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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Vol. 35, No. 8 EILEEN BRADSHAW President & CEO of LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE & Vintage Housing

KELLY KIRCHHOFF Senior Director of Communications

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Stay or Go? Retirement Choices for Empty Nesters and Beyond

Operation Downsizing

What kind of lifestyle do you want to embrace during retirement? Get a glimpse of some of today's popular living options.

Simplify your life by letting go of some of the things taking up space in your home – and find support for the process.

DEE DUREN Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

BERNIE DORNBLASER Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

LEAH WEIGLE Graphic Designer

Timeless Tulsa 1900 – 1910s

Brady Heights is one of the earliest built neighborhoods in Tulsa. Architects and builders used elements of Queen Anne as well as other styles, houses built on a larger scale and of a more sophisticated design than those of adjacent neighborhoods. ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Queen Anne style was popularized by English architect Richard Norman Shaw in the 1860s. The style was oddly named, having nothing to do with the 18th Century reign of Queen Anne.

CAROL CARTER

1910 – 1920s

The area bounded by Cheyenne to Elwood, between 15th and 17th Streets is the Stonebraker Heights Historic District. Providing additional variety to the district is that even the houses classified as the same style are not identical, thus the Stonebraker Heights Historic District is a unique expression of period architecture in Tulsa.

A Look at Iconic Neighborhoods Through the Decades BY KAREN J. O’BRIEN

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT On June 27, 1980, Brady Heights became Tulsa’s first district to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT This piece of true architectural history was built by worldrenowned architect Bruce Goff at age 16. As one of Tulsa's real estate treasures, this Prairie School-style Stonebraker Heights home has retained it's historic character over the last 101 years.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Dominated by the Bungalow/Craftsman style, the district also contains a notable percentage of Prairie School and Colonial Revival style homes.

Copy Editor

When the Frisco Railroad line came to Tulsafrom Vinita in 1882, the city’s population was about 200 people. The City of Tulsa was incorporated in 1899. The 1900 U. S. census reported a population of 1,390. In 1901, wildcatters and investors floodedinto the city and the town began to take shape, an official survey was done and streets laid out. Neighborhoods began to spread out from downtown Tulsa. As the population of Tulsa grew, neighborhoods developed to the west, east and south.

KRISTEN HARRIS Communications Coordinator

1900 CENSUS: 1,390 Population of the newly incorporated Tulsa

1910 CENSUS: 18,182

1940 – 1950s

1920 – 1930s

After World War II, tract homes were built to provide for the families of returning servicemen. One of the more easily identified tract home developments in Tulsa is Lortondale, located near 26th Street between Yale and Darlington Avenue in what was considered south Tulsa at the time.

ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Lortondale homes were designed by Tulsa architect Donald Honn and built by developer Howard Grubb. They were the first spec homes to be built with central air conditioning as a standard feature.

Significant construction of residences in the Yorktown district began in 1921 and nearby Gillette the next year with Bungalow/Craftsman style the majority. Tudor Revival style gained popularity in the late 1920s. ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Craftsman is an architectural style, inspired by the Arts and Crafts movement, beginning in the last years of the 19th century. It began the movement away from Victorian style. NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT These mid-century modern homes with extremely low-pitched roofs and open floor plans were some of the first of their kind in this part of the U.S. They were priced at $12,750 to $16,650.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Historic neighborhoods such as Yorktown and Gillette represent windows of time that are architecturally homogeneous for that period of Tulsa’s history.

Population growth during first oil boom

1920 CENSUS: 72,075 The City sees a big growth spurt with second oil boom in early statehood

DICK MCCANDLESS ESTEBAN VALENCIA

1930 CENSUS: 141,258 The Roaring ‘20s and annexation spurs growth

1940 CENSUS: 142,157

Great Depression slows city’s growth

1950 CENSUS: 182,740

Oil and aviation industry bring prosperity

Community Distribution

1960 CENSUS: 261,685 Many buildings lost in period of urban renewal

1960s – Present

Between the censuses in 1960 and 2010, the City of Tulsa population moved further east and south. Modern architectural styles derived from the ranch-style, such as two-story split-level and the low, flat-roofed contemporary emerged.

1950 – 1960s

Ranch-style homes became very popular in the 1950s. Homes in Tulsa's Ranch Acres sold from $25,000 to $100,000 in 1954 when “lower price” homes were in the $6,500 to $9,000 range. The neighborhood near 31st Street and Harvard Avenue is named for the ranchstyle architecture the subdivision features. The one-story ranch house is a mix of historical precedents and an adaptation of ideas from several sources, including Prairie style. ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Ranch-style was created by architect Clifford May and is a domestic architectural style originating in the United States. The ranch-style house is noted for its long, close-to-the-ground profile and wide open layout.

ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT A split-level home has staggered floor levels. There are typically two short sets of stairs.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Wedgwood near 21st and Yale is another example of 1960s ranchstyle homes.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Further residential developments and in-fill projects include large “McMansion” style homes, a Neoeclectic or Neo-Colonial creation from mix-and-match decorative details.

1970 CENSUS: 330,350 Continued, slow growth and construction

1980 CENSUS: 360,919 City goes through oil bust years

1990 CENSUS: 367,302 Recovery years are aided by factory and tech jobs

2000 CENSUS: 393,049 City leaders urge investment in infrastructure, downtown area

2010 CENSUS: 391,906 Downturn in economy stalls expansion

2020 CENSUS ESTIMATE: 401,190 Tulsa attracts new residents with Gathering Place, revitalized downtown area

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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Timeless Tulsa: A Look at Iconic Neighborhoods Through the Decades

Getting Real With Two of Tulsa's Long-Time Realtors

Take a photo tour of historic Tulsa neighborhoods as the Vintage explores architectural styles favored by homeowners over the years.

26 Baby Boomers Redefine Senior Living Trends

Trendsetters for life, Baby Boomers are now changing the shape of retirement communities.

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Meet two women who found their passion helping others find that special home in these tales from the real estate trenches.

6 Letter From Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner Care Transitions: How Caregiving Continues After Your Loved One Leaves Home 12 Medicare & You Benefits Update for 2021 19 LIFE PACE 28 Healthy Living Stress Relief 101 30 Mindbender & Puzzles 31 Puzzle Partners 32 Product Review 15 Products for Home Organization 34 Dinner Belle 35 LIFE EDU 36 Noteworthy 37 Share Your Time and Talent 38 Bunkering With Books 39 Business Directory 40 People & Places 41 Classifieds 43 Vintage Friends

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services (a Tulsa Area United Way nonprofit) and helps fulfill LIFE Senior Services’ mission to promote and preserve independence for seniors. This publication is printed and mailed at no charge. Donations of any amount are appreciated and will help offset LIFE Senior Services’ production costs. A donation of $25 per year is suggested. To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 35, Issue 8, January 2021 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 2168-8494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135-5114.

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LETTER FROM EILEEN Dear Vintage Readers, Happy, happy New Year! I hope this note finds you healthy and hopeful. We must all stay vigilant regarding COVID-19, but I am very grateful that vaccines have been released and better days are on the way.

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing eileen.bradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

In this time of COVID-19 and quarantining, home is not only where the heart is, but where the office, the school and the gym are too! Whether your home consists of one room or a dozen, chances are you are spending a lot more time there. The home improvement industry is actually prospering as people strive to maximize their spaces. The housing market is also booming in Tulsa, thanks to low interest rates and people reexamining what they want in their homes. Our physical surrounding are reflections of our taste and our budgets, but also of our history and our values. Throughout our 34-year marriage, my husband and I have had very different outlooks on houses and moving. He grew up in a military family, moving frequently. I, on the other hand, came home from St. John Hospital to 630 N. 28th W. Pl., and it remained my home address until I graduated from college. Consequently, he hates to move, and I am always open to the possibility of a new housing adventure.

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

After our youngest daughter graduated from high school, our rambling ranch house seemed to have too many bedrooms and way too much stuff. We came to the decision that it was time for a new setting for our family. Children had moved out; parents had passed on, but so many of their belongings remained behind with us! We did not need to move all of it with us to a new house.

Despite my wholehearted enthusiasm for the move, the sorting process was an emotional one for me. We discarded some and donated so much. It was time consuming because every item I touched had a story or attendant memory. I laughed a lot, cried some and at the end had reduced our “stuff ” dramatically. I have to be honest though: I am nobody’s decluttering advisor. My new home still has (hidden) boxes of children’s artwork and a tote of toys I snuck over for yet unborn grandchildren. I am a work in progress. My biggest worry in moving was the reaction of our three children. I wanted them to still feel like our home was their family home, even if they didn’t spend their growing up years in it. My worries turned out to be groundless. We shared memories of trick-or-treating adventures, parties and Christmas gatherings. After all the cathartic conversation though, my oldest daughter wrapped it up with, “This has been a great house. But every house we have lived in has been great because it’s the family that makes it a home. The next one will be great too.” Sounds like a Hallmark card, but she was right. What happens in the home has more impact than the zip code it is in or the paint color on the walls. I think you will enjoy this issue about home and all of the options Tulsa offers. Whether you choose to stay in a home with family history, or opt for a new abode, I hope that you find your home to be a sanctuary this new year. Best,

Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

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Elizabeth Manor Apartments at 1820 S. Boulder Ave, c. 1925.

Looking Back

Courtesy of Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa

Home, Sweet Home Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

R.N. Bynum family gathers on porch at 5th and Cheyenne on Christmas Day, 1915. Charles and Louise Clinton home built in 1882 in Red Fork, Indian Territory.

Norvel family at home, 916 S. Lawton, c. 1910. Courtesy of Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa

Sledding near Dr. Kennedy’s home north of Owen Park in February, 1929.

This Month in History JANUARY 1, 1892: Ellis Island Opened To Immigrants

Annie Moore, a 15-year-old girl from Ireland, became the first person to pass through the doors at Ellis Island Immigration Station. Ships would dock at the small island for passengers to disembark after they crossed the Atlantic Ocean. Ellis Island and the nearby Statue of Liberty became symbols welcoming immigrants to America. More than 12 million arrived in the island’s 62 years of operation.

JANUARY 7, 1714: British

Inventor Patents the Typewriter

Englishman Henry Mill filed patent No. 395 for “an artificial machine or method for the impressing or transcribing of letters singly or progressively one after another…in paper or parchment.” Mill was a waterworks engineer who claimed to have perfected the machine, but no drawings were required to file a patent at that time. It's not known if he actually built the machine as no record exists.

JANUARY 9, 1776: Thomas Paine Publishes ‘Common Sense’ Pamphlets were important publications in the 16th through 19th centuries, and “Common Sense” is credited with uniting people in the Thirteen Colonies in the cause of independence from England. It sold an astounding 120,000 copies by April. Paine wrote in the language of the people and first published the pamphlet anonymously. He went on to join the U.S. Army, serving the new country.

JANUARY 17, 1950:

Thieves Rob Brinks in Boston Anthony Pino recruited 10 other men to steal more than $2 million from the Brink’s Armored Car depot in Boston. Dressed like Brink’s employees – but in masks – they filled 14 canvas bags with loot for what was then the largest robbery in U.S. history. They almost got away with the crime, but one robber talked. Most of the money was never recovered.

JANUARY 23, 1957:

Wham-O Produces First Frisbees The story of the Frisbee began in Connecticut with the Frisbie Pie Company. Students from nearby universities would throw the empty pie tins to each other, yelling “Frisbie” as they let go. Two men invented a plastic version of the disc, and one of them sold it to the toy company. Wham-O improved the design and patented the Frisbee with a misspelled name, creating a new sport.

JANUARY 28, 1915:

U.S. Coast Guard Created An Act of Congress created the U.S. Coast Guard, the military branch that enforces maritime laws. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton first established the USCG as the Revenue Marine Service in 1790. The Coast Guard enforces federal laws on the high seas and waters within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States and has been under the jurisdiction of the Department of Homeland Security since 2003. © The History Channel

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CAREGIVER CORNER

are also readily available. This style of facility will take care of many of the things that, as a caregiver, you have been used to taking care of. Social and medical staff will be available to your loved one at all times. You may still have some things you like to do personally, such as grocery shop for small items, help your loved one decorate their room, light housekeeping, etc. It’s still a good idea to keep an eye on your loved one’s medical appointments and prescriptions to make sure nothing is overlooked. It’s also a good idea to drop in at mealtimes to check on your loved one’s nutritional needs and to make The level of sure personal hygiene, dental care a loved one and other needs are being receives in a routinely met.

facility will help determine which responsibilities will still be yours.

CARE TRANSITIONS How Caregiving Continues After Your Loved One Leaves Home BY CHELSEA EDWARDS, SENIORLINE SUPERVISOR

C

aregiving comes in many forms. Many times, your loved one lives with you or you with them. What about when your loved one moves into a senior living facility? Caregiving roles and responsibilities will be different, but caregiving doesn’t end. Here are some tips to help make the transition in caregiving. The most common communities are independent living, assisted living and nursing facilities. INDEPENDENT LIVING Independent living is for individuals who can still perform most of the activities of daily living (ADLs) but enjoy having access to assistance when needed. Independent living communities provide their residents with convenient access to dining, medical care, entertainment and more. The independent lifestyle offers residents a safe living environment, but with minimal assistance. Hospitality services, such as housekeeping, meals, and laundry may or may not be included in the monthly rent, but are typically available.

laundry home and do it weekly. You may find it helpful to bring by purchased or prepared meals and store them in your loved one's refrigerator for easy access. ASSISTED LIVING Assisted living is a great option for individuals who have difficulty with daily activities at home. Residents at assisted living facilities are free to live an independent lifestyle, but also receive regular support for daily activities from cleaning to meal preparation. Housekeeping and maintenance services are often included in the monthly rental of an apartment, along with laundry services, utilities, transportation and meals. In addition to enjoying the peace of mind that comes with this maintenance-free lifestyle, residents can take advantage of a full calendar of events, activities, outings and countless opportunities for social engagement. Additional care services, such as medication management or assistance taking a shower,

Independent living will provide you as the caregiver many options to be as involved or hands-off as you and your loved one choose. If housekeeping, meals and laundry are not included, caregivers often step in to help. Many caregivers find it easier to take their loved one’s 10

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

NURSING FACILITIES A nursing facility is an in-patient rehabilitation and medical treatment center staffed with trained medical professionals. They provide the medically-necessary services of licensed nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists and audiologists. Nursing facilities give patients round-the-clock assistance with healthcare and ADLs. If your loved one lives in one of these facilities, your responsibilities as a caregiver will decrease. You will have more time just to spend with your loved one, maybe bringing things from home that give them joy and help make the room their own. Again, however, it’s good to provide oversight that hygiene and medical needs are being met. Arrange to be present when your loved one is getting ready for bed, for example, so you can check overall cleanliness and things like foot care and skin health. As caregivers, responsibilities come with the territory. The level of care a loved one receives in a facility will help determine which responsibilities will still be yours. For safety reasons, COVID-19 has affected how much or little we can see our loved ones. Consider having a camera placed in your loved one’s room so you can see them at all times and know they are doing well. Many facilities allow family members to speak through windows and hold up signs showing loved ones they care. Phone calls and FaceTime are important ways to keep connected as well. Always try to make the best choice not only for your loved one, but also for you.

For more information and a list of senior living facilities in northeastern Oklahoma, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org and view the digital edition LIFE's Vintage Guide to Housing & Services under the education tab.

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Northeastern Oklahoma Senior Retirement Communities BIXBY

Autumn Park 8401 E. 134th St. S. (918) 369-8888

BRISTOW

Woodland Village 131 E. 9th Ave. (918) 367-8300

BROKEN ARROW

Hartford Villas 714 N. 14th Street (918) 251-0399

Kenosha Landing 2602 W. Oakland Pl. (918) 258-0331 Vandever House 3102 S. Juniper Ave. (918) 451-3100

COLLINSVILLE

Cardinal Heights 224 S. 19th St. (918) 371-9116

COWETA

Carriage Crossing 28530 E. 141st St. (918) 486-4460

GLENPOOL

Redbud Village 14900 S. Broadway St. (918) 322-5100

JENKS

Pioneer Village 315 S. Birch St. (918) 298-2992

OWASSO

Prairie Village 12877 E. 116th St. N. (918) 371-3221

SAND SPRINGS

SAPULPA

Hickory Crossing 2101 S. Hickory St. (918) 224-5116

SKIATOOK

West Oak Village 1002 S. Fairfax Ave. (918) 396-9009

TULSA

Brookhollow Landing 2910 S. 129th E. Ave. (918) 622-2700 Cornerstone Village 1045 N. Yale Ave. (918) 835-1300 Country Oaks 5648 S. 33rd W. Ave. (918) 446-3400

Heartland Village 109 E. 38th St. (918) 241-1200

Heritage Landing 3102 E. Apache St. (918) 836-7070

River Ridge 5202 S. Hwy. 97 (918) 245-4131 55 and older

Park Village 650 S. Memorial Dr. (918) 834-6400

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Free Tax Help From LIFE Senior Services

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have set the Medicare premiums, deductibles and coinsurance amounts to be paid by Medicare beneficiaries in 2021. BY CHANNING RUTHERFORD MEDICARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR

MEDICARE PART A

(Hospital Insurance) Medicare Part A covers inpatient hospital, skilled nursing facility, and some home health care services. Most Medicare beneficiaries do not have a Part A premium since they have at least 40 quarters of Medicare-covered employment or are the spouse or widow(er) of such a person. • Part A Monthly Premium Enrollees age 65 and over who have fewer than 40 quarters of coverage and certain persons with disabilities pay a monthly premium in order to receive coverage under Part A. Individuals who had at least 30 quarters of coverage or were married to someone with at least 30 quarters of coverage may buy into Part A at a reduced monthly premium rate, which will be $259 in 2021, a $7 increase from 2020. Other individuals who have less than 30 quarters of coverage will pay the full premium, which will be $471 a month in 2021, a $13 increase from 2020. • Part A Deductible and Coinsurance The Medicare Part A inpatient hospital deductible that beneficiaries will pay when admitted to the hospital will be $1,484 in 2021, an increase of $76 from $1,408 in 2020. The Part A deductible covers beneficiaries’ share of costs for the first 60 days of Medicare-covered inpatient hospital care in a benefit period. In 2021, beneficiaries must pay a coinsurance amount of $371 per day for the 61st through 90th day of a hospitalization in a benefit period and $742 per day for lifetime reserve days. For beneficiaries in skilled nursing facilities, the daily coinsurance for days 21 through 100 of extended care services in a benefit period will be $185.50 in 2021. NOTE: A benefit period starts the day a patient is admitted and ends when the patient has been out of the hospital for 60 days in a row.

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MEDICARE PART B

(Medicare Insurance) Medicare Part B covers physician services, outpatient hospital services, certain home health services, durable medical equipment, and certain other medical and other health services. • Part B Monthly premium The standard monthly premium for Medicare Part B enrollees will be $148.50 for 2021, an increase of $3.90 from $144.60 in 2020. • Part B Income-Related Adjustments Since 2007, beneficiaries with higher incomes have paid higher Part B monthly premiums. Specifically, if a beneficiary’s modified adjusted gross income as reported on their IRS tax return from two years ago is more than $88,000 ($176,000 filing jointly), the beneficiary is responsible for a larger portion of the cost of their coverage. The premium adjustments range from $59.40 to $356.40 more per month for Medicare Part B. • Part B Deductible and Coinsurance Costs for Part B services depend on whether you have Original Medicare or are in a Medicare health plan. For some services, there is no cost, but you may have to pay for the doctor’s visit. If the Part B deductible applies, you must pay all costs until you meet the yearly Part B deductible before Medicare begins to pay its share. In 2021, the Part B deductible will be $203, an increase of $5 from the annual deductible of $198 in 2020. After your deductible is met, you typically pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount of the service. NOTE: If you join a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO) or have other insurance (like a Medigap policy or employer or union coverage), your cost may be different.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

Tax season is upon us, and April 15 will be here before you know it! Like many taxpayers, you may find yourself dreading those confusing forms, worrying that you will make a mistake or have to pay a sky-high cost to get them professionally prepared. If so, you are not alone. According to the IRS, millions of people will spend an average of $200 in tax preparation and filing fees this year, instead of saving that money and filing their taxes for free. From February 1 until April 15, trained and IRS-certified volunteers will be available to help seniors age 60 and older who make $57,000 or less annually with free, basic income tax preparation and electronic filing. Appointments are required and will be held throughout the filing season.

To schedule your appointment, contact the Tax Assistance Program at LIFE Senior Services at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1189.

Source: www.cms.gov www.LIFEseniorservices.org


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LIFE's MAP on the Move a Success Congratulations to the Oklahoma Medicare beneficiaries who saved money by taking advantage of the 2020 Medicare Assistance Program (MAP), a program of LIFE Senior Services. MAP provided accurate and unbiased information to 1,374 beneficiaries during Medicare Open Enrollment, assisting them with counseling to make choices that best fit their personal needs.

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• Helpful to caregivers

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This year, a total of 830 beneficiaries made changes to their enrollment, resulting in savings of $1.5 million, despite limitations imposed by the pandemic. To reach people during COVID-19, MAP offered phone appointments as well as face-to-face clinics that followed CDC guidelines for safety. It was the first year for MAP on the Move, a new outreach that took LIFE’s trained Medicare counselors into surrounding communities. MAP on the Move provided Medicare enrollment help in Owasso, Broken Arrow, and four Tulsa locations including Oklahoma Methodist Manor and Montereau.

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ATTENTION SENIOR CITIZENS! The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has changed the household median income in Tulsa County and Osage, Creek, Rogers, and Wagoner Counties. This change will impact senior citizens’ ability to qualify for a Property Valuation Limitation for Ad Valorem tax purposes. For 2021, the new maximum annual gross household income is now $68,600. Seniors who are qualified are not required to re-file.

View the digital edition of LIFE’s Vintage Guide under the education resources tab at www.LIFEseniorservices.org

2020 Medicare Assistance Program Highlights • 1,374 Medicare beneficiaries served

To be approved for year 2021, you must be 65 years of age or over as of January 1, 2021 and have a gross household income of $68,600 or less during 2020. You must file between January 2nd and March 15th or within 30 calendar days from the issue date of Notice of Increase in Valuation of Real Property. To file you will need to bring proof of income from 2020, such as Social Security, 1099 and W2 forms from all income sources. Please contact the County Assessor’s office in the county you live in to see if you qualify and apply for this benefit. Assessor: Assessor: Assessor: Assessor: Assessor:

John A. Wright, Tulsa County Ed Quinton, Jr., Osage County JaNell Enlow, Creek County Scott Marsh, Rogers County Sandy Hodges, Wagoner County

(918) 596-5100 (918) 287-3448 (918) 224-4508 (918) 923-4795 (918) 485-2367

• 830 beneficiaries enrolled or changed plans • $1,501,217 total cost savings • $1,809 average savings per person • 20% of beneficiaries counseled were new clients LIFE’s Medicare specialists are trained to help with Medicare, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage and other health coverage-related options for beneficiaries. LIFE Senior Services is proud of the program which empowers Oklahoma seniors to make the best coverage choices in a safe environment.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

13


Retirement Choices for Empty Nesters and Beyond

L

eaving the workforce is a big decision. But if you’re like many seniors, that decision can be followed by a bigger one – deciding whether to stay in your home or find a new place to live. And if you do decide to move, where will you go? From condos to apartments to 55+ communities, the options are as varied as today’s seniors. Understanding these options can help you plan the right move. DEFINE YOUR NEW LIFESTYLE The type of housing that is right for your retirement will depend on your situation and lifestyle. Do you want to stay in your home? Do you want to downsize? Is condo living right for you or would you miss your lawn and garden? Do you enjoy the energy of the city or the quiet of the country? Consider your day-to-day life and make sure you can continue doing what you enjoy. STAYING PUT If you love your home, you don’t have to leave it. A 2018 survey by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) found that 76% of adults age 50 and older want to stay in their homes as they age. You can age in place and

BY KAREN SZABO renovate spaces to meet your needs now and in the future. Simple modifications include adding nonslip floor surfaces, grab bars and lever-handled doorknobs. Or create a one-floor living space by transforming a first-floor home office into a bedroom and a powder room into a full bath. Sarah Susanka, architect and author of “The Not So Big House” series, recommends retaining your upstairs bedrooms to eventually house full-time, live-in caregivers. If you’re over 62, you can borrow money based on the equity you have in your home using a reverse mortgage. Instead of paying mortgage payments, the debt is repaid when you eventually move, sell or die. However, according to the Center for Retirement Research (CCR) at Boston College, it can be costly. For example, a reverse mortgage on a $300,000 house would include an upfront cost of $9,000 as well as annual interest on the amount borrowed. UP FOR DOWNSIZING Downsizing is the most common choice for

retirees. While many homeowners downsize to condos or 55+ communities, others prefer moving to a new home with a smaller square footage. Your choice depends on your lifestyle, desires and resources. If you have a pet and like gardening and puttering in the yard, a smaller home might be right for you. If you’re ready to lighten your amount of yard work and maintenance, a condo or 55+ community may fit the bill. Built in 2019, Legacy Park Midtown Apartments in Tulsa were built with senior needs in mind. According to builder Steven Benge, all units are single story and have no steps. “Other accessible features include 3-foot wide minimum openings throughout, double seat walk-in showers, handicapped toilets, wheelchair accessibility in the toilet areas and non-slip hard surface flooring,” Benge said. “There are 24-hour monitored security cameras, a large fenced common STAY OR GO, continued on page 16.

If you have a pet and like gardening and puttering in the yard, a smaller home might be right for you.

While many homeowners downsize to condos or 55+ communities, others prefer moving to a new home with a smaller square footage.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | December 2020

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STAY OR GO, continued from page 14.

area in the back, and small pets are allowed. Large covered porches are included in all units.” For some seniors, trading their home for an RV offers an adventurous lifestyle for as little as $1,500 per month.

RENTING VS. BUYING IN Rental Senior Communities are the most popular option for retirees in the United States. They usually provide a variety of services and amenities that are built into residents’ monthly payments. These can include meals, housekeeping, maintenance, transportation, and on-site events and activities. “Typically, a rental community will offer independent living and have an assisted living facility on the premises for residents whose care needs increase,” explains Bruce Rosenblatt, senior housing expert. “Some offer higher levels of care, such as memory care and skilled nursing care, at an extra cost.” LIFE’s Vintage Housing communities for seniors offer full access to community-based services, fostering independence, socialization and the ability to age in place. For more information, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org. Equity or Ownership Senior Communities are a fee-simple arrangement in which a resident purchases their unit and enjoys full ownership privileges. “As in a traditional real estate deal, pricing is usually negotiated with the previous owner,” Rosenblatt explains. “There are obviously pros and cons to owning real estate, but this type of community is most attractive to seniors who want to own something and hope to enjoy some level of equity appreciation upon resale.” Residents pay a monthly maintenance fee as well as condominium association dues and are responsible for covering real estate taxes, assessments and renovations. Should a resident require higher levels of care, there is typically assisted living available onsite for an additional cost. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) offer a full “continuum of care,” including independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and memory care, all on the same campus or within the same building. There is a hefty up-front entrance fee as well as an ongoing monthly charge. Typically, CCRCs attract younger seniors and more couples than the rental option. According to Rosenblatt, there are both financial and medical criteria that seniors must meet to qualify for move-in. This is because once a senior is accepted into a CCRC, the community is contractually obligated to care for them no matter how their medical condition or financial situation changes.

GO DOWNTOWN More retirees are taking a cue from Petula Clark and moving downtown. Many cities like Tulsa and Oklahoma City are experiencing a downtown renaissance and apartments are full of amenities, are within walking distance of shopping, restaurants, and cultural and recreational activities, and free of mowing, mortgages, maintenance and property taxes. “Downtown living can help retirees stay active both physically and mentally while keeping them entertained in the process,” said author Kyle Ezell. LIFE ON THE ROAD For some seniors, trading their home for an RV offers an adventurous lifestyle for as little as $1,500 per month. Aside from the cost of the RV itself, the main costs are food, gas and campground fees – which range from $20 to $100 per night. But motorhoming is not for everyone. The RV lifestyle means being away from family and friends, adjusting to living in a small space, selling your home and getting rid of all your belongings. “If you’re not ready to get rid of everything, you’re not ready,” said senior travel author Jerry Minchey.

“CCRCs are not for everyone, but the folks who do qualify enjoy the peace of mind of knowing that they have guaranteed care for life and that all these care options are provided in one convenient, familiar location,” he said.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

MOVING IN WITH THE KIDS Although not for everyone, moving in with your adult child – or having them move in with you – can be a win-win for everyone in the family. It can slash living expenses in half, plus parents benefit from built-in babysitters and grandparents benefit from an active household that can stave off loneliness. FIGURE OUT YOUR FINANCES According to the CCR, most people need about 75% of their pre-retirement income to maintain their standard of living. Create a budget and compare it to your retirement income and savings. If the numbers don’t match, your housing could help. Moving from a $250,000 house to a $150,000 home can save about $3,250 a year in reduced maintenance costs, estimates the CRR. The CCR adds that – assuming there is no mortgage and subtracting $25,000 in real estate commissions and moving costs – retirees who invest the $75,000 in equity they’d recover after selling could generate $3,000 per year in income with an annual 4% return. Whether you decide to enjoy the home you’ve lived in for years or set out on a new adventure, take advantage of this stage of life and all it can offer.

Are You Searching for Senior Living Communities? For more information about and direct links to area senior living communities, view the digital edition of LIFE’s Vintage Guide to Housing & Services at www.LIFEseniorservices. org under the “Education and Resources” tab. Pick up a free copy of LIFE's Vintage Guide at area Reasor’s Food Stores and CVS Pharmacy locations.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


55+ Active Adult Communities Sometimes referred to as "active adult communities," 55+ communities are neighborhoods that require at least one resident in each home to be over the age of 55. They’re lowmaintenance and designed for active older adults who can still take care of themselves, as opposed to an assisted living facility that offers on-site dining and healthcare services. However, they are designed with independent living in mind. If you require in-home care or other frequent assistance, you may be better served by a community built around those medical needs.

Three 55+ Communities in the Tulsa Area

1. Hyde Park

This 55+ gated community in Tulsa at Tulsa Hills has move-in ready or custom-built 2- and 3-bedroom homes ranging from the mid $300s to the low $400s.

2. Rabbit Run

A gated community in Broken Arrow featuring all singlestory, 3-bedroom homes ranging from the low $300s to mid $600s.

What is Kyphoplasty?

Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that quickly repairs vertebral compression fractures (VCF) and restores structural integrity to broken vertebral bone. Kyphoplasty is an outpatient procedure that uses a cavity creation device (usually a balloon) to create a space in the broken vertebra which is then filled with a special bone cement to stabilize the fracture and reduce pain.

How does Kyphoplasty help?

The goal of kyphoplasty is to restore the broken vertebra to a more normal height and to fix the pain caused by the fracture. When a vertebral fracture occurs, it most commonly presents as an acute worsening of chronic lower back pain. Many times the patient’s chronic back pain is getting worse, but it’s actually due to a recent fracture. Studies have shown that up to 85% of fractures are missed even in advanced imaging reports. According to the medical literature, the most accurate way to detect a painful fracture is by physical percussion exam. Many of our patients experience immediate pain relief following kyphoplasty. It can help relieve pain by stabilizing the fracture. Improved mobility results because of decreased pain levels.

Dr. James Webb Kyphoplasty Expert

When it comes to kyphoplasty, Dr. Webb is one of the most experienced physicians in the U.S. Dr. Webb has performed thousands of kyphoplasty procedures and has the experience necessary to safely perform kyphoplasty. In fact, he also teaches other physicians how to safely and effectively perform the procedure.

Here are a few facts about Dr. Webb’s kyphoplasty expertise: He performed over 120 kyphoplasties during his training (fellowship).

3. Spicewood at Cedar Ridge

A gated community in Broken Arrow with 47 2- to 5-bedroom homes, ranging from the high $200s to mid $400s.

Was one of the first physicians to perform kyphoplasty in Oklahoma. Was a principal investigator in the EVOLVE trial, the largest ever on-label study of kyphoplasty in Medicare patients with vertebral fractures with 350 patients enrolled over 24 sites across the U.S. The first in Oklahoma and one of a few in the nation to establish a full-service outpatient clinic focused on medically treating the underlying causes of osteoporosis in patients with VCF. The highest level of experience in the Tulsa area with 300-400 fractures treated per year. Continues efforts to refine vertebral fracture treatment, consulting for numerous medical device companies and teaching other physicians how to perform this life-saving procedure.

“WE’VE GOT YOUR BACK”

(918) 260-9322 • www.drjameswebb.com 6550 E. 71st St., Ste. 200 • Tulsa, OK 74133

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

17


5 Tips

To Formulate An Effective Downsizing Plan 1. Organize Your Goals in a Notebook – Buy a notebook to outline your plan and write down your goals for operation downsizing. Keep it with you and jot things down as you think of them. You can set a timeline and make lists. If a question occurs to you, write it down to remind yourself to follow up later. 

OPERATION DOWNSIZING

Whatever your age, downsizing your possessions can help you streamline and simplify your life. Decluttering can open up space for new possibilities. BY LINDSAY MORRIS

W

hether you’re moving into assisted living, purchasing a smaller home or just trying to get rid of things, downsizing can be a big undertaking. Sorting through a lifetime of possessions, many associated with special memories, can be daunting and may trigger emotions.

people sometimes become overwhelmed during the downsizing process. “They shut down; then nothing happens,” she said. “It leaves the responsibility up to the loved ones to navigate on their behalf, and it’s really stressful,” Willard said.

2. Be Clear About the End Result – Are you downsizing to prepare for a move or are you just tired of living with things you no longer use? The result will make a difference in your decisions as you sort through items, so write it down.  3. Organize Room By Room – Choose which rooms or even areas of rooms you’d like to focus on first. Is your kitchen hard to maneuver in or would you love to have a more tranquil bedroom? You get to choose. 4. Break Down Your Goals – Use “SMART” goals: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and with a time frame that’s doable. It can be helpful to break the plan down into weeks. For example, in that cluttered kitchen, spend the first week going through the spice cabinet and pantry. During week two, go through the gadget drawer and reduce the number of items on countertops. If it takes a month to get the kitchen under control, that’s great – you’re establishing new habits as you go.

Usually, people downsize in preparation for a move. However, downsizing may be necessary if a person’s home is simply too full. If there are piles of items all over someone’s house, for example, it becomes a safety hazard. “That’s why downsizing or decluttering is important,” Sharyn Willard, owner of Mature Transitions said Willard. of Tulsa and a member of the National While Association of Senior Move Managers, says downsizing can be a monumental task, the end result It’s important to create a plan. Here are can help create a some helpful tips on how to navigate simple, stress-free environment. the waters of downsizing. While downsizing can be a monumental task, the end result can help create a simple, stress-free environment. It’s important to keep a positive outcome in mind when going through the process of downsizing.

1. FIND HELP – Who can help you in the downsizing process? Perhaps you should consider hiring someone. Senior move managers such as Sharyn Willard can help individuals who are having a hard time downsizing due to emotional attachments to items (perhaps a loved one has passed away, and they need to part with their items), or if the individual has dementia.

5. It's OK to Change Your Mind – Remember, you can always change your mind about some items on your plan. As you go through your home, you may find a new use for something that’s been lying hidden in the back of a cabinet. 

OPERATION DOWNSIZING, continued on page 20.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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Teamwork Helps Fuel LIFE PACE

Senior living, with promise.

BY ADRIAN ROLLE, LIFE PACE INTAKE MANAGER

LIFE PACE, a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, is a comprehensive, coordinated senior healthcare program that uses a team approach to provide medical, social, nutritional, personal and home care services. LIFE PACE allows individuals in need of skilled care to remain in their homes or community setting while receiving the care they need. At the core of the LIFE PACE program is the Interdisciplinary Team (IDT). With LIFE PACE, you have a team of healthcare professionals working with both you and your family to ensure you get the coordinated care that you need. But what does that mean?

The LIFE PACE Interdisciplinary Team (IDT) consists of 11 professionals: Primary care provider Registered nurse Social worker Physical therapist Occupational therapist Activity coordinator

Center manager Registered dietitian Home care coordinator Certified nurse assistant Transportation and scheduling coordinator

Covenant Living at Inverness | Tulsa, OK 3800 West 71st Street Limited availability! • Independent & Assisted Living Skilled Nursing • Memory Care • Rehabilitation To schedule a tour today, call (877) 478-8455, or visit us online at CovLivingInverness.org.

The IDT uses an integrated approach, where each of the team members actively works to coordinate care and services across disciplines, sharing each other’s knowledge and skills. This leads to a more comprehensive approach to assessing needs, as well as identifying specific strategies to meet those needs. The IDT then works with the participant and their caregivers to create a personalized plan of care, focused on what that participant needs most. The IDT, along with PACE providers, then implements that plan of care to provide care, support and services for the participant. This approach makes PACE much more adaptable than other care models. If someone has a sudden change in condition – a fall with injury, or a stroke – changes in lifestyle may have to be made. They need additional support to get better, or may need more long-term solutions to continue to live independently. In traditional care settings, this usually leads to provider visits, then having to wait on referrals to home health, or skilled therapies. This is where the care of an IDT makes the difference. With all the disciplines already in place – home care, skilled therapies, nutritional support – the LIFE PACE participant is able to get care more quickly, care catered exactly to their needs. Coordinated healthcare is the core of LIFE PACE. The common-sense proactive approach that the LIFE PACE IDT uses to provide medical care and support services helps keep people in their homes so that they can be near friends and family. As a welcome alternative to costly in-home or institutional care, LIFE PACE may be the perfect care solution for you and your family.

For more information, call (918) 938-7653, or visit www.LIFEPACE.org. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Covenant Living of Bixby | Bixby, OK 7300 East 121st Place South Available now! • Independent & Assisted Living Excellent service, worry-free living • No buy-in fee! To schedule a tour today, call (877) 312-3248, or visit us online at CovLivingBixby.org.

Covenant Living is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. For information, visit CovLiving.org.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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OPERATION DOWNSIZING, continued from page 18.

“ Every cabinet they go through has memories of kids and grandkids – 40 or 50 years of memories in their house that they have to figure out what to do with,” Willard says. “It truly becomes an emotional situation for everyone involved. We’re trained to know how to relate to people who have the emotional side or who have dementia/Alzheimer’s.” I f you’re not able to hire someone, then find a friend or family member who has time and will sensitively help you with the undertaking of downsizing. 2. START EARLY – If you have a plan to move in June, for example, then begin in January. The process will inevitably take longer than you expected. Take it one room at a time, and take plenty of breaks. If you aren’t rushed, the process will be less stressful. “Take little bits and pieces. Don’t try to do it all at one time,” Willard says. 3. LIVE MINIMALLY – Sometimes downsizing isn’t planned. Sometimes quick decisions are required because of a change in a person's health. Willard suggests having the mentality that you could have to move or downsize unexpectedly. She discourages seniors from keeping items in their attics because they could become difficult for you to reach or move. She also recommends giving away or selling items that are not regularly used. “When you gain more things, you should get rid of things in the meantime to balance it out,” she said. 4. HAVE FUN GETTING RID OF IT – Instead of dreading the actual act of downsizing, why not have some fun with it? Sometimes, older adults may be disappointed at the lack of interest their successors show in inheriting their treasured items. “People are saving up all these things to give to their family, but the people they’re leaving them for may not understand the value. Don’t be offended by the fact that your kids don’t want your things,” Willard said. One idea is to throw a downsizing party. You can set out all of the valuable items you think your friends and family may want and allow them to choose items.

Searching for More Information? Get started with these helpful resources.

Categorize Everything When you’re in the trenches of downsizing, organization is key! As you go through each category, divide items into groups – definitely discard, maybe discard, not ready to discard, donate and throw away. You could use colored stickers to designate which group an item belongs to.

Here is a checklist to help categorize items as you move ahead in the process. 1. Papers, both records and keepsakes – Check with an accountant or tax person to find out what records need to be kept. Shred or recycle the papers you no longer need like old, canceled checks, magazine articles, catalogs, etc. Gather important papers like wills, deeds, medical records, military records, birth certificates, identification papers, etc., and keep them together in one place. Make sure a key friend or family member knows where they are. 2. Family Heirlooms – Includes jewelry, antique furniture, china and other items that someone will inherit. If there’s someone you’d like items to go to, make a list or give it to them now. If your family members are using your house as a place to store their memories, now is the time to pack them up and move them out. Your home is not a museum for old homework, clothes and other items. 3. Sentimental Items – These can be gifts, photos and souvenirs that you bought while traveling. Take a photo of items and keep that instead of the item itself. Perhaps you could record memories of the trip on your phone or camera. 4. Charitable Contributions – Gather musical instruments, clothing and books that you might take to a nonprofit or give to a friend. Many charities pick things up, or you may know a particular group or person who could use the items.

The National Association of Senior Move Managers blog www.nasmm.wordpress.com

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

5. Trash – Professional mover Sharyn Willard suggests that an estate sale professional should check out items first to determine if they have value. If not, call the city to arrange for an extra trash pickup and say goodbye!

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


NEW YEAR, NEW YOU Get fit, have fun, make new friends

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Nurses - RNs, LPNs • Home Health Aides Companions • RN Supervision Intermittent Visits or Hourly Care Home IV Therapy • Sitter Service Call us. We can help.

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All employees are screened, fidelity bonded, liability insured, and drug tested.

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View a full calendar of events on www.LIFEseniorservices.org To arrange a tour, call (918) 744-6760

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Sheridan Terrace does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

(NE of 21st and Sheridan)

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

21


Timeless Tulsa

191

The area bo Cheyenne t between 15 Streets is th Heights His Providing a to the distr the houses same style thus the St Heights His unique exp architecture

A Look at Iconic Neighborhoods Through the Decades BY KAREN J. O’BRIEN

1900 – 1910s

Brady Heights is one of the earliest built neighborhoods in Tulsa. Architects and builders used elements of Queen Anne as well as other styles, houses built on a larger scale and of a more sophisticated design than those of adjacent neighborhoods. ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Queen Anne style was popularized by English architect Richard Norman Shaw in the 1860s. The style was oddly named, having nothing to do with the 18th Century reign of Queen Anne.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT On June 27, 1980, Brady Heights became Tulsa’s first district to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

N D th P

1940 – 1950s 

192

After World War II, tract homes were built to provide for the families of returning servicemen. One of the more easily identified tract home developments in Tulsa is Lortondale, located near 26th Street between Yale and Darlington Avenue in what was considered south Tulsa at the time.

ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Lortondale homes were designed by Tulsa architect Donald Honn and built by developer Howard Grubb. They were the first spec homes to be built with central air conditioning as a standard feature.

Significan and nearb Tudor Rev

ARCHITE Craftsman Crafts mo century. I NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT These mid-century modern homes with extremely low-pitched roofs and open floor plans were some of the first of their kind in this part of the U.S. They were priced at $12,750 to $16,650.

B o M ra lo

1950 – 1960s 

Ranch-style homes became very popular in the 1950s. Homes in Tulsa's Ranch Acres sold from $25,000 to $100,000 in 1954 when “lower price” homes were in the $6,500 to $9,000 range. The neighborhood near 31st Street and Harvard Avenue is named for the ranchstyle architecture the subdivision features. The one-story ranch house is a mix of historical precedents and an adaptation of ideas from several sources, including Prairie style. ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT Ranch-style was created by architect Clifford May and is a domestic architectural style originating in the United States. The ranch-style house is noted for its long, close-to-the-ground profile and wide open layout.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

N H G a T

A A T

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Wedgwood near 21st and Yale is another example of 1960s ranchstyle homes.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


10 – 1920s  

ounded by to Elwood, 5th and 17th he Stonebraker storic District. additional variety rict is that even s classified as the are not identical, tonebraker storic District is a pression of period re in Tulsa.

ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT This piece of true architectural history was built by worldrenowned architect Bruce Goff at age 16. As one of Tulsa's real estate treasures, this Prairie School-style Stonebraker Heights home has retained it's historic character over the last 101 years.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Dominated by the Bungalow/Craftsman style, he district also contains a notable percentage of Prairie School and Colonial Revival style homes.

When the Frisco Railroad line came to Tulsafrom Vinita in 1882, the city’s population was about 200 people. The City of Tulsa was incorporated in 1899. The 1900 U. S. census reported a population of 1,390. In 1901, wildcatters and investors floodedinto the city and the town began to take shape, an official survey was done and streets laid out. Neighborhoods began to spread out from downtown Tulsa. As the population of Tulsa grew, neighborhoods developed to the west, east and south.

1900 CENSUS: 1,390 Population of the newly incorporated Tulsa

1910 CENSUS: 18,182

20 – 1930s 

nt construction of residences in the Yorktown district began in 1921 by Gillette the next year with Bungalow/Craftsman style the majority. vival style gained popularity in the late 1920s.

ECTURE STYLE FAST FACT n is an architectural style, inspired by the Arts and ovement, beginning in the last years of the 19th It began the movement away from Victorian style.

NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Historic neighborhoods such as Yorktown and Gillette represent windows of time that are architecturally homogeneous for that period of Tulsa’s history.

Population growth during first oil boom

1920 CENSUS: 72,075 The City sees a big growth spurt with second oil boom in early statehood

1930 CENSUS: 141,258 The Roaring ‘20s and annexation spurs growth

1940 CENSUS: 142,157

Great Depression slows city’s growth

1950 CENSUS: 182,740

Oil and aviation industry bring prosperity

1960 CENSUS: 261,685 Many buildings lost in period of urban renewal

1960s – Present 

Between the censuses in 1960 and 2010, the City of Tulsa population moved further east and south. Modern architectural styles derived from the anch-style, such as two-story split-level and the ow, flat-roofed contemporary emerged.

ARCHITECTURE STYLE FAST FACT A split-level home has staggered floor levels. There are typically two short sets of stairs. NEIGHBORHOOD FAST FACT Further residential developments and in-fill projects include large “McMansion” style homes, a Neoeclectic or Neo-Colonial creation from mix-and-match decorative details. 

1970 CENSUS: 330,350 Continued, slow growth and construction

1980 CENSUS: 360,919 City goes through oil bust years

1990 CENSUS: 367,302 Recovery years are aided by factory and tech jobs

2000 CENSUS: 393,049 City leaders urge investment in infrastructure, downtown area

2010 CENSUS: 391,906 Downturn in economy stalls expansion

2020 CENSUS ESTIMATE: 401,190 Tulsa attracts new residents with Gathering Place, revitalized downtown area


With Two of Tulsa's Experienced Realtors BY JOEY MECHELLE FARQUE

hey are the experts when it comes to home inspections, repairs, mortgage lenders and insurance. They are realtors, and their priority is helping you find or sell your home. Meet two of Oklahoma’s long-time realtors and hear their stories of buying and selling. Sally Carter moved back to Tulsa from Boston as a young, single parent in the late 1970s. She was a teacher, but a teacher’s pay in Oklahoma wasn’t cutting it, so she began looking for a better paying job. “I did secretarial work for my parents who owned The Martin Company Realtors,” Sally explained. “After editing some commercial contracts, my father, Jack Martin, suggested I take the real estate class so I’d have a better understanding of real estate law.” Sally sat for the broker’s exam a couple of years later. Tulsa is a diverse community with something for everyone. It’s a great place for any demographic. There are some beautiful areas in our city that I would like to see restored. – Lori Cain, Realtor with eXp Realty

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In 1984, after Tulsa experienced the Memorial Day Flood, Mayor Terry Young hired Sally to negotiate the purchase of 350 homes the Corps of Engineers had marked for removal. That project took more than a year. While she was focused exclusively on buying flood houses, her mother took up golf and her father delved deeper into the oil and gas royalty business, so Sally moved her license to Tulsa’s Walter & Associates where she remains to this day.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

In 2002, Lori Cain was offered a job to prepare a website and marketing materials for a small, start-up real estate brokerage. In February 2003, she took her real estate test and got licensed. “The job didn’t really work out, but by then, I was bitten by the real estate bug – and I just started selling,” Lori said. Today, Lori is with eXp Realty, a cloud-brokerage with close to 40,000 agents worldwide. THAT FIRST SALE All agents remember their first sale – and there is always a story. Lori remembers her first. “It’s a sad story. A woman was selling her home because her husband was years behind on child support, and she just had her hours cut at her job. She cried all over my listing paperwork,” Lori recalled. “I felt so sorry for her and wanted to make everything better. When we finished the paperwork and I returned to my car, I burst into tears, thinking ‘what have I gotten myself into?’ I learned a valuable lesson that day about compassion.” When asked what keeps her going, Sally talked about homeownership as the best road to personal wealth. “Through the years, there have been dramatic changes in the economy with interest rates as high as 18-20%, stock market crashes, etc., but people still www.LIFEseniorservices.org


It's the joy I feel when I find a house that wraps its arms around the buyer, offering them solace from our crazy world, a neighborhood where people care about and look out for one another. – Sally Carter, Realtor at Walter & Associates

need a place to live so I tackle those challenges, figure out how to make it work for buyers and sellers,” she said. “Economics aside, it is the joy I feel when I find a house that wraps its arms around the buyer, offering them solace from our crazy world, a neighborhood where people care about and look out for one another. I’ve received gifts, flowers, thank you notes and the ultimate compliment of referring me to friends and family.” IN CHARGE Because all real estate agents are independent contractors, they are their own bosses, which can have advantages. “Being able to schedule my work so I could attend Little League games, school plays and other activities with my son was a huge incentive to me. After he went to college, I began to travel. This kind of freedom doesn’t pay the bills, so you have to be disciplined, a self-starter and save for a rainy day (like quarterly taxes, health insurance & retirement),” Sally explained.

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Lori loves the fact that you truly get out of real estate what you put into it. “We can make our own hours and choose to work when we want – which may be 18-hour days or two-hour days! No ceiling, no limitations – you work for the goals you’ve set for yourself,” Lori said. Let’s face it, not all showings over the years can be perfect. From the unexpected to high emotions to embarrassing occurrences to emotional situations – anything is possible. “In a gated neighborhood with a guard on duty at the gate who assured me the house was vacant, my clients and I walked into the bathroom where a well-known public figure was showering! Talk about a hasty exit! I found out later he was a frequent house guest who had his own key to use when the owners were out of town,” Sally recalled. SELLING A CITY There is a reason that realtors choose to stay and work in the area. From the world-class ballet company, symphony orchestra, theater, outstanding museums, performing arts venues and beautiful parks, Tulsa is increasingly attractive to potential homeowners. The city has a lot to offer – from interesting neighborhoods and unique homes to a rich history and genuinely friendly people. “Fortunately, our housing market is pretty affordable for people of all ages and stages of life,” Sally said. “Tulsa is a medium-size town with a big city vibe.” “Tulsa is a diverse community with something for everyone. It’s a great place for any demographic,” Lori said. “There are some beautiful areas in our city that I would like to see restored." www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine has been educating and engaging audiences for more than 30 years. It has built an outstanding brand that is recognized and trusted for excellence and value – the very qualities advertisers seek. Advertising in LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine associates your company with these qualities and puts your message in front of LIFE’s diverse audience.

For additional information or to place your advertising in LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine please contact: BERNIE DORNBLASER bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org (918) 664-9000, ext. 1206

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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adding a variety of dining options, from casual to formal, as well as bars and lounges.

The Heartwood Commons cohousing community is already like close-knit family.

“Active adult communities simply provide more carefree living with an appropriately designed residence linked to active recreation, entertainment and continuing education – as well as proximity to healthcare, fitness and other community services,” said Bradford Perkins, architect and author of “Building Type Basics for Senior Living.”

Baby Boomers Redefine Senior Living Trends

Active adult communities can simply be a conveniently Cohousing is a located neighborhood with particular kind of age restrictions for residents, intentional community. You live in a close-knit or they may offer an array neighborhood where you of services similar to a know your neighbors. It’s cruise ship. Demonstration a neighborhood that you can lean on. kitchens, tennis and – Suzy Sharp pickleball courts, travel clubs, spas and workout facilities are often included. They may also offer facilities for swimming, horseback riding, a walking track or a golf course. Like-minded residents can band together to play Bunko, ride their Harleys or start an investment club.

BY JULIE WENGER WATSON

T

hey’re known as Baby Boomers, and they make up about 25% of almost every state in the country, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Born in the time of prosperity following World War II, around 73 million Baby Boomers are now in their mid-50s to mid-70s. They’ve spent their lifetimes redefining how the country works and recreates – and now they’re redefining life during retirement.

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ACTIVE ADULT COMMUNITIES Ready or not, Boomers are coming – and they want more from senior living communities, seeking amenities that support an active lifestyle. In response, even traditional retirement communities have upgraded their services with chef-prepared meals, concierge services, and opportunities for travel, exercise, hobbies and a variety of social activities as part of the offerings. With an emphasis on hospitality, many senior communities are also

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

It’s all about lifestyle, and Boomers are setting the pace. Active retirement communities promote maintenance-free living with easy access to shopping, entertainment venues and travel opportunities. Florida continues to be a dream location for many retirees with no state income tax, a cost-of-living around the national average, no tax on retirement income, and, of course, the weather. Some Florida communities resemble small cities with different residential styles, communal buildings and activities directors.   Age-restricted communities must have at least one person over the age of 55 in at least 80% of homes, according to the Fair Housing Act. Age-targeted communities are marketed to people 55 and up but aren’t limited to those homeowners. Be sure to check specific rules

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when considering an age-restricted community as some limit how long grandchildren can visit. They generally don’t provide home health care but may have a referral network should it become necessary for residents. Search for active adult communities at www.whereyoulivematters.org. SMART-SIZING   “Smart-sizing” is a popular trend when it comes to living choices. As opposed to “downsizing,” which can imply compromise or loss, smart-sizing embodies simplicity and enjoyment – finding the perfect space for your lifestyle needs. The idea of having a smaller mortgage, less responsibility for yardwork and maintenance and fewer bathrooms to clean can have a lot of appeal to retirees who have moved repeatedly in their careers and don’t mind embracing change. Meyers Research, a housing research firm located in California, reports smart-sizing isn’t just about square feet but is about a home that’s designed with the owner in mind. Construction should be affordable, focus on areas where residents spend most of their time, and use glass and light for spaciousness. Smart-sized homes are generally described as energy-efficient with a smaller building footprint and a minimal outdoor area to maintain, according to the research firm. Smart-sized homes generally include smart technology as well. Baby Boomers are also leading the way in choosing homes that use technology to monitor and control a variety of systems remotely and with voice commands. Smarthome technology is becoming more prevalent in the form of lights, thermostats, appliances and security systems. This technology can even reach into areas of health monitoring, with everything from wearable apps to telemedicine. Pria, a Black & Decker product, is a medication manager that provides alerts at med times and two-way video calling to help keep long-distance caregivers informed. Other technology can help monitor health conditions and detect changes that cause concern. Voice-activated devices such as Amazon’s Alexa can be ideal for helping an older adult use convenient services like ride-sharing programs and grocery delivery. More importantly, voicecontrolled security systems mean help is just a voice command away. Smart appliances can remind you when maintenance is due, and sensors are available to detect leaks before the damage becomes apparent. Video doorbells allow remote screening of anyone who comes knocking on the door. COHOUSING COMMUNITIES Cohousing communities are described as people living together in neighborhoods designed for both community interaction and personal privacy, according to the Cohousing Association of America. Residents live in private homes but can easily interact with each other. Common spaces may bring them together for meals and www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Future residents of Heartwood Commons Cohousing Community break ground near 71st Street South and Riverside Drive in Tulsa.

other activities like gardening. People attracted to cohousing generally have a wish to share their lives and work collaboratively with others. It may be particularly appealing to single adults but is attractive to many married couples as well. Oakcreek Community in Stillwater was the first cohousing community in the state. It began with a group of eight households of people who wanted to retire in Stillwater but couldn’t find the housing they wanted. They found a site and worked with an architect to design a plan of private homes in four different sizes and remodeled an existing home to become a common house for meals. It opened to the first residents in October 2012. Tulsa is now getting its first cohousing community. It came about after group of interested adults toured Oakcreek in the spring of 2016 and were inspired to move forward with cohousing plans. Four years later, the group broke ground near South 71st Street and Riverside Drive for what is now known as Heartwood Commons. The 55+ cohousing community will eventually include 36 private homes built around shared spaces. The purpose of cohousing communities like this one is to foster connection. While households have independent incomes and private lives, community activities are collaboratively planned and managed with neighbors.  “Cohousing is a particular kind of intentional community,” said Suzy Sharp, the point person for Heartwood’s marketing and membership team. “You live in a close-knit neighborhood where you know your neighbors. It’s a neighborhood that you can lean on.”

Sharp and other future Heartwood residents have all had input into the development of this community, something Sharp says is unique about cohousing for seniors. “They are involved in deciding what the community will look like, what the houses look like, what kinds of common amenities the community wants, and how the community is going to live together,” she explained. While residents own their homes and are responsible for their electric bills, property taxes and homeowners’ insurance, some expenses are shared, similar to a Home Owners Association. “It’s common for cohousing fees to include things like water, sewer, trash, and even cable and Internet,” Sharp said. “You share common expenses, and the other thing that’s included in them is money that goes towards a long-term savings account, or reserve account, to cover major replacements like roofs, dishwashers in the common area, etc.” Although the community doesn’t provide levels of health care to its residents as a multi-level facility might, the homes are designed for “aging in place,” and residents can hire any in-home help that is needed.  For Sharp, cohousing is all about the community. “I’m looking forward to living in a place where I can walk out my door and run into somebody with whom I want to have a cup of coffee, or a glass of wine, with a good conversation,” she said. For more information visit  www.heartwoodcommonstulsa.com.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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HEALTHY LIVING

s we start the new year with the release of COVID-19 vaccines and the hope of an eventual end to the pandemic, what have we learned from the last 10 months? Some of the lessons of 2020 have been valuable ones. Most of us are now familiar with the technology that keeps us connected to loved ones near and far. Some have established a rewarding new hobby like gardening or baking bread.

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The Keys to Worrying Less and Thriving More in 2021 BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

THE ANATOMY OF

ANXIETY

AND HOW THE BODY RESPONDS

WHAT TRIGGERS IT? The senses perceive a threat – a frightening sight, sound or smell – and sends messages in two paths: the emotional brain and the thinking brain.

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Responding to what the sense perceive, the amygdala triggers changes in brain chemicals and hormones that put the entire body in anxiety mode.

THE SHORTCUT

STRESS HORMONE BOOST

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The amygdala (emotional brain) perceives the threat and kicks in, sending messages to the body that are meant to protect us from danger but also cause stress and anxiety. The body begins to react before the thinking mind has processed the potential danger.

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After the fear response is activated, the conscious or thinking mind kicks into gear. The frontal cortex can now process whether the body is really in immediate danger. If so, the body will stay on alert. If not, the physical response starts to decrease.

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WAYS TO COPE WITH STRESS MINDFULNESS BREATHING EXERCISE Perceived threats may trigger the amygdala even though the body is not in immediate danger. Mindfulness helps you recognize the symptoms of the stress response. Coping methods like focusing on breathing can help activate the thinking brain or frontal cortex. Exercise can help burn up stress hormones. Regular practice of coping techniques, mindfulness and movement can help the body more quickly move from “fight or flight” to “rest and digest.”

Information and graphic adapted from www.survival-mastery.com

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The amygdala triggers the hypothalamus to send messages to the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands produce hormones including epinephrine and cortisol. The stress hormones “hijack” the thinking mind, making it difficult to process memories of traumatic events.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

Stress hormones cause the eyes to dilate and senses to become hyper-aware of surroundings. The heart pounds, blood pressure increases and breathing quickens to provide the body with energy and oxygen to respond to the danger. Blood is diverted to the muscles which tense and may tremble. Skin becomes clammy or flushed. Digestion and some other functions shut down.

FLIGHT OR FIGHT

The senses switch onto high alert, and energy increases so the body can respond to the threat the mind has perceived. The amygdala may trigger a strong aggressive or fearful emotional response that later feels like an overreaction.

We’ve learned personal shoppers can do a decent job of picking out produce and that grocery pickup isn’t just for those with physical limitations or small kids. Some of us rediscovered our natural hair color, and most of us have a new appreciation for loungewear. We can wash our hands with the skill of a surgeon and have embraced bottles of hand sanitizer as the most desirable accessory to any outfit. Perhaps you’re one of the fortunate ones who, like Dr. Terence Grewe, has reached a new level of fitness. Grewe is a physician with Utica Park Clinic in Tulsa and is board certified in family and geriatric medicine. At the beginning of the pandemic, he committed to exercising for 30 minutes every day – a promise he’s kept. Grewe jokingly credits a nagging electronic device for his accomplishment. “My Apple watch makes me do it,” he said. “Working out keeps my body moving and gives my brain a chance to rest. It gives me something to focus on besides what’s going on in the world.” You may be more like the majority of us who have alternated healthy behavior with bowls of ice cream, watching news compulsively or not at all, reaching out to others and going it alone. If you’ve struggled with depression and anxiety during COVID-19, this article is intended for you. There are steps we can take to decrease the strangleholds of fear and uncertainty, and they start with a look at the human brain. THE SETUP Medical researchers studying stress and anxiety point to the temporal lobe, a part of the brain that processes sound, memory and emotion, among other things. The temporal lobe is part of the limbic system which deals with emotion, learning and motivation. Specifically, scientists point to an almond-shaped region of the brain called the amygdala which initiates the stress-response system. The amygdala gets input from all our senses, detecting stress in our environment, our bodies and our feelings. Stimulating the amygdala causes intense emotions like aggression or fear. Its job is to jolt us into flight or fight to escape a threat. The amygdala starts a chain reaction that releases stress hormones that in turn affect heart rate, blood pressure and breathing. Stress hormones also impact digestion, increasing appetite and the risk of stress ulcers.

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Because the amygdala is involved in learning and memory, it is thought to be how we learn to associate good and bad emotions with sounds and smells. Shock and trauma from negative experiences get triggered when we hear a car crash or an angry voice. On the other hand, we learn to associated good experiences with those senses as well – remember Pavlov’s dogs salivating when they heard the dinner bell? Either way, when you have a “gut reaction” to something in life – good or bad – the amygdala is involved. What the brain doesn’t seem to know is whether you’re actually in present danger or the stress-response is being triggered by something in the environment or even our imagination. THE PROBLEM The amygdala is just trying to help us survive, but exposure to long-term stress is different than reacting to a temporary threat. Months of stress takes a big toll on the body and mind. Many adults ages 65 and up have been strongly affected by the challenges of the pandemic, and they can also be particularly susceptible to the effects of stress on the body. Older adults are likely to be worried about COVID-19 and stressed by not being able to do the things they like. The typical older adult Dr. Grewe sees has several medical conditions. Excess stress and anxiety make all those conditions harder to manage, he said. Grewe said he’s treated several older patients for COVID-19 because they persisted in regular activities like family gatherings and church, so he urges older adults to be ready for the long haul. “I think we’re all having to cope with how long this is going on. If you’d asked us in March, we would have thought it’d be over in six months even though the experts said that would not be the case,” he said. “We’re going to have to learn to cope with it for at least another six months, maybe another year. That means a lot of strain on our interpersonal relationships and strain on people from isolation and from not being able to do the things you enjoy.” WHAT HELPS There’s no doubt the amygdala was working overtime in 2020, but we can use what science teaches about our brains to help give it a rest. We want it to hand over some of the workload to the prefrontal cortex instead. That part of the brain helps us assess situations, plan, organize, decide. If we can learn to toggle the switch from fear

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that the woman’s mood and health improved. He recommends spending time reaching out to others by phone or internet to maintain the social support that also helps us combat stress. As for physical consumption, Grewe recommends keeping a close eye on alcohol intake. Recommendations are for no more than one drink a day for women and smaller men, up to two drinks a day for most males. Although alcohol may feel relaxing and give temporary relief, studies show in the long term it causes increased inflammation and impairs digestion, organ function, energy levels, the immune system and sleep.

DR. TERENCE GREWE to calm, we’ve taken an important step toward improving our health. First responders are taught to use “square breathing” to stay sharp and decisive during emergencies. The basic formula is simple: breathe in for four counts; hold the breath for four; exhale for four counts, then rest for four before starting again. It helps the body switch from flight or fight to rest and digest, so those who suffer from digestive disorders can also benefit from square breathing. Returning to Dr. Grewe’s Apple watch, movement is one of the best tools to use against chronic worry. Think of it this way: move a muscle, change a thought. Grewe recommends downloading an app or setting alarms that remind us to move at least once an hour. “Exercise is good for everything,” he said. “Thirty minutes of any exercise is extremely helpful for any condition much less stress and anxiety. It can be anything from chair exercises to golf to walking around the block.” Interrupt the amygdala’s response by changing the input given by your senses. Soothing music, a candle, an encouraging podcast can all help derail stress hormones. Watch what you consume – both mentally and physically. Dr. Grewe said one of his patients was so upset over the state of the nation it was affecting her health. He learned she spent hours watching television coverage of politics and the pandemic. “I asked her what she thought she could do about it, and she said ‘nothing – absolutely nothing,’” he recalled. He prescribed watching no more than a halfhour or so of news coverage a day and reports

That brings up another important factor in defeating stress – sleep. Older adults can have difficulty with quality of sleep including trouble falling asleep and increased waking through the night, studies show. “If people don’t get enough sleep, they’re not going to deal with stress well at all,” Dr. Grewe said. Keeping to a regular sleep schedule, having a relaxing evening routine before bed and keeping your bedroom environment free from distractions can help. WHEN IT’S NOT ENOUGH For many people, stress can be managed with exercise, coping techniques like square breathing, social support and getting adequate sleep. If those things aren’t enough, Dr. Grewe recommends talking to a physician about the possibility of counseling, medication or both. “Anxiety can be caused by stress and problems of living, but it also can be a biochemical problem in the brain that doesn’t let us process things in what we’d consider a normal manner,” he said. In those cases, medication may be a valuable option. “The newer serotonin types of antidepressants such as Zoloft, Prozac and Lexapro are all very helpful,” he said. They may have added benefits for some of the physical conditions older adults often face as well, he noted. Physicians avoid prescribing sedatives to older adults because of potential medication interactions and increased fall risk. “Focus on what you can help and hang in there,” Dr. Grewe concluded. “We’ll eventually get through this. No pandemic is permanent.” Sources: National Institute of Mental Health, National Center for Biotechnology Information, Harvard Medical School Health Publishing.

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MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

WORD SEARCH: HOME IS WHERE YOUR HEART IS Find and circle all of the words.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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PUZZLE PARTNERS

MUMBO JUMBO A mumbo jumbo is a list of words/hints for you to unscramble. You then take designated letters from each word/hint to come up with the final word that is associated with each hint you have unscrambled. Unscramble each of the clue words. Take the letters that appear boxes and unscramble them for the final word. in Answers on page 43. PUZZLE THEME: Home and Location

SIAFMEIL EGRAGA YAODROW OMROB KONO EOHM ALWYALH E

G

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© 2013 Wuzzles & Puzzles

BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 43.

L Y I N G

PROGRAM

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SMOKE SMOKE SMOKE SMOKE SMOKE

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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15 Products

Our homes are extensions of ourselves. When our home environment is cluttered, it takes extra time and energy to find things. Instead of living with that stress and anxiety, imagine how much simpler and more peaceful life could be with a little strategic organizing. It's helpful to find creative ways to use space effectively. The following home organization products can help us take control of our homes and lives.

FOR HOME ORGANIZATION BY KIMBERLY BLAKER

1. G  eekDigg Food Container Lid Organizer {$22.99 on Amazon} Food storage containers are handy for leftovers, meal prepping, and other kitchen uses. But keeping them organized can be a nightmare. This adjustable organizer means your storage containers take up less space, and a matching lid is always at your fingertips.

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3. Tosca Magnet Kitchen Storage Rack {$50 on Burke DĂŠcor} A cluttered kitchen makes it more challenging to cook and clean when there's insufficient counter space. Stick this magnetic storage rack to your fridge. It can hold your most used items like paper towels, spices, cookbooks, and oven mitts. 4. S  mart Design Over-the-Door Adjustable Pantry Organizer {$31.47 on Amazon} Use the empty space behind your pantry door to store and organize pantry items. This organizer makes it easy to grab things you use frequently or that you need to remember to use first. 5. M  ind Reader 9 Removable Drawer Tea Bag Holder and Condiment Organizer {$17.99 on Amazon} Get rid of big bulky tea boxes and keep your teabags organized. That way, you can see what you have and what's running low. The Mind Reader 9 fits tea bags and even has room for creamers, sweeteners, or coffee pods.

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2. K  leverise Pot and Pan Storage Rack Organizers {$18.99 on Amazon} Pots and pans of all different shapes and sizes take up an abundance of space. This adjustable organizer rack allows you to fit more and quickly find what you need so you can utilize your time cooking.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

6. Z  enna Home Drop Door Over-the-Toilet Spacesaver {$52.05 on Amazon} Utilize the space over your toilet to store extra toilet paper, sanitary products, tissues, cleaning products, toiletries, spare hand towels, and anything else you need to keep in the bathroom. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


7. Simple Houseware Closet Underwear Organizer Drawer Divider {$14.97 on Amazon} Drawers can quickly become a mess when searching through them for specific clothing items. A drawer divider set can help you keep smaller pieces like scarves, ties, socks, and undergarments separate and organized. 8. Songmics Folding Storage Ottoman Bench {$47.99 to $55.99 on Amazon} When organizing in a smaller space, you want items to be useful in more than one way. An ottoman bench can be placed at the end of the bed, in an entryway, or in the living room for extra seating space. 9. Devesanter Pants Hanger {$11.98 on Amazon} These pants hangers use a tiered system to fit up to five pants or similar clothing items on one hanger. As a result, you have more room and can quickly find the clothing you need. 10. Spacesaver Premium Vacuum Bags {$25.99 to $39.99 on Amazon} Store out-of-season fabric items in vacuum-sealed bags to save storage space and keep items clean. You can use the bags for offseason sheets, comforters, sweaters, or even cushions and pillows. 11. 24-Pocket Simple Houseware Over-the-Door Hanging Shoe Organizer {$9.87 on Amazon} These shoe organizers hang over the door and can store shoes, but also cleaning supplies, snacks, beauty products, accessories, and more. Clear pockets mean you can easily see what you need to access. 12. 2-Tier OBOR Expandable Under-Sink Organizer {$32.99 on Amazon} Sinks often have a large cabinet area underneath to accommodate plumbing, making the cabinet space awkward to use. This organizer has adjustable shelves that can move horizontally to fit around hardware, providing you multiple levels so you can utilize more space. 13. EONSIX Over the Sink Dish Drying Rack {$59.99 on Amazon} This dish drying rack uses wasted space around the sink, so your countertops stay clear. It allows dishes and utensils to drip directly into the sink as they dry. You can even store frequently used kitchenware there. The rack can also hold freshly washed fruits and veggies. 14. BehLiving Gift Wrap Organizer {$32.99 on Amazon} This organizer provides a single place to organize all your gift wrap, bows, ribbons, cards, and gift bags, plus the tape and scissors. It keeps everything in one spot for easy last-minute gift wrapping and can slide under a bed or into a closet, so it's out of the way. 15. 14-Piece Chef’s Path Airtight Food Storage Container Set {$33.63 on Amazon} Organize your pantry by eliminating bags and boxes of various sizes with this uniform container set. Clear sides help you see when you're running low, so there are no surprises when you go to grab your favorite snack.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

MAKE THE MOST OF

YOUR SPACE BY KIMBERLY BLAKER

Space can be a scarce commodity in smaller homes, but the way you organize and the styles of furniture you choose can make a big difference. Try the following ideas to make the most of every nook and cranny.

1. FAMILY ROOM When shopping for living room furniture, take heed. The size that furniture appears in showrooms is deceiving. Measure both the width and depth of sofas and chairs, and opt for smaller styles. In small living rooms, sectionals offer the most seating while taking up the smallest amount of space. Select a recliner instead of a chair and ottoman. That way, when the footrest isn't in use, it can be stored away. To create storage space in your family room, choose end tables and a coffee table with drawers and cabinets. Arrange all the furniture against the walls if possible. If there isn't wall space for a sofa or chair to back up to, place a cabinet and table lamp behind it to serve as an end table.

2. THE MESS HALL They don't call it a mess hall for nothing! Underutilized gadgets and gizmos take up precious kitchen space. Take inventory and eliminate non-essentials. Also, better utilize your cabinet space by purchasing additional shelving or small stackable organizers. If you are replacing your cabinets, buy taller ceiling height cabinets. The top shelves provide extra storage for seldomused essentials. Also add corner shelving to the outside ends of your cabinets for knick-knacks, a fruit basket, and other odds-and-ends. For tight eating areas, consider purchasing a rectangular corner table with "L" shaped bench seating.

3. BEDCHAMBER BASICS Buy shallow cardboard containers to slide under the bed or stack in the closet for off-season clothing. Under the bed can also be used for storing holiday decorations, gift-wrapping, keepsakes and more. Also, consider converting your closet to double hanging rods to make it more functional. Does your bedroom serve as a home office by day? If so, invest in a Murphy's bed. Just press a button, and your bedroom is transformed as the bed mechanically folds into a wall cabinet. Install a wall-mounted light above a reading chair or your headboard to eliminate a table or nightstand. When choosing window coverings, forego drapes and curtains. Venetian or wood blinds or decorative shades with a valance on top will create the illusion of more space.

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THE DINNER BELLE

THE PINK HOUSE Homemade Reasons to Gather Together

“I was going to simply enjoy the luscious marriage of salty bacon and eggy/cheesy filling.”

BY CINDY WEBB The Pink House, a charming, Victorian-style restaurant located in the Belvidere Mansion in Claremore, is a quick 30-minute drive from Tulsa. The Rogers County Historical Society purchased and restored the Belvidere in the 1990s, and it is now an Oklahoma treasure. The Pink House restaurant and gift shop are on the first floor, historically furnished living quarters on the second and an expansive ballroom on the third. The Belvidere was constructed in 1907 by John Bayless. Though Bayless died before the home was completed, his family lived in the house until 1919. In the 1920s the home was sold and divided into apartments. By the early 1990s the mansion was deserted and ready for the wrecking ball when the Historical Society rescued it. The mansion is open for touring and rental. I have a bit of family history with the Belvidere. My Mother’s cousin, Joan Hawkins, was on the board of the Historical Society when the mansion was purchased. Joan and many other volunteers spent long hours 34

FOOD Luncheon and Tea Room Fare

PRICE Appetizers From $4 to $5 Main Dishes From $7 to $10 Desserts From $4 to $5

California Cobb Salad

meticulously restoring the then tumbledown Victorian-style mansion. In 1997, while it was still in process of restoration, my daughter Kathryn had her 9th birthday party in the freshly painted, sunlit ballroom of the Belvidere. The Pink House has not always been a part of the Belvidere. Kay Grubbs originally opened it in 1982 in a literal pink house in Claremore. In 2007, Margo Stewart and her daughter, Shari

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

VERDICT A beautifully restored, Victorian-style restaurant that pours on the charm.

THE PINK HOUSE

Belvidere Mansion 121 N. Chickasaw • Claremore, OK 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. • Monday – Saturday (918) 342-2544 www.pinkhouseofclaremore.com

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Beguin, purchased it. However, the building was in serious disrepair. “When the Historical Society approached us (suggesting relocating to the Belvidere) we were thrilled,” said Shari Beguin. To sample lunch at The Pink House, I invited my foodie friends Jeff and Didi Davis to join me. Due to COVID-19, I called ahead and learned that outside seating was available. Outdoor is dining is limited two tables; however, so be aware of that when you go. When our cheerful young waitress, Emma, handed us our menus, I was delighted to see a separate tea menu. Didi tried the crème brule oolong tea, while I had the Madagascar coconut white tea. Both were delicious! For lunch, I ordered the broccoli and cheese quiche, which came with a green salad, a fruit salad and a small slice of banana bread served with real butter. The first thing I noticed was that the salad greens were so fresh it seemed they had been pulled from the garden that morning. The ranch dressing tasted like the original Hidden Valley ranch dressing – the kind that came in a packet and had to be mixed with buttermilk and mayonnaise (so worth the trouble). The fresh fruit salad was topped with the “famous Pink House dip,” a fluffy, sweet concoction. My slice of quiche was somewhat small and barely warm, but, oh my, the flavor! In fact, it tasted a bit too good. After my second bacony bite, I realized I had been served the bacon and spinach quiche. I was going to simply enjoy the luscious marriage of salty bacon and eggy/cheesy filling, but my friend Jeff alerted Emma to the mistake. Embarrassed, Emma quickly returned with a large, piping hot slice of my originally chosen quiche. I’ve been on a vegetarian diet for about 18 months, but that savory bacon and spinach quiche was so heavenly, I happily indulged. The broccoli and cheese quiche was quite good warmed in the microwave later for my dinner. In homage to his home state, Jeff ordered the California club sandwich. It had large chunks of flavorful chicken breast, bacon, swiss cheese and tasty avocado on what he described as “toasted artisan bread.” It was served with potato chips and a crunchy dill pickle. He said he would definitely order it again. Didi ordered the southwestern cobb salad drizzled with a delicious creamy vinaigrette. She immediately commented on how fresh and crisp the greens were. It also included generous slices of avocado, marinated grilled chicken slices and bits of crunchy bacon. For dessert, Didi ordered the seasonal special, pumpkin cheesecake, while I opted for coconut cream pie, and Jeff ordered the Butterscotch Layer Dessert. All of the desserts were fresh and yummy, but Didi’s pumpkin cheesecake was my favorite. It was New York-style cheesecake baked with a top layer of pumpkin pie filling. The melding of the two desserts was genius and perfect for the season!

LIFE’S VIRTUAL PROGRAMMING January 2020

Follow LIFE Senior Services on Facebook for video outreach, news, local events and area resources for seniors. Find the following content and more at www.facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices during January.  sk SeniorLine With Sarah Tronnier, MSW A Friday, January 8, 15, 22 and 29 • 2 p.m. Join Sarah, LIFE Senior Services’ sunniest case manager, Fridays at 2 p.m. on LIFE’s Facebook page. Sarah enjoys connecting with LIFE followers and sharing tips and thoughts on senior living and family caregiving. She has two special programs planned for January 8 and 22, but will also be live on January 15 and 29. • New Year’s Resolutions Friday, January 8 • 2 p.m Discuss healthy, happy and fun new year's resolutions as we enter 2021. • Personal Emergency Response Systems Friday, January 22 • 2 p.m. An important safety device is a personal emergency response system, sometimes called a medical alert button. Technology has come far in this area. Sarah will share some shopping tips, as well as some things to watch out for in the fine print.  ffordable Housing Options for Seniors A Tuesday, January 12 • 10 a.m. If you have had trouble finding affordable senior housing, this presentation is for you! Sarah Tirrell, director of Vintage Housing, will talk about a full range of independent housing options and assistance for lower-income seniors.  rafting with Roxanne C Wednesday, January 20 • 2 p.m. Join LIFE’s Roxanne King for step-by-step instructions for making a decorative wine bottle. The only materials you will need are: • A wine bottle (any bottle with a similar shape will do), • Roll of any color (or multiple colors) of twine or hemp cord, the thicker the better. Yarn is not recommended. • Elmer’s or any quick-drying glue • Small twig from a tree • Craft flower of your choice, a little larger than a quarter or up to golf-ball-sized  eating the Winter Blues B Tuesday, January 26 • 2 p.m. Deborah Tommey, LIFE’s behavioral health consultant, will discuss Seasonal Patterned Depression and share tips on overcoming the winter doldrums.

We happily recommend The Pink House, and, don’t let the name fool you, it is not just a ladies’ tea room. Men are regulars at The Pink House, and the menu satisfies the tastes of both men and women. Finally, if you order the broccoli and cheese quiche, I hope they accidentally send you a slice of the bacon and spinach quiche. Believe me, you won’t send it back!

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

35


An Evening With Ann Patchett – Magic City Books Join Magic City Books in welcoming author Ann Patchett back to Tulsa – virtually! The 2014 winner of Tulsa City-County Library’s Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, Patchett is no stranger to the city. Magic City will host this event in celebration of the paperback release of her latest novel, “The Dutch House.”

About “The Dutch House”

At the end of the Second World War, Cyril Conroy combines luck and a single canny investment to begin an enormous real estate empire, propelling his family from poverty to enormous wealth. His first order of business is to buy the Dutch House, a lavish estate in the suburbs outside of Philadelphia. Meant as a surprise for his wife, the house sets in motion the undoing of everyone he loves. The story is told by Cyril’s son Danny, as he and his older sister, the brilliantly acerbic and self-assured Maeve, are exiled from the house where they grew up by their stepmother. The two wealthy siblings are thrown back into the poverty their parents had escaped from and find that all they have to count on is one another. It is this unshakeable bond between them that both saves their lives and thwarts their futures. Set over the course of five decades, The Dutch House is a dark fairy tale about two smart people who cannot overcome their past. Despite every outward sign of success, Danny and Maeve are only truly comfortable when they’re together. Throughout their lives they return to the well-worn story of what they’ve lost with humor and rage. But when at last they’re forced to confront the people who left them behind, the relationship between an indulged brother and his ever-protective sister is finally tested. Tickets will include a paperback copy of “The Dutch House” and a link to the virtual event on Thursday, January 7 at 7 p.m.

36

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

'Savvy Caregiver' Series The Alzheimer’s Association Oklahoma Chapter has hosted many virtual events in 2020 and will host a virtual four-part series in January called “Savvy Caregiver.” The series will explore every aspect of dementia caregiving and will arm caregivers with knowledge, not only on how to care for their loved ones, but also how to take care of themselves while doing so. This series will be held virtually, via Zoom on the following dates: • Part 1: Tuesday, January 12 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. • Part 2: Thursday, January 14 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

• Part 3: Tuesday, January 19 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. • Part 4: Thursday, January 21 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. To register for this series, and to view a full line-up of virtual events, visit www.alz.org/oklahoma and search for virtual education or call the 24/7 Helpline at (800) 272-3900. The Alzheimer’s Association Oklahoma Chapter serves all 77 counties in Oklahoma, with offices in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Lawton, Ada and Enid.

OU is Seeking Caregiver Feedback Researchers from the University of Oklahoma are conducting a survey of Oklahoma family caregiver needs and characteristics. Results from this research can help to better understand the needs of caregivers and understand the differences between caregivers caring for a loved one in the community, and those using residential care facilities for support. If you are caring for or managing the care of a loved one, researchers would like to hear from you! As a thank you for completing this survey, you will be entered in to win one of five $100 gift cards courtesy of OU. If you would like more information, contact Kim Cassie at (918) 640-3121 or kmcassie@ou.edu. A list of commonly asked questions, along with the survey, can be found online at www.tinyurl.com/OKcaregivers.

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SHARE YOUR TIME & TALENT To submit a volunteer opportunity, contact Kristen Harris at kharris@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1207.

At the end it’s not about what you have or even what you’ve accomplished. It’s about who you’ve lifted up, who you’ve made better. It’s about what you’ve given back. – Denzel Washington

 ommunity Food Bank of C Eastern Oklahoma The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma is now accepting volunteers. Precautions are in place to limit the number of volunteers per shift, and the best practices for physical distancing, cleanliness and sanitary conditions are maintained. It is requested that you bring your own face mask. Various opportunities exist, from sorting and packing to outdoor community food distribution. For more information, contact Teressia Kehr at (918) 936-4512 or Karen Mirando at (918) 936-4545 or go online to www.okfoodbank.volunteerhub.com.

Reading Partners Reading Partners is looking for volunteers to tutor children in grades 1– 4 and help them become lifelong readers. By sharing knowledge and experience, volunteers become mentors, friends and positive role models to the children they work with. Working one-on-one with a student is a fun, effective way to change a life – maybe even your own. This is a virtual opportunity for the time being. Training and curriculum are provided by Reading Partners. Volunteers must have a laptop and regular access to Wi-Fi.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Pause4Paws Pause4Paws is a Tulsa nonprofit that arranges short term, emergency pet foster care for pet owners who have nowhere to turn for pet assistance while they are in treatment for medical or mental health reasons. The program has enabled many people to get the treatment, medical, drug or mental health care they need without the heartache of having to give up their pet. They can relax into treatment knowing their pet will be in a safe and loving environment and that they will get their pet back when they are discharged. All pets are vaccinated and neutered, and all expenses are covered. If you are interested in this program, please contact Cindy Webb at (918) 829-9811 or cindy@pause4pawsok.org. You can find Pause4Paws online at www.pause4pawsok.org.

American Red Cross The American Red Cross is seeking fundraising office administration support. Volunteers will assist with research and administrative projects that help fulfill fundraising needs and annual fundraising goals. Other duties include printing and sending outgoing donor communications, such as event mailings (invitations), disaster solicitation mailings during national disasters, donor mailings for end-of-year solicitation and postcards to steward donors. An orientation as well as duty-specific training will be provided.

Military History Center The Military History Center in Broken Arrow is looking for individuals to help with education and tours. The History Center houses a remarkable collection of military artifacts from almost every U.S. war, from the War for Independence to the present day. Military uniforms, weapons, photographs, newspaper articles and much more fill the 6,400 sq. ft. facility. Volunteers are sought for greeting guests, assisting in guided tours, answering questions and various other reception tasks.

If you would like more information on any of these opportunities, please contact the RSVP office at (918) 280-8656.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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Recommended Reads

Bunkering With Books Decluttering and Downsizing BY CONNIE CRONLEY I have bought so many books about decluttering and downsizing, my library is cluttered with them.

creative. Her parents’ love letters? The family gathered on their wedding anniversary, burned them in a ritual and “sent the love back into the universe.”

Marie Kondo’s “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” and “Spark Joy” advocate the most rigorous approach. These books from the Japanese author launched a decluttering movement, complete with a Netflix series. I like her concept: touch every item mindfully, and if it does not spark joy, eliminate it. However, I could not manage her process: pile everything (all clothes for example, or all books) in the middle of the room. Then, examine each item one by one. I know myself too well for that. One look at that pile and I would just move to another room and leave it behind, looming like the mysterious mountain in “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” The international best-seller “The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning” is not as gloomy as the title suggests. Author Margareta Magnusson, who says she is “somewhere between 80 and 100,” has done several final declutters for late relatives and even her own house. It isn’t sad, she says, it is invigorating. I like her suggestion of finding new homes for our special things by giving them as hostess gifts. I tried it, but I suspect I liked it more than the hostesses. Peter Walsh’s “Let It Go” acknowledges upfront that downsizing can be stressful because it requires us to confront “our insecurities, our relationships and our own mortality.” He takes us step-by-step through serious decluttering with important lessons, such as: you are not your stuff; you’re entering a new identity phase, and you 38

Whew. Now that the heavy lifting is done, let’s read something for fun. I have just the thing.

need to shed items sticky with negative emotions. Everything doesn’t have to go. Maybe hold on to a wedding dress that can be worn by someone later, or refashion it into a christening gown or wrap a wedding bouquet in a swathe of the fabric. “Downsizing the Family Home” by nationally syndicated columnist Marni Jameson gets a great review from “The Wall Street Journal.” She cleared her own parents’ home, 50 years of treasures, respectfully but armed with “smelling salts and a bulldozer.” What to sell, donate or trash? She sought – and shares – advice from experts: antiques appraisers, garage-sale gurus, professional organizers and family psychologists. The process of learning, loving and letting go can be tremendously rewarding, she says, and

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

“The Thursday Murder Club” by Richard Osman is one of the most charming books I’ve read in some time. Four friends in an affluent retirement village in Kent, all in their 70s and 80s, begin meeting regularly to discuss unsolved crimes. In their active careers, Joyce was a nurse; Ibrahim was a therapist; Ron was a fiery political activist, and – well, we’re not sure about Elizabeth, something vague and international. Soon they are using their professional skills, their experiences and their irrepressible enthusiasm to help the local constabulary solve a couple of local murders. “Help” is not the word the police would choose, at least at first. “Meddle” would have been more appropriate. But the four turn out to be good at amateur sleuthing, having a wonderful time along the way. Many cups of tea are poured, but other beverages as well. Consulting one afternoon over cold beers beside the bowling green, Joyce says, “Well, isn’t this lovely. I never knew I liked beer. Imagine if I’d died at 70. I never would have known.” I hope this becomes a series and I get to read more of the exploits of these British senior sleuths.

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY

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LIFE PACE is a medical and social services program for seniors who want to continue living in their own home or community. A team-based approach to care results in dramatically reduced hospitalization rates, fall rates and positive health outcomes. Together with the LIFE PACE team, PACE participants design a personalized care plan that helps to keep them independent and safe.

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LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

39


PEOPLE & PLACES

The Tulsa Botanic Garden continued its tradition of the “Garden of Lights” in 2020. Each year the garden puts on a beautiful display to benefit their non-profit organization.

Zarrow Pointe hosted a fun, “sociallydistanced” sing-along for residents of their facility. Pictured above is Len Morton, resident, and Kimgrace Haokip, Director of Social Services.

Mary Jane Bittick, Debbie Jacoby and Beverly Williams attending the special “Lights on the Lawn” event held in November at Montereau. LIFE’s Senior Center coordinator Melodie Powders shows East Side member Jim Teague how to use the center’s vibrating plate machine. Jim and his wife Linda joined this fall.

Oklahoma Senior Games coordinators, from left to right: Nancy Robertson, Linda Morris, Janet Thornton, Beverly Ramsey, Charlotte Brown and Shelby Bryan.

Residents at The Parke Assisted Living get together for a fun round of “giant Jenga.”

Volunteers of America Oklahoma honored J. Lyon Morehead, Director Emeritus, for his 30 years of service to their organization. Pam Richardson, President/CEO presents an award to Lyon, pictured second from left, who is next to his wife Ginny and fellow Director Emeritus, Monty Berry.

Functional Movement Exercise class is offered at LIFE's Senior Center at East Side. Instructor Brenda Weaver is supervised by her golden retriever, Redford.

Send Us Your Pictures LIFE Senior Services wants to see what you're doing to stay active during the COVID-19 pandemic. Submit high-resolution photos to kharris@LIFEseniorservices.org by the 1st of every month. 40

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

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CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

AUTO REPAIR

Strickland Automotive Strickland Automotive is locally-owned and – operated with over 40 years of auto repair experience. We perform all types of vehicle repair, from computer and electrical problems to engine and transmission overhauls. ASE Certified mechanics.Open six days a week, with towing provided. Call Gary (918) 832-7072.

BIBLE STUDY

Weekly Bible Reading Session Join us in reading, explaining and discussing the bible on Friday nights 7:00 p.m. CST and 8:00 p.m. EST. Questions are always welcome. Perfect for those who cannot get out of the house. Call (918) 872-1400.

CARPET CLEANING

ALL PRO Carpet Cleaning Senior and caregiver discounts. Carpet, furniture, rug cleaning. Pet odor removed and Teflon protectant available. Emergency water extraction. Residential and commercial services. Professional truck mount steam cleaning. Carpet repairs and restretching. Prompt, professional, quality service at a fair price. Certified, insured. Veteran owned and operated. Call Thomas Fink, owner/ technician, for free estimate (918) 636-6303.

CEMETERY LOTS

Calvary Cemetery Calvary Cemetery, section 7, Way of the Cross.Two side-byside spaces lot 204, space 6 and lot 207, space 4. Asking pricing is $4,500 for both. Truly a beautiful view. Call (405) 273-7071. Floral Haven in Broken Arrow Floral Haven, Garden of Devotion. Standard single lot, or double-depth interment for two persons, or cremated remains of two persons. $2300. Call (816) 304-7664 or bjward521@gmail.com. Great Price in Memorial Park One space, retail value $1,975 will sell for $1,475. Section 30, lot 84, space 5. Established area with mature trees. Contact Margaret VanHorn at (918) 627-2885. Lower Priced Lots in Memorial Park Garden of the Christus area, section 15, lot 58. Four plots are together and we are willing to separate. Retail value $2145 each, selling for $1300 each. Pics are available. Call or email at billtresa@cox.net or (918) 855-7638.

Memorial Park Cemetery Two Single Spaces Two single spaces which are not close together. Section 9A, Lot 35, Space 6. Section 21, Lot 212, Space 1. Asking $1200 each. Contact Ron at ron.cleveland1947@gmail.com or call (417) 793-0743. Plots For Sale in Floral Haven 4 plots in the beautiful, serene, well maintained Floral Haven Memorial Gardens. They are in the Garden of the Prophets. 2 plots have a double headstone paid for. The cemetery says they are worth $4900 each and headstones $6-8000. Floral Haven is at 6900 S. 129 E. Ave. Broken Arrow, OK. Asking $18,000 obo. (801) 574-4410. Plot in Veterans Field, Floral Haven Floral Haven Veterans Field, Lot 248-C, Space 3 in Broken Arrow, OK. Asking $1000 obo. You do not have to be a veteran to be buried here. It can be stacked with a second right to buy later. Change of deed can take place at Floral Haven for a small fee. Contact (918) 728-0482. Priced to Sell In Memorial Park 4 Spaces at Memorial Park Section 35, Lot 288. Retail Value $2,850 each. Will sell for $2,550 each or all 4 spaces for $9,000. Call (479) 643-2457 or email judithblazer@msn.com. Spaces at Memorial Park Multiple spaces for sale. Section 34, Lot 416. No burials there and no markers. Current value is $2,20 0/ea. Will sell for $1,900/ ea. If interested, contact Cindy Taylor at Oxley.Plots@gmail. com or (281) 990-6223.

COMPUTER SERVICES

Does Technology Frustrate You? Honest, patient, ethical help with your pc, router, wifi, cell phone, email, streaming, camera, password recovery, etc. 30 years of IT experience in Tulsa. Special rates for seniors. References available. Call or email Carmen Armstrong. Carmstrongva@gmail.com or call (918) 688-7453.

DAYTIME CARE Daytime Care For Older Loved Ones LIFE’s Adult Day Health offers convenient, affordable daytime care at three locations in Tulsa and Broken Arrow. For more information, call LIFE’s Adult Day Health at (918) 664-9000.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

ESTATE SALES

2MS Estate Sales ...Tulsa’s Finest! Downsizing? Estate Liquidation? Let us take the worry away and Maximize your return. No out of pocket expense. We specialize in senior transitions, with over 20 years in the senior housing market. My team includes realtors, moving company, senior housing and attorneys if needed. Please contact Michelle Reed (918) 691-5893 or Atulsa@aol.com also Facebook 2MSestatesalestulsa for a Free consultation.

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE

Does Medicare Cover Telehealth/Telemedicine? Medicare has expanded the coverage of telemedicine services, also known as Telehealth, due to COVID-19. Medicare Part B covers outpatient services and, in most cases, telehealth. People pay the same amount for telehealth services as they would for inperson services. For more information check out the Health Management At Home page at www.lindasseniorservices.com. (918) 355-1843. Medicare Assistance Program The Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services provides accurate information, counseling and assistance relating to Medicare benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives and persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call MAP at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000 or toll-free at (866) 664-9009. Need A New Medicare Plan? The Medicare Supplement Store at Promenade Mall is your “One-Stop-Shop” for Medicare Supplements, Advantage Plans, & Drug Plans. We can give you a quote from top-rated carriers like: Aetna, Blue Cross, Humana, GlobalHealth, UnitedHealthCare, Mutual of Omaha and others. For information, call Bob Archer today (918) 814-5550.

GARDENING/LAWN CARE

AAA Lawns & More Total lawn care. Lawn Mowing. Leaf removal. Snow removal. Gutter clean-up. Specialist in fence/property line lawn cleanup. Stump grinding and small tree work. Dedicated to making your lawn look its best. Insured, honest, experienced and dependable. Veteran-owned. We are a small company with personal service. References available. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Larry. (918) 361-1299.

Green Hibiscus Lawn & Garden Services Scheduled garden maintenance (weeding, planting, mulching). Garden bed design and installation. Hedge & shrub trimming. Tree pruning & removal. Leaf clean up. Hauling green debris. Call Charles (918) 636-0298. Kimble Davis Tree Company Family-owned and operated. Specializing in all aspects of tree care: restoration, pruning/ thinning, removal, stump grinding, hedge trimming, firewood available. Serving Tulsa for 25 years. References. Member BBB. Insured. ISA certified arborist. Check us out at www.kdtreeco.com. Call Kimble at (918) 853-5383. Mower Repair / Maintenance All brands – Riders, ZTR's, Walk-behinds, UTV’s / ATV’s. Top Quality work, ASE certified Mechanic. Pick-up and Delivery available. Tulsa and surrounding counties. Maintenance specials include pick-up and delivery 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call Scott (918) 519-3869. New Season Lawn & Tree LLC Now accepting new customers. Fall clean-up available. Mowing, trimming, leaf and debris removal, fence line trim/cleanup, leaf mulching, flower beds. Tree pruning/thinning and removal. Shrub and hedge trimming/ shaping of all sizes. Pressure Washing driveway, decks, siding. ISA Certified Arborist. Fully insured with verified references. Best rates, senior discounts. Free Estimates.Call Todd (918) 639-2262. www.newseasonlawnandtree.com HOME REPAIR/REMODELING A Handy Helping Hand Professional home maintenance, painting, and improvements. Whether you’re making overdue repairs, sprucing up your home and garden, or optimizing your home’s “sale-ability” potential, call Joe Surowiak with A Handy Helping Hand. Professional results. Competitive rates. (918) 520-0333. Allen’s Handyman Services of Tulsa “Your Home Improvement and Repair Specialist.” 20th year serving Tulsa seniors. “One call can do it all.” 10% senior discount. Insured. All work guaranteed in writing. No pay until job is completed. Plumbing, drain cleaning, grab bars, electrical, carpentry, painting, seamless guttering installation/repair/cleaning. Dryer vent cleaning. Roof, tile and drywall repair. Wood siding/

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CLASSIFIEDS trim replacement. Deck repair, power washing, staining. Tree trimming. No job too small. For free estimate, call Allen at (918) 630-0394. Big C’s Plumbing Services Your one stop Plumbing Shop! Call us and I guarantee you will never have to call another plumbing company. Licensed, bonded and insured for your protection....Call (918) 855-9216, tell us you saw us in the Vintage Newsmagazine receive an automatic 10% discount....call us now. Bumgartner Plumbing Licensed, with over 30 years of experience. Rates are low and based on the job, not the hour. No service call fee or travel time charge. Senior and caregiver discount. Plumbing service and repair our specialty. Honest, professional service you can count on. Lic. # 82750. (918) 355-4747. Burton Painting Specializing in all aspects of exterior and interior home painting. Staining, sealing, and painting faux finishes. Decks, fences, cabinets and floors. Free estimates. 30+ years of experience. Reliable, courteous, professional service. Fully insured. (918) 378-2858. Dave’s Heat and Air, Inc. Licensed, insured, and bonded. Honest and reliable service for over 30 years. Competitive rates. Specializing in heating and air conditioning service and repair. All makes and models. Residential and light commercial. Tulsa metro area. Family-owned and operated. (918) 437-8101. Doc J’s Heat and Air LLC We install, replace and repair all brands of quality heating and air-conditioning equipment. Our contractor has over 25 yrs. of experience. Your comfort is our business. Contact us today for a service appt or free estimate for a HVAC system. Senior discounts on services. Call (918) 921-4240, docj@docjsheatandair.com Free Storm Inspection Do you have a leaky roof? Call for free inspection/emergency tarp service. Small roof repair free for seniors. We provide patient, honest and ethical help through any insurance claims. Call Brian Morris at (918) 734-4444. Proof Construction, 1924 W. Albany St., Broken Arrow. Other services include patios, outdoor kitchens, etc. Handyman & Construction Services 30 Years Experience! All Handicap Accessories – grab bars, handicap access abilities;

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Framing, Drywall, Tape & Bed; Texture & Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Tile, Laminate & Wood Floors. Free Estimates, Competitive Rates, Professional Service. Call Craig (918) 892-4168. Housecleaning Solutions & Junk Removal House cleaning, junk removal, furniture moving, clean-ups, hauling, tree trimming. Free estimates. Senior discount. Call Darrell for all your housecleaning and junk removal needs. (918) 644-1776. New Season Junk Removal LLC Commercial and Residential removal of furniture, yard waste, appliances, construction waste. We will dispose of hot tubs, mattresses, and e-waste. Disposal and Recycling of televisions and refrigerators available. Cleanouts include foreclosure clean outs and garage clean outs. Fully Insured. Discounts available for senior citizens, military, first responders. Call Todd at (918) 639-2262 or email

newseasonjunkremoval@gmail.com. Visitwww.newseasonjunkremoval.com.

RDA Remodeling, LLC We offer home repair services, full remodeling and insulation. Call (918) 209-5766. Same Day Services Light Hauling /Light Moving – help you rearrange room furniture, lawns-grass mowing/ small paint jobs/cleanup/ fence repair/light construction/sheet rock tile repair – We are honest dependable. References. Call (918) 313-5230. Scrap Metal Haul Off/Handyman Free haul off/pick up of appliances such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioners, hot water tanks and any scrap metal. Also offering handyman services. Call John at (918) 313-4405.

HOUSING

Female Roommate/Companion Wanted Christian senior female looking for a senior female 65+ roommate/companion. Within a clean house, private bedroom with private bath available. Access to all amenities within the house. Low cost for a wonderful home. Call (918) 622-0093. OVERJOYED NOT OVERWHELMED Some days you want to move, and others, not so much. OVERWHELMED with the process? Let a Certified Senior Housing Specialist (CSHP) guide you through the entire process. One call, One Company, DONE!

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | January 2021

Licensed and Bonded and BBB Member. Mature Transitions Of Tulsa (918) 973-1350 or (918) 605-1480. Senior Community in Sperry Senior Community 55+ in Sperry, 2 bed, 1 bath single level, trash and lawn service included. $750/month. 2 units available. (918) 289-6630. Senior Friendly Duplex For Rent Senior friendly duplex with 2 bedrooms and 2 bath is available. Located at 75th & Birmingham by ORU this updated unit provides necessities for seniors. Washer, dryer, cable, stainless steel appliances, granite counters, vaulted ceiling, medical alert button. 24 hour security. Also, available next door is an oversized Mother-in-law Suite. Call for pricing (918) 491-9929.

LEGAL

Full Service Estate Planning Law Firm Trusts, Wills, Gift and Tax Planning, Powers of Attorneys and more! With offices in Sand Springs and Tulsa. Discount to Veterans and Retired Teachers. Willing to meet you in your place for no extra charge! Call Penni of the Skillern Law Firm at (918) 805-2511. www.skillernlaw.com Need Legal Help? Call Me First. Ramona Jones, Attorney at Law. Why travel when we can do a video conference? Wills, trusts, deeds, advance directives, powers of attorney, probate, divorces, civil, DUI, criminal, guardianships, adoptions and more. Also paperwork for limited scope representation. Credit cards accepted. (918) 585-2255. Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy. Attorney Brian Crain can assist you through the legalities of all the big events in your family's life. Estate planning, probate, trusts, adoption, guardianships, real estate, elder exploitation and more. Call (918) 627-4400 or visit www.brianacrain.com. MOBILITY EQUIPMENT/REPAIR Mobility City of Tulsa We repair scooters, power chairs, lift chairs, wheelchairs, etc. Friendly service at our retail store or at your home with our mobile van. We also rent and sell all types of mobility equipment. Great deals on new and used items. (918) 600-2112.

MOVERS

Tulsa Movers Dependable Movers! Low Rates. Free Estimates. Senior Discounts. Call (918) 836-3225.

OIL AND GAS Mineral, Oil/Gas Interests Want to purchase minerals and oil/gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO, 80201

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE

Bobbi and Bob’s Personal & Business Assistance Run errands; grocery and personal shopping; transportation to medical appointments, beauty shop, airport or other local destinations; organize home; handle medical insurance claims; provide administrative and secretarial support; wait for deliveries and repairmen at your home. Call Bobbi Warshaw at (918) 852-5302 email: bobbi.warshaw@att.net Caring Hands Specialized one on one care for you or your loved one from a licensed nurse. Services I provide for you or your loved one: Companionship, sitter, light housekeeping, and preparing meals. I provide 12/24 hour shifts at an affordable cost. Please call Delia at (405) 714-8016 for more information. Compassionate Senior Services Do you or a loved one need help with grocery shopping? Maybe help with meals? Or maybe just a companion to visit with or play games with? If this sounds like you or someone you know. Please Call, Christie at (918) 934-7986. Financial Organizer/Liaison Do you or a loved one need help keeping up with mail, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, making phone calls, organizing or preparing for tax time? I can help! I will work with you or act as a liaison between family members. Call or email me to discuss options. Essential Strategy Consulting, LLC. Gwen Stevens (918) 557-5259, esc9315@gmail.com

PERSONAL SAFETY

EARS Emergency Alert Response Systems. Enjoy living at home while we listen for your safety with our quality personal medical alarm and monitoring service. Affordable with no long-term commitment. Locally owned and operated (918) 298-0500 or toll-free (877) 885-3277. HALO Medical Alarms Worried about falling? HALO provides medical alert services for those at home or on the go who may need help in an emergency. HALO allows you to get help at the push of a button which is worn as a necklace

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


or wristband. We offer a variety of choices to best fit your needs. Check out the HALO products at our retail store - Mobility City at 61st & Sheridan (918) 392-0566 or (877) 747-HALO (4256)

Vintage Friends SUBSCRIBE TODAY

PERSONAL SERVICES

Affordable Hairstyling In-Home or My Shop With 35 years’ experience, I can help with all of your hairstyling needs. I will come to your home, the hospital, rehab or you can come to my shop. In-shop special: haircut $7 for first time customers only and perms for $45. Senior special pricing can’t be beat! Available Tuesday – Saturday. A Mane Event hairstyling, located near 11th and Yale at 937 South Canton. Call Mary Wilkinson at (918) 834-2686. Following CDC Guidelines – masks worn, temperature taken, safe environment.

FREE SUBSCRIPTION! Name:

Salon Retro Hair care for men and women, specializing in senior clients. This month’s special - First time customers receive one of the following for $12: Haircut or Style or Manicure. $45 for cut and perm. Pedicures are $20. Very Experienced Hairdressers! Come see us in Midtown at Highland Plaza, 5661 East 41st Street (corner of 41st and Hudson). (918) 742-3440.

Full Address:

Phone Number: Email Address:

PET CARE Home Veterinary Care Experience Tulsa’s most convenient veterinary service in the comfort of your own home. Our goal is to develop a personal relationship with each of our clients and patients. Contact us today to schedule your house call appointment. Call (918) 892-9382 or email DrFielstra@gmail.com or visit us atwww.homevetcaretulsa.com.

TRANSPORTATION

My Driver Transportation Service Let me do the driving. To and from work, airport, shopping, errands, post office, appointments. Also, LIFT VAN transportation available. Able to assist getting to and from bed. Senior sitting. Also, small breed dog boarding. 20 years experience. CLEET certified and licensed. References. Member, Better Business Bureau. (918) 491-9929.

VOLUNTEER

JUST DO IT! If you've been looking for a way you can make a difference, consider joining the Millennium Hospice team as a volunteer. Caregiver relief is so important during this difficult time. Volunteers provide that by sitting with patients for an hour or so. Training is provided. (918) 493-6555.

CLASSIFIEDS

TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: Bernie Dornblaser (918) 664-9000 or bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Cut out and mail to LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135 SUBSCRIBE ONLINE:

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

JANUARY ANSWERS For puzzles, see pages 30-31

Families Garage Doorway Broom

Anonymous Dale Atherton Marjorie Breidenbach Jeffery and Linda Burns Church of St. Mary Elizabeth S. Coleman Sandra Collier Angela Cozort Charles Danley Delores Dieman Barbara Doolittle The Sharna and Irvin Frank Foundation Patricia French John and Marge Gaberino Manuella R. Glore Joyce A. Hawthorne Bill and Terri Hirsch Susan Honeycutt Marty and Marcy Howerton Jeffrey L. Ivers Dave and Claudia Jones George Kaiser Family Foundation Kenneth M. Leshurd Laurel Madland Bruce R. Magoon and Diana Wolff Meg and Gary Otterstrom Arthur and Anita Pancook Jeanna Parrott Sandra Payne Gregory and Pam Petzet Bob and Leslie Pritchard Mr. and Mrs. William D. Pruitt III John and Iva Reynolds The Robinson Foundation Alice Rodgers Myra D. Seymour

Gary and Kala Sharp David Singleton Bernadette Smith Rosemarie Spaulding Melanie Stewart Jeanne and John Sturges Stan Teter Ben A. Weddington Warren C. Whitsel Nathan and Sheri Wood Clayton and Patricia Woodrum Carolyn Yancey Harold and Marge Zimmerman Gigi Zyla

IN MEMORY OF

Thomas M. Campbell In Memory of Charlotte I. Campbell Judy Clapp In Memory of Bob Clapp Mary E. Dennis In Memory of H. Stanley Dennis Sybil P. Holland In Memory of Richard Holland Tommy Jones Jr In Memory of Lawrence "Larry" Baer Donna J. Palmer In Memory of Steven and Priscilla Hurt Patricia E. Patterson In Memory of Mom - Jane Beisell James E. Witter In Memory of Barbara A. Witter Lauren Corbut In Memory of James W. Hawkins

IN HONOR OF

Libbye Sloan-Brooks In Honor of Jeanne Sturges

Become a Vintage Friend

LIFE Senior Services is a recognized leader in aging services and an acknowledged voice on aging issues and is proud to be a nonprofit United Way organization.

5. Nook 6. Home 7. Hallway

Please mail your contribution to: LIFE Senior Services 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 • Tulsa, OK 74135-5114 Make your donation online: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

Final message: Neighborhood

BAMBOOZABLES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. If there is an error, please call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

DONATE TO LIFE

MUMBO JUMBO 1. 2. 3. 4.

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in November 2020.

BE A LIFESAVER

Lying on the Job Space Program Free for All Double Agent Any Questions Smoke Stack

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Every dollar invested stays local to fuel LIFE Senior Services’ mission-related initiatives of promoting and preserving independence for seniors. Today – Tomorrow – Always. FOLLOW US ON

Donate now by visiting www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

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Medicare seminars now available online. If you’re turning 65 this year, you are eligible to enroll in Medicare. Whether you know a lot or very little about Medicare and your insurance options, CommunityCare is here to answer any questions you may have.

Like us on Facebook to be alerted for live events.

Our virtual seminars give you the opportunity to learn more about Medicare and Senior Health Plan (HMO). Our plans include everything Medicare covers as well as essential benefits not covered by Medicare, such as prescription drugs, dental and vision care, and much more. Plus, monthly premiums as low as $0. And, we have the only Medicare health plans contracted with Saint Francis Health System and Ascension St. John for in-network benefits.

Get the facts on Medicare by signing up for a virtual Medicare seminar today. Visit ccokadvantage.com for details. If you do not have access to Microsoft Teams, call 918-594-5234 for more information.

ccokadvantage.com Williams Center Tower II • Two West Second Street, Suite 100 • Tulsa, Oklahoma 74103 • 918-594-5234 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353)

For accommodations of persons with special needs at meetings, call 918-594-5234 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353). CommunityCareChoice, Inc. is an HMO plan and PDP plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in CommunityCare Choice, Inc depends on contract renewal. CommunityCare Choice, Inc. service area includes Tulsa, Creek, Craig, Muskogee, McIntosh,Nowata,Osage, Wagoner,

and Washington Counties. Other providers are available in our network. Please call CustomerService for assistance at 918-594-5323 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353), Monday - Sunday and some holidays from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.October 1 - March 31 and Monday - Friday from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. April 1 - September 30. CommunityCare complies with Federalcivil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. ATENCIÓN: si hablaespañol, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 918-594-5323 (TTY: 1-800-7220353). CHÚÝ: Nếu bạn nói Tiếng Việt, có các dịch vụ hỗ trợ ngôn ngữ miễn phí dành cho bạn. Gọi số 918-594-5323 (TTY: 1-800-722-0353). Y0131_2020 SHP Virtual REV_M

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LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine - January 2021