the oldest woman in the Tulsa Run, a 15K event, and I placed second in my age group. So here I am in 2021, looking forward to my 80th birthday. I am thankful to have a healthy body that I love and enjoy.

JIM MCFADDEN

Jim McFadden breaks through the finish line tape

Jim McFadden posing with his medal

My athletic odyssey may be a bit different than others. It is a tale of longevity rather than drama. I started running 65 years ago as a 15-year-old high school freshman. I won my first mile race and have been going ever since. I have averaged 25 races a year for 65 years – That’s 1,700 races! I have won open or master's races in 33 states. I have also had the fun of racing in Canada, Mexico, England, France, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia. In all of these years, I have never had an injury or lost a season. During this time, I have been a married man and the father of four children. I have worked as a high school track coach, a high school and college teacher, and a high school and college administrator. My highlights have included being state champion miler in high school, becoming an All-American in college cross country, winning the Army 10K Championship, and running the Olympic Trials Marathon. I set a state record for the marathon

(2:26), and 32 years later set the state master’s record for the distance (2:41). In between, I won nine marathons and finished in the top three in five others. After I turned 40, I set every Oklahoma master’s running record from the mile (4:32) to the marathon (2:41). I also medaled in several national track championships, both indoor and outdoor, when they were an easy driving distance from Oklahoma. At 81, I am still running well. I have won 21 races this year. I plan on running as long as possible and winning in a few more states. I have won Senior Games races in Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri, Wyoming and Colorado.

2021 EVENT SCHEDULE EVENT

DATE

SITE

Basketball

Sept. 4

Santa Fe Family Life Center, OKC

Golf Croquet

Sept. 7

LaFortune Park, Tulsa

Archery

Sept. 11

Trosper Park, OKC

5K Power Walk

Sept. 11

Riverside Parks, Tulsa

5K Race Walk

Sept. 11

Riverside Parks, Tulsa

Water Walking

Sept. 11

Westwood Family Aquatic Center, Norman

Swimming

Sept. 12

Westwood Family Aquatic Center, Norman

Disc Golf

Sept. 12

Will Rogers Disc Golf Course, OKC

5K Road Race

Sept. 18

Perry

10K Road Race

Sept. 18

Perry

Pitch, Hit, Run

Sept. 24

Stars & Stripes Park, OKC

Softball 5 vs 5 vs 5

& Stripes Sept 25-26 Stars Park, OKC

Cornhole

Sept. 25

Oklahoma State Fair, OKC

Triathlon

Sept. 25

Lake El Reno, El Reno

Golf

Oct. 2

Muskogee Golf Club, Muskogee

1500M Power Walk

Oct. 2

Shawnee High School, Shawnee

1500M Race Walk

Oct. 2

Shawnee High School, Shawnee

Track & Field

Oct. 2

Shawnee High School, Shawnee

Shuffleboard

Oct. 2

Bixby Community Center, Bixby

Fitness

PerforOct. 3, 10, Kaizen mance Center, 23, 30 Norman

Cycling

Oct. 9

Lake Stanley Draper, OKC

Badminton

Oct. 16

Jackie Cooper Gym, Yukon

Volleyball

Oct. 16

Jackie Cooper Gym, Yukon

Bowling

Oct. 16-17

Green Country Lanes, Muskogee

Tennis

Oct. 20-22 RH 91, Tulsa

Pickleball

Time Oct. 22-24 Life Athletic, OKC

Weightlifting

Oct. 23

Kaizen Performance Center, Norman

Table Tennis

Oct. 30

Oklahoma Table Tennis Club, OKC

Celebration of Athletes

Nov. 6

Quail Creek Country Club, OKC

TO REGISTER FOR THE GAMES OR FOR MORE INFORMATION:

www.okseniorgames.com info@okseniorgames.com • (405) 821-1500


FASHION AFTER 50

WHAT TO WEAR TO DRESS WITH

STYLE BY KAREN SZABO

As you navigate the world of fashion after 50, here are recommendations from local and celebrity stylists.

START WITH THE STAPLES 1. A WHITE BUTTON-DOWN What’s the one must-have staple every woman should have in her closet? “A crisp, white button-down shirt,” said Hailey Nelson, owner of Donna’s Fashions in Tulsa. “You can dress it up with jewelry, a pair of black slacks and heels. Or you can dress it down with a pair of jeans and flats. We have a 70-yearold customer who wears her white button-down with a modest front tie and jeans. She looks fantastic!”

2. FIND THE RIGHT JEANS A basic pair of jeans can be found in almost every wardrobe. They are a staple and a neutral that can be styled in multiple ways. “Dark denim is more polished whereas a light denim reads a bit more casual,” said Kline. “But more important than the wash of the denim is the fit."

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Celebrity stylist Negar Ali Kline agrees. “A crisp white button-down is the perfect piece every woman should have. It looks polished but can be worn running errands, and it can go from day to night. It's a hero piece." For fashion editor Dena Silver, a good white T-shirt is another must-have wardrobe staple. White tees look great under a cardigan or blazer and paired with a pair of jeans or khakis. You can kiss the old “no white after Labor Day” rule goodbye. White clothing is a terrific year-round

Nelson recommends skinny jeans for most of her customers, especially when paired with a loose, flowy top. “You don’t want to have two loose items. Choose tighter jeans with a flowy top or vice versa.” She’s also a big fan of mid-rise jeans. “The higher rise holds you in and hides those love handles, which makes them more comfortable than low-rise jeans.” Skinny and straight-leg jeans go perfectly with longer jackets or tunic tops. Pair them with flat

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

staple. That fashion rule began in the late 19th century when those who had money could leave the city during the summer. Lightcolored clothing was impractical for the dirty, muddy streets and soot of the city. Breezy white dresses and linen shirts became synonymous with wealth. Today, light fabrics like linen and cotton are best left for summer, but soft white, ivory or cream in heavier fabrics like denim and knit are great options for fall and winter.

ballet slippers, moccasins, loafers or kitten heels, and tuck them into tall boots in cooler weather. White jeans are a fashion staple for all women over 50, especially in warmer months. They look fresh and can go from day to evening with just a few quick changes in tops, accessories and shoes. In warmer weather, wear them with wedge sandals and tunic tops or a crisp navy jacket and white tank. When it gets cooler, pair them with brown or black boots, a sweater or jacket and a pretty scarf.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Senior living, with promise.

3. FLATTERING PANTS A pair of pants tailored to fit your body is a basic building block that allows you to feel chic as soon as you put them on. Look for a lightweight wool blend (wool/Lycra is best) in black, charcoal or navy. Wear with a silky blouse, a T-shirt or a tank with a cardigan or jacket.

Covenant Living at Inverness | Tulsa, OK 3800 West 71st Street Limited availability! • Independent & Assisted Living Skilled Nursing • Memory Care • Rehabilitation To schedule a tour today, call (877) 478-8455, or visit us online at CovLivingInverness.org.

4. A BLACK PENCIL SKIRT A basic black pencil skirt is versatile, stylish and surprisingly flattering, no matter what your size. Make sure it has a little stretch and some draping but is not tight. Pair it with boots or black tights and booties or patent-leather pumps for night. As for length, Nelson is a big fan of the midi-skirt which falls a couple of inches below the knees. “A midi-skirt is great for all ages and body shapes. And you don’t have to worry about your knees showing,” Nelson said. The most unflattering length is exactly at the widest part of your calf. A good tailor can tweak any midi to hit exactly where it’s best for you. Even an inch can make a difference between beautiful and blah.

Covenant Living of Bixby | Bixby, OK 7300 East 121st Place South Available now! • Independent & Assisted Living Excellent service, worry-free living • No buy-in fee! To schedule a tour today, call (877) 312-3248, or visit us online at CovLivingBixby.org.

Covenant Living is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. For information, visit CovLiving.org.

FASHION AFTER 50 continued on page 18

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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FASHION AFTER 50 continued from page 17

DON’T BE AFRAID OF

COLOR 5. CARDIGANS These are a year-round fashion accessory and the best way to cover up arms that are less than toned. Look for long and three-quarter-length sleeves in styles that hit you at or above the hip. Longer cardigans are great with straight-leg jeans or pants – but not with skirts.

6. A REALLY GOOD BLAZER When it comes to staples, fashion editor and celebrity stylist Ashley Pruitt likes timeless, chic and sophisticated items like a cream blouse, black sweater and a good blazer. Jackets that hit at the hips are a great look with jeans, skirts, dresses, pants — everything. Black is most versatile but consider navy and cream, too. “Take the time to find a blazer style that you like – single or double-breasted – and don’t be afraid to invest time and money into tailoring it to your dimensions, focusing specifically on the shoulders and the sleeve length. And definitely make sure it’s not too snug around the back,” Silver said.

7. THE LBD

Want a fresh new look? Add some color to your wardrobe. Kate Smith, internationally recognized color expert and president of Sensational Color, recommends turquoise, red-violet, periwinkle and black to give your look a lift. “Turquoise is a color that brings out the glow in every skin tone,” Smith said. “If you have a lighter skin tone, find the perfect turquoise by turning over your arm and looking at the veins in your wrist. If they look bluer or greener, then find a shade of turquoise that leans toward that color. If you have a mediumto-dark skin tone, just about any midtone turquoise will look great."

Of all the closet staples a woman needs, perhaps none is more classic than the little black dress. It's a garment you can wear almost anywhere. Stylists recommend having at least one perfectly fitting LBD that can be dressed up or dressed down. The three styles that flatter women over 50 best, regardless of size or shape, are wrap dresses – especially with long or three-quarter sleeves, sleeveless sheath dresses with a cardigan or jacket, and “fit and flare” dresses.

As we age, hair and skin tone change and many of the colors that looked great on us when we were younger are no longer flattering. Silver recommends wearing colors that complement how you look right now.

PAY ATTENTION TO FIT

“Women with white hair look gorgeous in deep, rich colors like bright blues and teals, while softer colors look beautiful on women with gray hair,” Nelson said.

Probably the single most important fashion tip for older women is to find the right fit. It’s no news that as we age our bodies change. As tempting as it can be to wear loose-fitting clothes with no shape, stylists recommend opting for pieces that flatter your body shape and create balance instead. “When you reach a certain age it’s especially important that everything is fitted for you,” said Paul Cavaco, stylist and former fashion director at Harper's Bazaar and Vogue. “If clothes are fitted well then a lot of the things that are problematic are no longer problematic."

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Nelson agrees – especially when it comes to pants and jeans. “Don’t buy pants or jeans that are too loose,” she said. “If you want a looser fit, I recommend a wide leg pant or pair of joggers, which are popular right now. And I always recommend trying on a smaller size – not so small you can’t sit down – but at least one size smaller. You’ll be surprised at how much better you look.”

You don’t have to abandon your favorite colors, however. Just consider wearing them on the bottom of your outfit, not on top next to your face.

Nelson’s number one fashion tip for women over 50 is to stop saying you can’t wear something because of your age. “If you look good, wear it,” said Nelson. “Confidence will remove 50 pounds."

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Share Your Memories, Win a Prize! LIFE Senior Services is holding its first-ever Writing Contest this summer, and we want to hear from you! Part of the Writers’ Symposium made possible by LIFE’s Senior Centers and the Oklahoma Arts Council, the contest is intended to lend creative writing ideas to seniors in our community and encourage a sense of connection, creativity and appreciation of the arts among older adults. The contest is open to anyone age 50 and older who lives in northeast Oklahoma and is not an employee of LIFE Senior Services, their immediate families or a judge of the contest. Only original, unpublished manuscripts will be accepted. Writers may enter one essay (between 500 and 800 words) in each category (see below). • Drawing from Memory – Writers should compose an essay about a topic meaningful to them, drawing from their personal life experiences. • Humor – A story crafted in a touching or lighthearted tone using humor – quirky, offbeat, or laugh-out-loud funny.

Pickleball Tourney Benefits Hospice of Green Country Pickleball fanatics, get ready! Hospice of Green Country is holding the Pickleball Smash Classic Thursday, July 22 from 5 to 9 p.m. at Titan Sports & Performance Center, 101 E. 81st St. S. in Tulsa. There will be beginner and competitive brackets in the 2021 non-sanctioned tourney. A team of two players can register for $150 which will go to benefit the nonprofit hospice. Players will receive T-shirts, food, beer and prizes for the bracket winners. Spectators can pay $25 to eat, drink and watch the fun. You must be at least 21 years of age to attend.

• Cooking Culture – Entries should revolve around the world of food, cooking and eating – from the story of a family recipe to lessons learned in the kitchen or around the dinner table.

Hospice of Green Country is northeast Oklahoma’s oldest hospice and has served thousands of Oklahomans and their families since opening its doors in 1987. It is the only United Way supported, multi-faith, multi-cultural nonprofit hospice in the area. Their mission continues to be serving patients regardless of ability to pay.

One person in each category will receive a $100 gift card, a year’s membership to LIFE’s Senior Centers and a subscription to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine. The winning manuscripts will be published as submitted in LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, both the printed and digital versions.

The deadline for registration is Friday, July 16, so don’t delay! Call (918) 388-1327 for more information or email sgarcia@hospiceofgreencountry.org.

• Family Tales – A narrative prose essay illustrating a story from the writer’s family history and ancestry. Names may be changed.

See the complete instructions for entering the contest on LIFE’s website, www.LIFEseniorservices.org. There’s a link on the home page to “Writers’ Symposium.”

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

New Tulsa VA Outpatient Clinic Opens The Eastern Oklahoma Veterans Administration will open the new Ernest Childers VA Outpatient Clinic this month at 8921 S. Mingo Rd. in Tulsa. It replaces the longtime clinic on 41st Street near the Broken Arrow Expressway. The VA expects to begin treating some patients at the new facility on July 19 with the former location officially closing on August 8. The Mingo Road clinic will have new telephone numbers, but they were not available by LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine deadline. Veterans are asked to check the VA website at www.muskogee.va.gov. The new clinic has over 180,000 square feet devoted to services for U.S. veterans. It will include space for new services including chemotherapy, an infusion clinic, endoscopy suite and mammography. Servicemen and women can continue to connect with VA programs like prosthetic and sensory aids, physical therapy, optometry, pharmacy, weight management, social work, radiology, mental health treatment, dental, visual and audiological services. It will shorten wait times for veterans and have significantly increased parking, according to the VA. Tulsa will eventually be the site of a state-ofthe-art VA inpatient medical-surgical hospital downtown at 7th and Houston on the OSU Medical Center Campus. That facility is expected to become a 275,000 square-foot, 58-bed medical-surgical hospital for veterans. It will serve Tulsa-area veterans who currently travel to the Jack C. Montgomery VA Medical Center in Muskogee. A daily shuttle service is available from the Ernest Childers VA Outpatient Clinic to Muskogee hospital. Veterans can board the shuttle from behind the current clinic for a trip to Muskogee three times per day, Monday through Friday. The shuttle departs Tulsa at 8:15 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 1:45 p.m.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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MATURE SKIN MAKEUP TIPS

BY SUZANNE BURROW, LIFE Senior Services Outreach Coordinator

“There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives of people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.” – Sophia Loren

Erin Hall, a makeup artist of 18-plus years and a local hairstylist with Blow Dry Bar Salon in Brookside, recently shared how the right tools can make all the difference. From foundation to mascara, read on below for her advice for showcasing your natural beauty and achieving a flattering look that is all your own.

ALWAYS USE THE RIGHT SKIN CARE ESSENTIALS

“Too many women try to capture society’s ideal of smooth skin by layering on multiple products when all they need is a few simple tips,” said Tulsa makeup artist Erin Hall. “The best foundation for a good makeup look is a good skin care routine.” It starts with moisture. Skin tone changes as we age. Priming the skin with a good moisturizer or serum containing hyaluronic acid gives the skin a plumper appearance. Pay careful attention to those areas that are dryer and apply moisturizer more liberally.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT BLUSH AND BRONZER PRODUCTS According to Hall, choosing a blush and bronzer correctly is critical because the wrong colors and consistencies can really age the skin.

Hall prefers softer shades over brighter ones. Pinks and corals often wear better on mature skin than reds. For bronzer, less is more. Use a light hand. If applied correctly bronzer can give you a youthful, sun-kissed look. Use a big brush to contour, placing color upward on the highest point of the cheekbone to raise up and elongate the face.

"Don’t be afraid to use a red or bright lip color. Bold color on the lips can be powerful." GO BIG ON THE LIPS EXPLORE NATURAL EYE LOOKS

When it comes to your peepers Hall has some suggestions. For eyeshadow, stay away from heavy, dark colors. Choose earth tones like browns, taupes, plums, olive greens and even navy blue. And stick with two shades if possible. As for mascara, black is OK for mature skin. It opens the eyes. Hall recommends one or two coats on top lashes and one lighter coat on bottom lashes. Use a light hand to avoid a spider look.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

Hall surprised me when she said “I love lips! All shapes and sizes!” Tulsa makeup artist Erin Hall said she disagrees with those who frown on lip liner for mature skin. Don’t be afraid to use a red or bright lip color. Hall says bold color on the lips can be powerful. If you want to soften it use a nude liner to subdue the color. Matte texture is preferred, but if you want a glossy look, she recommends adding a touch of gloss to the middle of the lip before smacking them together.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


LIFE’S VIRTUAL PROGRAMMING July 2021

Follow LIFE Senior Services on Facebook for LIFE videos, news, local events and resources for seniors. Join us at www.facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices to find the following content and more.

Lifelong Learning is Vital and Fun at OLLI @ OSU Tuesday, July 6 • 10 a.m.

Robbin Davis from the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at OSU will talk about the benefits of learning throughout life and its positive influence on aging. She will also give us a preview of some of the classes that OLLI will be offering this fall.

AVOID FULL-COVERAGE FOUNDATION PRODUCTS

Heavy foundations may seem like the right choice, but they can make lines and wrinkles more pronounced by becoming cakey in areas you don’t want to accentuate. To combat this, Hall recommends a beauty balm (BB) cream or tinted moisturizer which offers sheer to medium coverage. A BB cream isn’t quite as thick as a traditional foundation and becomes easier to apply with the heat from your hands. Hall is a fan of BB cream because it offers a foundation, moisturizer and sunscreen all in one. If you do choose a foundation, she prefers using a liquid or whipped type (sheer to medium coverage) applied with a rounded, fluffy-tipped brush to achieve an airbrush-like finish.

CONCEAL YOUR EYES AND FACE WITH CAUTION

The skin around our eyes is more prone to fine lines and wrinkles. Hall stresses the importance of choosing a lightweight concealer under the eyes. Use in small amounts and only where needed, like the inner corner of the eye. Pat the concealer with your finger and blend it into the skin completely.

“Ask SeniorLine” With Sarah Tronnier, Lead Case Manager Fridays, July 9, 16, 23 and 30 • 2 p.m.

Join Sarah, LIFE’s lead case manager for SeniorLine, most Fridays at 2 p.m. Sarah enjoys connecting with and encouraging LIFE followers while sharing tips on senior living, family caregiving, senior resources and more. Special topics this month are: • July 9 – LIFE’s Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair on July 13 • July 23 – Eight Medical Check-Ups You Shouldn’t Miss LIVE EVENT

LIFE’s Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair Tuesday, July 13 • 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Join LIFE Senior Services for Oklahoma’s premiere seniors event at the Exchange Center at Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St. The in-person event includes opportunities to meet representatives from more than 100 businesses, organizations and services that help seniors stay active, involved and healthy. For more information about the 2021 Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair, see the Event Guide beginning on page 29 or contact Carol Carter at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1219 or ccarter@LIFEseniorservices.org.

Crafting With Roxanne – Terra Cotta Pot Wind Chimes Wednesday, July 21 • 2 p.m.

Roxanne is back with a project that’s fun, easy and pleasing to the ears! For this craft you will need three or four terra cotta pots (graduated in size, the larger one on top then progressively smaller); 6 feet of jute or heavy twine; three or four colors of acrylic or enamel paint (pick your colors); 12 plastic beads (make sure the holes are large enough for your jute) and scissors.

Club LIFE – A New Program for People With Early-Stage Alzheimer’s Tuesday, July 27 • 10 a.m.

Mandy Woodruff of LIFE Senior Services will speak about Club LIFE which offers fun and therapeutic programming, new friends and support for those in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

LIFE’s Senior Centers' Writers’ Symposium Rabbi Marc Boone Fitzerman, “My Writing Life: On (and Off) the Pulpit” Thursday, July 29 • 10 a.m.

Join LIFE Senior Services and LIFE’s Senior Centers for the third session of the Writers’ Symposium with Rabbi Marc Boone Fitzerman, rabbi of Congregation B’nai Emunah, writer and photographer. Attend in person at Legacy Plaza East, 5330 East 31st St., or watch on LIFE’s Facebook page. To reserve your spot for attending in person, call LIFE’s Senior Centers at (918) 744-6760 or register online at www.LIFEseniorservices.org. Made possible by the Oklahoma Arts Council.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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TRENDS IN MEN’S GROOMING BY STEVE CLEM

Everything old is new again – especially when it comes to men’s grooming. As men return to the barber’s chair with longer locks grown during the pandemic, at least one style change is brewing in the never-ending circle of fashion. “It’s not a change to something new, it’s going back to something old,” said Kory Marsden, a stylist at New Alpha Barbershop, 5800 S. Lewis, Suite 115. “Mullets are back,” he said, laughing. “Seems like everyone is going back to the edgy, ‘90s rockers’ hairstyles such as 'Wedding Singer' mullets and hard rock, old-school mullets. Those are a lot of fun.” While some of those longer styles are making a comeback, especially with the “wife-cut-my-hair-at-home” crowd, Marsden says the prevailing trend is much neater. It involves a lot of hair on top and drastic tapers, or “fades.” To translate, that means short on the sides. "When I’m not doing something with my family, I’m at the hospitals, the nursing homes, wherever somebody needs a haircut." – Michael "Mike the Barber" Helms

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

“A pompadour with something like a shadow fade on the sides,” Marsden explained. “Keeping the length on top and either combing it back or combing it over – getting a hard part – that is a very common trend.”

STYLE INFLUENCERS Michael Helms, aka Mike “The Barber,” of Tee’s Barber Shop, 120 N. Greenwood, has a base of Black and Caucasian clients. “We cut everyone’s hair. Green people, too,” Helms joked. He further explained the current trend: “It’s however they want to wear their hair on top, with the sides real neat, and front edge real neat. Faded, tapered and blended around the sides.” Helms says his Black and Caucasian customers have different influencers. “For my Black brothers, whatever they see the athletes wearing on the basketball court, that’s what they want,” Helms said. He says movie stars often inspire styles for his Caucasian clients. “What I call the ‘hard part,’ which is a line running from the temple, and real clean on the sides.” But, Helms sees commonalities in all the cuts. “Short around the ears, long on top. That’s for everybody walking on this earth!” Helms declared.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


LIFE PACE Offers Nutritional Support for Healthy Aging TEE'S BARBER SHOP 120 N. Greenwood Ave. • Tulsa THE BUSINESS VIKING LOOK With current fashion, there is often as much happening on the face as on the top of the head. Both Helms and Marsden trim a ton of beards. “Everyone wants to look like a business Viking now…look like a lawyer, but also can chop wood,” Marsden joked. He says beard coloring is big right now, as are waxes for beards and mustaches. “That includes tobacco-scented waxes,” he said. Both Marsden and Helms also have many clients coming in wanting their heads shaved. “Guys come in and get the steam treatment, hot towels, then get their head shaved,” said Marsden. He asserts that offering straight-razor shaves is part of the throwback feel of their shop. “It’s got the classic barbershop mixed with a tattoo parlor vibe,” he said. DON’T FORGET THE PRODUCTS To complete your new “do,” there are a variety of products available, depending on the look you are going for. “Pastes, gels and putties,” Marsden explained. “Some are designed to hold the hair in place, some to give it body – let it move and have life to it, but also to relatively keep it where you want it to be.” There is even a powder now for texture and volume, Marsden added. “After applying this powder, no matter which way you put your fingers through your hair, the hair will stay exactly where you put it.” He explains that he often uses putties in his styling. “Especially for the comb-over hair where they want that partially wet shine and to make hair stay instead of blowing in the wind.” In addition to these products, Helms says moisturizers are also part of the regime for his Black clients. While both men will adapt to whatever new fashion emerges, Marsden sees a positive trend developing with his clients – faith and trust in his abilities. “A large percentage of my clients, they come in Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly and they just say ‘do what you do!’” he said. Helms’ talent with the clippers is not limited to normal business hours. “I’m 24/7,” Helms announced, laughingly. “When I’m not doing something with my family, I’m at the hospitals, the nursing homes, wherever somebody needs a haircut.”

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

BY ADRIAN ROLLE, INTAKE COORDINATOR

Nutrition influences overall well-being, especially with seniors. Maintaining a healthy diet is known to be one of the main influences for healthy aging. Many seniors want fresh fruit and vegetables every day but fall short because they don't have the resources to buy nutritious food. Obstacles such as lack of transportation to grocery stores or inadequate funds are just two of the barriers many seniors face. Inadequate nutrient intake can lead to deficiency-related diseases, including anemia, frailty and blindness. Chronic diseases associated with aging include osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Studies show that in seniors, there is a decrease in healthy eating habits for nutrient-rich foods (i.e., vegetables, fruits) and an increase in carbohydrates due to oral health, or tooth loss. An excessive intake of carbohydrates can increase your risk for diabetes and other comorbidities. LIFE PACE – a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly – is a comprehensive, coordinated senior healthcare program that uses a team approach to provide a variety of services: medical, skilled therapies (physical, occupational and speech), behavioral, dietary, nursing, transportation, social, recreation, hospitalizations, caregiver training, basic health supplies and durable medical equipment. One member of the care team is a registered dietician. A registered dietitian assesses each participant’s nutritional needs, and recommendations are built into personalized care plans. Nutritional assessments look at food access in the home, as well as the participant’s nutritional status, including weight, medications, lab results, teeth condition and swallowing ability. The LIFE PACE dietitian also meets with participants and caregivers to provide education on a variety of health issues like weight loss, diabetes and healthy eating habits. LIFE PACE provides nutritional support in a variety of ways. Meals can be delivered to the participant’s home, providing nutritious, ready-to-eat meals customized for their unique dietary needs. Participants can also receive supplements such as ready-to-drink shakes to provide a boost in nutrition. The care team also connects with community resources that can provide fresh fruits, fresh vegetables and pantry items for those needing additional support. Participants can also receive hot meals by coming to the Adult Day Center, and PACE will provide transportation. Including nutritional support as part of the holistic approach that LIFE PACE provides is essential in making sure that seniors have what they need to stay healthier – and in their own homes – for as long as possible.

PACE If you or someone you care about could benefit from LIFE PACE, contact a LIFE PACE specialist at (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Español).

www.LIFEPACE.org LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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LOCAL FASHIONISTAS BY LINDSAY MORRIS

The Tulsa area has no shortage of fashionable folks. You can see them just about anywhere – as you’re strolling around downtown, at Utica Square, in the Rose District or along Brookside. It’s easy to spot stylish people of all ages sporting every color of the rainbow in all sorts of creative ways. These three “fashionistas” share what fashion means to them and remind us that true style is more than what meets the eye.

Q: What originally gave you an interest in cuffs? Jill: I took a sabbatical from teaching law. I had been using the left side of my brain so much that I was craving to do something with the right side of my brain. I opened a drawer in my house and saw all of these cuffs that had been given to me. I wondered why I couldn’t make them on my own? I got online, and I could not get enough of learning how to make something beautiful for the wrist. The cuffs I made had inspiring words on them because I wanted people to walk around with hope on their wrists. I wanted to be able to give out hope each day and for people to wear hope each day. Q: Has fashion always been an interest of yours? Jill: I had an epiphany one day that fashion is about what makes me feel good. I don’t have to have a pair of Chanel sunglasses to make me feel good. If you have a good haircut, and you halfway like your shoes; it doesn’t matter what is in between. For me, fashion is, how do you feel about you, and how do you present yourself to the public? If you like you, then they like you.

JILL DONOVAN

Founder and owner of Rustic Cuff Jill Donovan was a practicing attorney and professor at the University of Tulsa when she was inspired to start making bracelets or “cuffs.” Her successful business venture has brought beauty and hope to others. She also supports several charitable causes and is the author of “The Kindness Effect.”

Q: Do you have any tips about how to wear Rustic Cuff? Jill: Some people, over the lifetime of a bracelet, end up buying it in 10 different

colors so it can go with every outfit. For me, Rustic Cuff is a conversation starter. I want to wear something that if I’m in an elevator, they’ll say, “Oh, that’s cool.” Does that one cuff make you feel good because it says “one day at a time?” Is it going to help you in the middle of the day when you’re in a slump? Then wear that. Q: Are there any people or brands that inspire your fashion or your cuff designs? Jill: My personal style is a cross between Ralph Lauren – rugged and stable – and Alexander McQueen – edgy, bold, outside the lines. I like bouncing back and forth between those two. I like to shock people sometimes too. Q: Coming out of COVID-19, why is a personal sense of fashion important? Jill: COVID-19 has given me a new perspective on fashion. I don’t think you necessarily work better and harder if you’re dressed up in heels. If you feel good about yourself, you’re going to be fashionable because people won’t be looking at your clothes as much as they’re looking at your smile and how you’re reaching out to others. You could have the best clothes and purse, but if you don’t have a smile and kindness, you’re no longer fashionable.

ON THE COVER Tulsan Jill Donovan turned her love of cuff bracelets from a hobby to a thriving business. Celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, Miranda Lambert, Beyonce and Carrie Underwood are known to wear her designs. Jill is pictured at Rustic Cuff’s midtown Tulsa store on Cherry Street. Photo by Valerie Wei-Haas.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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Q: Why was it important for you to dress up for church services even though they were online? La Verne: I didn’t want to get into a habit of bumming around or looking slouchy. I know it takes just 21 days for a habit to be changed or to acquire a new one. I wanted to keep my spirits up as well as encouraging other members on Facebook. Q: How has the concept of “dressing up” changed during your lifetime? La Verne: It has changed over time because clothes are not as tailored as they once were. Everyone seems to now go to church with no hats. For the men, they’re wearing casual pants.

DR. LA VERNE WIMBERLY Retired Tulsa Public Schools administrator

My mother wore hats – she had beautiful hats. I started wearing hats when I became an adult. It complements and completes a look, along with a purse and gloves.

Q: What are some of the favorite “go-to” items in your wardrobe? La Verne: I like solid clothes that I can accessorize with jewelry and/or scarves. I like a good tailored suit. I like bright colors or jewel tones and black and white as well. Q: At 82, why do you think fashion is still important? La Verne: The way you look is how you’re going to feel. If you look good, you’re going to do your best. You don’t want to get into a rut of not looking your best. Don’t think that life is over because maybe you’re turned 70 or 80 or above. You need to enjoy and get the most out of life. When you have a reason to get up and dressed, your whole life will change because you still want to stay connected to the external world.

Dr. La Verne Wimberly's story about dressing up for online church every Sunday for 52 weeks during the COVID-19 pandemic has been reported by dozens of news outlets around the world this spring. She retired from Tulsa Public Schools after 40 years in education, including roles as principal, director of 17 middle schools and the district’s interim superintendent in 2000.

Q: How is fashion/style different now, from when you were growing up? Georgia: If you went to the theater, you dressed like you were going to church. Fashion meant a great deal. When Marjorie Tallchief and the other Native American ballet dancers performed, they were elegance personified. The younger generations have become more and more relaxed. When I was a little girl, I would go to downtown Tulsa with my mother in a dress, polished shoes, white gloves and a hat. I was on an airplane recently and saw a teenager wearing pajamas. It is fashionable now to look like you just got out of bed.

GEORGIA SNOKE

Former Ballerina With Tulsa Ballet Company Georgia Snoke trained under the world-famous ballet dancers Roman Jasinski and Moscelyne Larkin as they founded what would become the Tulsa Ballet. An original cast member of Jasinski’s The Nutcracker, she co-authored “Roman Jasinski: A Gypsy Prince from the Ballet Russe.”

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There is an attitude of, “I don’t care what you think of me” now. I think people have become slovenly. When you’re slovenly in the way you dress, your attitude and choice of vocabulary become slovenly as well.

Q: How do you describe your personal sense of style? Georgia: I am a Chico’s girl. I am somebody who loves colors. I love shawls – I love the drama and movement of them. I’ll wear fancy shoes into grocery stores. The jewelry I love is inexpensive but from interesting places, like my Trees of Life from Tibet and pieces from Katmandu. I usually wear pants. I teach exercise classes at Montereau, and it’s important that I can teach in what I’m wearing. Q: How do you define style? Georgia: When I think of style, I think of internal styles, not external. I far more admire people with kind eyes –people who have genuine smiles – and I don’t care what they look like. I put a lot of emphasis on movement, having been a dancer all my life. The older I get, I try to move with dignity and grace because self-presentation is so important.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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EMBRACING the GRAY

Women Increasingly Choose to Ditch the Hair Dye BY STEVE CLEM

DITCHING the DYE

Jane Huggins Clayton, and her sister, Julie Hudson are co-owners of Tulsa’s iidentity Salon, 2731 S. Harvard. That’s not a typo on the spelling of “iidentity.” Clayton and Hudson are twins. “We’re identical twins, and that’s the two “ii’s” in iidentity,” Clayton said. Clayton and Hudson have seen a lot in their 22 years in business, and what they are witnessing now are fundamental changes in the way their customers view hair styling. “During the pandemic, people have gotten out of high-maintenance hair coloring and haircuts,” Clayton said. “COVID-19 has made people come to terms with what they have naturally. That means embracing the gray.”

A NEW MODEL FOR HAIR CARE

Clayton believes the very model of salon visits is evolving. “It is freeing to not have to come into the salon every four to six weeks. It saves money and time. If you do a blending gray, you may never have to cover it…you can just blend it out every 8 to 12 weeks,” Clayton said. Clayton maintains that customers are blending gray out with highlights and low lights, or shadowing of the roots. “It blends the gray out, so you’re not getting a hard line when it grows out,” she said. “And people are adding highlights that focus around the face to brighten the face.” Hudson says clients are embracing longer and softer styles including shags and layered cuts. “Also, people are putting a little bit of body in

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their hair now. Before, they were wearing their hair more structured, more blow-dried, more flat-ironed,” she said. “Now, everything is looser and softer.” But what about the maintenance of gray hair? “A lot of people, their gray hair turns yellow, so they need to use a purple or a blue shampoo or conditioner, Clayton said. “That will take the yellow out of the gray hair and brighten it.” She says the rest is just moisture and oil to keep hair soft and healthy.

BOOSTING SELF-CONFIDENCE

Clayton and Hudson are seeing other women who are going for it in a different way. “I think during the pandemic some people thought ‘if I’m going to do something crazy, I’m going to do it when it reopens,’” Clayton said, laughing. “So, I think people have gotten braver about trying to do funky colors. We’ve seen a lot of people who want extravagantly colored hair,” she said. Clayton reiterates that there aren’t a lot of challenges to maintaining attractive gray hair. She says its about getting into the mindset. “We’re raised in a culture to cover it, to only have gray hair in your 60s, 70s and 80s. Now, you can have gray hair in your 20s…people are just embracing it,” she said. “If you go back closer to your natural hair color that’s always the most flattering to the skin tone,” Hudson declared. “Just do whatever makes you feel confident! As long as the hair is healthy, it doesn’t matter what length or style it is.”

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

When Joli Campbell, owner/creator of www.quicksilverhair.com, decided to ditch the dye in her late 30s, it was definitely not trendy. Campbell’s website is dedicated to helping women “care for their silvers and keep them beautiful.” She says the women in her family live well into their 90s and all go prematurely gray. “The thought that I would have to dye my hair for 70 years just wasn’t an option for me,” Campbell said. She says she reached a point where she couldn’t find a color that was right for her anymore. “Everything was too dark, and bleaching was going to cause severe hair damage,” she recalled. Additionally, she was losing hair with each dye job. “How many reasons does a person need?” she asked. Deciding to be dye-free by her 40th birthday, Campbell never looked back. “It became about so much more than the hair. I transformed my inner world, my career, my home…all of it,” she said. She believes authenticity builds on itself, as does the confidence that comes with owning who you are. “Authenticity is defined by the individual. If it feels right to you, go for it!” Campbell said.

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WHERE TO SHOP Tulsa is fortunate to have several locally owned stores that can provide wardrobe advice, along with the clothes to match. For three decades, Travers Mahan, near East 81st Street & South Lewis, has sold clothing for all occasions, from casual to formal and even custom made. Ed Beshara’s Formal Wear & Fine Clothing at East 36th Street & South Harvard, was founded in 1960. Specializing in formal wear for black-tie events, the store has tuxedo rentals, in addition to clothing and accessories available for purchase. Free alterations and custom fittings are part of the service. The Pinpoint Resource, a family-owned men’s clothing store in the Farm Shopping Center, has specialized in suits of all kinds, including custom and tailor-made for, 20 years. Styles of New York near East 48th Street & South Memorial carries men’s clothing at a discounted price. While not locally owned, Jos. A. Bank is a popular menswear retailer in Utica Square. The store has several “Big & Tall” options and sells shoes and outerwear, along with most of the basics. Consignment stores are the perfect way to find nicer clothing at a more affordable price. In Tulsa, the Echo Man in the London South Shopping Center has current fashions in designer labels for a fraction of what they cost new. Echo Man carries everything from formal wear and loungewear to casual clothing and workout attire.

SHARP DRESSED MEN BY JULIE WENGER WATSON

CASUAL WEAR Traditionally a time to relax and recover, Saturday afternoons are made for jeans, chinos or casual trousers made from cotton or woolen fabric. Pair them with your favorite T-shirt or polo in the summer or a flannel, Henley shirt, or crewneck sweater in the fall. Brown shoes are more informal than black, and slip-ons like loafers or boat shoes are easy accessories for a casual look. Canvas sneakers or athletic shoes are a good solution for activities such as hiking, gardening or walking. Dress things up with a jacket or sweater.

QUICK TIP

Casual doesn’t mean sloppy, and attention to detail makes all the difference. Choosing a belt to match your shoe color and socks to match your trousers helps pull things together. Pay attention to fit (not too baggy), cut and color.

DRESS IT UP Purchase higher quality clothing when you can afford it. If you still wear a suit to work, invest in a good one with classic styling that will last. A dark color, such as navy blue or charcoal gray, works well for most occasions. Double-breasted is more formal than single, but it’s less versatile. Neckties and pocket squares are your chance to personalize your outfit, but avoid matching. A black belt with black oxfords is traditional; black dress boots or loafers offer a slightly more relaxed look.

“We keep our styles very current because our space is so limited,” said owner Pam Graddy. “With more people working from home, our fitness section has just taken off, and we have a lot of designer jeans, too.” For wardrobe advice, Graddy defers to her saleswomen. “If a gentleman truly doesn’t know which way to go, he can ask one of the ladies who work in the men’s store. They’ll be glad to help because every gentleman’s style is a little different,” she said. Graddy recommends paying attention to the feel of the fabric and the workmanship when selecting an item. “We feel a lot of fabrics in the store, and you can literally feel the difference between a cheaper fabric and something like a highquality cotton or cashmere,” she noted.

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Shopping for casual wear depends on your budget and your sense of style. Inexpensive jeans, khakis and tees can be found at places like the Gap or sporting goods stores such as Bass Pro Shops or Academy. For a more personal shopping experience and some expert advice, locally owned Abersons near 35th Street & Peoria Avenue is an excellent option for higher-end and designer labels.

QUICK TIP

Get to know a tailor. A few alterations can completely change the fit and appearance of your clothes.

If suits aren’t a part of their everyday wardrobe, most men need an alternative to casual clothing. Khakis and chinos are dressier than jeans. Wear them with a jacket or sweater for a sharp look. A plain white button-down is a versatile basic. Leather shoes add class. Sports jackets are a fun place to express your style with patterns and textures.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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Recommended Reads

Bunkering With Books SCANDALOUS FASHION BY CONNIE CRONLEY

A word that appears regularly in books about clothes and fashion is “scandalous!” That is one thing that makes fashion so interesting. When we costume ourselves, do we want to scandalize? Set trends? Elicit admiration? Demonstrate conformity? Proclaim our individuality? The late, revered University of Tulsa literature professor Dr. Winston Weathers once told a class that how we dress shows our sense of occasion. We dress one way for a tennis game, he said, and another way to go to church. Well, we used to. Now people wear sweat pants to travel and flip-flops to the White House. I suppose that says more about their statement of self than their bowing to place. “Move over, special event, here I come through the door. Me!” The subtitle of a new book, “Dress Codes,” tells the story: “How the Laws of Fashion Made History.” Author Richard Thompson Ford takes a deep dive into fashion through the ages to explain dress codes established by royalty, aristocracy, politics and religion. Although laws tried to set social hierarchy, people always resisted like wiggling puppies. The 15th century was particularly turbulent for fashion. When Joan of Arc violated religious

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morality by wearing men’s clothing, she was burned for heresy. In Italy, Christian women were condemned for wearing bright colors, jewelry or elaborate hairstyles. Although in some places in Italy, female prostitutes were required to advertise themselves by wearing yellow ribbons, red skirts and coats, so were Jewish women. “The dress codes that condemned jewelry as vanity also made it a mandatory sign of Judaism,” Ford writes. Jewish women were mandated to wear a yellow veil and conspicuous earrings. Suddenly, the wind changed. Perhaps influenced by the allure of the taboo, jewelry and bright colors became fashionable for powerful members of society. By the 1700s in Europe, colored bonnets with ostrich plumes, high-heeled shoes, bright colors and glittering jewelry were the height of fashion – for men. Dress codes always reflect struggles for power and status. A chapter titled “Power Dressing” focuses on race. The 1700 South Carolina Negro Act prohibited Black people from dressing “above their condition.” In the 1940s, Black and Latino men wore zoot suits and ignited riots. Ford, a professor at Stanford Law School, is both a lawyer and a minister. He loquaciously tells us that clothing is so important, it has been

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

the “subject of rules and regulations, legislative proclamations and judicial edicts.” And still, what we choose to wear “reflects our deepest commitments, aspirations and sense of self.” I’ll never take my little black dress for granted again. My favorite book about black dresses is “Strapless: John Singer Sargent and the Fall of Madame X” by Deborah Davis, published in 2003. This is a compelling dual biography of the painter and his model, Amelie Gautreau, and the scandal they caused in Belle Époque Paris. Sargent was an up-and-coming artist hoping to break into society; Gautreau was an ambitious American from New Orleans. In the original painting, she wore a low-cut black gown with one falling, jeweled shoulder strap. The painting was considered so deliberately provocative, it set off a frenzy that ruined her career and sent Sargent fleeing to England. Sargent bounced back and rose to international fame; she was forgotten. Today, the Portrait of Madame X hangs in New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art with a revision by Sargent. She now wears two jeweled shoulder straps, firmly in place. Ah, the power of fashion.

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2021

EVENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 13 • 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Exchange Center at Expo Square 4145 E. 21st St. • Tulsa


WELCOME TO THE

SENIOR SAFETY AND LIFESTYLE FAIR Exchange Center at Expo Square • 4145 E. 21st St., Tulsa Tuesday, July 13, 2021 • 9:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

LIFE Senior Services is pleased to present the 2021 Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair. This premiere senior event is designed especially for you! The primary focus is on health and safety, active aging and retirement lifestyles and interests. We hope that you will gain new insight into aging in place; take advantage of the free health screenings; learn about community and volunteer organizations that you might enjoy being involved with, and discover how to live more safely and securely in your home and in the community. There will also be many programs and services to explore that will help you live your best life.

9 a.m. Event Opens With More Than 125 Exhibitors You will find information about active aging and senior centers; caregiver support services and support groups; money management, retirement planning and investments; home improvement and remodeling; Medicare options and VA benefits; health, vision and hearing screenings; mental and behavioral health services; accessibility services; senior housing options; adult day health centers and PACE; rehabilitative services; durable medical equipment; volunteer organizations, travel clubs and so much more! • Free Health Screenings Blood pressure checks – Indian Health Care Resource Center Hearing screenings – Armstrong Hearing Aid Center Vision screenings – TRIAD Eye Institute • Rx Take Back With Tulsa Health Department, the Coalition Against Prescription and Substance Abuse of Tulsa (CAPSAT) and the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (OBNDD) Bring in your expired or unwanted prescriptions and over-the-counter medications for safe disposal. ***Please no liquids, inhalers or syringes. • Seek, Find, WIN! Search out our top sponsors, get your card stamped by at least 15 of them, and then enter to win one of 10 Reasor’s $100 gift cards! Gift cards are compliments of Memorial Park Cemetery.

9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Senior Stage Education and Entertainment Emceed by News On 6 Anchor Lori Fullbright, the Senior Stage offers free educational presentations, entertainment and “Seek, Find, WIN!” prizes. Lori will give her popular “Cons, Frauds and Scams” presentation alongside talks on Medicare, lifelong learning, keys to healthy aging, affordable housing and more. Other highlights include a fashion show presented by Assistance League Tulsa, music with Nashville recording artist James Robert Webb, and lively performances by line dancers and the East Side Band.

10 a.m. – 1 p.m. AARP Oklahoma Free Shredding Event (East Side of the Exchange Center) Drive through and drop off your old tax, medical and banking records, prescription tags or any paperwork with personal information. Materials will be shredded on-site by American Document Shredding.

If You’ve Been Considering a Pet, This Could Be Your Day! Caring for pets has been proven to help establish a renewed

sense of purpose, reduce loneliness and depression, and even lower blood pressure in older adults. Visit with the Paw Pals therapy dogs and then check out the rescue pets for adoption from Oklahoma Alliance for Animals, Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF) and Lab Rescue OK.

HOT OFF THE PRESS!

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rservices.org www.LIFEsenio

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LIFE’s Vintage

Guide •

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Get your free copy of the 2021-2022 LIFE’s Vintage Guide to Housing & Services. The Vintage Guide is northeast Oklahoma’s most comprehensive catalog of senior housing, home and community-based health and social services, government programs and community resources.


CommunityCare Medicare Resources for Tulsa-Area Seniors Hello, Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair attendees! It is hard to believe that we’re already over halfway through the year. Fall will be here before we know it, and with the change in seasons comes the Medicare Advantage Annual Election Period (AEP). Once October begins, your mailboxes, TVs and radio stations will be inundated with ads for different Medicare plans. Medicare plans can and do change each year, and it is important to explore your options. Below are some questions to consider and information you should know before AEP begins in October.

CommunityCare Senior Health Plan offers a variety of plans with benefits you want and deserve.

 edicare Supplements and M Medicare Advantage Plans

Medicare supplements or Medigap plans are standardized plans that pay some or all of your covered medical claims after Medicare pays their portion. These plans only cover what Original Medicare does, they don't cover prescription, vision or dental services. Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C) are also called replacement plans. Advantage plans pay the claim, and you may have some out-of-pocket costs for services. You typically do not show your Medicare card at all when you receive services. Plans typically include drug coverage and some extra benefits such as dental and vision.

 uestions to ask when you're Q considering your options • Are my doctors covered by the plan? • Is my preferred hospital in the network? • Are my maintenance drugs covered and what will they cost?  

What to watch out for!

Be careful when answering calls from unknown numbers, and don't provide your personal information over the phone. Television ads about Medicare plans are often from national insurance brokerages, and the benefits they promote may not be available in your area.

• Low and $0 premiums • Worldwide emergency & urgent care • Vision and dental coverage and more Join the only Medicare Advantage plan with in-network access to two of Oklahoma’s premier health systems—Ascension St. John and Saint Francis.

What to look for at the end of the year

Medicare supplement beneficiaries should watch for a rate increase letter around October or November. Most plans are age-rated, and premiums usually increase annually.

Now is the time to explore your Medicare coverage options. We’ll help you join the plan that’s right for you. Monday-Friday, 8a.m. – 6p.m. 918-594-5272 (TTY 1-800-722-0353)

Medicare Advantage members should receive their Annual Notice of Change by October 1. This booklet tells you what is changing for the coming year. It is also important to review the drug list to make sure the cost of your medications is not changing.

ccokadvantage.com Medicare can be complicated, and CommunityCare is here to help. If you have questions about your options, our team is available at (918) 594-5257, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.  As Oklahoma’s largest locally owned health insurance company, we work with you to ensure you have the information you need.  

CommunityCare Choice, Inc. is an HMO and PDP plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in CommunityCare Choice, Inc. depends on contract renewal. The Senior Health Plan service area includes Tulsa, Creek, Craig, Mayes, Muskogee, McIntosh, Nowata, Okmulgee, Osage, Pittsburg, Rogers, Wagoner, and Washington Counties. Other providers are available in our network. Please call Customer Service for assistance at 918-594-5323. (TTY: 1-800-722-0353), Monday – Sunday and some holidays from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. October 1 - March 31 and Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. April 1 - September 30. Y0131_2021 LSSProgramAd_M

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DON'T GET SCAMMED Oklahoma Insurance Department Works to Protect Seniors The pandemic has given scam artists new ideas for conning people out of money and personal information. The Oklahoma Insurance Department wants to keep older adults from becoming victims of fraud.

“I was certain I needed to do what he told me to do,” but something about the call made Velma Sinclair uneasy. The gentleman claimed to be with Medicare conducting a survey about her experience with the COVID-19 vaccine. He said he needed her to verify her Medicare number and personal information. “I thought we aren’t supposed to give that kind of information out, but he urged me, very urgently,” said Ms. Sinclair in a shaky voice. Widowed nearly two decades ago, Ms. Sinclair still lives independently in her home at the age of 92, but her budget is tight. “He promised me a gift card if I participated in the survey. I went ahead and gave him the information because I really needed the gift card,” said Ms. Sinclair. Unfortunately, that man was a fraud and up to no good. According to Ray Walker, director of the Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at the Oklahoma Insurance Department, they get calls from Oklahomans like this all the time. “Many seniors want to believe the best in people and many times, they are preyed upon for that very reason,” said Walker.

For more information about fraud prevention or if you or someone you know feels they may be the victim of a fraud, please contact the Oklahoma Medicare Assistance Program.

Walker also said one of the side effects of the pandemic had been more Oklahoma seniors isolated which often increases their vulnerability to scam artists. “These fraudsters are trained professionals, and they sound legitimate. No one from a vaccine distribution site, an insurance company or Medicare should be contacting you to discuss vaccine registration, administration or your experience with the vaccine,” said Walker. “If someone does contact you, they shouldn’t be asking for any personal information, like your date of birth, address or Medicare number. If you receive a call like this, just hang up.” The Medicare Assistance Program at the Oklahoma Insurance Department has a team available to help with questions about Medicare, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage Plans, resources to help with prescription drug costs for those who qualify, and fraud prevention and reporting.

(800) 763-2828 www.map.oid.ok.gov

WE’RE HERE TO HELP The MEDICARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, a part of the Oklahoma Insurance Department, has a team of people and volunteers to help with questions about:

• MEDICARE • MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS • MEDICARE ADVANTAGE • MEDICARE FRAUD

CALL 1-800-763-2828 or VISIT MAP.OID.OK.GOV Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 5


Northeastern Oklahoma Senior Retirement Communities BIXBY

Autumn Park 8401 E. 134th St. S. (918) 369-8888

BRISTOW

Woodland Village 131 E. 9th Ave. (918) 367-8300

BROKEN ARROW

Hartford Villas 714 N. 14th Street (918) 251-0399

Kenosha Landing 2602 W. Oakland Pl. (918) 258-0331 Vandever House 3102 S. Juniper Ave. (918) 451-3100

COLLINSVILLE

Cardinal Heights 224 S. 19th St. (918) 371-9116

COWETA

Carriage Crossing 28530 E. 141st St. (918) 486-4460

GLENPOOL

Redbud Village 14900 S. Broadway St. (918) 322-5100

JENKS

Pioneer Village 315 S. Birch St. (918) 298-2992

OWASSO

Prairie Village 12877 E. 116th St. N. (918) 371-3221

PONCA CITY

Willow Creek 1501 Princeton Ave. (580) 765-8011

SAND SPRINGS

Heartland Village 109 E. 38th St. (918) 241-1200 River Ridge 5202 S. Hwy. 97 (918) 245-4131 55 and older

ARE YOU EXPERIENCING? • leg or hip pain • sharp back pain • shoulder pain • neck pain

• low back pain • upper back pain • pain around the ribcage • tingling or numbness

Has your Doctor said you’re too old or they can’t help you because of your medical condition?

We Can Help With Your Back PAIN!

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

Call Dr. Webb Today (918) 260-9322 www.drjameswebb.com • 6550 E 71st St, #200 • Tulsa, Ok 74133 6 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

SAPULPA

Hickory Crossing 2101 S. Hickory St. (918) 224-5116

SKIATOOK

West Oak Village 1002 S. Fairfax Ave. (918) 396-9009

TULSA

Brookhollow Landing 2910 S. 129th E. Ave. (918) 622-2700 Cornerstone Village 1045 N. Yale Ave. (918) 835-1300 Country Oaks 5648 S. 33rd W. Ave. (918) 446-3400 Heritage Landing 3102 E. Apache St. (918) 836-7070 Park Village 650 S. Memorial Dr. (918) 834-6400


AVOID ROBO CALLS WITH AARP FRAUD WATCH NETWORK

Did you get a call from a number you do not recognize? Was the caller a robotic voice on the other end of the line? You are not alone. During May 2021, 47.3 million robocalls were placed in Oklahoma, and 38% were placed by scammers, according to YouMail’s RoboCall index. The robotic voices often claim to represent trusted sources such as name-brand companies or government agencies, like the Internal Revenue Service and Social Security Administration. In the instance of fake Social Security calls, scammers call with warnings that your Social Security number has been linked to criminal activity and blocked or suspended. Scammers ask you to confirm your number so they can reactivate it or issue you a new number for a fee. This is a ploy to take your money and personal data. Social Security does not block or suspend numbers.

Car warranty scams are another prolific con artist tactic. They call with offers to extend your existing warranty or sell a new warranty. These calls appear to be legitimate because scammers often have information about your car or warranty. During the call, you may be instructed to press a specific number or stay on the line and provide personal information. Whatever the message, do not engage. Doing so can lead you to a real live scammer who will pressure you to make a purchase or provide personal information. Pressing a key or answering a question alerts scammers that they have hit a “live” number, and they will call repeatedly. To help protect against illegal robocalls, the AARP Fraud Watch Network recommends adding your telephone number to state and national Do Not Call registries. Visit www.donotcall.gov to register on the National Do Not Call Registry. Visit the Oklahoma State Attorney General’s Office

website, www.oag.ok.gov/consumerprotection or call (405) 521-3921 to register your number on Oklahoma’s registry. Additionally, do not answer calls from unknown numbers. Consider using a callblocking mobile app or device to screen your calls and weed out spam and scams. AARP’s Fraud Watch Network can help if you believe you are a scam victim or want fraud prevention resources. The Fraud Watch Network gives support and guidance to victims and families when fraud occurs.

BY WAYNE BLACKMON Fraud Watch Network Lead Volunteer

To learn more, visit www.aarp.org/fraud or call the AARP Fraud Watch Network Helpline at (877) 908-3360 toll-free. For information on upcoming local fraud prevention seminars, visit www.aarp.org/ok or call (866) 295-7277.

Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 7


WHERE BARGAINS CHANGE LIVES Assistance League Tulsa Thrift Shop Funds Community Outreach BY LINDSAY MORRIS

customers to let them know that their donations and purchases help to fund the work in Operation School Bell, and our customers have responded in a resoundingly positive fashion,” Taylor said.

OPERATION SCHOOL BELL

Operation School Bell promotes student selfconfidence by providing them quality school uniforms, clothing and other essential items. The new Operation School Bell storeroom is located on the level below Bargains Thrift Shop. Before children are fitted for outfits, they spend time in a large, fun space that has a library, chalk walls and games. When it’s their turn to shop, they get a shopping cart, and volunteers help them select two school uniforms – which include everything from the actual uniform to a belt, underwear, socks and shoes – plus a fun outfit. The children also receive a hygiene kit and two books. Children who participate in Operation School Bell are identified by school counselors based on need. For families that do not live in Tulsa, Operation School Bell goes to them. They set up clothing and supplies in their area Walmart. Each child in the family receives $75 worth of clothing. Due to COVID-19, the program ran differently than normal during the 2020-21 school year. “While we were still able to provide clothing to students enrolled in Tulsa Public Schools and area schools, most of the work was done by a smaller group of volunteers who worked in the Assistance League building without the children present,” Taylor said.

Dayon Smith of Assistance League Tulsa puts her fashion advisory skills to work at Bargains Thrift Shop. Assistance League Tulsa is dedicated to transforming the lives of children and adults through community programs. This national organization, which has a strong Tulsa chapter, operates as an all-volunteer organization. The dynamic philanthropic program is funded by contributions from corporate sponsors, individuals, grants and proceeds from their Bargains Thrift Shop. Like most non-profit organizations, Assistance League experienced some temporary setbacks during the COVID-19 pandemic, including being closed from March to September in 2020, but most of their programs are back and fully running now, says Yolanda Taylor, Assistance League Past President. Assistance League Tulsa’s many philanthropic programs include Bargains Thrift Shop, Operation School Bell and the Betty Bradstreet Assistance Fund.

BARGAINS THRIFT SHOP

In 2018, the thrift shop moved into a larger location at 5350 E. 31st St., on 31st Street between Sheridan Road and Yale Avenue. Items in the store are priced to sell and are high quality, including clothing from stores like Talbot’s and Chico’s. The shop has a “Treasures” area that features valuable items such as Waterford crystal and Frankoma pottery. It's currently open Saturdays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

8 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

BETTY BRADSTREET ASSISTANCE FUND

Helping to fill the gap of funding to fine arts programs in public schools in the Tulsa area is the Betty Bradstreet Assistance Fund. The program has allowed schools like Key Elementary to introduce new mediums of art – such as painting on velvet and using wax to demonstrate deconstruction.

MORE LOCAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Check out the next page for outfits put together by Assistance League of Tulsa. Items can be donated to Bargains Thrift Shop right at the front door. When donors contribute clothing or other items, they can rest assured knowing their donations will not go to waste. Every item donated is assessed by a volunteer, who carefully examines it to decide whether or not it should go into the thrift shop. If it doesn’t go into the shop, it is given to another charitable organization or recycled. Proceeds made at Bargains Thrift Shop go to benefit other Assistance League programs, namely Operation School Bell. “Assistance League has increasingly spent time with

Assistance League Tulsa also gives back to several area organizations. Volunteers provide welcoming baskets, Thanksgiving dinner and a Christmas party to Mental Health Association recipients at Yale Apartments. They also help fulfill “wish list” items for the apartments, such as linens and mattresses.

This organization helps LIFE Senior Services by purchasing items from a “wish list” for their adult day centers: patio furniture, a popcorn machine – even a Wii. They also put together baskets of household items for ADvantage program recipients and host holiday parties at LIFE’s adult day centers. Assistance League Tulsa also provides items to Emergency Infant Services and Tulsa Advocates for the Protection of Children. This vibrant group of volunteers gives not only their time but also their money to meet the needs of the community. They are a tight-knit group of individuals who are mostly retirement age and who form lasting friendships through their service.

If you are interested in becoming involved in Assistance League Tulsa, visit their website at www.altulsa.org/getinvolved or call (918) 832-8832.


STYLES FOR A

BARGAIN Dress in style for any occasion with these outfits put together by Assistance League Tulsa's Bargains Thrift Shop Stylist Dayon Smith.

CASUAL WEAR

DRESS WEAR

EVENING WEAR

• Worth pantsuit – $28 • Andrew Gellar shoes – $8 • Handbag – $6 • Scarf – $3 • Necklace – $4 • Hat – $5

• Teri Jon dress – $22 • Ann Michelle shoes – $6 • Handbag – $4 • Earrings – $15

• Dress – $20 • Rampage shoes – $9 • Handbag – $4 • Earrings – $15

TOTAL: $47

TOTAL: $48

SPORTSWEAR

CASUALWEAR

EVENING WEAR

• Club Room shorts – $10 • Merona polo shirt – $6 • Jarmon loafers – $13 • Cap – $3 • Racket – $3

• Pinpoint Resource blazer – $12 • Levi jeans – $6 • Stafford shirt – $8 • Belt – $3 • Florsheim boot – $10 TOTAL: $39

• Calvin Klein suit – $15 • Kenneth Cole shirt – $9 • Ed Beshara tie – $4 • Shoes – $10

TOTAL: $54

TOTAL: $35

TOTAL: $38

Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 9


TULSA POLICE LORI FULLBRIGHT'S CRIME SAFETY TIPS

Lori Fullbright, anchor and crime reporter for News On 6 in Tulsa, has spent her career talking to victims of crime, police officers and criminals. Take her advice to reduce the chances you’ll be a target of crime – or increase your odds of surviving one.

1. HAVE A PLAN – No one wants to imagine being a victim of crime,

but it’s an important part of self-protection. What would you do if you were home, and someone started kicking in your door? Get out as fast as you can or barricade yourself in a room with a phone?

LORI SAYS – “The important thing is to think of different scenarios before they happen, create a plan then practice that plan over and over in your mind.”

2. NEVER PRETEND YOU’RE NOT HOME – Most burglars are looking for an empty house – that’s why home burglaries happen most frequently during workweek hours. Burglars often knock to make sure no one’s home, according to Lori Fullbright. “If no one answers, and they don’t hear footsteps or voices, they’ll kick in the door,” she said. LORI SAYS: “Make sure the person knocking understands the house is not empty. Blast the TV, have a loud conversation or talk loudly through the door – without opening it!”

3. KEEP YOUR PURSE ON YOU – There’s only one safe place for a purse, and that’s on your person. Purses are stolen from cars frequently, and it often costs more to repair the damage to the vehicle than to replace the purse. It only takes a second for someone to swipe a purse left in a shopping cart. LORI SAYS: “Never leave your purse in your car, even for just a few minutes. If you decide to put it in the trunk, do that at home where no one can see you.”

4. PROPERTY ISN’T WORTH YOUR LIFE – If approached by a robber, the safest approach is to cooperate. “Hand over whatever they want, show them you are not a threat so they will leave quickly and without hurting you,” Lori said. Don’t argue or make any quick or unexpected movements. LORI SAYS: “Everything you own can be replaced, and you can deal with whatever happens to you, as long as you survive the encounter.”

10:25 A.M. CONS, FRAUDS AND SCAMS Fullbright will be presenting her “Cons, Frauds and Scams”seminar at this year’s Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair on the Senior Stage. Find the complete Senior Stage schedule on page 18.

10 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

PROTECT & CONNECT SENIOR CRIME VICTIMS

Crime can happen to anyone, but statistics show older adults are targets for certain types of fraud and abuse. Tulsa Police Department’s Senior Services Unit investigates those crimes including home-repair fraud, identity theft and caretaker abuse. The investigative unit works closely with Adult Protective Services (APS), Domestic Violence Intervention Services and the Department of Human Services. Those agencies often refer people to TPD, according to Detective Sergeant Darin Filak. “There is a lot of overlap,” he said. “We couldn’t do it by ourselves. Some issues are crimes; some are more of a social services thing.” To further address the possible need for social services, TPD started a Victim Services Unit in January of 2020. Its primary function is to connect crime victims with services available to them through community partnerships. Whitney Allen, a retired TPD sergeant, is the victim services coordinator. “We advocate for victims of elder abuse, financial abuse and physical abuse, to help them find resources in the community to help them begin the healing process from their victimization. We work closely with LIFE Senior Services and Adult Protective Services on these types of cases,” Allen explained. According to Filak, the investigative process often begins when the Unit receives a report from APS. “I enter a police report because it might be elder abuse, someone – a caregiver or family member – taking their money when they shouldn’t, then we do what we call a ‘check on well-being,’” he said. “We go out in a two-man unit wearing Tulsa Police vests and just knock on the door to basically see what is going on, just a visit. We check to see if somebody’s not eating or to see if somebody’s being abused, financially or otherwise.” These “checks on well-being” make up a significant part of their work. “We go knock on the door and check on people hundreds and hundreds of times in the year,” Filak said. The officers talk to the individual and the caregiver on these visits, trying to determine if there is a problem, and if so, how to solve it. Even if they find no crime is being committed, there is often need for some kind of support. They can then contact the appropriate social services program to help. Both Filak and Allen find the work very rewarding. “A lot of elderly people are more vulnerable than just the average citizen. It’s rewarding to help them out and get some measure of justice for them,” Allen said. “They can’t defend themselves or fight back like the average citizen.”


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Manage your energy use and bills

Weatherization Program It’s easy to increase your comfort and reduce your heating and cooling bills at no additional cost with OG&E’s Weatherization Program. You could receive up to $2,500 in energy efficient services, from duct sealing to adding attic insulation and more. Home Energy Efficiency Program You can qualify for an In-Home (or virtual) Energy Assessment – a $300 value – that includes an analysis of your home’s energy efficiency, up to 15 LED bulbs, power strips (as needed) and a custom Home Energy Report with recommended improvements – all at no additional cost to you.

Flexible Billing Options *Not to exceed 50 miles per trip Humana is a Medicare Advantage HMO and PPO organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in any Humana plan depends on contract renewal. Applicable to Humana Gold Plus - Diabetes and Heart (HMO C-SNP). At Humana, it is important you are treated fairly. Humana Inc. and its subsidiaries comply with applicable Federal Civil Rights laws and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, ancestry, marital status or religion. English: ATTENTION: If you do not speak English, language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-877-320-1235 (TTY: 711). Español (Spanish): ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-877-320-1235 (TTY: 711). 繁體中文 (Chinese): 注

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You’re full of life. We’re here to keep energizing your life. © 2021 OGE Energy Corp.

Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 11


LIVING YOUR BEST LIFE "LIFE's Senior Center has given me a new lease on life. Having a place to go, play games and laugh with others brings happiness back to life." – Michaelene

AT LIFE'S SENIOR CENTERS

"LIFE's Senior Centers are my home away from home. I love pickleball, line dancing and now gardening. Wow, I love it here." – Billie

"The Centers get me out of the house and around people I enjoy being with. The activities are well organized – there's something for everyone." – Jack

"When I retired, I thought I wouldn't know how to fill my time. The answer was right under my nose and just a few miles from my house: LIFE's Senior Center." – Sherry

LIFE'S SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITIES LIFE’s Senior Centers offer a wide variety of activities and classes that promote active aging and incorporate all of its benefits. With classes offered Monday through Friday at both East Side and Southminster, you’ll enjoy fun activities in a safe, friendly environment. Listed below are just a handful of the dozens of activities that can be found at LIFE’s Senior Centers. For more information, call Melodie at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1130 or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org/seniorcenters for activity calendars for both centers.

GARDENING

LINE DANCING

PICKLEBALL

MUSIC

is more than just a hobby at East Side Senior Center. Garden planning, planting, watering, weeding and pruning can help you burn up to 250 calories an hour, all while getting a little sunshine, boosting your mood and creating something beautiful for all to enjoy.

is a fun activity that is also good for cardiovascular health and promotes weight loss and muscle strength. Plus, studies have shown that it can even reduce your risk of osteoporosis. Besides its health benefits, line dancing improves both your coordination and sense of rhythm.

combines elements of badminton, tennis and volleyball and is one of the nation’s fastest growing sports. Besides being great for the cardiovascular system, playing pickleball improves hand-eye coordination, balance and stamina. Best of all, it is a fun team sport that promotes friendships and taps into your competitive spirit.

truly is a universal language that can connect people of all ages and from all walks of life. If you enjoy singing or jamming, consider joining the Vintage Voices choir or the East Side Band. LIFE’s Senior Centers also offer guitar and drumming classes for those who want to learn something new.

FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT is one of the best investments you can make in improving your quality of life. This class will help you build strength, improve balance, range of motion and stamina, and strengthen your core. Incorporating everything from pushups and sit-ups to moving and pulling, this class will help you move through your daily routines with greater ease and confidence.

VISIT LIFE'S SENIOR CENTERS

TAI CHI

CREATIVE WRITING

YOGA

is an ancient Chinese martial arts practice that involves relaxing the mind and body through slow and gentle movements. It reduces stress, is easy on the joints and great for improving balance, stability and reducing the risk of falls.

is a relaxing activity that boosts your mental dexterity and relieves stress. The creative writing group offers topics each week that allow writers to exercise their imaginations, “unpack” experiences they’ve had and sort through them in a therapeutic process. The group provides a unique way to meet new friends and share life experiences, while encouraging self-expression and creativity.

was developed over 5,000 years ago and combines rhythmic breathing, meditation and stretching to help strengthen the body and calm the mind. Yoga can help lower blood pressure, regulate blood sugar and reduce body weight. For those who don’t have good range of motion or balance, chair yoga is also available to help you get started.

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTER AT EAST SIDE Formerly East Side Christian Church 1427 S. Indianapolis Ave., Tulsa, OK 74112 (918) 744-6760

12 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTER AT SOUTHMINISTER Southminster Presbyterian Church 3500 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa, OK 74105 (918) 749-2623


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From generation to generation IHCRC has been providing quality care to Tulsa’s Native American community since 1976 Medical Services • Pediatrics • Optometry Dental • In-house Pharmacy • Transportation Behavioral Health •Substance Abuse Treatment Health Education and Wellness • Youth Programs Mammography, X-ray, and Lab Diagnostics

40

th

Anniversary 1976-2016

Celebrating More Than 40 Years of Service to Tulsa’s Native Community Call or visit the website to learn more 918-588-1900 • www.ihcrc.org 5 5 0 S P e o r i a A v e . , Tu l s a , O K 74 1 2 0

Medical Services • Pediatrics • Optometry • Dental • In-house Pharmacy Behavioral Health • Substance Abuse Treatment • Health Education and Wellness Mammography, X-ray, and Lab Diagnostics

918-588-1900 www.ihcrc.org Senior •Safety and

Lifestyle Fair • 13


5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT OG&E’S SILVER ENERGY® PROGRAM

OG&E’s Silver Energy® Program provides its most experienced customers – those 60+ years-young – with a suite of programs and services to increase comfort, safety, security and savings. These energy-efficient options help keep OG&E rates the lowest in the nation, and the silver lining is that all these services are offered at no additional cost.

Here are five ways to turn Silver Energy into a golden opportunity: 1. WEATHERIZATION – OG&E’s residential weatherization program can increase comfort and reduce heating and cooling bills. Seniors could receive up to $2,500 in services, which may include adding attic insulation, duct sealing, weatherstripping around doors, installing energysaving LED light bulbs, sealing air leaks around windows and doors, and other thermal improvements. 2. HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM (HEEP) – Seniors can learn how to save energy with OG&E’s online home energy profile. Completing a home energy profile qualifies seniors for an inhome energy assessment (a $300 value) that includes an expert walk-through analysis of the home’s energy efficiency, up to 15 LED bulbs, power strips (as needed), and a custom home energy report with recommended improvements. In addition, OG&E offers HEEP rebates for a variety of energy-saving projects, including attic insulation and windows. 3. BILLING OPTIONS – OG&E offers several billing options to fit the senior lifestyle. Options such as average monthly

OG&E WILL NEVER: If seniors suspect they are the target of a scam and are unsure about a bill being delinquent, they can: 14 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

billing levels out bills during hot summer months of high electricity use. The total annual cost for electricity remains about the same, but seniors have the convenience of a more consistent bill each month. When seniors switch to the SmartHours summer pricing plan, they'll see savings by shifting their energy use to off-peak hours whenever possible. SmartHours also benefits customers age 65 and older because they qualify for a $5 monthly credit, June through September. This billing option rewards decreased usage during peak summer demand hours. That’s a guaranteed initial summer savings of $20. 4. SILVER ENERGY PARTNERS AND PROJECTS – OG&E partners with social services agencies to provide comfort, safety and security to residents in the towns and cities we serve. We know that many of our silver customers need help making improvements to their homes. OG&E provides each employee with 16 hours of paid volunteer time each year and have prioritized Silver Energy projects to directly benefit from these volunteer hours.

In support of the United Way’s mission, our employees contributed nearly $21,000 to the Tulsa Area United Way through workplace giving last year. Recipients like Broken Arrow Seniors, LIFE Senior Services, RSVP and others have programs and services that directly benefit silver customers. In addition, for 15 years, OG&E has provided 1,200 electric fans each summer to low-income and silver residents in 12 communities across its service area. 5. SCAM PREVENTION AND EDUCATION – OG&E urges seniors to be alert and aware of scammers. More sophisticated scammers have used software that lets them show the OG&E name and customer service number on caller ID, and some have set up fake call back numbers to confirm. The scammer typically threatens to send out a technician to turn off power unless a “delinquent” bill is paid. The scammer may demand payment with a pre-paid debit card or say that someone will come to collect a cash payment in person.

1. Call anyone directly even if there is a past due balance

2. Ask for payment over the phone

3. Demand bill payment with a pre-paid debit card

4. Ask to meet somewhere to make a bill payment

5. Arrange an in-person collection of a cash payment

6. Request personal bank information or credit card number over the phone

2. Call OG&E, (800) 272-9741, to use the automated system to get account information

Call (800) 272-9741 and talk to a customer service representative

1. Log in to their www.oge.com account to see if there’s a balance

For more information on Silver Energy, visit www.oge.com/silverenergy.


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Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 15


ENJOY LIFE VOLUNTEERING AT LIFE SENIOR SERVICES

It’s been written that it takes a village to raise a child, but it takes volunteers to raise a community. Volunteering is an area where everyone in a community can find a place to give of their time and talents. Those talents may be something learned or abilities such as listening to someone, building a ramp, planting a garden or helping a nonprofit raise needed funds to fulfill a mission. Research shows that volunteering can benefit an individual in seven areas. It provides more happiness, reduces stress, relieves pain (both physical and emotional), increases the lifespan, lowers blood pressure, reduces mild depression and benefits your career if you’re still working. LIFE Senior Services is advancing its volunteer opportunities this summer. The people behind RSVP, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, with its 50-year history in Tulsa, became part of LIFE Senior Services on July 1. LIFE is excited to continue their mission of placing volunteers in fulfilling opportunities across our community. Volunteer Manager Heidi Braver will lead the expanded volunteer program at LIFE. Heidi has a long history of successful volunteer management,

searching for individuals, and hopefully soon groups, to help with many of our programs. LIFE has three adult day centers in Tulsa. Each center has volunteer opportunities like playing games, teaching a group in art, crocheting or leading a book club. A new program called LIFE University is designed for our participants with special needs. We are looking for volunteers, hopefully retired teachers, to assist in developing a third-grade curriculum to be taught daily from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at our Broken Arrow location. most recently serving as director of the volunteer experience at Tulsa Area United Way. LIFE is delighted she will help shape the future of volunteer programs at LIFE Senior Services. Jennifer Thompson, GaryAnn Tomkalski, Penny Woolery and Joan Hutchings will also lend their expertise to the program. Volunteer opportunities can be found at LIFE Senior Services through the newly combined programs. While COVID-19 has made changes in how and where we may use volunteers, volunteering is once again becoming a great part of the organization. LIFE is always

Another volunteer opportunity is within our Club LIFE program. This program is for individuals with early memory loss. This program has openings for volunteers to help in areas of socialization, physical exercise and other activities to improve brain function and memory enhancement. Other programs using volunteers are the Medicare Assistance Program (MAP), Tax Assistance Program (TAP), the Holiday Project and special events throughout the year.

Want More Volunteer Information? Contact Jennifer Thompson, CVA Volunteer Coordinator at LIFE Senior Services, or mail in the form below. Name _______________________________________________________ Phone _________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/ZIP _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Email ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

CONTACT:

Jennifer Thompson, CVA Volunteer Coordinator at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000, ext. 1225 jthompson@lifeseniorservices.org

16 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

MAIL TO:

LIFE Senior Services Attn: Jennifer Thompson, CVA Volunteer Coordinator 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 Tulsa, OK 74135


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Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 17


COME JOIN THE FUN! Here’s just a sampling of the entertainment you’ll find at the 2021 Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair.

David Horne Band 9:00 a.m.

Lori Fullbright “Cons, Frauds and Scams” 10:25 a.m.

Assistance League Fashion Show 12:05 p.m.

David Horne is a talented Tulsa pianist who performs weekly at Duet Jazz. His passion is performing at senior communities, something he does more than 20 times each month. David and his band perform a mix of everything from swinging jazz and funk to country and folk. News On 6 Anchor and Crime Reporter Lori Fullbright speaks to groups all over the state about crime safety and how to avoid the current cons, frauds and scams. Don’t miss her fascinating presentation!

Karen Larsen, KJRH, introduces the Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair’s first fashion show, presented by Assistance League Tulsa. The amazing volunteers from Assistance League show us what styles are available at a bargain.

SENIOR STAGE SCHEDULE 9:00 a.m. David Horne Band 9:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions

Carol Carter, LIFE Senior Services and Lori Fulbright, News On 6

9:45 a.m. “Comparing Medicare Advantage Plans and Medigaps” Kelly McEver, Community Care

10:10 a.m. “Affordable Senior Housing” Dee Goodall, Wilhoit Properties

10:25 a.m. “Cons, Frauds and Scams" Lori Fullbright, News On 6

11:25 a.m. "Keys to Healthy Aging"

Melodie Powders, LIFE Senior Services

11:40 a.m. East Side Line Dancers

LIFE's Senior Center at East Side

12:05 p.m. Assistance League Fashion Show Emcee Karen Larsen, KJRH

12:45 p.m. "Lifelong Learning with OLLI @ OSU" James Robert Webb 1:05 p.m.

James Robert Webb is a doctor by day and a singer by sundown! The Nashville recording artist’s style is described as a blend of traditional and contemporary country music. He shares his talents and latest music on the Senior Stage!

Robbin Davis, OSU

1:05 p.m. Nashville Recording Artist James Robert Webb 1:30 p.m. “We are OID!” M  ike Rhodes, Oklahoma Insurance Department 1:50 p.m. East Side Band

LIFE's Senior Center at East Side

East Side Band 1:50 p.m.

LIFE’s Senior Center at East Side has it going on – and so does the East Side Band. You’ll be sure to hear some of your favorites as the veteran musicians perform classic country.

2:10 p.m. Announcing Winners of "Seek, Find, WIN!"

Eileen Bradshaw, CEO of LIFE Senior Services

2:20 p.m. Closing Announcements East Side Band

**Subject to change without notice**

18 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair


Mobility One

E C I SALES – SERV AL T N RE 918.437.4488 – 14720 E. Admiral Pl., Ste. A LEASING

Tulsa, OK 74116

mobilityONEtransportation.com Free Consultation

SENIOR CARE ONLY BETTER Senior Helpers stands ready to serve your family’s needs with personalized, in-home care and expertly trained, professional caregivers. • Bathing, Dressing, Personal Hygiene Assistance • Specialized Care for Alzheimer’s & Dementia

• Meal Preparation & Light Housework • Medication Reminders • Up to 24 hour care

Your in-home care initial assessment is the first step to peace of mind. Call today to learn more.

918.574.2273 www.seniorhelpers.com/ok/tulsa All rights reserved. Senior Helpers locations are independently owned and operated. ©2021 SH Franchising, LLC.

Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 19


LIST OF EVENT SPONSORS AND EXHIBITORS Let the Games Begin! HOW IT WORKS As you enter the Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair, you'll receive a Seek, Find, WIN! Game card. This is where the fun begins. Find as many of our top sponsors listed on the card as you can. As you visit, the sponsor will stamp your card. Collect 15 stamps then turn your game card into the registration table. Your card will be entered into a drawing to win one of TEN Reasor’s Gift Cards. Thank you for playing Seek, Find, WIN! • AARP • Advanced Body Scan of Tulsa • Amada Senior Care Oklahoma • CaptionCall • Central States Research • CommunityCare • Country Club at Woodland Hills • Dr. James Webb • Good Shepherd Hospice • Heart for Seniors • Humana • Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa • Marker Funeral Homes • Medicare Prepare • Memorial Park Cemetery • Mobility One Transportation • News On 6 • OG&E (Oklahoma Gas & Electric) • Oklahoma Insurance Department • Oklahoma Senior Law • OsteoStrong • Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at OSU • Right at Home • Saint Francis Health System • Senior Helpers + HealthRide • Tulsa Bone & Joint • University Village Retirement Community • Wilhoit Properties

COURTESY OF

20 • Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair

Thank you to our sponsors and exhibitors who make this event possible. PRESENTING SPONSOR • AARP Oklahoma • Community Care • News On 6 • Oklahoma Insurance Department

DEPUTY CHIEF

• Amada Senior Care • Dr. James Webb • Humana • Memorial Park Cemetery • OG&E (Oklahoma Gas and Electric) • Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at OSU • Wilhoit Properties

MAJOR

• Advanced Body Scan of Tulsa • CaptionCall • Country Club of Woodland Hills • Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa

CAPTAIN

• Central States Research • Good Shepherd Hospice • Heart for Seniors • Marker Funeral Homes • Medicare Prepare • Mobility One Transportation • Oklahoma Senior Law • OsteoStrong • Right at Home - Tulsa • Saint Francis Health System • Senior Helpers & HealthRide • Tulsa Bone & Joint • University Village Retirement Community

SERGEANT

• ABC Medicare • Armstrong Hearing • Edward Jones • Independent Therapy Partners • Post Acute Medical Rehab Hospital • Saint Simeon's Senior Living Community • Triad Eye Institute, PLLC • United Healthcare

CORPORAL

• BIO-ONE Tulsa • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma • Brookdale Home Health • Brookdale Senior Living • Clear-tone Hearing Aid Laboratories • Electronic Caregiver • Excell Private Care Services • First Physicians Capital Group • Grace Hospice • Heartwood Commons Cohousing • Hillcrest Healthcare System • Mobility City of Tulsa • Moore & Fitzgerald Funeral Homes • NALP Advisors • NanoPac, Inc. • Oklahoma Insurance Services • Perini Eyecare • Redbud Physical Therapy

• Senior Star • ShelfGenie of OK • Transitions LifeCare • Visiting Angels • Wilson Investment Consultants • Young Living Essential Oils

POLICE OFFICER

• Ability Resources • Alzheimer's Association • Animal Rescue Foundation of Tulsa • Assistance League Tulsa • Better Business Bureau of Eastern Oklahoma • Centenarians of Oklahoma • Coalition Against Prescription and Substance Abuse of Tulsa (CAPSAT) • Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma • EODDS - Eastern Oklahoma Donated Dental Services • Hospice of Green Country • INCOG Area Agency on Aging • Lab Rescue OK & Tag OK • Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma, Inc • LIFE PACE • LIFE Senior Services - ADvantage Case Management • LIFE Senior Services - SeniorLine • LIFE Senior Services - Volunteer Resources • LIFE's Adult Day Health Services • LIFE's Senior Centers • Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services • Metropolitan Environmental Trust (The MET) • NE Oklahoma Quilts of Valor • OK Library for the Blind & Physically Handicapped • Oklahoma Alliance for Animals • Oklahoma Senior Games • OSU Cooperative Extension • Oxford Healthcare • Parkinson Foundation of Oklahoma • Parkside Psychiatric Hospital & Clinic • Paw Pals - Tulsa Dog Training Club • Rx Oklahoma • Saint Francis Hospice • Tulsa & Creek Counties Senior Nutrition • Tulsa Performing Arts Center and Trust • Tulsa Police Foundation • Tulsa Police Senior Services Unit • US Attorney's Office – Elder Justice • Vintage Housing

Special thanks to our water sponsors, ABC Medicare and Moore & Fitzgerald Funeral Homes.


Professional Care You Can Trust

Care • Tradition • Family

At Heart for Seniors Home Health Care, our primary goal is to help provide a high quality of life for our clients and their families by delivering customized, dependable and affordable care.

Some of Our Services Include • Free consultation • VA Benefit Assistance • Respite

• Companion & personal care • Chronic disease • Alzheimers/Dementia, Parkinson

(918) 505-3109

www.heartforseniorshomehealth.com

(918) 366-8288 www.MarkerFuneralHomes.com

1175 S. Aspen Ave. • Broken Arrow, OK 74012

Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair • 21


MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

WORD SEARCH: FASHION Find and circle all of the words.

Accessorize Apparel Attire Beautiful Belts Blouse

Boutique Casual Catwalk Chic Classic Color

Couture Dapper Denim Designer Dress Ensemble

Eyewear Fabrics Fashion Formal Hair Handbag

Hanger Hemline Icon Jacket Jeans Jewelry

Label Leather Makeup Material Model Modern

Neckline Pants Pattern Runway Scarf Shoes

Shopping Silhouette Skirts Sleeves Store Sweater

Tailoring Textile Trend Unique Vogue Watches

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SUDOKU Difficulty Level: 1 2 3 4 5 Answers on page 59.

It’s Christmas in July! Pick a stocking PROMOTION for savings from RUNS FROM July 1–31 10%-50% off the purchase of a set of hearing aids.

7 6 3

8 9 9

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Call (918) 492-6087

0% Financing Available (WAC) • Payments as Low as $57

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LEARN MORE BY VISITING 6038 S. Yale Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74135 www.armstronghearing.com

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Only one selection of a stocking per purchase. Selection of a stocking to occur after purchase price has been agreed upon. Selected discount not valid on any other purchase or previous purchases. Cannot be combined with other promotions.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


PUZZLE PARTNERS

MUMBO JUMBO A mumbo jumbo is a list of words/hints for you to unscramble. You then take designated letters from each word/hint to come up with the final word that is associated with each hint you have unscrambled. Unscramble each of the clue words. Take the letters that appear boxes and unscramble them for the final word. in Answers on page 59. PUZZLE THEME: A person who wears the latest trends in clothing styles.

BLLEA EPRATNT ILBATEFUU ORCLO EUSIOTELTH CARBIF

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© 2013 Wuzzles & Puzzles

BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 59.

PRICE

1. cloud 2. cloud 3. cloud 4. cloud 5. cloud 6. cloud 7. cloud 8. cloud HE 9. cloud

HAVE HAVE hold hold

HE'S HIMSELF

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

$ Rolling $

ROSIE

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

51


TABLE FOR TWO

Look and Feel Your Best With a

HEART-HEALTHY DIET BY KIT HINES, DIETITIAN

What you eat can make a big difference in how you feel. When you feel better, it can impact how you look. A heart-healthy diet that is high in fiber and low in saturated fat will help you feel your best – with all the benefits that brings.

WHAT IS A HEART-HEALTHY DIET? It is a meal plan balanced with whole grains, fruits, vegetables and lean protein sources.

HONEY GARLIC SALMON Recipe courtesy of www.recipetineats.com 583 calories per salmon fillet Ingredients: • 4 tablespoons honey • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (light) • 1 tablespoon white vinegar • 2 garlic cloves, minced • 2 6-ounce, skinless salmon fillets • Olive oil

GOOD SOURCE OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

Instructions: • Take salmon out of the refrigerator 20 minutes before cooking. Pat salmon dry with a paper towel and sprinkle with salt and pepper. • Whisk together the honey, soy sauce, white vinegar and garlic in a small bowl. • Drizzle oil in a nonstick frying pan and set burner to medium-high heat. Place salmon in pan and cook the first side for 3-4 minutes or until golden. Turn, then cook the other side for 2-3 minutes until golden. • Pour sauce over the salmon. Cook for 1 minute or until it starts to thicken slightly. • Remove to serving plates. Serve salmon drizzled with sauce.

GOOD SOURCE OF FOLIC ACID

NUTRIENTS DIRECT FROM THE SOURCE THE RIGHT FATS

GRAINS

THE POWER OF B AND OMEGA-3

Fat sources in a heart-healthy meal plan will come from unsaturated fats – olive oil, canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil and safflower oil. Limit saturated fats, trans fat (stick margarine, shortening, hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil) and cholesterol intake. Switch from solid fats to oils when preparing foods.

At least half of your grains should be whole grains. Foods with fiber tend to be filling, which may help with weight management. Fiber also promotes regular bowel habits and may lower the risk for certain chronic diseases such as heart disease. Dietary fiber can be found in a variety of sources, including whole fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds. Whole grains, like oatmeal and quinoa and foods made with 100% whole grains, such as bread, cereal and pasta, also provide dietary fiber.

Vitamin B12 and folic acid assist in keeping the brain and nerves healthy. In case of a deficiency, you may feel tired or confused. Both of these nutrients may help prevent disorders of the central nervous system, such as mood disorders and dementias.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

Sources of folic acid include beans and greens. Vitamin B12 sources include meat, fish, poultry and fortified foods. Omega-3 fatty acids can improve mood. These are a vital part of the body’s cell manufacturing. Fish is a major source of Omega-3 fatty acids.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


CILANTRO LIME BROWN RICE Recipe courtesy of Food and Nutrition Magazine Ingredients:

• 1 cup brown rice • 1 ¾ cups water • 2 tablespoons olive oil • ¼ cup fresh cilantro • 1 lime, zested and juiced • Black pepper to taste

Instructions:

• Add water to a medium saucepan and bring to boil. • Add the rice and olive oil. • Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 30 – 45 minutes or until all of the water has absorbed. • While the rice is cooking, zest and juice the lime and finely chop the cilantro. • When the rice is done, remove from heat and let it sit covered for 10 minutes. Remove cover and fluff with a fork. Stir in cilantro, lime juice and lime zest. Add black pepper to taste.

BAKED ITALIAN CHICKEN Recipe courtesy of www.ohsweetbasil.com Ingredients:

• 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts • 1/3 c. apricot, peach or apple preserves • Dash garlic powder • 2/3 bottle Italian dressing

PARMESAN ROASTED BROCCOLI

Recipe courtesy of www.iwashyoudry.com 145 calories per 1 cup serving

Instructions: • Mix the salad dressing, preserves and garlic powder

• Pour mixture over the chicken in a small baking dish • Bake for 25 – 30 minutes. • Nutrition Information based on 6 oz. chicken breast: 350 calories

Ingredients:

• 6 cups fresh broccoli florets • 3 tablespoons olive oil • ¼ cup Italian-style bread crumbs • ½ cup fresh shredded Parmesan cheese • 1 teaspoon garlic powder • ½ teaspoon salt • ¼ teaspoon pepper

Instructions: • Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with

aluminum foil and coat with non-stick spray. • Combine the broccoli and olive oil in a large zip-close bag and shake to coat. Add the bread crumbs, parmesan cheese, garlic powder, salt and pepper to the bag and shake to coat. • Use your hands to rub the bag and help the coating stick to the broccoli. • Spread the broccoli in an even layer on the baking sheet. • Bake for 12 minutes, then stir and flip the broccoli, baking for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, until crisp but tender.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

HEALTHY PROTEIN INTAKE A heart-healthy diet also includes eating plant-based protein using beans, nut butters or soy for protein. To limit the amount of sodium, eat whole, unprocessed foods and choose fresh or frozen instead of canned foods. Dairy choice should come from 1% or lower fat items, including milk, cheese, yogurt and ice cream. Older adults need more calcium and Vitamin D to help keep bones healthy. Include three servings of fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt or cheese each day. Vary your protein choices. Eat a variety of foods from the protein food group each week, such as seafood, lean meat, eggs and poultry without skin. Spread your protein intake throughout the day by including a lean source with meals and snacks.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

53


DOLLARS & SENSE

AFFORDABLE COSMETICS BY KIMBERLY BLAKER

Protect and Highlight Your Natural, Mature Beauty

If you’ve ever shopped for cosmetics at a department or drug store, you know costs vary greatly for what appear to be similar ingredients. Add in “anti-aging” claims, and the price tag increases even more. Tired of hearing the cha-ching of the register as it empties your bank account? Try these lower-cost alternatives when you're ready for a change - or hope to have more change to spend elsewhere!

NAIL CARE

3.

1.

1. ESSIE TREAT LOVE & COLOR

Essie offers a range of colored nail polishes containing collagen and camellia extract to help strengthen nails and reduce breakage. To help balance cool tones in older hands, try bright and light colors with orange or pink undertones. TO BUY: $10; Walgreens

4.

2. BARIELLE HYDRATING RIDGE FILLER

2.

This is a clear polish that can be used as a base coat or on its own to smooth and fill in dry, weak or ridged nails. It strengthens the nail with silk protein fibers as your nails grow. TO BUY: $9.99; Walmart

6.

SKIN CARE

5. 7.

3. GOLD BOND ULTIMATE STRENGTH & RESILIENCE SKIN THERAPY LOTION

This inexpensive product is specifically designed to support the needs of mature skin with a blend of vitamins, proteins, lipids and moisturizers. TO BUY: $9.99; Target

4. CERAVE MOISTURIZING CREAM

8.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

Use this product on the face, body or hands to smooth and moisturize the skin. It rebuilds your skin's natural barrier with ceramides and hyaluronic acid. TO BUY: $15.92; Walmart

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

HAIR CARE

5. LIVING PROOF FULL THICKENING MOUSSE

This product gives a thicker, full-bodied appearance to thinning hair with a lighter, more flexible hold. Reliable, safe, affordable and courteous transportation in Tulsa

TO BUY: $29; Ulta Beauty

6. YANIBEST SILK PILLOWCASE

Using a silk pillowcase provides a softer, smoother sleeping experience to prevent hair and skin from losing moisture. It also reduces the friction that increases damage or wrinkling in the skin and hair breakage and tangles.

(918) 404-0038

• Ambulatory, wheelchair and stretcher transports

Rates Vary Depending on Location

• A ride to your destination upon hospital discharge

www.healthridetulsa.org

• Medical appointment transportation

After hours phone system utilized

WE HAVE THE WIDEST RAMPS IN THE STATE!

TO BUY: $23.99; www.amazon.com

Located At 61st And Sheridan

MAKEUP

Come and Test Drive a Scooter in Our Store! Easy disassembly for most scooters Rental option available

7. NYX COLOR CORRECTING PALETTE

This product has various colored concealers to use when color correcting uneven tones in the skin. The idea is that using opposing shades on the color wheel will cancel out to create an even tone.

Need Repair? We Come to You.

(918) 600-2112

TO BUY: $8.99; Ulta Beauty

www.mobilitycity.com/tulsa

8. BOOMSTICK COLOR

One stick that can be used as lipstick, blush, bronzer and more. It is made by Boom, a "pro-age" company that embraces the beauty of aging and is a sheer shade that uses your natural coloring. TO BUY: $28; www.boombycindyjoseph.com

Over 30 Years of Experience

9. CLINIQUE MOISTURE SURGE COLOR CORRECTION CREAM

An oil-free color correction cream with SPF 30 sunscreen protection to give your skin moisture and coverage with a more lightweight formula.

MIKE BAXTER

C H A M B E R L A I N R E A LT Y B R O K E R

TO BUY: $39.50; Ulta Beauty

LIC# 082355 \ LIC# 185526

10. L’OREAL PARIS AGE PERFECT MAGNIFYING MASCARA

Mascara designed for mature lashes. It creates volume while protecting lashes with a gentle brush and a formula with conditioning serum and jojoba oil.

Whether you have property management questions or need assistance with buying or selling a home, let me help with your real estate needs.

OFFICE: (918) 290-9399 CELL: (918) 933-9995

GET YOUR DREAM KITCHEN THIS NEW YEAR! With our custom pull-out shelves, you can always find more space, access, and joy in your existing cabinets

BUY 6 SHELVES

TO BUY: $7.69; CVS

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

55


PEOPLE & PLACES

Covenant Living at Inverness resident Dr. Bob Hughes enjoys a game of pool.

Resident Orlando had a great time at the Cinco de Mayo celebration held at Oxford Glen in Owasso.

Joe Pendergraft and Dr. Greg Williams take part in a boxing class at Covenant Living at Inverness.

Members at the former Oklahoma Methodist Manor celebrate the unveiling of the multi-level senior community’s new name, Trinity Woods.

Authors Barry Friedman and Connie Cronley were the first two speakers at the Writers’ Symposium sponsored by LIFE’s Senior Centers and the Oklahoma Arts Council.

A participant in LIFE's Adult Day Health program is all Christine Reynolds brought tortoises to visit smiles during their recent carnival. LIFE’s Adult Day Health.

Send Us Your Pictures Whether it's your traveling group, tennis buddies or a night on the town, we want your pictures. Submit high-resolution photos to dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org by the 1st of every month.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

AUTO REPAIR

Strickland Automotive Strickland Automotive is locally-owned and – operated with over 40 years of auto repair experience. We perform all types of vehicle repair, from computer and electrical problems to engine and transmission overhauls. ASE Certified mechanics. Open six days a week, with towing provided. Call Gary (918) 832-7072.

BIBLE STUDY

Weekly Bible Reading Session Join us in reading, explaining and discussing the bible on Tuesday nights 7:00 p.m. CST and 8:00 p.m. EST. Questions are always welcome. Perfect for those who cannot get out of the house. Call (918) 872-1400.

BOOKS

THE MOMENT I SAW YOU This internationally acclaimed 256 page book of poetry for lovers of all ages creates for the readers feelings and emotions all have known in their lives. Relive those experiences by reading the beautiful love poems in this book. The Moment I Saw You: Poetry for Lovers by W. Blaine Wheeler is available on Amazon.com.

CARPET CLEANING ALL PRO Carpet Cleaning Senior and caregiver discounts. Carpet, furniture, rug cleaning. Pet odor removed and Teflon protectant available. Emergency water extraction. Residential and commercial services. Professional truck mount steam cleaning. Carpet repairs and restretching. Prompt, professional, quality service at a fair price. Certified, insured. Veteran owned and operated. Call Thomas Fink, owner/technician, for free estimate (918) 636-6303.

CEMETERY LOTS 2 Plots in Memorial Park 2 plots for sale in Memorial Park Cemetery. Lot 33 in Section 39, spaces 4 & 5 offer those visiting a view from a hill. Priced to sell at $2,500 for both plots. Call Tim at (918) 695-7162. Adjacent Spaces at Memorial Park Two adjoining spaces in Section 57, Lot 260, Memorial Park Cemetery (51st and Memorial, Tulsa). Will sell for $3,300. Text or leave Voicemail at (918) 204-3350. Arlington Memorial Cemetery 6 cemetery spaces all in the same section at Arlington Memorial Cemetery, 3400 N. Midwest Blvd, Spencer, OK. $3,000 per space plus 1/2 of the $750 deed transfer. If you purchase all 6, we will pay deed transfer. Call or text (405) 640-8044.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Bargain Sale Six cemetery lots all together in Memorial Park Cemetery at 51st and Memorial in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Located in Section 15, Lots 1-6. Cemetery priced $12,870 for the six lots. Sale price is $10,000 for all six lots. A savings of $2,870! Your family can be laid in rest together. Call (918) 809-1787 and leave a voicemail and phone number. Beautiful Floral Haven – Broken Arrow Side-by-side spaces 1 and 2, Lot 25-C, in the Masonic Garden. Masonic affiliation not necessary. Convenient location. Valued at $3,400 each. Asking $5,000 for both. For more information please call Carole at (918) 850-2913 or email clcbarnes1@sbcglobal.net. Calvary Cemetery Calvary Cemetery, section 7, Way of the Cross. Two side-by-side spaces lot 204, space 6 and lot 207, space 4. Asking pricing is $4,500 for both. Truly a beautiful view. Call (405) 273-7071. Floral Haven Garden of Good Shepherd Floral Haven, 4 adjacent lots in the Garden of Good Shepherd, $2,500 each. Email sherry@maysco.com. Individual Selling Memorial Park Spaces Spaces 1,3,4 in Lot 297 in Section 28. Asking $2,150 per space. Serious offers considered. Will sell individually or together. Email deedunn34@yahoo.com. Contact Sarah Stegall at Memorial Park for map. Memorial Park Crypts, Tulsa Two crypts, $5500 each. Includes bronze crypt nameplate and perpetual care. Mausoleum location near lake, Sec 27-2, crypt E, rows 53 & 54. A 2021 retail value of $7325 each. Contact Clark Duffe at clark.duffe@yahoo.com or (405) 760-3108. Memorial Plot for Sale Memorial Park Cemetery Plot in Tulsa, Ok for sale Section 56, Estate 110 Space 1. Price includes plot, opening and closing plus title transfer. $3,260 not negotiable. Please contact David or Joyce at (918) 322-3010 after 5:00 pm for more info. Spaces at Memorial Park Multiple spaces for sale. Section 34, Lot 416. No burials there and no markers. Current value is $2,200/ea. Will sell for $1,900/ea. If interested, contact Cindy Taylor at Oxley.Plots@gmail.com or (281) 990-6223. Three Spaces, Memorial Park Cemetery, Tulsa Section 9-A, "Pleasant Valley North", Lot 423, spaces 4, 5, and 6, in older, beautiful section

near Carillon Bell Tower. Section allows lawn-level granite or bronze memorial markers. Cemetery listing price $2445 each. Price reduced to $1,200 each or $3,500 for all three. Negotiable. Buyer pays small transfer fee. Contact Mary at (512) 468-5020 or (417) 271-1273 or email whistonmary@yahoo.com.

COMPUTER SERVICES Does Technology Frustrate You? Honest, patient, ethical help with your pc, router, Wi-Fi, cell phone, email, streaming, camera, password recovery, etc. 30 years of IT experience in Tulsa. Special rates for seniors. References available. Call Carmen Armstrong (918) 688-7453.

DAYTIME CARE Daytime Care For Older Loved Ones LIFE’s Adult Day Health offers convenient, affordable daytime care at three locations in Tulsa and Broken Arrow. For more information, call LIFE’s Adult Day Health at (918) 664-9000.

ESTATE SALES

2MS Estate Sales...Tulsa’s Finest! Downsizing? Estate Liquidation? Let us take the worry away and Maximize your return. No out of pocket expense. We specialize in senior transitions, with over 20 years in the senior housing market. My team includes realtors, moving company, senior housing and attorneys if needed. Please contact Michelle Reed (918) 691-5893 or Atulsa@aol.com also Facebook 2MSestatesalestulsa for a Free consultation.

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE Medicare Assistance Program The Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services provides accurate information, counseling and assistance relating to Medicare benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives and persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call MAP at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000 or toll-free at (866) 664-9009. Need A New Medicare Plan? The Medicare Supplement Store at Promenade Mall is your “One-StopShop” for Medicare Supplements, Advantage Plans, & Drug Plans. We can give you a quote from top-rated carriers like: Aetna, Blue Cross, Humana, GlobalHealth, UnitedHealthCare, Mutual of Omaha and others. For information, call Bob Archer today (918) 814-5550. WORRIED ABOUT FUNERAL EXPENSES? Preferred Rates, Standard Rates, Guaranteed Issue Plans, Permanent Whole Life Rates never increase. Issue up to $40,000. Benefits paid to beneficiary of

choice or assignment to any funeral home. We can give you quotes from top rated carriers, Mutual of Omaha, American Amicable, and AIG. Call or text Michael Moore Insurance Agency (918) 557-5665 for RATES or email ineedlifeinsurance@sbcglobal.net

GARDENING/LAWN CARE AAA Lawns & More Total lawn care. Lawn Mowing. Leaf removal. Gutter clean-up. Specialist in fence/property line lawn cleanup. Stump grinding and small tree work. Dedicated to making your lawn look its best. Insured, honest, experienced and dependable. Veteran-owned. We are a small company with personal service. References available. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Larry. (918) 361-1299. Green Hibiscus Lawn & Garden Services Scheduled garden maintenance (weeding, planting, mulching). Garden bed design and installation. Hedge & shrub trimming. Tree pruning & removal. Leaf clean up. Hauling green debris. Call Charles (918) 636-0298. Kimble Davis Tree Company Family-owned and operated. Specializing in all aspects of tree care: restoration, pruning/ thinning, removal, stump grinding, hedge trimming, firewood available. Serving Tulsa for 25 years. References. Member BBB. Insured. ISA certified arborist. Check us out at www.kdtreeco.com. Call Kimble at (918) 853-5383. Mower Repair / Maintenance All brands – Riders, ZTR's, Walk-behinds, UTV’s / ATV’s. Top Quality work, ASE certified Mechanic. Pick-up and Delivery available. Tulsa and surrounding counties. Maintenance specials include pick-up and delivery 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call Scott (918) 519-3869. New Season Tree Masters Specializing in tree removal and stump grinding. Tree trimming service available. Certified arborist on staff. Serving all of metro Tulsa with over 20 years’ experience. Fully insured. BBB accredited. Free estimates. Contact us at info@newseasontreemasters.com or call Todd at (918) 934-4868. www.newseasontreemasters.com.

HOME REPAIR/REMODELING A Handy Helping Hand Professional home maintenance, painting, and improvements. Whether you’re making overdue repairs, sprucing up your home and garden, or optimizing your home’s “sale-ability” potential, call Joe Surowiak with A Handy Helping Hand. Professional results. Competitive rates. (918) 520-0333.

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CLASSIFIEDS Allen’s Handyman Services of Tulsa “Your Home Improvement and Repair Specialist.” 21st year serving Tulsa seniors. “One call can do it all.” 10% senior discount. Insured. All work guaranteed in writing. No pay until job is completed. Plumbing, drain cleaning, grab bars, electrical, carpentry, painting, seamless guttering installation/repair/ cleaning. Dryer vent cleaning. Roof, tile and drywall repair. Wood siding/trim replacement. Deck repair, power washing, staining. Tree trimming. No job too small. For free estimate, call Allen at (918) 630-0394. Big C’s Plumbing Services Your one stop Plumbing Shop! Call us and I guarantee you will never have to call another plumbing company. Licensed, bonded and insured for your protection....Call (918) 855-9216, tell us you saw us in the Vintage Newsmagazine receive an automatic 10% discount....call us now. Bumgartner Plumbing Licensed, with over 30 years of experience. Rates are low and based on the job, not the hour. No service call fee or travel time charge. Senior and caregiver discount. Plumbing service and repair our specialty. Honest, professional service you can count on. Lic. # 82750. (918) 355-4747. Burton Painting Specializing in all aspects of exterior and interior home painting. Staining, sealing, and painting faux finishes. Decks, fences, cabinets and floors. Free estimates. 30+ years of experience. Reliable, courteous, professional service. Fully insured. (918) 378-2858. Dave’s Heat and Air, Inc. Licensed, insured, and bonded. Honest and reliable service for over 30 years. Competitive rates. Specializing in heating and air conditioning service and repair. All makes and models. Residential and light commercial. Tulsa metro area. Family-owned and operated. (918) 437-8101. Doc J’s Heat and Air LLC Avoid costly repairs and breakdowns with our yearly maintenance plan. We are factory authorized dealers for reliable, best value Bryant, heating and air conditioning equipment. Service, repair, and installations, we do it all. Financing, free estimates and senior discounts. Call Doc J today (918) 921-4240, docj@docjsheatandair.com Free Storm Inspection Do you have a leaky roof? Call for free inspection/emergency tarp service. Small roof repair free for seniors. We provide patient, honest and ethical help through

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any insurance claims. Call Brian Morris at (918) 734-4444. Proof Construction, 1924 W. Albany St., Broken Arrow. Other services include patios, outdoor kitchens, etc. www.proofok.com or www.patiobrothersok.com. General Home Maintenance Cyrco Renovation is here for all your General Home Maintenance and/ or Remodeling needs. Well over 30 years of experience. We are your one stop for quality and professional contracting. Fast, Clean, Courteous and Reliable. Please Call Phillip Cyr (918) 693-5121. Handyman & Construction Services 30 Years Experience! All Handicap Accessories – grab bars, handicap access abilities; Framing, Drywall, Tape & Bed; Texture & Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Tile, Laminate & Wood Floors. Free Estimates, Competitive Rates, Professional Service. Call Craig (918) 892-4168. Home Improvements Energy Efficient Windows. We offer custom made replacement windows to make your home comfortable and reduce your energy bills. Interior/ exterior painting, general remodeling and home improvements. 15% discount to those over 55. Free Estimates. Call Richard Johnson (918) 261-9999. Same Day Services Light Hauling /Light Moving – help you rearrange room furniture, lawns-grass mowing/small paint jobs/cleanup/ fence repair/light construction/sheet rock tile repair – We are honest dependable. References. Call (918) 313-5230. Scrap Metal Haul Off Free haul off/pick up of appliances such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioners, hot water tanks and any scrap metal. Call John at (918) 313-4405.

HOUSING SHOULD I MOVE, OR SHOULD I STAY? Can't decide whether to Age in Place, or move? Feeling Overwhelmed? We can help. We are your One Source for Downsizing, Moving, Aging in Place, Estate Sales, Selling Home, Selecting a Community, Etc. www.MatureTransitionsOfTulsa.com. (918) 309-6120

LEGAL

Full Service Estate Planning Law Firm Trusts, Wills, Gift and Tax Planning, Powers of Attorneys and more! With offices in Sand Springs and Tulsa. Discount to Veterans and Retired Teachers. Willing to meet you in your place for no extra charge! Call Penni of the Skillern Law Firm at (918) 805-2511. www.skillernlaw.com

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

Need Legal Help? Call Me First. Ramona Jones, Attorney at Law. Why travel when we can do a video conference? Wills, trusts, deeds, advance directives, powers of attorney, probate, divorces, civil, DUI, criminal, guardianships, adoptions and more. Also paperwork for limited scope representation. Credit cards accepted. (918) 585-2255.

Ms Pac Ma'am Need help packing or organizing? I can pack boxes for moving, downsizing or decluttering. I can help organize rooms, closets, attics or garages providing you more space. Flexible hours – day or evening. Lots of experience. References available. Jacki (918) 922-9558.

Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy. Attorney Brian Crain can assist you through the legalities of all the big events in your family's life. Estate planning, probate, trusts, adoption, guardianships, real estate, elder exploitation and more. Call (918) 627-4400 or visit www.brianacrain.com.

EARS Emergency Alert Response Systems. Enjoy living at home while we listen for your safety with our quality personal medical alarm and monitoring service. Affordable with no long-term commitment. Locally owned and operated (918) 298-0500 or toll-free (877) 885-3277.

MOVERS

Tulsa Movers Dependable Movers! Low Rates. Free Estimates. Senior Discounts. Call (918) 836-3225.

OIL AND GAS Mineral, Oil/Gas Interests Want to purchase minerals and oil/ gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO, 80201

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE Bobbi and Bob’s Personal & Business Assistance Personally assist in driving to beauty shop, medical appointments, and other destinations; provide accounting, secretarial, and specialized administrative assistance; help with business-related matters; serve as liaison with physicians/healthcare personnel; resolve Medicare and medical insurance issues. Bobbi Warshaw, MPH and Bob Warshaw, MBA (918) 852-5302, bobbi.warshaw@att.net Compassionate Senior Services We offer a wide variety of services for seniors. Whether it's: Rides, Errands, Meal Preparation, Companionship, or Sitting With A Loved One, we're here to help. We offer competitive rates and Smiles are always free. 24 hour Care Available. Contact, Christie at (918) 934-7986. Financial Organizer/Liaison Do you or a loved one need help keeping up with mail, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, making phone calls, organizing or preparing for tax time? I can help! I will work with you or act as a liaison between family members. Call or email me to discuss options. Essential Strategy Consulting, LLC. Gwen Stevens (918) 557-5259, esc9315@gmail.com Kind Hands Home Care, LLC We are a team of dedicated health care professionals who work hard in order to keep our clients in their homes safely and well taken care of. 12 to 24 hour shifts available. For information please call or message Delia at (405) 714-8016.

PERSONAL SAFETY

HALO Medical Alarms Worried about falling? HALO provides medical alert services for those at home or on the go who may need help in an emergency. HALO allows you to get help at the push of a button which is worn as a necklace or wristband. We offer a variety of choices to best fit your needs. Check out the HALO products atour retail store – Mobility City at 61st & Sheridan (918) 392-0566 or (877) 747-HALO (4256)

PERSONAL SERVICES Affordable Hairstyling In-Home or My Shop With 35 years’ experience, I can help with all of your hairstyling needs. I will come to your home, the hospital, rehab or you can come to my shop. In-shop special: haircut $7 for first time customers only and perms for $45. Senior special pricing can’t be beat! Available Tuesday – Saturday. A Mane Event hairstyling, located near 11th and Yale at 937 South Canton. Call Mary Wilkinson at (918) 834-2686. Following CDC Guidelines – masks worn, temperature taken, safe environment. Salon Retro Hair care for men and women, specializing in senior clients. This month’s special - First time customers receive one of the following for $12: Haircut or Style or Manicure. $45 for cut and perm. Pedicures are $20. Very Experienced Hairdressers! Come see us in Midtown at Highland Plaza, 5661 East 41st Street (corner of 41st and Hudson). (918) 742-3440.

PET CARE Dog House For Sale Heated dog house for sale. This dog house is like no other! The house is heated with an attic and on skies for easy change of location within your yard for your large or small fur baby. Can be viewed at 622 North 145th East Avenue. Call Tim at (918) 695-7162.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Home Veterinary Care Experience Tulsa’s most convenient veterinary service in the comfort of your own home. Our goal is to develop a personal relationship with each of our clients and patients. Contact us today to schedule your house call appointment. Call (918) 892-9382 or email DrFielstra@gmail.com or visit us at www.homevetcaretulsa.com.

Vintage Friends JULY ANSWERS For puzzles, see pages 13, 50-51

REAL ESTATE

CRYPTOGRAM

Ready To Downsize? I will help you sell your current home and help you look for that smaller place that fits your needs. Whether it’s independent living or assisted living, let me help you through the process. Honest, patient and ethical help along the way. Carmen Armstrong, Solid Rock Realtors, (918) 688-7453. www.solidrockrealtors.com/realtors/ carmen-armstrong

SOCIAL Single Seniors (50+) Are you over 50, single, divorced or widowed? We are a fun-loving group of single seniors over 50. We meet every Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the Buffet Palace, 10934 East 21st Street. We eat at 11:15, have a short meeting and then play cards. Join us for great fun and fellowship. Questions, call Beverly at (918) 272-1049.

"Simplicity is the keynote of all true elegance." – Coco Chanel "The essence of style is a simple way of saying something complex." – Giorgio Armani

PHOTO DIFFERENCE

TRANSPORTATION My Driver Transportation Service Let me do the driving. To and from work, airport, shopping, errands, post office, appointments. Also, LIFT VAN transportation available. Able to assist getting to and from bed. Senior sitting. Also, small breed dog boarding. 20 years experience. CLEET certified and licensed. References. Member, Better Business Bureau. (918) 491-9929.

VOLUNTEER

JUST DO IT! If you've been looking for a way you can make a difference, consider joining the Millennium Hospice team as a volunteer. Caregiver relief is so important during this difficult time. Volunteers provide that by sitting with patients for an hour or so. Training is provided. (918) 493-6555.

CLASSIFIEDS

TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: Bernie Dornblaser (918) 664-9000, ext 1206 or bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

MUMBO JUMBO 1. Label 2. Pattern 3. Beautiful

4. Color 5. Silhouette 6. Fabric

The Price is Right To Have and to Hold Rollin in the Money He's on Cloud Nine He's Beside Himself Ring Around the Rosie

SUDOKU 5 2 4 7 9 1 3 8 6

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ABC Medicare Air Assurance Co. Sue Ames Anonymous Jim and Cathy Bishop Mary Jane Bittick Rebecca Blackwell John and Sonja Blocha Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma Jeffery and Linda Burns Charities Aid Foundation of America Charles & Marion Weber Foundation Bill and Jean Cheatham Church of St. Mary Clear-Tone Conner & Winters, LLP Bill and Lisa Copeland Angela Cozort Darlene Crutchfield Brad and Leslie Dalton Charles Danley Rubye Eldridge Stephanie Garrett June Garver Gordon George Chris Gruszeczki Hillcrest HealthCare System - Marketing Department Kit Hines Mary P. Huckabee Steve Johns Kathy Kenney Agatha Kilburn Janet Kimball Mary C. Lengacher Kenneth M. Leshurd Peter and Jane Luitwieler Bruce R. Magoon Nicolas Mantilla Alan Mure Parkside Psychiatric Hospital & Clinic G. S. Patterson Jack Preston Joseph and Darlene Promowicz Kevin Redwine Sara Robinson Bob and Denise Rock Jeanne Sanders Bobby D. Sayr Sue Slama Glenna Stark Marilyn E. Steward Sarah and Alex Tirrell Transitions LifeCare Triad Eye Institute Tulsa & Creek County Senior Nutrition Tulsa Performing Arts Center and Trust

Suzanne R. Tumy Stacey and Alton Wells Warren C. Whitsel Williams Vince and Beverly Zardus

IN MEMORY OF:

Shirley Ann Allen In Memory of Major Rob N. Tuttle Narvelle O. Beard In Memory of Alice Ray Francis P. Ferrantino In Memory of Alfonso Ferrantino Theresa M. Finck and Mary Ann Finck In Memory of Theresa Ann Finck LeRoy and Linda Fore In Memory of Ken Choate, Doug Brush and Dennis Inman Iron Horse Soldiers In Memory of Shera Miner

IN HONOR OF:

Bob and Mary Kay Baird In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Joy Browne In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Pamala Canton In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Vicki L. Coleman In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Cristy Cox In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Alice Doyle In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart David and Barbara Goddard In Honor of Carolyn and Bruce Stewart Diane L. Houston In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Paula and Jack Hughey In Honor of Carolyn & Bruce Stewart Vivian Kouplen In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Jeff and Dana Lack In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Michelle and Doug Minton In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Janet Moore In Honor of Muriel Williams Rod and Susan Nordstrom In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Philip and Linda Purpura In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart Herb and Mary Sue Whitney In Honor of Charles Faigle Olivia York In Honor of Bruce and Carolyn Stewart

DONATE TO LIFE Become a Vintage Friend PLEASE MAIL YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO: LIFE Senior Services 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 • Tulsa, OK 74135-5114 Make your donation online: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

BAMBOOZABLES

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We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. Due to publication deadlines, acknowledgment of gifts may take up to 60 days in Vintage Newsmagazine. If there is an error, please call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

LIFE Senior Services is a recognized leader in aging services and an acknowledged voice on aging issues and is proud to be a nonprofit United Way organization.

Final message: Fashionable

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in May 2021.

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Every dollar invested stays local to fuel LIFE Senior Services mission-related initiatives of promoting and preserving independence for seniors.

Today – Tomorrow – Always. FOLLOW US ON

Donate now by visiting www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | July 2021

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Join us for a Medicare seminar. If you’re turning 65 this year, you are eligible to enroll in Medicare. Whether you know a lot or very little about Medicare and your

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insurance options, CommunityCare is here to answer any questions you may have. Our seminars give you the opportunity to learn more about Medicare and Senior Health Plan (HMO). Our plans include everything Medicare covers as well as essential benefits not covered by Medicare, such as prescription drugs, dental and vision care, and much more—with monthly premiums as low as $0. Plus, we have the only Medicare health plans contracted with Saint Francis Health System and Ascension St. John for in-network benefits.

Visit ccokadvantage.com to find an in-person Medicare seminar near you, or call our Medicare team at 918-594-5272 to learn about our plans. Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (TTY 1-800-722-0353).

Visit us at the Senior Safety and Lifestyle Fair July 13 at Expo Square.

ccokadvantage.com

For accommodations of persons with special needs at meetings, call 918-594-5272 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353). CommunityCare Choice is an HMO and PDP plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in CommunityCare Choice, Inc depends on contract renewal. The Senior Health Plan service area includes Tulsa, Craig, Creek, Mayes, Muskogee, McIntosh, Nowata, Okmulgee, Osage, Pittsburg,

Rogers, Wagoner and Washington Counties. Other providers are available in our network. Please call Customer Service for assistance at 918-594-5323 (TTY: 1-800-722 0353), Monday – Sunday and some holidays from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. October 1 - March 31 and Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. April 1 - September 30.

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