LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine - January 2022

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WHERE LEARNING NEVER RETIRES

Take advantage of interactive, senior-adult classes offered in Tulsa and online! Spring session begins Feb. 14.

Registration can be completed online at OLLI.okstate.edu, or you can mail this registration form with your payment to OLLI @ OSU.

TULSA CLASS REGISTRATION

OLLI @ OSU 139 Nancy Randolph Davis Stillwater, OK 74078 P | 405.744.5868

CHOOS E Y OU R MEMBERSH IP Check this box if already an OLLI member (7/1/21-6/30/22). To become an OLLI member, select your preference below.

NAME

Premium Annual Membership $200 Unlimited courses through 06/30/2022

ADDRESS

A La Carte Annual Membership $40 Each class taken is $25, unless otherwise denoted (in addition to the one-time $40 membership fee)

APT #

CARD #

EXP. DATE

CARD

CASH

CHECK

CITY

ZIP CODE

PHONE

DATE OF BIRTH

EMAIL

MOBILE CARRIER

TOTAL ENCLOSED:

WRITING A CHECK? MAKE IT PAYABLE TO OSU.

Please mark class selections from the options below. Full class descriptions can be found online at OLLI.okstate.edu. ONLINE

IN PERSON

Beloved Okie: The Life & Impact of Will Rogers – $25 Mondays, 10a – 12p | 2/28 – 4/4

Housing the Unhoused: Refugees & the Homeless – $25 Mondays, 10a – 12p | 2/14 – 3/21

Let’s Watch: Bogie & Bacall – $25 | Mondays, 1:30 – 4p | 2/28 – 4/4

War Posters: Patriotism & Propaganda – $25 Mondays, 10a – 12p | 3/21 – 4/4

Cons, Frauds & Scams – FREE | Tuesday, 1:30 – 3:30p | 2/22 The Older Americans Act & Services for Older Adults – FREE Tuesday, 10a – 12p | 2/28 Searching the U.S. Census for Genealogy, History & Fun – $25 Tuesdays, 10a – 12p | 3/1 – 4/5 Let’s Play Games – $25 | Tuesdays, 1:30 – 3:30p | 3/1 – 4/5 Oklahoma Geography – $25 | Wednesdays, 10a – 12p | 2/16 – 3/9 Oklahoma Jazz Players, Part II – $25 Wednesdays, 1:30 – 3:30p | 3/2 – 3/23 More than a City Proper: Tulsa Suburbs – $25 Wednesdays, 10a – 12p | 3/16 – 4/6 Aging in Place: There’s No Place Like Home – FREE Wednesday, 1:30 – 3:30p | 3/30 Ad Valorem Property Tax – FREE | Wednesday, 1:30 – 3:30p | 4/6 Great Decisions – $25 | Thursdays, 10a – 12p | 2/17 – 4/7 Let’s Play: Canasta – $25 | Thursdays, 1:30 – 3:30p | 2/17 – 3/10

OLLI.OK ST A T E.EDU | 4 05 .744.5868

Little House on the Prairie Book Club: Farmer Boy – $25 Mondays, 1:30 – 3:30p | 2/14 – 4/4 Blue Zones – $25| Tuesdays, 10a – 12p | 2/15 – 3/22 Contemporary Economic Policy Issues – $25 Tuesdays, 10a – 12p | 2/15 – 3/22 Cons, Frauds & Scams – FREE | Tuesday, 1:30 – 3:30p | 2/22 This Land is Herland: Oklahoma Women’s History – $25 Wednesdays, 10a – 12p | 2/16 – 3/2 What in the World? Again … – $25 Wednesdays, 10a – 12p | 3/16 – 4/6 Freedom Quilts: Secret Quilted Codes & The Underground Railroad – $25 Wednesdays, 1:30 – 3:30p | 3/16 – 4/6 Great Decisions – $25 | Thursdays, 10a – 12p | 2/17 – 4/7 Eat Plants: Preventing & Reserving Chronic Disease with a Plant-Based Lifestyle – $25 Thursdays, 3 – 5p | 2/17 – 5/5


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JA N UA RY 2 022

Features 14

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Guide to the Olympic Games

Meet Oklahoma's Olympic Stars

The world’s best athletes will soon gather to compete in the Olympic Games in Beijing. What U.S. competitors are favored to win?

Oklahomans have earned Olympic glory starting with Jim Thorpe’s two gold medals in 1912. Find inspiration in their stories of adversity and triumph.

BY LINDSAY MORRIS

BY CONNIE CRONLEY

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LIFE LESSONS COACH BILL BLANKENSHIP

LIFE Lessons

Written By Paula Brown, Assistant Editor Photo By Beth Hawkins

Bill Blankenship was inducted into the Oklahoma Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2009. Blankenship served as starting quarterback at the University of Tulsa during his college career, then was head coach of TU’s Golden Hurricane program from 2011 to 2014. He coached Tulsa’s Union High School football team to a 154-26 overall record and currently has his “dream job” leading the Owasso Rams football program.

Bill Blankenship, Oklahoma Hall of Fame football coach, shares wisdom learned from his life experiences on and off the playing field.

What are some of the most important lessons your life experiences have taught you? Perseverance, not quitting, is the number one thing I would say, the most important. Even in the face of adversity and life struggles, you’ve got to keep going. When I had what seemed like an endless series of game losses at the beginning of my career, I wondered if I would ever have a win. I could have quit then. But I persevered, and am so glad I did.

Tough Times

When I was fired at the University of Tulsa, my alma mater, it was painful. I was angry at first – bitter – and couldn’t believe it was happening. I learned, it’s human nature to be ticked off or upset, angry even. But don’t wallow in it.

BY PAULA BROWN PHOTO BY BETH HAWKINS

Just keep going, and don’t let bitterness take root. All the things that have transpired in my life have led me to my dream job as head coach of the Owasso football team. The secret is to keep going, no matter what. Now I look back, and I wouldn’t trade that pain for anything.

Gratitude in Action

Find gratitude and joy to replace bitterness. Constantly make a list of thankful things. I truly believe happiness is gratitude. Giving thanks is a continual process in life and begins as an act, not an emotion. My wife, Angie, helps keep me stay on track, reminding me to count my blessings.

"I truly believe happiness is gratitude. Giving thanks is a continual process in life and begins as an act, not an emotion." – Coach Bill Blankenship

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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Let's Compete! Oklahoma Senior Games Oklahoma Senior Games give athletes over age 50 the chance for fitness and fun. Two local competitors tell how fitness has enriched their lives. BY DR. TOM ALLEN AND ANGELA SMITH 6 Letter From Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner Caregiver Resolutions for a Bright 2022 12 Medicare & You Medicare Coverage: Changes You Can Make Now 23 LIFE PACE 24 The Pickleball Explosion 25 LIFE EDU 26 Smart Fitness at Home 28 Preventing Sports Injuries After 50 30 Mindbender & Puzzles 31 Puzzle Partners 32 Bunkering With Books 33 Noteworthy 34 Share Your Time & Talent 35 Business Directory 36 Writer's Symposium 37 Classifieds 39 Vintage Friends

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


You’re invited to visit the Health Zone at Saint Francis on Saturday, January 15, for our annual Health and Wellness Expo. Join us for fitness classes, free health screenings, wellness education, a tour of the facility and more. H EALTH ZONE FE AT URE S AND S E RV I CE S :

EXPO

• Two indoor saltwater pools

• Racquetball courts

• Premier cardio, weight training and strength equipment

• Pickleball and basketball

• Aqua Stand Up® paddleboard classes

• Massage and spa services

• Zumba, barre and yoga • Pilates equipment studio • Indoor cycling studio • Boot camp • Suspension training

SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 2022 9 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

Visit our website saintfrancis.com/healthzone for complete event details.

• Year-round swimming lessons

$0. JOINING FEE.

• Indoor walking track

• R.I.P.P.E.D. and RUMBLE classes • Personal trainers • Steam rooms and saunas • Kids Zone activity center • Specialized kids’ programming • Grab-and-go deli • Membership discounts for Warren Clinic patients and seniors

VALID JANUARY 9 – 15, 2022.

5353 East 68th Street South | Tulsa, Oklahoma | 918-494-1671

How

you like to live

The truth about Cedarhurst. Cedarhurst creates communities faithful to one big idea: Every person should feel loved, valued, supported and able to safely live life to the fullest. Discover senior living that unfailingly respects every individual. The Cedarhurst Promise.TM We promise. If you’re not satisfied and decide to move out within your first 60 days, we’ll give you a complete refund.*

Call now (918) 201-1540 to schedule your tour. 7345 S. 99th East Ave., Tulsa, OK 74133 • CedarhurstWoodlandHills.com Independent Living *Cedarhurst Promise™ program is only available at advertised community. Not applicable for respite or other short-term stays. Refund is available only if move out is a result of dissatisfaction with Cedarhurst community as documented throughout stay. Complete refund includes base rent, level of care charges, and community fee. Ancillary services fees (ex. additional transportation, pet fees and laundry charges) do not qualify for refund. Additional terms and conditions may apply. Please contact community for additional details. Void where prohibited.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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Letter From Eileen Dear Vintage Reader:

Vol. 36, No. 7

Happy New Year! 2022 is here, and even better, it’s an Olympic year! In these pages you will find stories on the history of the Olympics and some interesting facts about Oklahomans who have pursued the gold.

Photo by Jessica Karin Trout

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing eileen.bradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine is printed and mailed at no charge. A minimum donation of $25 per year is suggested to help offset production costs. To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000.

I like the Olympics – especially the Winter Games. The snowboarding, the ski jumping, and the bobsledding are all thrilling to watch. I enjoy the unusual sports, like curling and the one where you cross-country ski and shoot a rifle (I can never recall the name of that event). My most vivid Olympic “dreams” took flight in the 1968 Winter Olympics. I was 5, and mesmerized by Peggy Fleming in her lime green dress, spinning and turning, defying gravity. She was amazing. I really can still envision her final performance. Inspired by her grace, I committed to a life devoted to figure skating. I began my career in rented skates downtown at the Civic Center rink. My skating skirt, though not lime green, was still quite stylish. Like most great athletes, I experienced literal ups and downs at the rink, and eventually hung up my skates and dreams. My career lasted all of four weeks. I then joined a Camp Fire group. As I said, I like the Olympics. My best friend Eva, however, loves the Olympics. She rallies us all, every four years. She says the Olympics have something for everyone: sports, drama, politics geography, and human interest stories. They teach life lessons: hard work pays off; accidents happen, and sometimes life is unfair. They bring awareness of mental health challenges and human rights issues. They highlight strength and athleticism, and showcase national spirit. I hope this issue, and Eva’s enthusiasm, have you rallied to enjoy this year’s games. Maybe I will see you at the rink? Best wishes,

President & CEO of LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE & Vintage Housing

KELLY KIRCHHOFF Senior Director of Communications

DEE DUREN Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

BERNIE DORNBLASER Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

LEAH WEIGLE Graphic Designer

PAULA BROWN Assistant Editor pbrown@LIFEseniorservices.org

CAROL CARTER Copy Editor

DICK MCCANDLESS ESTEBAN VALENCIA Community Distribution LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2022. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 36, Issue 7, January 2022 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 2168-8494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK.

Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

Free Prescription Delivery ORGANIZE YOUR MEDICATION AT NO ADDITIONAL COST Simplify and organize your medications with prescription packaging. One package contains all the medication you need to take at any given time, automatically refilled at the same time each month per your request. • Organized by date and time

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

Versailles Apartments

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Efficiency • $625 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom • $650 2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom • $750 2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom • $850 Independent Living Utilities included, except for phone and cable

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(918) 627-6116

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


QUALITY IN-HOME CARE FOR YOUR LOVED ONE. PEACE OF MIND FOR YOU. The holidays can be a time of joy, togetherness, and connection. For many seniors, these happy feelings can be replaced with anxiety or depression once the festivities are over. Feeling blue after the holidays is common for older adults — especially for those that are isolated from loved ones, suffering from a physical illness or those with a less busy lifestyle. At Senior Helpers of Tulsa, our goal is to provide uplifting in-home care that benefits seniors and their families. We create a personalized care plan for our clients that considers physical safety and goals as well as quality of life and mental health needs.

Our expertly-trained professional caregivers can provide: • Transportation to Community Events • Companionship & Helping Families Connect through Technology • Specialized Care for Alzheimer’s & Dementia • Meal Preparation & Light Housework • Bathing, Dressing, Personal Hygiene Assistance • Medication Reminders Senior Helpers is ready to provide your family quality, compassionate, and joyful care. Let us ease your mind with a complimentary in-home care assessment today.

918-574-2273 www.seniorhelpers.com/ok/tulsa All rights reserved. Senior Helpers locations are independently owned and operated. ©2021 SH Franchising, LLC.


Patricia “Pat” McCormick (second from the left) won diving medals in the 1952 and 1956 Olympics She visited Oklahoma in 1955.

Looking Back Wayman Tisdale, who won a gold medal playing on the 1984 Olympic basketball team, is pictured in his Indiana Pacers uniform in 1986. Tisdale, who attended Booker T. Washington High School and the University of Oklahoma, retired from basketball in 1997 to focus on his musical career.

Olympic Glory Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

Oklahoma State University wrestler John Smith won Olympic gold in 1988 and 1992. He is pictured wrestling against Clemson in 1988.

State Representative Betty Boyd poses with Olympic figure skater Nancy Kerrigan and Oklahoma Governor David Walters in the early 1990s.

This Month in History JANUARY 5, 1933: Golden Gate Bridge Construction Begins In 1916, journalist and former engineering student James Wilkins proposed the city of San Francisco build a suspension bridge to span the Golden Gate, a narrow, 400-foot deep strait that serves as the mouth of San Francisco Bay. The city came up with a plan and sold bonds for the project in 1932, despite the Great Depression. It officially opened in May 1937 and was the longest bridge span in the world at the time.

JANUARY 10, 1901: Texas Gusher Starts U.S. Oil Industry Beaumont, Texas became a black gold boomtown after a drilling derrick at Spindletop Hill produced an enormous gusher of crude oil, signaling the start of the American oil industry. Until that time, petroleum was used primarily as a lubricant and in kerosene for lamps. Oil became the world’s first trillion-dollar industry with petroleum used as the main fuel source for new inventions like cars and airplanes.

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JANUARY 15, 1929: Martin Luther King Jr. Born

Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the son of a Baptist minister. King received a doctorate in theology in 1955 and began working to end segregation in the South. King preached nonviolence and led peaceful protests, giving his famous “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. King was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. He was assassinated in April 1968.

JANUARY 22, 1998:

Unabomber Pleads Guilty Ted Kaczynski entered a guilty plea acknowledging responsibility for a 17-year campaign of bombings that killed three people and injured more than 20 others. Kaczynski was a mathematics professor who began living as a recluse in a Montana cabin during the early 1970s. He mailed package bombs, targeting airlines and universities. Kaczynski’s brother became suspicious and went to authorities. Kaczynski is serving a life sentence in Colorado.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

JANUARY 25, 1905: World’s

Largest Diamond Found

A superintendent on a routine inspection found a 3,106-carat diamond in a South Africa diamond mine. The diamond, which weighed 1.33 pounds, was named Cullinan and given to King Edward VII as a birthday present. A diamond cutter studied it for months then fainted after successfully shattering it. It then became several stones including the Star of Africa I, the world’s largest fine-quality, colorless diamond.

JANUARY 26, 1788: British Settlement Began in Australia

A fleet of British ships carrying about 700 convicts landed at the country now known as Australia. The British government appointed Captain Arthur Philip to establish a penal colony on the new land, without providing much support. After several very difficult years, the colony became prosperous with a 1,000-strong party at the turn of the 19th century. Philip returned to England in 1792. In 1818, January 26 became an official holiday known as Australia Day. © www.loc.gov/collections/today-in-history

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Like peas and carrots, your plan and provider go hand-in-hand.

Attend one of our weekly Medicare education events to learn about the basics of Medicare and how your Primary Care Provider can help you maximize your benefits.

Where:

When:

Oak Street Health - Lewis Ave 1538 N Lewis Ave, Tulsa Phone: (918) 725-1878

Every Tuesday at noon

Call to RSVP

(847) 250-9071

Oak Street Health - Garnett Plaza 11511 E. 31st Street, Tulsa Phone: (918) 615-4938

Doctors for adults on Medicare

Be active. Live vibrantly. Enjoy fewer worries, and schedule a visit today!

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LOVE LIFE? WE’RE ! HIRING

LIFE Senior Services is a Great Place to Work ! ®

LIFE Senior Services is one of the nation’s top 25 small to midsize companies for aging services in 2021, according to Great Place to Work® and Fortune magazine.

APPLY ONLINE TODAY www.LIFEseniorservices.org/careers

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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Caregiving Resolutions

CAREGIVER CORNER

CAREGIVER RESOLUTIONS

Consider making one or more of the following New Year’s resolutions suggested by Erin Powell, behavioral health specialist with LIFE Senior Services. A licensed counselor, Powell worked for the Alzheimer’s Association and Laureate Psychiatric Hospital before joining the team at LIFE.

for a Bright 2022 BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

ERIN POWELL

When I was actively caregiving for my parents, I heard about the resources offered by LIFE Senior Services and other groups that serve older adults. Some of the ideas sounded wonderful – helpful and affordable. Some were even free. My sister and I picked up LIFE's Vintage Guide to Housing & Services, using it to plan visits to assisted living communities and discover organizations like LIFE, the Alzheimer’s Association, and the Area Agency on Aging. The problem was, most of the great ideas I heard about from these groups just seemed like too much work. Yes, I would think, adult day health would probably be great for my mother, who had Alzheimer’s disease. I thought there was a good chance she would enjoy it. It would have provided a break for my dad, who was her primary caregiver. Somehow, we just never made it happen. Sound familiar?

Help is Available If you can relate to knowing help is available, but still feeling that you’re the only one who can carry the load, welcome to the world of caregiving. Some of those feelings might stem from your loved one being more comfortable around you than a stranger. Maybe you’re so tired, it seems like too much work to arrange for services when there’s no guarantee they will be a good fit. Maybe you’ve just gone it alone for so long that you think that’s the way it has to be. It does take time and effort to set up new services, find your way through the paperwork, and let go of the reins. Now that I work at LIFE Senior Services, however, I have learned how many good people there are in our community whose mission in life is assisting caregivers and older adults. I’ve seen the programs in action and know how much they can help.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

Behavioral Health Specialist at LIFE Senior Services

“Caregiving is one of the hardest things most people will do in their lives,” she said. “Utilizing resources out there is not just a help to the caregiver, but the person they are caring for. Taking care of yourself is critical to being able to continue in your role as a caregiver to someone else and is the opposite of being selfish!"

1. I will prioritize self-care this year. Self-care may look different for a caregiver than it does for someone who has fewer responsibilities. Think of the person you want to be when your caregiving duties have ended, and keep a few activities in your life that support that vision. Prioritize the things that add to your quality of life – like maintaining your health. While you may not have an hour to spend at the gym, you can likely find 15 minutes twice a day for a brisk walk. 2. I will reach out for help and support when I feel overwhelmed. Is there an understanding person you can call? Ask the person you call if they are willing to let you vent for a few minutes, then share what is going on. You may find a new perspective or something to smile about. 3. I will give myself a weekly or monthly caregiving break by using respite care, possibly through the Area Agency on Aging. Vouchers to hire respite care are available through the Area Agency on Aging. The vouchers pay for a home health aide or adult day health sitter to give you a few hours off. Call the INCOG Area Agency on Aging at (800) 336-2222 for more information. 4. I will educate myself through caregiving classes. Find free classes offered through Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative, the Alzheimer’s Association, Morton Comprehensive Health, and LIFE

Senior Services. Empower yourself by attending classes taught by aging services professionals. Check LIFE's Vintage Guide to Housing & Services available at area Reasor’s grocery stores, CVS stores, Whole Foods, libraries and online at LIFEseniorservices.org to see what’s available. 5. I will communicate with family and friends about what I’m going through so they better know how they can help me. A caregiver may believe friends and family should know what to do to help out, but it’s not always obvious to another person. Ask for what you need. Perhaps they’d be willing to bring over a meal, help with laundry or mow your lawn. 6. I will prioritize my mental health this year – even if that means reaching out for professional support. Listen to your self-talk, and witness the emotions you experience each day. Do your daily habits support the person you want to be? Counselors can help you move forward with solutions. If you’re experiencing a crisis, call the COPES 24-hour crisis line at (918) 744-4800. 7. I will get involved in a support group, so I won’t feel so alone on my journey. The Alzheimer’s Association, Morton Comprehensive Health Services, the Area Agency on Aging, and the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma are just a few agencies offering support groups for caregivers.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Estate Planning Trusts, Probate Elder Exploitation Complimentary Consultation southtulsalaw.com 918-512-1800 | 888-970-8760

Life is better at home. When your loved one needs extra care at home, choosing the right caregiver agency can be tough. Let BrightStar Care® make it easier. • Your loved one’s care is supervised by a Registered Nurse. Having a nurse on your side can make a big difference as needs change. • We’ll provide a plan of care tailored around your loved one’s needs with our Registered Nurse conducting regular supervisory visits.

Call for your free in-home assessment. BrightStar Care of Tulsa

918-392-9949 brightstarcare.com/tulsa

©BrightStar Care Independently Owned and Operated

CONNECT WITH LIFE FOLLOW US ON

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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MEDICARE & YOU

Medicare Coverage Changes You Can Make Now BY KATHY JONES, MEDICARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR

Knowing when you can make changes to your Medicare coverage can be confusing at times. We all know what it’s like to have second thoughts about a decision, especially when it comes to healthcare. Below is some information about changes you may be able to make to your coverage now through the first quarter of 2022.

Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period

January 1 – March 31 If you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan like an HMO or PPO, you can change from one Medicare Advantage Plan to another or return to Original Medicare between January 1 and March 31 each year. Your coverage will start the first of the month following your change. Remember, if you change from a Medicare Advantage Plan to Original Medicare, you also have an opportunity to join a separate Part D Plan. During this period, you cannot: • Change from Original Medicare to a Medicare Advantage Plan • Change from one Medicare Prescription Drug Plan to another

General Enrollment Period

January 1 – March 31 Usually, there is no monthly premium for Part A coverage if you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes while working. • If you are not eligible for a premium-free Part A and didn’t buy it when you were first eligible, you can sign up during the General Enrollment Period, and your coverage will begin July 1. Your monthly premium may increase 10% for every 12 months you didn’t have coverage. You will have to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you could have had Part A, but did not sign up for it.

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• If you didn’t sign up for Part B (for which you pay a monthly premium) when you were first eligible, you can sign up during this period, and your coverage will begin July 1. You may have to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B. Similar to Part A, your monthly premium may increase 10% for each full 12-month period that you could have had Part B, but didn’t sign up for it. • If you don’t sign up for Part A and/or Part B when you were first eligible because you or your spouse are still working, you are covered by a group health plan, and your plan is as good as Medicare, you will be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period once you (or your spouse) stop working or the group health plan coverage ends, whichever happens first. You usually don’t have to pay a late enrollment penalty if you sign up during a Special Enrollment Period. • You can sign up for Part A, Part B, or both at your local Social Security office, on Social Security’s website, or by calling Social Security at (800) 772-1213; TTY users call (800) 325-0778. If you receive benefits from the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB), call your local RRB office or (877) 772-5772; TTY users should call (312) 751-4701.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

Source: www.medicare.gov

FREE

Tax Help From LIFE Senior Services

February 7 through April 15 Tax season is upon us, and April 15 will be here before you know it! Like many taxpayers, you may find yourself dreading those confusing forms, worrying that you will make a mistake or have to pay a sky-high cost to have them professionally prepared. If so, you are not alone. According to the IRS, millions of people will spend an average of $200 in tax preparation and filing fees this year instead of saving that money and filing their taxes for free. From February 7 until April 15, trained and IRS-certified volunteers will be available to help seniors age 60 and older who make $58,000 or less annually with free, basic income tax preparation and electronic filing. You need to schedule an appointment for the free service.

To schedule your appointment, call LIFE's Tax Assistance program at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189.

Please let LIFE's Tax Assistance Program counselors know if you will need transportation to and from your appointment. 48-HOUR NOTICE REQUIRED Tulsa Area Only

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


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Whittier Heights

ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY MEMORY CARE IN MIDTOWN

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At The Grove at Midtown, our dedicated Memory Care specialists are able to provide personalized care in a supportive environment built around the needs of those living with memory impairment. Call us for more information on our Care Specials today! Move in by January 31st to get one free month! 5211 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa, OK 74105 grovemidtown.com • 918.743.2700 PE T friendly

E Affordable Burial Spaces

Glenwood Apartments

E Family Estates

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(918) 663-7797 Retirement Living for Seniors Age 62+ & Adults with Disabilities

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Caring for Tulsa’s Memories Since 1927

All Bills Paid 24-hour On-site Staff Laundry Facilities Library & Fitness Area Planned Activities & Bingo Emergency Pull Cords On-site Beauty Salon

E Private Mausoleums E Cremation Burial Gardens E Columbarium Niches E Permanent Memorial Bronze Markers E Upright Granite Monuments

To find out more information, please call (918) 627-0220 to speak with one of our Family Service Counselors.

E Affordable Lawn-Level Granite Markers

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13


THE CREATION & HISTORY OF THE ICONIC OLYMPIC RINGS LOGO

PIERRE DE COUBERTIN

A French educator and historian, founder of the International Olympic Committee, and its second president.

In 1913, Pierre de Coubertin designed one of the world's most famous symbols. The Olympic rings represent the five continents and all nations united by the spirit of the games. Today, they make up one of the most famous and recognized symbols in the world.

GUIDE TO THE OLYMPIC GAMES PA S T• P R E S E N T• F U T U R E

The ancient Olympics were held every four years in August and September during a religious festival honoring Zeus. The Roman Empire continued the games after conquering Greece in the mid-second century B.C., but the quality of competition declined. In A.D. 393, Emperor Theodosius I called for a ban on all “pagan” festivals, ending the ancient Olympic tradition after nearly 12 centuries. Baron Pierre de Coubertin of France resurrected the games around 1,500 years later. A proponent of physical education, the baron was inspired to create a modern version of the Olympic Games after visiting the ancient Olympic site. In 1892, the baron proposed reviving the Olympics as an international athletic competition held every four years. Two years later, he founded the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the governing body of the modern Olympic games.

Fans gather for an event at the Olympic Stadium in Athens 120 years ago. Photo courtesty of Getty Images

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The first modern Olympics were held in 1896 in Athens and featured 280 participants from 12 countries. Since 1994, the Summer and Winter Olympic Games have been held separately, alternating every two years. The 2020 Summer Olympics were delayed by one year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

ASIA SHAUN WHITE SNOWBOARDER

AFRICA

From the eighth century B.C. to the fourth century A.D., the Olympics were held every four years in Olympia, located in the Peloponnese peninsula. The first written records of the ancient Olympic Games date to 776 B.C. when a cook named Coroebus won the only event – a 192-meter footrace called the stade (the origin of the word stadium). Historians believe the games had been going on for many years before that time.

AUSTRALIA

The Olympic Games originated in ancient Greece as many as 3,000 years ago. After disappearing for several centuries, they were revived in the late 19th century and have become the world’s quintessential sporting competition.

AMERICA

HOW THE OLYMPIC GAMES BEGAN

EUROPE

BY LINDSAY MORRIS

MIKAELA SHIFFRIN ALPINE SKIER

NATHAN CHEN FIGURE SKATER

BEIJING Winter Olympics 2022

It’s hard to believe that another Olympics is just around the corner, especially since the Tokyo 2021 Olympics were less than six months ago! The XXIV Winter Olympics will take place February 4 through 20 in Beijing and towns in the neighboring Hebei province in the People’s Republic of China. For the first time, the Winter Olympics will be hosted by a city that previously hosted the Summer Olympics. The 2022 Winter Olympics will feature seven new events: women’s monobob (a solo bobsled), men’s and women’s big air (freestyle skiing), mixed team snowboard cross, mixed team aerials, mixed team short track relay, and mixed team ski jumping. In total, there will be 109 events in seven winter sports. Snowboarder Shaun White, alpine skier Mikaela Shiffrin, and figure skater Nathan Chen are just a few of Team USA’s biggest stars who are expected to compete in Beijing. Snowboarding star Chloe Kim and curler John Shuster are also athletes to watch in Beijing. NBC Sports expects Team USA to rank fourth on the medal table. GUIDE TO THE OLYMPIC GAMES, continued on page 16.

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GUIDE TO THE OLYMPIC GAMES, continued from page 14.

BEIJING Paralympics 2022

The Paralympics are held following the Winter and Summer Olympics every two years. These sporting events involve athletes with a range of physical disabilities, including impaired muscle power, impaired passive range of motion, limb deficiency, vision impairment, and intellectual impairment. The Paralympics has grown from a small gathering of British World War II veterans in 1948 to hundreds of competitors from more than 100 countries.

Trevon Jenifer of the USA Paralympic basketball team competes in the gold medal finals in Toyko.

Beijing will welcome about 600 of the world’s best Paralympic athletes for the 2022 Paralympic Winter Games from March 4 through 13. The next Summer Paralympic Games will likely be held through August 28 to September 8, 2024, in Paris. GABBY THOMAS

TRACK & FIELD

PARIS

Summer Olympics 2024

JAGGER EATO SKATEBOARDER

We’re just two and a half years away from the next Summer Olympics, which will be held in Paris from July 26 through August 11, 2024. Having previously hosted in 1900 and 1924, Paris will become the second city to host the Summer Olympics three times, after London. The Paris program is expected to feature 306 events in 32 sports.

A photo illustration shows beach volleyball being played next to the Eiffel Tower for the 2024 Games in Paris.

BRODY MALONE GYMNAST

Photo courtesy of usatoday.com

OLYMPIC MUSEUM IN COLORADO SPRINGS

Team USA 2024 Olympians to watch include track and field standouts Erriyon Knighton and Gabby Thomas, skateboarder Jagger Eaton and gymnast Brody Malone. In the last seven Summer Olympics, Team USA has ranked first when it comes to overall medal count.

Did you know that there are 32 Olympic museums throughout the world? The Olympic Museums Network was founded in 2006 to grow the global Olympic movement. The actual United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum in Colorado Springs, Colorado opened in July 2020. The 60,000-square-foot museum is dedicated to America’s greatest athletes and their compelling stories, with the artifacts, media, and technology behind the athletes who make the U.S. proud. The museum also hosts regular meet and greet events with U.S. Olympic and Paralympic competitors.

Visit the museum’s website at usopm.org for more information and to purchase tickets.

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The museum was selected as the country’s Best New Attraction in 2020 by USA TODAY’s 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards. Colorado Springs was a commonsense choice for the new museum since it is home of the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC), the first and main United States Olympic Training Center, and two dozen National Governing Bodies.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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INTERESTING OLYMPIC SPORTS Olympic sports have evolved over the years, that’s for sure! Several sports will be in the Olympics that may be new to you. For example, the 2024 Paris Games will for the first time include a sport called breaking, which started as a form of dancing associated with the hip-hop culture, but has transformed into a competitive sport governed by the World DanceSport Federation. Breaking is a competitive form of breakdancing where “b-boys” and “b-girls” are judged on their dance routines and moves like spinning on their heads and backs.

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The president of the IOC said breaking, along with other recentlyintroduced sports like skateboarding and surfing, make the Olympic games more youthful, urban, and gender-balanced. Over the years, there have been several unusual and obscure demonstration events in the games, such as bandy (a mix of ice hockey and field hockey), dogsled racing, tug of war, military patrol (a skiing and shooting sport similar to biathlon), bicycle polo, roller hockey, rope climbing, pesapallo (a Finnish version of baseball), and Australian rules football. While some sports are being added to the Olympic roster, others are being removed. For example, wrestling, which dates back to the ancient Olympics, was axed from the Tokyo Olympics but was then reinstated months later. Baseball and softball have been removed for the 2024 Paris Games. Other sports, such as golf and rugby, were part of the Olympics in the early 1900s, then dropped for decades before being added back in.

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Checkout these unique and notable sports in the upcoming 2022 Winter Olympic Games: MONOPOD

Bobsled races traditionally involve teams of two or four people, but women will compete solo in the new monopod event in Beijing. That gives women a second bobsledding event for the first time. Watch for new U.S. citizen Kaillie Humphries, formerly of Canada.

FREESTYLE SKI BIG AIR

Big air freestyle skiing will debut in Beijing with high-flying tricks and flips. Two-time gold medalist Jamie Anderson is a U.S. hopeful in the women's event while Nick Goepper hopes to add gold to his previous bronze and silver medals.

MIXED TEAM EVENT

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Men and women compete on teams together in events set to debut in Beijing, including freestyle skiing aerials, short-track speedskating relay, ski jumping, and snowboard cross. The new events are intended to address gender equality and were popular with viewers in Tokyo’s summer games.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

17


MEET

OKLAHOMA'S

OLYMPIC STARS BY CONNIE CRONLEY

Oklahoma is gold country. Also silver and bronze – with medal riches brought home by Oklahoma athletes and coaches. Their athletic accomplishments are extraordinary; their professional contributions exemplary; their personal lives range from heroic to tragic. Here is a sampling of athletes with Oklahoma ties who medaled in track and field, wrestling, basketball and gymnastics. TRACK AND FIELD Oklahomans staked their claim as winners in track and field in the 1912 Prague games. That’s the year the state’s most famous Olympian, James Francis “Jim” Thorpe, won gold in decathlon and pentathlon. King Gustav V of Sweden presented the medals saying, “Sir, you are the greatest athlete in the world,” to which he replied, “Thanks, king!” Angelina Jolie is producing a movie of Thorpe’s life, called “Bright Path,” which is the English translation of his Sac and Fox Nation name, Wa-Tho-Huk. The film stars Martin Sensmeier, an Alaskan Native. Often overlooked in those same games is Ira Davenport of Tonkawa, who won bronze in the 800 meters.

JIM THORPE

MADELINE MANNING MIMS 18

J. W. MASHBURN

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

Loren Murchison, from Muskogee, won gold in the 400-meter relay in both the 1920 and 1924 games. In 1925, he developed spinal meningitis and was paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life. In 1956, Seminole’s J.W. Mashburn won gold with the 1,600-meter relay team and ran his 400-meter leg in 46.5 seconds.

The year 1968 was a good Olympic year for Oklahomans. Madeline Manning Mims, a Tulsa resident, had been diagnosed with spinal meningitis at age 3 and was not expected to live. Instead, she won gold in 1968, winning the women’s 800-meter race by 10 meters and setting an Olympic record, then captured silver in the 1972 games. Mimi earned a Doctor of Divinity from Oral Roberts University and became a gospel recording artist and lay minister. Ed Caruthers, who won silver in the 1968 high jump, said his childhood in segregated Oklahoma City inspired him to become active in a group of Black professionals and businessmen helping financially disadvantaged college students. Oklahoma had two state winners in 1976. Johnny “Lam” Jones of Lawton was a gold medal relay runner who played in the NFL as a wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys and New York Jets. Jones overcame drug and alcohol addiction to become a motivational speaker for high school athletes. David Roberts of Stillwater took pole vault bronze in 1976. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


WRESTLING Oklahoma wrestlers began bringing home medals in the 1930s and have continued with such frequency it borders on greed. Jack Van Bebber, from Perry, was the first wrestling champion in 1932. He won welterweight gold despite having to hitchhike 6 miles to the Olympics arena. That evening, Robert Pearce, a Cushing native, won bantamweight gold. In 1936, Cushing’s Frank Lewis was the only American to win gold in the 1936 Olympics. He received the medal in freestyle welterweight at the Berlin games where he saw Hitler every day. Ross Flood, of Braman, captured freestyle bantam silver. Josiah “Joe” Henson, of Bristow, won wrestling bronze in 1952. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and served as a captain in the U.S. Navy. Henson later became an acclaimed international wrestling referee and founded a wrestling-equipment supply company. He died in Tulsa in 2012 at age 90.

KENNY MONDAY

Photo courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

Dan Hodge, of Perry, took wrestling silver in 1956 and Chicago Golden Gloves in 1958. He was the first wrestler to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Hodge boxed professionally for a short time and wrestled professionally for 18 years. At age 80, he could still crush an apple in one hand.

Oklahoma wrestlers had a banner year in the 1960 Olympics. Doug Blubaugh, a gold medal winner, called himself just “an old country boy from Ponca City” who joined the Army “so I could eat while training.” At West Point he worked out eight hours a day. Terry McCann, a bantamweight gold wrestler, trained for the Olympics while living in Tulsa with his wife and six children and working full time. Ponca City native Shelby Wilson won gold in the freestyle lightweight division. Yojiro Uetake, a native of Japan who attended Oklahoma State University (OSU), won gold medals in 1964 and 1968. He is often considered the most accomplished wrestler in OSU history and is the only Cowboy to finish his collegiate career undefeated. Wayne Wells, OU student-athlete, trained by running the stadium stairs six or seven times a day. In 1972, he finished law school, passed the bar, and won wrestling gold despite injuries to his ribs, spleen, and knee. OSU Cowboy John Smith, the most titled American wrestler, won gold medals in 1988 and 1992. A native of Del City, he is head wrestling coach at OSU. At the 1984 Olympics, brothers Dave and Mark Schultz won wrestling gold. Both brothers had wrestled for OU. They were the subjects of the 2014 movie “Foxcatcher” after Dave’s murder in 1996. He was shot and killed by the Foxcatcher wrestling facility’s sponsor, multimillionaire John du Pont.

A MEETING OF HOPE

TREATMENT WITH DR. JAMES WEBB Why did you choose Dr. Webb? I had back surgery in 2002 and was on pain meds and had lots of issues. I went to Advanced Orthopedics and as soon as they saw what I was going through, they sent me to Dr. Webb. They said “He can help you.”

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Tulsan Kenny Monday became the first Black athlete to win wrestling gold in 1988. Monday graduated from Booker T. Washington High School and helped the OSU Cowboys win two Big Eight titles. A three-time Olympian, Monday was a silver medalist in 1992. Several other Oklahoma Olympians won medals and went on to become coaches including Kendall Cross, Jamill Kelly and Coleman Scott. MEET OKLAHOMAS OLYMPIC STARS, continued on page 20.

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MEET OKLAHOMA'S OLYMPIC STARS, continued from page 19.

Faith Powers Olympic Weightlifter

SHANE HAMMAN Oklahoman Shane Hamman, recognized as the strongest weightlifter in American history, competed in two Olympics and broke all American records in the 2004 games in Athens.

The USA men’s basketball team is awarded gold medals in the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo. Coach Henry Iba of OSU led the USA to victory in 1964 and 1968.

BASKETBALL

Oklahoma basketball players and coaches alike have shined in Olympic Games. OSU’s legendary Coach Henry "Hank" Iba, coached the U.S. men’s basketball teams to two golds in 1964 and 1968. In 1972, he refused the silver medal after a highly controversial game against the Soviet Union when the clock was reset multiple times. Iba said, “It takes a man a long time to get over something like that. Maybe you don’t ever get over it.” The U.S. team refused to accept the silver. One of the state’s first Olympic basketball stars was Jesse “Cab” Renick of Love County, who led the men’s gold medal team in 1948. He grew up playing basketball on a dirt court in Marietta and was the second Native American, after Thorpe, to win an Olympic gold medal. Bob Kurland, who was also on the 1948 gold squad, was basketball’s first 7-foot player. Coach Iba recognized the potential, and Kurland’s height changed the game. Wayne Glasgow, of Dacoma, won men’s basketball gold in 1951 in Helsinki. He was drafted by the Minneapolis Lakers but chose the Phillips 66ers amateur team and worked for the oil company for 30 years. Perhaps the most beloved Oklahoma Olympian is Wayman Tisdale, who won men’s basketball gold in 1984. A graduate of Booker T. High School, the three-time AllAmerican at OU was second overall in the 1985 NBA draft. As an accomplished jazz musician, Tisdale recorded eight albums, one of which became the number one contemporary jazz album in 2006. He died of bone cancer in 2009 at age 44, leaving his wife Regina and their four children. Some 4,000 people attended his funeral in the BOK Center.

GYMNASTICS

Oklahomans were latecomers to gymnastic glory. In 1984, OU student-athlete Bart Conner captured two gold medals in team and parallel bars. He is married to internationally famous Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (five Olympic gold medals, three silvers and one bronze). They have a gymnastics academy in Norman.

He did not win a medal, but he’s proud of his performance. Hamman placed 10th in the 2000 games and seventh in 2004. “I have all the American records, won all the national championships, and broke three American records at each Olympics.” He speaks modestly and matter-of-factly, as we might say, “I dropped off the laundry today.”  Shane said many weightlifters from other countries weren't following drug-free standards. “I can be proud knowing I did what I did clean. I’ve never done drugs in my life,” he said. "Pretty much everybody I was competing against (in the Olympics) was enhanced.”  At 5’9” and 350-400 pounds, Hamman competed in the super heavyweight class. “I’m a big guy,” he laughed. “I’m built like a box.”  Hamman got big and strong working on his family’s farm in Mustang where they raised and sold produce and operated a fruit stand in Oklahoma City. When he switched from football to weightlifting in high school, he broke school records. He was a competitive powerlifter until he moved to Colorado Springs at age 24 to train for the Olympics. Hamman attributes his strength to farming’s hard work, to the values of his religious family, and to his faith. “My personal relationship with God played a huge part in my career.” When he retired from weightlifting in 2005, he became the national spokesman for Rachel’s Challenge, a nonprofit named for Rachel Scott, killed at age 17 in the Columbine school shooting. After giving more than 1,000 school assembly programs, he was ready to stop traveling and recently opened his own insurance agency in Tulsa. His wife Cristin is associate pastor at Tulsa’s RiverGate Church, and they have three children. Shane highly recommends weight lifting for older people: “Nothing’s better to build bone strength than lifting weights." No Olympic medal for Shane Hamman, but with his faith, family, and his integrity, he’s a gold-standard champion.

Shannon Miller, a gymnast from Edmond, won two silver and three bronze medals in 1992 and two gold medals in 1996. She holds a law degree from Boston College but never practiced, instead promoting fitness and health for women. Miller has a foundation to combat childhood obesity and is an ovarian cancer survivor. In 2008, Jonathan Horton, OU gymnast, took silver in high bar and bronze on the team all-around competition. He is married to OU gymnast Haley DeProspero.

20

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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21


"I am a Pole Vaulter"

LET’S COMPETE! OKLAHOMA SENIOR GAMES The Oklahoma Senior Games offer opportunities for fun, fitness, and friendship to anyone age 50 and older. From archery to water walking, there’s a sport to suit all fitness levels. The games have 25 different team and individual events. Non-ambulatory athletes can take part in the accuracy sports of bowling, cornhole, or shuffleboard. Line dancing competition will be new in 2022. The senior games are held annually in different cities across the state each fall, and though they are competitive, “a great emphasis is placed upon participation and support of fellow competitors,” according to Executive Director Kathleen Fitzgerald. Top-ranking competitors in each gender and age group earn the right to take part in the National Senior Games to be held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 2023. Local senior games will also be offered in the winter, spring, and summer of 2022 in Tulsa County, Muskogee, and Stillwater. Learn how you can join the fun at okseniorgames.com, and hear good reasons to do so from two Tulsa-area athletes.

TO REGISTER FOR THE GAMES OR FOR MORE INFORMATION:

BY DR. TOM ALLEN Let me tell you how I became a pole vaulter. During the 6th through 9th grades, I lived in the small southern Illinois town of Marissa where my father was the pastor of the First Baptist Church. The only competitive sports at the high school were baseball and basketball. During my freshman year, a new teacher and coach came from Chicago. “Boys, we are going to have a track team,” he announced. About 15 of the boys showed up in the field far beyond the baseball diamond to mark out a quartermile oval track. It was on grass, of course, but it was pretty level and smooth. After a few practices, the coach assigned events to us such as high jump, long jump, sprints, shot put, etc. All events had been assigned, except the mile, and I was the only boy without an event. Coach said, “Allen, you will be our miler!” I had never run a mile – I played baseball and basketball, but I was now the miler. TOUGH BEGINNING I remember a meet where I saw pole vaulting for the first time. Bobby Joe Mason, who later became a Harlem Globetrotter, was vaulting. Wow, I’d like to try that, I thought. But we had neither a pit nor pole at Marissa. Jump ahead a few weeks and we were at the district meet in East St. Louis. For the first time, we were to compete at night under lights. Now, these lights were aimed at the football field, not on the track surrounding the field, so parts of the course were in darkness. As I crossed the start/finish line after my second of four laps in the mile race, suddenly the starter’s gun was fired. That indicated the final lap for the lead runner while I still had two laps to go. As I was on the backstretch, running from dark to light, a man clapped his hands and said, “You can make it, son,” as tears flowed down my cheeks. I finished dead last.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

The next summer, Dad moved the family to Cicero, Illinois to take on a new pastorate. I entered my sophomore year in a school with nearly 5,000 students. Although I lettered in basketball as a freshman in that small high school of 151 students, I was cut quickly after a few tryouts. What to do? The indoor track team had just begun practice, so I thought I’d give that a try. When I showed up for practice, the coach said, “You are new here aren’t you, son? What’s your name, and what is your event?” I replied, “Tommy Allen, and I am a pole vaulter.” He looked at me with that “really?” look but said, “Ok, let’s do some vaulting. Pick up a pole.” I think that my first jump was about three feet, but I was now a pole vaulter! Coach stayed with me and taught me how to vault. During the following two years, I was the varsity vaulter. PERSISTENCE PAYS OFF I went on to vault in college at Ottawa University and later in the Masters Track and Field. I placed third in the 1981, 1985, and 1987 National Masters Indoor Track and Field Championships. The 1987 meet was in Madison, Wisconsin, where my hero and former Olympic Champion Bob Richards also competed. I vaulted 11’6 to Bob’s 11’0! Because of shoulder surgery to repair an arthritic joint, I was unable to pole vault but kept competing as a sprinter. I won the 100 meters at the 2009, 2012, and 2014 Oklahoma Senior Games. True to my motto that, “Regular vigorous physical exercise is the cornerstone of health and a key to longevity,” I run three days a week and lift weights another three days. WHAT IS THIS ALL ABOUT? Well, when I think of all the opportunities that I have had as a teacher, a physician, a U.S. Army surgeon, and an elected government official, through medical leadership, choral conducting, and acting, it was my boyhood attitude that “I can do anything – I am a pole vaulter” that made all the difference. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


The Joy of Team Sports BY ANGELA SMITH As kids, my brothers and sisters and I were always throwing or kicking a ball around, running, climbing trees, riding bikes, and enjoying the outdoors in rural Oklahoma, but I will never forget the day I was introduced to organized team sports at our small school. One day, our school principal walked into our fourth-grade classroom, whispered to our teacher, then asked all the girls to stand up beside our desks. After a quick survey, he asked my friend Sherrill and me to follow him. JOINING THE COMPETITION Our apprehension that we were in trouble quickly subsided when he led us to the basketball gym where the fifth- and sixth-grade girls were practicing. Our principal was also the basketball coach, and he needed two girls to finish out his roster. Sherrill and I were the tallest fourth-grade girls, so we were recruited to join the school team a year ahead of normal. During the next year, we were permitted to join in on the fun and challenge of improving our basketball skills. We were thrilled. Our school made track and field training available to the girls, including traveling to other schools for meets and the countywide competition. We played on the school basketball teams until after our eighth-grade graduation, at which time we dispersed to schools in different communities, most of which did not offer basketball or any sports teams for girls. Those schools that did not offer sports teams for girls did offer sports teams for the boys. That seemed unfair. It reminded me of the feeling I had as a very young girl when my brother signed up for peewee little league baseball, and I assumed I would be playing on the team with him. The confusion and frustration when my parents explained to me that girls are not allowed to play was difficult to reconcile. I remember responding, “But I can catch and throw better than him.” The passage of Title IX occurred during my high school years and was most likely responsible for the organization of a girls’ track and field team at my high school. My focus was on the high jump and hurdles. Being a part of a sports team again was fun, great exercise, and rewarding. In college, I enjoyed playing intramural basketball and touch football at Oklahoma State University. ONE OF THE TEAM As an adult, playing on different women’s and co-ed softball teams was fun. In time, my activities shifted to spending time and getting exercise with my family, which was almost a repeat of my younger years. I love these precious family times. Retirement has also allowed me time to expand. I have rediscovered my love of playing basketball and of competing in track and field events. I have been pleasantly reminded of the wonderful companionship and support of other female athletes, of the common goals of developing skills and developing coordinated team play, and of the mutual desire to maintain our health and improve our fitness.

LIFE PACE Your Resource for Healthy Aging BY ADRIAN ROLLE, INTAKE MANAGER

Some people love it, some people hate it, but regardless of your personal feelings, exercise and physical activity are good for you – period. Exercise and physical activity are considered a cornerstone of almost every healthy aging program. Scientific evidence suggests that people who exercise regularly not only live longer, they live better. And, being physically active – doing everyday activities that keep your body moving, such as gardening, walking the dog, and taking the stairs instead of the elevator – can help you continue to do the things you enjoy and stay independent longer. LIFE PACE is a comprehensive, coordinated senior healthcare program that uses a team approach to provide a variety of services: medical care, prescription drug coverage, skilled therapies (physical, occupational, and speech), behavioral health services, adult day health, nutritional support, nursing, transportation, social workers, recreation, hospitalizations, caregiver training, basic health supplies, and durable medical equipment. PACE participants have access to many resources and activities to keep them active and engaged. Regular physical activity helps seniors manage pain and maintain independence. Physical therapy can help reduce the symptoms of some chronic diseases, keep some problems from getting worse, and reduce the risk of falls. Older adults have unique nutritional needs, often to manage chronic issues such as diabetes, or to reduce the risk of other diseases such as heart disease. PACE participants have access to a registered dietitian who can provide nutritional counseling and determine if additional nutritional support – such as home-delivered meals or supplements – is needed. Adult day health can provide participants with socialization and activities to keep the mind engaged. Studies have shown that people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias who are stimulated during the day will sleep better at night and are less likely to fall while at home. Activities with other seniors can help with depression and help improve quality of life not only for participants but also for their caregivers. The support and services available with LIFE PACE can help seniors be at their best. The holistic approach of PACE gives seniors the resources, tools, and skills to stay active longer, and remain healthy at home.

I currently live in the Tulsa area and play on the Oklahoma Hot Shots, a senior women’s basketball team for ages 60-69. I also practice with the Happy Hoopers senior women’s basketball team. Most of the women will be turning 80 next year, and we practice at LIFE’s Senior Centers. What we senior athletes have lost in agility and stamina from our younger years has been replaced by increased determination and by a fresh appreciation of what is important in our lives – supporting and nurturing our teammates, friends, family members, and ourselves. Whether competing or cheering on other senior athletes, we are energized and inspired by each other. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

If you or someone you care about could benefit from LIFE PACE, contact a LIFE PACE specialist at (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Español).

www.LIFEPACE.org LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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Pickleball Pointers

Wondering why this popular sport has such an odd name? According to the U.S. Pickleball Association, the wife of one of the sport’s inventors was a fan of competitive rowing. A “pickle boat” in rowing is comprised of a thrown-together crew of oarsmen who usually row on other teams. Since pickleball is a combination of several sports, she thought it an appropriate name. Though the family later named one of their dogs Pickles, purists insist the sport was born before the dog.

THE GEAR

To play pickleball, you need a paddle, a ball, a net, and the right footwear. The pickleball is a hollow, perforated plastic ball, larger but lighter than a tennis ball. Different ball models are available for indoor and outdoor play. Tennis shoes generally work, but some indoor courts request that players wear squash or badminton shoes. Paddles are similar to those used in ping pong. They’re made from various materials like wood, polymer, or aluminum, and the face is made from carbon fiber, fiberglass, or graphite.

Members of LIFE's Senior Center at East Side sharpen their skills.

THE PICKLEBALL

EXPLOSION

THE TERMS

• ACE – As in tennis, a point won by a serve that can’t be returned.

Have you been bitten by the pickleball bug? Learn more about this fast-growing sport with the funny name.

• VOLLEY – Hitting the ball before it’s bounced. • DINK – A shot that lands in your opponent’s kitchen or no-volley zone.

Mauldin, also a USA Pickleball Ambassador for the Tulsa area, describes the game as a mixture of ping pong and tennis. “It’s played on a slightly smaller court than tennis using an enlarged ping pong paddle. The movements and gameplay are similar.” MATT MAULDIN

What’s in a name? “My friend kept urging me to check out pickleball, but the name just didn’t sound appealing to me,” said Matt Mauldin, vice president of the Greater Tulsa Pickleball Club. “But as soon as I hit the court, I’ve been hooked ever since.”

THE PICKLEBALL COURT

Pickleball can be played indoors and outdoors on courts that are 20 feet wide and 44 feet long. On either side of the net is a non-volley zone called the “kitchen.” Players are not allowed to volley (hit the ball before it bounces) while standing in the kitchen. The rest of the court is divided into the right and left service areas.

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Invented in the 1960s in the Pacific Northwest as a backyard children’s game, the sport spread to senior centers for its low-impact fun. “Probably three-fourths of the Tulsa pickleball community is 50-plus,” Mauldin said. But its appeal is broadening as is evidenced by avid players like Mauldin, who is 28.

Vice President of the Tulsa Greater Pickleball Club

CENTERLINE

SIDELINE

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

NON-VOLLEY LINE

Pickleball is the fastestgrowing sport in America. Especially popular with the 50-plus age group, the sport is now exploding in all demographics. Pickleball is played at more than 30 Tulsa area recreation centers, so if you are only now hearing about it, keep reading so you can get in on the fun.

• GROUNDSTROKE – A player returning a shot after the ball has bounced. • PICKLED – A team that has scored no points during an entire game. • SHADOWING – Doubles partners moving in tandem, keeping a 10-foot distance between them. • VOLLEY LAMA – An illegal move involving a player hitting a ball in the kitchen.

THE RULES

Pickleball rules are similar to tennis, with a few exceptions. Play begins with an underhand serve, and the ball must bounce once on both sides of the net before either team can volley. Only the serving team can score points. Play continues until a fault is committed, then a team is awarded one point or the service changes. Faults include not returning the ball, hitting the ball out of bounds, or volleying the ball from the kitchen. The game is won when one side reaches 11 points and is ahead by at least two points.

NON-VOLLEY ZONE/KITCHEN

BY STEVE CLEM

RIGHT SERVICE AREA

LEFT SERVICE AREA

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


LIFE EDU

Virtual and In-Person Programming

JANUARY 2022

Silver Linings

A four-person pickleball game resembles doubles tennis. In Tulsa, it is most commonly played in recreation center gyms during open play sessions. “There will be other players and equipment for you to learn. Play is usually free,” Mauldin said. Sandite Dana Boone said she plays pickleball nearly every day somewhere. One of those places is Case Community Center in Sand Springs where Boone, age 60, says she is one of the younger players. “I would say the age range there is from 60 to 84.” Boone and her husband, likewise bitten by the pickleball bug, also play at Chandler Park. “The age group there is younger. Probably 20s and 30s on up,” Boone observed.

Welcome to Silver Linings – LIFE’s weekly video series that reminds us all that attitude is everything – especially when it comes to aging. Check out LIFE’s Facebook page most Wednesdays at facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices for the programs below.

Join the Pickleball Explosion!” “ Wednesday, January 5 Pickleball coach Paul Landis will explain why he’s so passionate about the game that is taking America by storm. He will also tell you about the special “Introduction to Pickleball” classes that will be held at LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster on Wednesday, January 12 for first-time players. (See below under Community Education for class details.)

“ Starting Fresh – How to Set Attainable Goals” Wednesday, January 12

The oddest-named sport since “curling” checks two important boxes – physical activity and social interaction. In terms of exercise, Boone says it is whatever intensity you decide to put into it. “I like it for the community! Getting the exercise and getting to know people at the same time,” Boone said.

Erin Powell, LIFE Senior Services’ behavioral health specialist, will discuss starting fresh in the New Year by setting attainable goals.

The ball being batted around the court resembles the whiffle ball you may have played with as a child. “It’s because the person who invented it was trying to entertain his kids with what he had on hand,” Boone stated. “He grabbed a whiffle ball and ping pong paddles. He had an old basketball court in the backyard and a badminton net.” Creative use of those ingredients, plus years of refinement in rules and equipment, have produced the sport enjoyed today.

Join Roxanne as she gives step-by-step instructions for making a pet treat jar. You will need a Mason jar of any size, brown paint (or whatever color you want your jar to be), black paint for paw prints, and the pet’s name (or you can use Cricut vinyl paw prints instead of paint).

Mauldin says existing tennis courts can be modified for pickleball. “One of my goals is to work with Tulsa area recreation centers to help them repurpose their old outdoor tennis courts,” Mauldin said. If pickleball piques your interest, Mauldin suggests one of their Beginners Nights, held once per month at several locations posted on the Greater Tulsa Pickleball Facebook page. LIFE's Senior Center at Southminster is hosting a free clinic later this month (see below). “The greatest thing about pickleball is that it is for everyone,” Mauldin said.

INTRODUCTION TO PICKLEBALL The best way to learn why pickleball is so popular is to play! LIFE's Senior Center at Southminster is offering a free clinic on Wednesday, January 12 for first-time players. This event is for LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine readers who are not members of LIFE's Senior Centers. LIFE will provide the paddles, balls and coaching. To reserve your spot, call Melodie Powders at (918) 703-9454 or (918) 749-2623.

LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster Wednesday • January 12

8:30 – 10 a.m. • 10:30 a.m. – Noon • 12:30 – 2 p.m. • 2:30 • 4 p.m. 3500 S. Peoria Ave. One block West of Peoria on 35th Place

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Crafting with Roxanne” “ Wednesday, January 19

Ask SeniorLine” “ Wednesday, January 26 SeniorLine Supervisor Chelsea Edwards will talk about brain and physical health and how to better care for yourself in the New Year.

Community Education The following in-person programming will be offered this month at LIFE Senior Services locations.

Introduction to Pickleball” “ Wednesday, January 12 LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster Learn basic pickleball skills at a free clinic hosted by LIFE's Senior Center at Southminster. Two-hour classes begin Wednesday at 10 a.m. and run through 4 p.m. Paddles and balls will be provided. This class is specifically for Vintage readers who are first-time players and who are not members of LIFE’s Senior Centers. To reserve your spot, call Melodie Powders at (918) 703-9454 or (918) 749-2623.

Basics of Medicare” “ Wednesday, January 19, 10 a.m. – Noon Legacy Plaza East Conference Center 5330 E. 31st St. LIFE’s Basics of Medicare class is designed for people who are newly eligible or soon-to-be eligible for Medicare. Reservations are required and can be made by calling LIFE’s Medicare Assistance Program at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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Smart Fitness at Home

BY JULIE WENGER WATSON

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NEW YEAR, NEW YOU! GET INTO SHAPE WITH THESE SIX PIECES OF HOME WORKOUT EQUIPMENT.

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PELOTON BIKE onepeloton.com

RESISTANCE BANDS amazon.com

Affordable and versatile, elastic resistance bands are a practical tool for at-home and travel workouts, useful for building strength, mobility, and stability. Bands are portable and come in a range of sizes and tension levels, so they work for all levels of athletic ability. YouTube is full of videos with workout examples and programs. Available on Amazon for $15.

Peloton's stationary exercise bikes come with an attached touchscreen to stream thousands of video workout sessions. Social features include the ability to virtually ride with friends, “high five” other members, and leaderboards with achievement badges. A Peloton Bike is a good fit for those who enjoy competition and indoor cycling classes. However, with a current base price of $1,495 for the bike and a monthly subscription fee of $39 for the classes (cycling, yoga, Pilates, and more), it isn’t cheap. SIMILAR OPTIONS: Diamondback 1260sc; diamondbackfitness. com; Bowflex C6 bowflex.com; SoulCycle At-Home Bike soul-cycle.com; Echelon Connect EX-5 echelonfit.com; NordicTrack S22i nordictrack.com. Prices range from $1,000 to $1,500.

2 MIRROR HOME GYM mirror.co

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TRX ALL-IN-ONE SUSPENSION TRAINING SYSTEM trxtraining.com DIAMONDBACK 1260SC

BOWFLEX C6

SOULCYCLE AT-HOME BIKE

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Mirror Home Gym is an LCD screen that functions as an actual mirror when not in use. Flip a switch at the bottom of the unit, and that mirror becomes a screen, ready to stream more than 50 different types of workouts (Pilates, kickboxing, strength training, etc.), with a mix of live and prerecorded classes. Mirror is sleek, and unlike other large pieces of home gym equipment, doubles as décor. It’s also an investment with a $1,895 initial purchase price and a $39-month subscription fee (delivery and installation will run you an additional $250).

6 JUMP ROPE amazon.com

HYDROW CONNECTED ROWER

3 ROWING MACHINES hydrow.com enchantfit.com

Ranging in price from hundreds to thousands of dollars, a home rowing machine can be a powerful fitness tool, providing a total body workout that is low-impact/joint-friendly. At the high-end, check out the Hydrow Connected Rower ($2,295 plus $456 for a 12-month, all-access membership to stream classes) at hydrow.com. For the basics, consider the ECHANFIT Foldable Indoor Rower ($288).

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

Compact and lightweight, suspension training systems like TRX use a series of straps and handles to allow you to perform a full-body resistance workout without the need for weights. The trainer uses gravity and your body weight to provide resistance during exercises, which can include lunges, squats, pullups, pushups, and planks. TRX sells for around $200 (cheaper alternatives exist), and examples of suspension workout routines are easy to find with a quick Internet search. Visit trxtraining.com.

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ENCHANTFIT FOLDABLE INDOOR ROWER

This elementary gym class staple is also an excellent home workout. Jumping rope regularly improves your coordination, agility, and balance. It also helps build bone density, which protects against osteoporosis, fractures, and bone loss. Options abound, but jump ropes are generally inexpensive (under $20). When working out, you’ll need a space that’s approximately 10-feet front-toback, 5-feet side-to-side, with a ceiling height that is about 3-feet taller than you are to exercise comfortably. To protect your floors and your joints, consider purchasing an exercise mat, too.

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LIFE LESSONS COACH BILL BLANKENSHIP Written By Paula Brown, Assistant Editor Photo By Beth Hawkins

Bill Blankenship was inducted into the Oklahoma Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2009. Blankenship served as starting quarterback at the University of Tulsa during his college career, then was head coach of TU’s Golden Hurricane program from 2011 to 2014. He coached Tulsa’s Union High School football team to a 154-26 overall record and currently has his “dream job” leading the Owasso Rams football program.

What are some of the most important lessons your life experiences have taught you? Perseverance, not quitting, is the number one thing I would say, the most important. Even in the face of adversity and life struggles, you’ve got to keep going. When I had what seemed like an endless series of game losses at the beginning of my career, I wondered if I would ever have a win. I could have quit then. But I persevered, and am so glad I did.

Tough Times

When I was fired at the University of Tulsa, my alma mater, it was painful. I was angry at first – bitter – and couldn’t believe it was happening. I learned, it’s human nature to be ticked off or upset, angry even. But don’t wallow in it. Just keep going, and don’t let bitterness take root. All the things that have transpired in my life have led me to my dream job as head coach of the Owasso football team. The secret is to keep going, no matter what. Now I look back, and I wouldn’t trade that pain for anything.

Gratitude in Action

Find gratitude and joy to replace bitterness. Constantly make a list of thankful things. I truly believe happiness is gratitude. Giving thanks is a continual process in life and begins as an act, not an emotion. My wife, Angie, helps keep me stay on track, reminding me to count my blessings.

"I truly believe happiness is gratitude. Giving thanks is a continual process in life and begins as an act, not an emotion." – Coach Bill Blankenship

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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“Resistance exercise like weight training is good for seniors because it builds strong bones and maintains muscle strength.”

DR. JACLYN JONES Orthopedic Surgeon, Utica Park Clinic

Preventing Sports Injuries After 50 Two medical professionals explain the best ways to play it safe while working out in our 50s, 60s, and beyond. BY KAREN SZABO As we ring in the New Year, you might be thinking about getting back into a fitness regimen. If so, you’re not alone. The most common resolution for U.S. adults last January was a close 50/50 split between working out more at 50% and losing weight at 48%. Exercise is important at any age, but perhaps more so after 50. Research shows that exercise can help prevent Alzheimer's, protect against stroke, increase life expectancy, and help avoid injuries from falls. But before you head to the gym or running track, it’s important to remember that as we age, our bodies start to change. Our joints may begin to tighten up, click, crack, or hurt in places that never bothered us in the past. Tendons, muscles, and reaction times change. We just don't bounce back from injury as quickly.

STRAINS AND PAINS

“Most seniors actually get overuse sports injuries rather than traumatic injuries,” said Jaclyn Jones, D.O., an orthopedic surgeon with Utica Park Clinic. “Things like shoulder impingement and bursitis, rotator cuff tendinitis, and tennis elbow are among the most common. I will also see knee arthritis (as an overuse injury) and hip bursitis.”

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tightness in the hips and shoulders and maintain good core strength with a focus on abdominal stabilization and back muscles.” Our bodies may change with age, but we don't need to trade the gym for the bridge table. We just need to be smarter about exercise so we can reap its health benefits. “Work on balance activities as they improve core strength, safety, and prevent injury."

JAMIE MCCANN

Physical Therapist Bailey Medical Center Jamie McCann, a physical therapist at Bailey Medical Center, also sees seniors with shoulder impingement, rotator cuff sprains, strains and tears, and knee injuries, as well as low back pain typically from muscle strains from lifting or twisting injuries. “You can avoid these injuries if you focus on maintaining proper muscle balance and flexibility through regular daily stretching and/or yoga or Pilates,” she said. “Especially focus on preventing

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

EASE INTO IT

It's good to be fired up about working out, but one sure way to hurt yourself is to do too much, too soon. “Start slow and progress gradually,” McCann said. “Work on balance activities as they improve core strength, safety, and prevent injury.” Your core includes all the muscles between the shoulders and pelvis, a sort of muscular corset that stabilizes the body and spine, acting as a functional center around which all other muscles in your body pivot. Without a sturdy core, serving a tennis ball or even walking can strain outlying muscles. To build core strength, try the plank – a simple exercise that resembles a pushup – in which your forearms rest on the floor. Hold your core steady for 30 seconds, rest and repeat. Another great exercise to prevent injury and maintain leg and lower-back strength, especially as

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


we get older, is the squat. Stand with your feet shoulder-distance apart and squat, back straight, until your thighs are almost parallel to the ground; rise slowly. Repeat up to 20 times. You can improve your balance by “playing flamingo.” Stand on one leg a few times a day for 20 seconds; then switch legs. This can help prevent trips and sprained ankles.

DON’T SKIP THE WARMUP

“The best way to avoid injuries is by warming up and stretching,” Dr. Jones said. A warmup is important for avoiding injury, especially as we age when our soft tissue becomes less elastic. Warming up increases blood flow to our muscles, improves tissue elasticity, and stimulates the nervous system. For example, if you're going to jog, start by walking. Playing tennis? Jog around the court a few times, then add eight to 10 jumping jacks. The goal is to literally raise the temperature of the muscles before you stress them. Stretching after your warmup or at the end of your session helps reduce the buildup of lactic acid in muscle tissue. Lactic acid contributes to lingering soreness and aches. “Also have a variety of activities, as opposed to just one sport or exercise,” Dr. Jones added. “Someone who plays tennis all the time will likely get shoulder and elbow injuries, but if they spend a day or two doing yoga, swimming, or walking, then they will use other muscle groups and not overuse the same ones all the time.”

VARY YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE

Even if your regular fitness routine is primarily cardio-based, like cycling or walking, you shouldn't skip resistance training. “Resistance exercise like weight training is good for seniors because it builds strong bones and maintains muscle strength,” Dr. Jones said. After age 50, you begin to lose muscle mass. Strong muscles will absorb impact and recover repeatedly. If you don't have enough strength, your joints will take the pounding and not recover as well. You should aim for two to three sessions of strength training a week.

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According to McCann, the safest sports for seniors in terms of avoiding injuries are golf, tennis, swimming, walking, yoga, Pilates, tai chi, cycling, kayaking or rowing, and hiking. Whereas high-impact activities like running, skiing, or competing in contact sports will be the most detrimental or likely to cause a traumatic injury.

TAKE TIME OFF

It may be a tough pill to swallow, but we do not recover as quickly after age 40 or 50 as when we're 20 or 30. Many of us continue working out through soreness and pain. But if something hurts, experts say to back off from training. As we get older, days off are more important. Take at least one day off every week or, at most, go for a gentle walk. If you're still fatigued or achy the next day, take another day off. “When you get an injury, you should first stop the activity you’re doing and rest,” Dr. Jones explained. “If you can do activities of daily living, you can take over-the-counter medications like Tylenol or Motrin if allowed by your medical conditions and give it a week. Icing is good for acute injuries as well. If they do not improve, then you should seek evaluation by a physician. Sometimes something as easy as a steroid shot will get you back in action.” McCann recommends seeing a physical therapist, as well. “We can help identify what is causing your limitation or injury and help you properly stretch tight muscles and strengthen weak ones,” she said. “We can recommend braces, taping, footwear, etc. to help you recover quickly and return to sports. We can also educate you on anatomy and structures and help prevent a future injury.” It’s important to remember that life isn’t a sprint, it’s a long race. It’s OK to take it easy sometimes so you can keep going.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

WORD SEARCH: OLYMPICS Find and circle all of the words.

Arena Athlete Beijing Bidding Board Bronze

Budget Career Ceremony Closing Committee Compete

Country Curling Development Dream Fencing Flag

Flame Funding Games Goal Gold History

Hockey Injury Inspire Judge Location Loss

Medalist Muscles Museum Olympics Opening Panel

Paralympics Podium Preparation Qualify Rings Silver

Skating Skiing Snowboarding Sport Stadium Stars

Summer Swimming Torch Training Winner Winter

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STOP THE HEARING AID MADNESS! Why would you trust a big box chain store or a website with people who don’t care if you hear or not? Where is the service after the sale? This is your health we’re talking about! When you come to Armstrong Hearing, you will see the owner. We truly care about your hearing and not “Will your check clear?” Stop wasting your money! We are not motivated to sell the most expensive hearing aids. We care about you having the correct technology for your hearing loss, lifestyle and budget.

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Call (918) 492-6087 6038 S. Yale Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74135 www.armstronghearing.com

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Why would you go anywhere else except a professional who has over 30 years of personal experience selecting and fitting hearing aids for individual needs?

If you want the BEST for your hearing health care, please call us now!

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PUZZLE PARTNERS

COMMONYM A commonym is a group of words that have a common trait in the three words/items listed. For example: the words; A car - A tree – An elephant – they all have trunks. Answers on page 39. A Bull - A Car - A Shoe Salesman _________________________________________________ A Courtroom - A Dugout - A Park _________________________________________________ A Football Team - A Phone - A Stereo _________________________________________________ Yellow - Black - Baltic _________________________________________________ Dark - White - Milk _________________________________________________ Steak - Spaghetti - Tartar _________________________________________________ A Bobbin - A Spider Web - A Screw _________________________________________________ Tow - Row - Show _________________________________________________ Rally - Stock - Drag _________________________________________________ Families - Trees - Hair _________________________________________________ © 2013 Wuzzles & Puzzles

BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 39.

PAR 2

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Recommended Reads

Bunkering With Books THREE BOOKS, THREE GENRES, TWO COUNTRIES BY CONNIE CRONLEY These three books from England and Ireland could not be more different from one another, but each is worthwhile. One is a mystery; one is nonfiction, and the third is a novel. The diversity in style and subject is yet another reason to love the English language. THE MAN WHO DIED TWICE “The Man Who Died Twice,” only the second book by Richard Osman, appeared recently as an instant New York Times bestseller and is scheduled to be a movie by Stephen Spielberg. That is a testimony to the popularity of the first book, “The Thursday Murder Club,” the joyous adventures of Elizabeth, Joyce, Ron and Ibrahim, residents of a posh retirement club. Here’s how the new book opens: “I was talking to a woman in Ruskin Court, and she said she’s on a diet,’ says Joyce, finishing her glass of wine. “She’s eighty-two!” “Walkers make you look fat,” says Ron. “It’s the thin legs.” “Why diet at eight-two,” says Joyce. “What’s a sausage roll going to do to you? Kill you? Well, join the queue.” “The Thursday Murder Club has concluded its latest meeting. This week they have been looking at the cold case of...” This series – and oh, let it be long and many – makes me so happy. The writing is witty, the dialogue sharp, and the mysteries light. And yet,

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Osman slips in some thoughtful wisdom about life and people.

the British tried to suppress it with coercive measures.

THE IRISH ASSASSINS “The Irish Assassins” by Julie Kavanagh is a serious, well-researched true crime story that explains the back story of The Troubles better than any history I have read. The book opens with a brief history (from 1170) of the age-old hostilities between the Irish and the English. In 1580, the poet Edmund Spenser described a war of extermination of the Irish by the English – massacres and starvation resulting from the destruction of crops and cattle by Queen Elizabeth’s troops.

But this is just the opening; the real book now begins and details the book’s subtitle, “Conspiracy, Revenge, and the Phoenix Park Murders that Stunned Victorian England.” The cast of characters – Irish and English – and the assassination of two English officials in a Dublin park, and what happened afterward is so complex I got lost. In summary, it upset a peace agreement being hammered out in back rooms by Prime Minister William Gladstone and Irish Party Leader Charles Stuart Parnell. And the violence continued into The Troubles of our time.

In the 1600s, the Irish retaliated and Cromwell responded with what the author calls “a massive campaign of ethnic cleansing.” Then came the Great Famine of 1845: a fungus that killed the potato fields, the inhumane British response, and the loss of two million Irish citizens by death or emigration. Irish nationalists have said ever since, “The Almighty, indeed, sent the potato blight, but the English created the famine.” Anglo-Irish landlords turned tenant families out, burned their huts, and left the peasants to starve in the roads and fields.

THIS IS HAPPINESS What a relief to escape history and sink into the nostalgic novel “This Is Happiness” by acclaimed Irish writer Niall Williams. Set in the 1950s, here is a County Clare village in a romanticized Ireland that probably never was. The people are eccentric and time stands still. Suddenly, everything is changing. The rain has stopped! Electricity is coming! Twin romances arrive for 17-year-old Noel Crowe and an older man named Christy who shows up to make amends to the woman he wronged 50 years ago and still loves.

By the 1880s, rural Ireland (especially the west) again was threatened by starvation and eviction, but they adopted a we-shall-never-forget resistance and thus began the Land War of 187982, funded in large part by American donors. The Irish vowed to destroy the landlord system;

Every page is written in prose painted with Irish poetry. No wonder one critic called the book “a delightful rural rhapsody.” Sink into a plush, comfortable chair and luxuriate in this lush Irish novel.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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To submit a Noteworthy event, contact Paula Brown at pbrown@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1207.

Route 66 Bridge Club

Calling All Writers Join fellow writers at a free workshop on memoir writing by author Nikki Hanna at LIFE’s Senior Center at Southminster. Hanna is a humorist, author, speaker, and writing coach who will share her experiences and give practical insight into the writing field. Hanna is the author of “Red Heels and Smokin'," "Capture Life – Write a Memoir,” and “Write Whatever the Hell You Want.” “Don’t tell people, ‘You can be anything you want to,’” she said. “Tell them, ‘Discover what you were born to do and do that.’” The workshop kicks off with pastries and coffee Tuesday, January 25 at 9 a.m. at Southminster Presbyterian Church, 3500 S. Peoria Ave. Stay for a lunch of loaded pasta salad, garlic bread, and dessert before attending the second half of the workshop which ends at 4 p.m. It’s a great way to learn more about memoir writing, ask questions, and plug into LIFE’s writing and storytelling groups that meet weekly at both senior center locations. “It takes courage to stare at a blank sheet of paper, look inside yourself and not blink,” said Steve Bigelow, member of the writing group at Southminster. “You also have to be able to make room in your life for a few more friends.”

Creative writing and storytelling classes meet at: LIFE's Senior Center at Southminster Tuesdays at 10 a.m 3500 S. Peoria Ave. • Tulsa LIFE’s Senior Center at East Side Thursdays at 11 a.m. 1427 S. Indianapolis Ave. • Tulsa

OSU/OLLI – Where Learning Never Retires OSU’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) program offers educational courses and travel opportunities for ages 50+ in Tulsa, Stillwater, Oklahoma City, Bartlesville, and online. OLLI is a member-driven, non-credit education program for those who want to enrich their lives and expand their knowledge. Become a member at the premium level of $200, which includes everything OLLI offers below, or purchase an “a la carte membership" for $40 that allows you to pick and choose courses for just $25 each. The membership runs from July 1 to June 30 and includes fall, spring, and summer sessions. Membership dues are paid annually and entitle you to participate in courses as well as the social, travel, and special events, voting, elected committees, and course evaluations. Membership does not include textbooks, supplies, meals, or other fees. Course offerings include "The Life & Impact of Will Rogers," "Searching the U.S. Census for Genealogy, History & Fun," "Let's Play Canasta," and "Cons, Frauds & Scams." If you are already a member, the spring session will be from February 14 to April 8. Registration will be available on OSU’s website, beginning January 3, 2022. Email olli.okstate. edu or call with questions at (405) 744-5868.

Learn to Play EasyBridge! The Route 66 Bridge Club is a nonprofit that began in the fall of 2019 to maintain a place for lovers of duplicate bridge to play in Tulsa. Playing bridge has been shown to increase memory and mental acuity in a very challenging and enjoyable way. If your bridge skills are rusty or you’ve never played, the club is pleased to announce the start of a new Easybridge! class session starting in February 2022. There will be free snacks and lots of fun as new class members learn how to play the challenging and brain-enhancing game of bridge. The Route 66 Bridge Club is located at 6205 E. 61st St. in Tulsa. The class runs for 15 weeks, but the first four lessons are free. The remaining 11 lessons will cost $8 per week or one pre-paid ticket, which will save $1 per game. For more information, contact Carol Gammell at (918) 232-0666 and visit route66bridgeclub.org. Easybridge! • Classes start Saturday, February 5, 2022 • Continue Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. weekly for 15 weeks • 6205 E. 61st St., Tulsa

For more information, call (918) 664-9000.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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SHARE YOUR TIME & TALENT To submit a volunteer opportunity, contact Paula Brown at pbrown@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1207.

The greatest good you can do for another is not just to share your riches but to reveal to him his own. – Benjamin Disraeli

Discovery Lab

Tulsa’s new Discovery Lab is an interactive museum and learning center for children located next to the Gathering Place. Its mission is to inspire children, connect families, and build community through exploration and play. Discovery Lab will open to the public this month and have several volunteer opportunities available. There’s a need for docents and volunteers to help with visitor activities in the workshop, labs, and other exhibits. Most shifts are for two hours. Don’t wait too late to sign up! To learn more, contact Roslyn Patrick at (918)-295-8144 or rpatrick@discoverylab.org. You can also visit their website at discoverylab.org and sign up by clicking the “Support” tab then “Volunteer.”

Modus Modus has been helping individuals and their families get to medical and social service appointments consistently and on time since 2017. As of October 2021, Modus has provided more than 10,000 rides to clients in the Tulsa area. Rides take place anytime Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. One ride typically only takes 15-30 minutes. Volunteers can work a flexible schedule, and Modus offers mileage reimbursement. Volunteer drivers must meet several requirements, including a background check. For more information, apply online at www.modustulsa.org/apply or call (918) 280-9563 for more information.

Oklahoma Aquarium

Ready to make an aquatic impact? The Oklahoma Aquarium’s dedicated volunteers are an integral and valued part of the team. Volunteer positions currently available include aqua agents (guest facilitators who provide information and help guests), divers, and docents. There are many volunteer benefits, including guest passes for hours of service, special recognition and volunteer appreciation events, discounts in the gift shop and café, and many more. The Oklahoma Aquarium is located at 300 Aquarium Drive in Jenks. Visit their website at okaquarium.org/198/volunteer, call (918) 296-3474, or email Chris Ray, volunteer coordinator, at cray@okaquarium.org.

Dress for Success Dress for Success helps empower women on their path to independence by providing a network of support, professional attire, and development tools. The organization’s ultimate goal is to help women thrive in work and in life. Since its opening, Dress for Success Tulsa has helped more than 16,000 women make transitions to thriving lives of self-sufficiency. Volunteers are needed in several diverse roles, including help with events, data entry, assisting with donated clothing, reviewing resumes, helping clients coordinate outfits, and conducting mock interviews. For information, email info@tulsadressforsuccess.org, call (918) 599-8892 or visit tulsa.dressforsuccess.org/get-involved/volunteer.

For more information about these volunteer opportunities, call LIFE's Volunteer program at (918) 664-9000.

Give 5 is an innovative, free, civic-engagement program designed for Tulsa residents who are either retired or about to retire. Don’t miss out on our 2022 classes now! Contact Heidi Braver at hbraver@LIFEseniorservices.org.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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WHO’S the Lamb

NOW? BY JOYCE HANEWINKLE

Mounds resident Joyce Hanewinkle won the humor category of the 2021 Writers’ Symposium writing contest sponsored by LIFE’s Senior Centers and the Oklahoma Arts Council. Joyce describes a shipboard shooting contest where one competitor turns the tables on the other. Her tongue-in-cheek character descriptions and creative use of similes add to the fun. Enjoy the second of four prize-winning essays written by LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine readers.

2021 Writers’ Symposium Contest Winners DRAWING FROM MEMORY James Laughlin HUMOR Joyce Hanewinkel NON-FICTION Mary O’Toole COOKING CULTURE Gayle Campbell

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I squint as the sun creeps around every edge of my sunglasses, but I don’t even care because there is a coconut in my hand filled with an elixir of the islands and a little umbrella. I’m on a cruise to the Bahamas where I will spend five glorious fun-filled days! I’m sporting my short shorts, a tank top, tennis shoes, and very long, very permed hair; after all, it is the early 90s. Evidently, I don’t look too intimidating. I am in my very happy place; what more could a girl ask for? And then I hear it, “There will be skeet shooting off the stern of the ship, all interested parties take the stairs to the lower deck.” Now we’re talking! I loved shooting my M-16 while in the Army, but I’ve never fired a shotgun! I’m quick to hop in line, my competitive spirit zinging through me like the little steel ball in a pinball machine. It doesn’t go unnoticed by me that the fella in line ahead of me is in quite good shape and even somewhat handsome and yes, perhaps just a tad bit cocky. We were given free drink tickets when we boarded, and mine are safely in my pocket.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

Mr. Smug-and-Cocky sizes me up before making his offer, “Would you like to make a little wager? A drink to whoever hits the most birds?”

We get two birds, and I quickly figure out that I need to lead the bird with the shotgun, fire with my site just in front to make up for the trajectory of the bird.

Well, this is a no-brainer; I’ve got free drink tickets, so it’s not going to cost me a thing even if I lose so I respond with a perky, “Sure!”

“Remember your training,” I coach myself as the second bird is released, “aim, exhale, hold your breath and squeeze that trigger!”

He gleefully nudges his buddy; it’s written all over him – he’s leading the lamb to the slaughter.

In an instant, orange shrapnel from that clay pigeon is flying against the backdrop of a clear blue sky and bouncing off the ocean like skipping rocks at a pond. There is a resounding “yes!” and an ensuing fist pump as I do my happy dance.

The line inches forward like a Chinese dragon in a parade and as we are about to descend the ladder, he turns to look at me but he can’t quite make eye contact. He looks at his feet and begins his confession, “I guess I should have told you – I’m a cop.” I smile politely, somewhat demurely even. “It’s OK,” I tell him. He’s all about being a gentleman now. “Go ahead, you can shoot first,” he says. I put on the earmuffs; I tell the deckhand I’ve never fired a shotgun before so he gives me a quick lesson. The first bird is released, I track it, exhale, hold my breath, squeeze the trigger, and – I miss.

I nod to my competitor on my way to the viewing area. He smiles at me a little condescendingly; this isn’t over, and his confidence is apparent. He shoulders the shotgun, the bird is released, he takes aim, fires, and – he misses. Another bird is released and again he takes aim, fires, and – it’s a miss! I don’t do my happy dance; I want to, but I don’t. He walks over to me and slams the drink ticket into my hand and as he starts to turn away, I touch his arm. “I’m sorry, I guess I should have told you – I was a soldier.”

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CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

BIBLE STUDY

Weekly Bible Reading Session Join us in reading, explaining and discussing the Bible on Tuesday nights 7:00 p.m. CST and 8:00 p.m. EST. Questions are always welcome. Perfect for those who cannot get out of the house. Call (918) 872-1400.

BOOKS

Grandma From Brooklyn Stories Enjoy this lovely book of humorous, true and inspiring heartfelt stories. A perfect gift to send to your dear ones at holiday time or anytime. Come along with Grandma from Brooklyn and share some smiles. Available as a paperback or on Kindle. Visit GFB's website: www.grandmafrombrooklyn.com

CARPET CLEANING ALL PRO Carpet Cleaning Senior and caregiver discounts. Carpet, furniture, rug cleaning. Pet odor removed and Teflon protectant available. Emergency water extraction. Residential and commercial services. Professional truck mount steam cleaning. Carpet repairs and restretching. Prompt, professional, quality service at a fair price. Certified, insured. Veteran owned and operated. Call Thomas Fink, owner/ technician, for free estimate (918) 636-6303.

CEMETERY LOTS

3 Memorial Park Burial Spaces 3 spaces in Memorial Park, spaces 1, 2 and 3, lot 85 section 35. According to Memorial Park the spaces in this section sell for $2800 each. I will sell these 3 spaces for $1,500 each and I will not separate. Buyer pays for transfer fee. Call (918) 406-3840. Adjoining Plots in Memorial Park Prime location. Priced to sell. Section 12, Lot 185, Spaces 3 & 4 for $3,000. Call Pris (918) 446-0318. Lot in Tulsa Memorial Park Tulsa Memorial Park Cemetery plot for sale. Space 6, lot 67, in section 36. Asking $1,000. Call (949) 969-4564. If you receive a busy signal from your land line, please use your cell phone to call.

CLEANING

Window Cleaning & Housecleaning Window Cleaning. House Cleaning. Home, Apartment – move in or move out. Deep Cleaning. Organization. Light Fixtures and Mirrors. Experienced and Reasonable. Call (918) 404-2575.

DAYTIME CARE Daytime Care For Older Loved Ones LIFE’s Adult Day Health offers convenient, affordable daytime care at three locations in Tulsa and Broken Arrow. For more information, call LIFE’s Adult Day Health at (918) 664-9000.

ESTATE SALES

2MS Estate Sales...Tulsa’s Finest! Downsizing? Estate Liquidation? Let us take the worry away and Maximize your return. No out of pocket expense. We specialize in senior transitions, with over 20 years in the senior housing market. My team includes realtors, moving company, senior housing and attorneys if needed. Please contact Michelle Reed (918) 691-5893 or Atulsa@aol.com also Facebook 2MSestatesalestulsa for a Free consultation.

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE Final Expense Life Insurance Are you overpaying for burial insurance? We are Tulsa Life Insurance Brokers with access to several premium national Insurance companies. We will find you the best coverage at the lowest cost. A+ BBB rating! Call for your free consultation. Mike Corey, North American Senior Benefits, (918) 516-5173. Medicare Assistance Program The Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services provides accurate information, counseling and assistance relating to Medicare benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives and persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call MAP at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000 or toll-free at (866) 664-9009. Need A New Medicare Plan? The Medicare Supplement Store at Promenade Mall is your “One-Stop-Shop” for Medicare Supplements, Advantage Plans, & Drug Plans. We can give you a quote from top-rated carriers like: Aetna, Blue Cross, Humana, GlobalHealth, UnitedHealthCare, Mutual of Omaha and others. For information, call Bob Archer today (918) 814-5550. True Freedom Home Care Plans These plans cover assistance with meal prep, bathing, laundry, grocery shopping, medication reminders and more in the privacy and comfort of your own home. No medical underwriting, no claim

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forms, no deductible, and no age limits. Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze plans available nationwide. Call or text Cindy Johnson at (918) 619-5919 to request a mailed copy of the plan brochureor appointment.

FOR SALE

Stamp Collection Unique US stamp collection. 1945-1982. 20 plus binders of blocks of new stamps. First day covers commemorative issues. Some binders approximately $50 in stamp value alone. Outstanding when reviewed by a Tulsa stamp collector president. If interested, please call (918) 527-3528. Fostoria Crystal Hand-etched chintz crystal. Over 150 pieces. Goblets, wine glasses, sherbets, plates, cups, saucers, torte plates, relish dishes, serving dishes, fruit bowls, cake plates, nappys, salt and peppers, double candlesticks, ice bucket plus more! Approximate 1945 retail cost $4200. Make an offer. No individual sales. (918) 663-3528.

GARDENING/LAWN CARE AAA Lawns & More Total lawn care. Lawn Mowing. Snow removal. Leaf Removal. Gutter clean-up. Specialist in fence/property line lawn cleanup. Stump grinding and small tree work. Dedicated to making your lawn look its best. Insured, honest, experienced and dependable. Veteran-owned. We are a small company with personal service. References available. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Larry. (918) 361-1299. Green Hibiscus Lawn & Garden Services Scheduled garden maintenance (weeding, planting, mulching). Garden bed design and installation. Hedge & shrub trimming. Tree pruning & removal. Leaf clean up. Hauling green debris. Call Charles (918) 636-0298. Kimble Davis Tree Company Family-owned and operated. Specializing in all aspects of tree care: restoration, pruning/ thinning, removal, stump grinding, hedge trimming, firewood available. Serving Tulsa for 25 years. References. Member BBB. Insured. ISA certified arborist. Check us out at www.kdtreeco.com. Call Kimble at (918) 853-5383. Mower Repair / Maintenance All brands – Riders, ZTR's, Walk-behinds, UTV’s / ATV’s. Top Quality work, ASE certified Mechanic. Pick-up and Delivery

available. Tulsa and surrounding counties. Maintenance specials include pick-up and delivery 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call Scott (918) 519-3869. New Season Lawn & Tree LLC Now accepting new customers. Fall clean-up available. Mowing, trimming, leaf and debris removal, fence line trim/cleanup, leaf mulching, flower beds. Tree pruning/thinning and removal. Shrub and hedge trimming/ shaping of all sizes. Pressure Washing driveway, decks, siding. ISA Certified Arborist. Fully insured with verified references. Best rates, senior discounts. Free Estimates. Call Todd (918) 639-2262. www.newseasonlawnandtree.com. New Season Tree Masters Specializing in tree removal and stump grinding. Tree trimming service available. Certified arborist on staff. Serving all of metro Tulsa with over 20 years’ experience. Fully insured. BBB accredited. Free estimates. Contact us at info@newseasontreemasters.com or call Todd at (918) 934-4868. www.newseasontreemasters.com.

HOME REPAIR/REMODELING A Handy Helping Hand Professional home maintenance, painting, and improvements. Whether you’re making overdue repairs, sprucing up your home and garden, or optimizing your home’s “sale-ability” potential, call Joe Surowiak with A Handy Helping Hand. Professional results. Competitive rates. (918) 520-0333. Allen’s Handyman Services of Tulsa “Your Home Improvement and Repair Specialist.” 22 years serving Tulsa seniors. “One call can do it all.” 10% senior discount. Insured. All work guaranteed in writing. No pay until job is completed. Plumbing, drain cleaning, grab bars, electrical, carpentry, painting, seamless guttering installation/repair/cleaning. Dryer vent cleaning. Roof, tile and drywall repair. Wood siding/ trim replacement. Deck repair, power washing, staining. Tree trimming. No job too small. For free estimate, call Allen at (918) 630-0394. Big C’s Plumbing Services Your one stop Plumbing Shop! Call us and I guarantee you will never have to call another plumbing company. Licensed, bonded and insured for your protection....Call (918) 855-9216, tell us you saw

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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CLASSIFIEDS us in the Vintage Newsmagazine receive an automatic 10% discount....call us now. Bumgartner Plumbing Licensed, with over 30 years of experience. Rates are low and based on the job, not the hour. No service call fee or travel time charge. Senior and caregiver discount. Plumbing service and repair our specialty. Honest, professional service you can count on. Lic. # 82750. (918) 355-4747. Burton Painting Specializing in all aspects of exterior and interior home painting. Staining, sealing, and painting faux finishes. Decks, fences, cabinets and floors. Free estimates. 30+ years of experience. Reliable, courteous, professional service. Fully insured. (918) 378-2858. Dave’s Heat and Air, Inc. Licensed, insured, and bonded. Honest and reliable service for over 30 years. Competitive rates. Specializing in heating and air conditioning service and repair. All makes and models. Residential and light commercial. Tulsa metro area. Family-owned and operated. (918) 437-8101. Doc J’s Heat and Air LLC Avoid costly repairs and breakdowns and save on service, repairs and replacements with our yearly maintenance plan. Mention this ad and get $25 off our Fall Furnace tune-up service. Financing, free estimates and senior discounts. Call Doc J today (918) 921-4240, docj@docjsheatandair.com. Handyman & Construction Services 30 Years Experience! All Handicap Accessories – grab bars, handicap access abilities; Framing, Drywall, Tape & Bed; Texture & Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Tile, Laminate & Wood Floors. Free Estimates, Competitive Rates, Professional Service. Call Craig (918) 892-4168. Same Day Services Light Hauling /Light Moving – help you rearrange room furniture, lawns-grass mowing/ small paint jobs/cleanup/ fence repair/light construction/sheet rock tile repair – We are honest dependable. References. Call (918) 313-5230. Scrap Metal Haul Off Free haul off/pick up of appliances such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioners, hot water tanks and any scrap metal. Call John at (918) 313-4405.

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LEGAL Full Service Estate Planning Law Firm Trusts, Wills, Gift and Tax Planning, Powers of Attorneys and more! With offices in Sand Springs and Tulsa. Discount to Veterans and Retired Teachers. Willing to meet you in your place for no extra charge! Call Penni of the Skillern Law Firm at (918) 805-2511. www.skillernlaw.com Need Legal Help? Call Me First. Ramona Jones, Attorney at Law. Why travel when we can do a video conference? Wills, trusts, deeds, advance directives, powers of attorney, probate, divorces, civil, DUI, criminal, guardianships, adoptions and more. Also paperwork for limited scope representation. Credit cards accepted. (918) 585-2255. Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy. Whether you are planning your estate or need help with a loved one who may be financially exploited, South Tulsa Law will represent you effectively and compassionately. We work in all areas of estate planning and probate, trusts and trust litigation, guardianship, and elder exploitation. Call (918) 512-1800 or visit www.southtulsalaw.com.

MOVERS

Tulsa Movers Dependable Movers! Low Rates. Free Estimates. Senior Discounts. Call (918) 836-3225.

OIL AND GAS

Mineral, Oil/Gas Interests Want to purchase minerals and oil/gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO, 80201

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE Bobbi and Bob’s Personal & Business Assistance Personally assist in driving to beauty shop, medical appointments, and other destinations; provide accounting, secretarial, and specialized administrative assistance; help with business-related matters; serve as liaison with physicians/ healthcare personnel; resolve Medicare and medical insurance issues. Bobbi Warshaw, MPH and Bob Warshaw, MBA (918) 852-5302, bobbi.warshaw@att.net Financial Organizer/Liaison Do you or a loved one need help keeping up with mail, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, making phone calls, organizing or preparing for tax

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

time? I can help! I will work with you or act as a liaison between family members. Call or email me to discuss options. Essential Strategy Consulting, LLC. Gwen Stevens (918) 557-5259, esc9315@gmail.com Home Health Services Tulsa’s Affordable Home Care offer’s compassionate, quality home care services to individuals. We provide the following services: bathing and dressing, companionship, exercise, grocery shopping, laundry, light housekeeping, medication reminders, meal planning and preparation, oral and personal hygiene, respite care for family caregivers. Please call (918) 622-7820 and schedule a free consultation!!! Kind Hands Home Care, LLC We are a team of dedicated health care professionals who work hard in order to keep our clients in their homes safely and well taken care of. 12 to 24 hour shifts available. For information please call or message Delia at (405) 714-8016. Ms Pac Ma'am Need help packing or organizing? I can pack boxes for moving, downsizing or decluttering. I can help organize rooms, closets, attics or garages providing you more space. Flexible hours – day or evening. Lots of experience. References available. Jacki (918) 922-9558.

PERSONAL SAFETY HALO Medical Alarms Worried about falling? HALO provides medical alert services for those at home or on the go who may need help in an emergency. HALO allows you to get help at the push of a button which is worn as a necklace or wristband. We offer a variety of choices to best fit your needs. Check out the HALO products at our retail store – T-Town Mobility at 61st & Sheridan (918) 392-0566 or (877) 747-HALO (4256). SAFETY GRAB BAR SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION Including handicap accessories for Residential, Commercial, Decorative, Indoor/Outdoor, Stairways, Bathrooms, and more. Secure your space, whether existing, remodeling or new construction, we handle it all. Call before you fall! Free Estimates. Licensed & Insured with over 20 years experience. Grab Bars of Tulsa, (918) 619-7324.

PERSONAL SERVICES Affordable Hairstyling In-Home or My Shop With 35 years’ experience, I can help with all of your hairstyling needs. I will come to your home, the hospital, rehab or you can come to my shop. In-shop special: haircut $7

for first time customers only and perms for $45. Senior special pricing can’t be beat! Available Tuesday – Saturday. A Mane Event hairstyling, located near 11th and Yale at 937 South Canton. Call Mary Wilkinson at (918) 8342686. Following CDC Guidelines – masks worn, temperature taken, safe environment. Salon Retro Hair care for men and women, specializing in senior clients. This month’s special – First time customers receive one of the following for $12: Haircut or Style or Manicure. $45 for cut and perm. Pedicures are $20. Very Experienced Hairdressers! Come see us in Midtown at Highland Plaza, 5661 East 41st Street (corner of 41st and Hudson). (918) 742-3440.

PET CARE

Home Veterinary Care Experience Tulsa’s most convenient veterinary service in the comfort of your own home. Our goal is to develop a personal relationship with each of our clients and patients. Contact us today to schedule your house call appointment. Call (918) 892-9382 or email DrFielstra@gmail.com or visit us at www.homevetcaretulsa.com. SENIOR MOVE MANAGEMENT

SHOULD I MOVE, OR SHOULD I STAY? Can't decide whether to Age in Place, or move? Feeling Overwhelmed? We can help. We are your One Source for Downsizing, Moving, Aging in Place, Estate Sales, Selling Home, Selecting a Community, Etc.

www.MatureTransitionsOfTulsa.com.

(918) 309-6120.

SOCIAL

Single Seniors (50+) Are you over 50, single, divorced or widowed? We are a fun-loving group of single seniors over 50. We meet every Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the Buffet Palace, 10934 East 21st Street. We eat at 11:15 a.m., have a short meeting and then play cards. Join us for great fun and fellowship. Questions, call Beverly at (918) 272-1049.

TRANSPORTATION My Driver Transportation Service Let me do the driving. To and from work, airport, shopping, errands, post office, appointments. Also, LIFT VAN transportation available. Able to assist getting to and from bed. Senior sitting. Also, small breed dog boarding. 20 years experience. CLEET certified and licensed. References. Member, Better Business Bureau. (918) 491-9929.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


VACATION SPOT

Meadow Lake Ranch in Sand Springs! Meadow Lake Ranch is more than a place for family fun, it also provides unique venues for holiday parties, conferences, baby showers, & more! The ranch offers “The Lodge” & “The Event Center” including multiple outdoor areas for guests to enjoy. Visit www.meadowlakeranch.com or give Susie a call (918) 494-6000.

Vintage Friends SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VOLUNTEER JUST DO IT! If you've been looking for a way you can make a difference, consider joining the Millennium Hospice team as a volunteer. Caregiver relief is so important during this difficult time. Volunteers provide that by sitting with patients for an hour or so. Training is provided. (918) 493-6555.

FREE SUBSCRIPTION! Name:

Full Address:

Volunteer for LIFE Discover the variety of volunteer opportunities that LIFE Senior Services has to offer. Whether you want to volunteer within the organization or with one of our local non-profit or public agencies, we can find the best fit for you. (918) 664-9000.

Phone Number: Email Address: Cut out and mail to LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., • Tulsa, OK 74135 SUBSCRIBE ONLINE:

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

JANUARY ANSWERS For puzzles, see pages 30-31

COMMONYMS

CLASSIFIEDS

TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: Bernie Dornblaser (918) 664-9000, ext. 1206 or bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

1. All have horns 2. All have benches 3. All have receivers 4. Seas 5. Chocolates

6. Sauces 7. All have threads 8. Boats 9. Car races 10. All have roots

Falling temperature Two under par Fat chance Broken heart Hot under the collar Head in the sand

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

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Sue Ames Kimberly G. Andes Anonymous Phyllis Aschim Candy Ash Jeanne Ash Dale and Johanna Atherton Carrie S. Barnes Benevity, Inc. Zella Borg Boot Braden Bonnie K. Brown Devon Burchfield Janine Burlin Carol Carter Lauren Casey Linda Childers Church of St. Mary Debbie Cogan Elizabeth S. Coleman Retha Coleman Jean Copley Robert and Susan Cronk Charles Danley Shannon Dobbs Carla Dodson Sharon DuMay Christina Ebron Herbert and Dorothy Elias Rose Marie Fennell Jeff Fick George Kaiser Family Foundation Manuella R. Glore Linda Goldsmith Peggy Grotts Juli Gutierrez John and Marilyn Hartman Anita Hartman Nick and Sheryl Hawkins Joseph W. Howard Madilyn Hutchings Jeffrey L. Ivers Jeanne Jacobs Macy Johnson Linda Jones Jennie Kimball Larry Krause Rachel Leonard Kenneth M. Leshurd James and Geraldine Long

Teresa Lovett Jan Lyon B.J. Machmueller Laurel Madland Bruce R. Magoon Andrea Menie Katherine Meredith Linda Metzger Patty Moser Frank and Janice Murry Gloria C. Nall Vanessa I. Neal Eve B. O'Kelley Nicole Orren Janet Peden Teresa Perry Nancy Phillips Sherry Phillips Monte and Bob Prater Shirley Jean Riggs Beth Rizzi Mary and Bill Russell Merrilyn Rutledge Jolene Sanditen Bobby D. Sayre Terri Sears Ranesha Smith Sherry Stewart Tish Stuart Beverly Sutton Barbie Tapp The Robinson Foundation The Sharna and Irvin Frank Foundation Jack and Betty Thompson John Wallace Trepp Jr. Tulsa's Affordable Home Care, LLC Louise Wagner Sara Walton Harley Ward Kathy Wheeler Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Bradley Jr. Richard and Barbara Wollmershauser Vince and Beverly Zardus

In Memory of Lynn and Ken Oliver Maxine T. Earnhardt In Memory of William R. Earnhardt Francis P. Ferrantino In Memory of Alfonso Ferrantino Theresa M. Finck and Mary Ann Finck In Memory of Theresa Ann Finck Duane W. Hall In Memory of Dona B. Hall Sybil P. Holland In Memory of Richard R. Holland Shalene Jacobson In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Joan Kaiser In Memory of William C. Kaiser Natalie Koenig In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Nelson Kymes In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Diane Lowery In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Judy Magness In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory John and Iva Reynolds In Memory of Terrie Jane Grant Spunky Creek Home Owners Association In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Stegge Family In Memory of Maureen Murphy Kathryn L. Tinker In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Lani Van de Wege In Memory of Don Van de Wege Stacy Welvaert In Memory of Marvin E. Gregory Rickye Dixon Wilson In Memory of Ken and Lynne Oliver IN HONOR OF: Connie and Dean Hedberg In Honor of Susan and Doyle Smith Vashi and Mary Mahtani In Honor of LeRoy Fore Helen E. Piett In Honor of Marilyn Sylvan

IN MEMORY OF Barbara Chesebro In Memory of James Chesebro Ken and Bernie Dornblaser

SUPPORT

LIFE

3 WAYS TO MAKE A DONATION: 1. BY MAILING CASH OR A CHECK

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We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. Due to publication deadlines, acknowledgment of gifts may take up to 60 days in the Vintage Newsmagazine. If there is an error, please call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is printed and mailed at no charge. A minimum donation of $25 is appreciated to help offset production costs.

BAMBOOZABLES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in November 2021.

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Complete and mail in the form below to the listed address.

2. ONLINE

Visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org, click the support LIFE tab and select the donate to LIFE option.

3. BY PHONE

Call (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

Name _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/ZIP ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Email ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

If you are mailing cash or a check please cut out this form and mail it to: LIFE Senior Services | 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 | Tulsa, OK 74135

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2022

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CommunityCare's Senior Health Plan offers a variety of plans with benefits you want and deserve.

Call now to learn about Senior Health Plan.

918-594-5251

Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. (TTY 1-800-722-0353)

Senior Health Plan has the benefits you need! ❑ Low or $0 monthly premiums

❑ $0 PCP copay

❑ Comprehensive dental up to $1,500 ❑ Over-the-counter items ❑ Hearing aids

❑ Transportation

❑ $35 copay for select insulin

❑ Wallet Benefit for gym memberships, home safety devices and more

Join the only Medicare Advantage plan with in-network access to Saint Francis and Ascension St. John (other providers available in our network). Join us at a seminar to learn more. Visit ccokadvantage.com for a list of seminars near you.

For accommodation of persons with special needs at meetings, call 918-594-5251 (TTY/TDD users call 1-800-722-0353). CommunityCare Choice, Inc. is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in CommunityCare Choice, Inc. depends on contract renewal. The Senior Health Plan service area includes Tulsa, Creek, Craig, Hughes, Mayes, Muskogee, McIntosh, Nowata, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Pittsburg, Rogers, Wagoner, and Washington Counties. Please call Customer Service for assistance at 918-594-5323 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353), Monday – Sunday and some holidays from 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. October 1 – March 31 and Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. April 1 – September 30 Y0131_2022 Vintage_M