__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

FREE Subscription: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/request


TABLE OF CONTENTS

TH DA R A E

Vol. 35, No. 11 EILEEN BRADSHAW

Y

President & CEO of LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE & Vintage Housing

VE

E V E RY DA Y

SA

KELLY KIRCHHOFF

E AK

OUR P

18

DEE DUREN Managing Editor dduren@LIFEseniorservices.org

Recycle This, Not That

Recycling is something we can all do to clean up our own little corner of the Earth. Check out what products can be recycled at the curb and where to take those that can’t.

PRIL

22

DOWN TO EARTH

AVERAGE DISTANCE FROM THE SUN AVERAGE DISTANCE FROM THE MOON 238,855 miles

An estimated 7.8 billion people call the Earth home. Earth is considered to be in the "Goldilocks zone” where temperatures are just right for water to remain liquid, an element considered essential for living organisms. Earth has a breathable atmosphere and a suitable amount of sunshine, making the existence of Goldilocks – and the rest of us – possible. Our home planet is the only one astronomers know of that is habitable.

EARTH IS 71% WATER

24 Eyes on the Skies: Storm Trackers

While most of us take shelter from the storm, these brave souls track them down. Meet two Oklahoma weather watchers who take to the road to warn others of potential danger.

4

DICK MCCANDLESS ESTEBAN VALENCIA

• Continental crust averages 25 miles thick. • Oceanic crust is roughly 5 miles thick.

4

3 2 1

UPPER MANTLE – About 450 miles thick • Makes up 84% of Earth's total volume and is divided into two sections. • The average temperature of the mantle is 1,652°F.

LOWER MANTLE – About 1,350 miles thick • Makes up 84% of Earth's total volume and is divided into two sections. • The average temperature of the mantle is 4,000°F.

EARTH IS 29% LAND

OUTER CORE – About 1,400 miles thick • Consists of 1,400 miles of liquid. • It's mostly composed of iron and nickel and is the only liquid layer due to the heat of the inner core.

1. TROPOSPHERE From the ground to about 7 miles high

2. STRATOSPHERE From troposphere to about 31 miles high

3. MESOSPHERE From stratosphere to about 53 miles high

4. THERMOSPHERE From mesosphere to around 372 miles high

Most weather events and cloud types occur in this layer.

The ozone layer is found here, as well as commercial passenger jets.

Meteors burn up and special clouds called noctilucent clouds form here.

The International Space Station orbits here, and this zone absorbs most of the X-ray and UV radiation. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

5. EXOSPHERE From thermosphere to outer space This layer contains extemely thin air and fades into the vacuum of space. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

INNER CORE – About 760 miles thick • The inner core is mostly made of iron. • It spins faster than the surface of the earth and is responsible for creating our magnetic field. • The temperature of the core is 9,392°F.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

20 Down to Earth

How much do we know about our home planet? Get the big picture of planet Earth and its place in the Milky Way galaxy.

6 Letter From Eileen 8 Looking Back 10 Caregiver Corner  Storm Preparedness: Preparation, Execution, Safety 12 Medicare & You Recognizing Medicare Fraud 22 Starry, Starry Oklahoma Nights: Find a Hobby That's Out of This World 25 LIFE EDU 26 What's in a Name: The History Behind Naming Hurricanes 27 In the Spotlight 28 Noteworthy 29 Share Your Time & Talent 30 Mindbender & Puzzles 31 Puzzle Partners 32 Table for Two 34 Bunkering With Books 35 Business Directory 36 People & Places 37 Classifieds 39 Vintage Friends

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

Communications Coordinator

CRUST – About 5 to 25 miles thick

5

EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE

20

KRISTEN HARRIS

Earth is estimated to have formed 4.54 billion years ago

96.5% SALTWATER

Earth Day began in 1970 as Americans became more aware of environmental issues and the need to protect the planet. Learn what you can do every day to support the effort.

LEAH WEIGLE

Copy Editor The moon formed 4.51 billion years ago – or did it? In 2020, a German study estimated the moon is only 4.425 billion years old.

EARTH'S LAYERS

3.5% FRESHWATER

Make Every Day Earth Day: Save Our Planet

Advertising Director bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

CAROL CARTER

The sun is estimated to be 4.6 billion years old.

92,955,807 miles

Statistics and Facts About the Third Rock From the Sun

Scientists have cataloged more than 1.7 million of the world’s species of animals, plants, insects and algae. They say millions more species are yet unknown – some too tiny to be seen, others living in the depths of the ocean or perhaps making their homes inside other living things. With all the mysteries Earth still has to offer, there are a few things we at least think we know. So, here’s a look at the big blue marble we call our home planet – third rock from the sun in the Milky Way galaxy.

14

BERNIE DORNBLASER

Graphic Designer

T

M

LAN E

A

Senior Director of Communications

21

Community Distribution

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services (a Tulsa Area United Way nonprofit) and helps fulfill LIFE Senior Services’ mission to promote and preserve independence for seniors. This publication is printed and mailed at no charge. Donations of any amount are appreciated and will help offset LIFE Senior Services’ production costs. A donation of $25 per year is suggested. To make a donation, visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call (918) 664-9000. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine accepts advertising to defray the cost of production and distribution, and appreciates the support of its advertisers. The publisher does not specifically endorse advertisers or their products or services. LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine reserves the right to refuse advertising. Rates are available upon request by calling (918) 664-9000. © LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE Senior Services, Inc., 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction without consent of the publisher is prohibited. Volume 35, Issue 11, April 2021 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine (ISSN 2168-8494) (USPS 18320) is published monthly by LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135. Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine, 5950 E. 31st St., Tulsa, OK 74135-5114.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Versailles Apartments

55+

Senio Livingr

Efficiency • $625 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom • $650 2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom • $750 2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom • $850 Independent Living Utilities included, except for phone and cable

4816 S. Sheridan Rd. • Tulsa, OK 74145

(918) 627-6116

Welsh & McGough, PLLC Experienced attorneys providing effective and aggressive representation. Guardianship Elder Law Estate Planning Probate

Trust Litigation Family Law Adoption Medicaid Planning

(918) 585-8600

2727 East 21st Street, Ste. 600

www.tulsafirm.com

Glenwood Apartments 10221 E. 34TH ST. • TULSA, OK

GLENWOODAPTSTULSA@GMAIL.COM

(918) 663-7797 Retirement Living for Seniors Age 62+ & Adults with Disabilities

• • • • • • •

All Bills Paid 24-hour On-site Staff Laundry Facilities Library & Fitness Area Planned Activities & Bingo Emergency Pull Cords On-site Beauty Salon

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

5


LETTER FROM EILEEN Dear Vintage Readers, I hope this note finds you well. Chaucer wrote, “April is the cruelest month.” However, after a very cruel past year, this April finds me feeling pretty positive! LIFE has been working hard to get seniors access to vaccination appointments since early January. Truthfully, we underestimated the need for assistance. In January and February, we fielded more than 19,000 calls for some type of vaccine-related assistance. Thank goodness we had help! We have built on wonderful partnerships with Morton Health, the Tulsa Health Department, Oklahoma State Department of Health, T. Roy Barnes Pharmacy and Spoon Drug. Former Tulsa Mayor Kathy Taylor stepped up to fund some additional helpers. Volunteers from the community and organizations like Bank of Oklahoma and the Tulsa Area United Way gave their time to return calls and schedule appointments. So far, we have scheduled more than 7,000 seniors for appointments and answered countless more questions.

Eileen Bradshaw

President and CEO LIFE Senior Services, LIFE PACE, Vintage Housing eileen.bradshaw@LIFEseniorservices.org

We are still getting around 200 calls a day for vaccination help at the time of this letter. So, if you are reading this and have not yet gotten a vaccine, or know folks who haven’t, please think about reaching out for help. We can schedule your appointment, and thanks to a transportation grant from INCOG, we can even get seniors or those with disabilities a ride there and back home! Call (918) 664-9000 for assistance.

(918) 664-9000 www.LIFEseniorservices.org

The vaccine is having many positive effects: deaths in nursing homes and assisted living facilities have declined as have deaths and hospitalizations for those over 65. Things are starting to improve – we just need to get vaccinated and stay vigilant. Brighter days are ahead. I am also looking forward to LIFE Senior Services' first-ever Writer's Symposium! Made possible by a grant from the Oklahoma Arts Council, this series of programs will highlight local writers in a series of individual interviews through the spring and summer, and culminate in a joint forum in the fall. Our current line-up includes Connie Cronley, Judy Allen, Barry Friedman and Rabbi Marc Boone Fitzerman. Stay tuned or check our website at www.LIFEseniorservices.org for additional information and dates. I really hope you will all attend at least one session. I know they will be fascinating because the presenters are all so interesting, but mainly I hope you attend and use the information to tell YOUR story. Each of us has lived an interesting life, and I think every family would love to have these stories on paper to read as the years go by. Please join us. It will be fun; it will be interesting, and there is no charge! Enjoy this issue and the warming days!

Eileen Bradshaw, President and CEO

Considering a Shoulder Replacement? Avoid the Hospital at our Outpatient Surgery Center. Save money and return home sooner. Ask us about hospital-free joint replacement.

918.392.1400 TULSABONEANDJOINT.COM

6

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Northeastern Oklahoma’s newest, premier skilled nursing and long-term facility, located in Broken Arrow, OK.

We Offer Rehabilitation Respite Long-Term Services Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy Call us today to see how we can make a difference!

1251 W. HOUSTON STREET • BROKEN ARROW, OK 74012 539.367.4500 • 539.367.4510 (F) • WWW.ASPENHEALTHREHAB.COM

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

7


Looking Back Wild Oklahoma Weather

KTUL meteorologist Don Woods drawing Gusty. Each evening Woods drew a cartoon on-air showing a character he created named Gusty. Each cartoon showed Gusty involved in various activities in all types of weather. Woods gave each cartoon to a news viewer. Woods drew the Gusty cartoons from 1954 until his retirement from KTUL in 1989.

A U.S. National Guardsman patrols a flooded area.

Tulsa Historical Society & Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa All photos courtesy of Tulsa Historical Society & Museum

Lee Woodward shares the weather report with KOTV viewers on the “Sun Up” show. Woodward joined the Tulsa station in 1957 and also hosted "Dance Party." He became well-known for using a puppet named King Lionel.

Members of the Civilian Defense gather during efforts to rescue people affected by flooding along Sand Springs Road in May 1943. L.O. Chapman owned the store in the background and is pictured in the middle of the group. The group worked day and night rescuing people using boats.

This Month in History APRIL 2, 2005

Pope John Paul II Dies

Two million people filled Vatican City for the funeral of Pope John Paul II. The service was held six days after his death and is said to be the largest funeral in history. Born Karol Jozef Wojtyla in Poland, he was the first Slavic pope. He held two doctorates and spoke eight languages. During his popedom, he was wounded in an assassination attempt and later visited his would-be assassin in prison.

APRIL 10, 1866 ASPCA Founded

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals got its start in New York, founded by philanthropist Henry Bergh. Bergh argued that protecting “mute servants of mankind” was a moral issue that crossed party lines. The organization investigated complaints of animal cruelty, rescued mistreated horses and livestock and worked to close down dog-fighting pits. The first humane society in North America, it remains one of the largest in the world.

APRIL 13, 1997

Tiger Woods Wins First Masters

Golfer Tiger Woods, 21, won the prestigious Masters Tournament by a record 12 strokes. It was his first victory in one of golf’s four major championships. He was the youngest Masters champion and the first person of Asian or African heritage to win a major. Woods was ranked number one in the world in 1997 and won the U.S. Open title in 2000, finishing 15 strokes ahead of his competitors.

APRIL 17, 1970

Apollo 13 Returns Safely to Earth

An anxious world watched as three U.S. astronauts touched down in the Pacific after an explosion halted their moon-bound mission. Pilot Jack Swigert famously said, "Houston, we've had a problem here" after the explosion. The line was changed a bit for the 1995 movie "Apollo 13." The badly damaged spacecraft and heroic astronauts returned to earth with the help of thousands of NASA workers.

APRIL 26, 1954

Polio Vaccine Trials Begin

The Jonas Salk polio vaccine field trials began at a Virginia elementary school and eventually involved 1.8 million children. The virus, which had reached epidemic proportions, most commonly affected children and could result in paralysis or death. The 1954 trial has been called the “greatest public experiment in history” and was funded by what is now the March of Dimes. Parents signed consent forms for their children who became known as "Polio Pioneers."

APRIL 29, 2004

World War II Monument Opens

Thousands of visitors attended as the longawaited World War II Memorial opened on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The monument recognizes the 16 million U.S. men and women who served in the war. Only 4 million of them were still living at the tribute’s completion. The memorial was formally dedicated by President George W. Bush, the son of President George H.W. Bush, a WWII naval aviator. © The History Channel

8

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Unique Location. Nurturing Staff. Locally Owned.

A Place Called

Home.

7821 East 76th Street, Tulsa, OK 74133 918-249-1262 | TheParke.Net

Free Rides to Vaccination Appointments LIFE’s SeniorLine can help you register for the Oklahoma State Department of Health’s COVID-19 Vaccination Registration Portal and schedule a FREE RIDE to and from your appointment.

Call (918) 664-9000 Transportation is available to adults 55 and up and disabled.

Free Prescription Delivery ORGANIZE YOUR MEDICATION AT NO ADDITIONAL COST Simplify and organize your medications with prescription packaging. One package contains all the medication you need to take at any given time, automatically refilled at the same time each month per your request. • Organized by date and time

FOLLOW US ON

www.LIFEseniorservices.org (918) 664-9000

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

• Securely sealed

NO PILL BOXES

• Cleary labeled • Helpful to caregivers

NO BOTTLES

• Ideal for travel and everyday • Easy to open

NO BOTHER

444 S. Sheridan • (918) 835-9577 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

9


CAREGIVER CORNER

SUPPLIES FOR AN Emergency kit or 'go bag' Consider storing some or all of these items in a waterproof container placed somewhere easy to reach. Use plastic bags to protect individual items.

STORM PrEpArEdNESS PREPARATION•EXECUTION•SAFETY BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

I

Tips for preparing a storm safety plan for you and your loved one.

f you are a full-time caregiver or part of a caregiving team, it’s a good idea to plan for the possibility of severe weather. In Oklahoma, it’s not uncommon for spring storms to bring heavy rain, strong winds and even tornadoes. When you’re responsible for someone who may have physical or mental impairments that make it more challenging for them to respond, take some pressure off yourself by following the old scouting motto: be prepared. “You are never too young or old to be ready for severe weather,” said Johnnie Munn, senior disaster program manager for the American Red Cross Kansas-Oklahoma region. “Being prepared will keep you and your family much safer. Build a kit, make plans and practice for what you would do during an emergency. Stay safe and remember you can always contact the Red Cross.” The Red Cross has free apps that give iPhone and Android users instant access to emergency alerts. You can also find medical guidance and a hospital locator in their first aid app. Download the apps at www.redcross.org/apps or text “GETEMERGENCY" to 90999. STAY WEATHER AWARE Keep an eye on the weather forecast when meteorologists say there is a threat of severe

storms in your area. Decide on the safest room in your home where household members and pets can gather during a tornado. If you don’t have a basement or storm shelter, choose an interior room (closet, hallway or bathroom) on the lowest floor with no windows. A mobile home is not a safe place to be in high winds or tornadoes, and the Red Cross recommends leaving for sturdier shelter. Remember that a tornado watch means a tornado is possible. A tornado warning means a tornado has been reported in the area or sighted on radar. Don’t wait for tornado sirens to take shelter, especially if your loved one has mobility issues. Do your best to stay calm, and if possible, keep listening to weather reports on a portable radio or your smartphone. If you hear damaging winds or the classic freight train sound of an approaching tornado, cover your head and neck with your arms, pillows, blankets or coats. If your home sustains damage or loses power and other utilities, a well-stocked emergency kit can be a caregiver’s best friend. It could turn into a “go bag” should you have to seek shelter with friends, family or through the American Red Cross. Most people want to shelter in place if at all possible, and doing so could help cut down on your loved one's confusion. If you can afford one and are comfortable using and maintaining it, a generator could help you remain in your home or keep lifesaving equipment running.

• NOAA weather radio (battery-powered or hand-crank) • First aid kit • Flashlight with extra batteries • Copies of identifying information (insurance card, driver's license or state-issued identification card) • Medication sheet with medication dosages, diagnoses and any allergies • Doctor’s name, address and phone number • Names and phone numbers of alternate caregivers • At least three days of supplies including food, water and prescription medication • Over-the-counter medication like ibuprofen or aspirin • Current photo of loved one • Cell phone charger • Charged power bank • Copies of legal information like power of attorney • Masks and hand sanitizer • Extra cash • Extra batteries

Other items to consider if needed

• Hearing aid batteries • Portable oxygen tanks • Incontinence products • Spare eyeglasses • A couple of easy-care outfits • Spare pair of shoes • Comfort items like lotion • Liquid meal replacements • Travel wheelchair, spare walker or cane • Veterinarian contact information for your pets • Carrier or kennel for pets, spare leashes and travel water bowl

Join Mathew Hitchcock from the American Red Cross as he shares expert advice for disaster preparedness on Thursday, April 8 at 2 p.m. on LIFE's Facebook page: www.facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices.

10

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Announcing LIFE Senior Services’ New Program

LIFE’S SENIOR CENTERS

Club LIFE welcomes individuals diagnosed with early memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other related disorders. Club LIFE is designed to enhance memory, improve physical strength and balance, stimulate brain function and provide social support. In addition, Club LIFE supports caregivers through personal consultation, education about early memory loss and support groups.

Get Fit, Have Fun, Make New Friends

Masks, Social Distancing and Temperature Checks Required

Nuture your mind, body and spirit for a healthier, happier LIFE at LIFE Senior Services’ Senior Center for active adults. Line dancing, Pickleball, Tai Chi, Creative Writing, Sculpt & Tone, Chair Exercises, Zumba, Wii Bowling, Wii Golfing and More! To arrange a tour, call (918) 744-6760

View a calendar of events on www.LIFEseniorservices.org

HOURS & LOCATION Monday – Friday 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Christ Church 10901 S. Yale Ave

Call LIFE’s SeniorLine

(918) 664-9000

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

11


MEDICARE & YOU

TAX SEASON

5 Tips to Protect Yourself From Identity Theft

RECOGNIZING MEDICARE FRAUD BY CHANNING RUTHERFORD, MEDICARE AND TAX ASSISTANCE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR

Y

ou may be exposed to Medicare fraud at any time, including before you enroll in a plan and when you get care at a doctor’s office, other medical facility or receive therapy in your home. Learning about common – and possibly suspicious – behaviors and actions may help you recognize and protect yourself from fraudulent activity.

BILLING FRAUD

If you have Original Medicare, your doctor should not: • Charge you for most preventive services • Offer tests or other services that you do not need, especially if the doctor says that the more tests you receive, the cheaper they are • Routinely waive your coinsurance (providers can waive cost-sharing for patients with great financial need, but not regularly) Always confirm that you received the services for the dates listed on either your Medicare Summary Notice or your Explanation of Benefits. Sometimes this can be hard to do if you received services from several doctors at the same time. If you returned durable medical equipment, your supplier should not continue to charge Medicare for rental fees or maintenance.

MARKETING FRAUD

You are being misled if an agent from an insurance company says that you: • Must sign up for a Medicare Advantage Plan to get Medicare drug coverage (you can also keep Original Medicare and enroll in a stand-alone Part D plan) • Must invite a plan representative to your home to get information about the plan or to enroll • Can switch back to Original Medicare at any time if you are dissatisfied with the plan, without providing information about enrollment periods • Will receive additional benefits that are actually Medicare-covered services 12

• Will receive additional benefits, such as dental or vision, that are actually covered by other insurance you have or are eligible to receive (such as Medicaid) • Will lose your Medicaid benefits unless you sign up for a certain plan Make sure to verify any marketing information you receive in the plan’s benefit manual or by calling the plan directly. Avoid errors in enrolling by confirming that the plan: • Provides drug coverage • Offers coverage through the coverage gap • Has your providers, hospitals and pharmacies in their network • Offers additional benefits, such as vision or dental NOTE: Insurance agents and brokers may receive a large fee for getting you to sign up for a Medicare private plan. Never let yourself be pressured to join any plan. Always make sure you understand what the plan is offering you and how all your benefits are affected. Ask to receive information about the plan’s benefits in writing. If you suspect that an agent is not following the rules, save documented proof such as the agent’s business card or marketing materials. If you believe that fraudulent claims about your health or drug coverage were made when you selected a plan, you may be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period to withdraw from that plan and switch to another one. To report fraud, you should contact (800) MEDICARE (633-4227), the Senior Medicare Patrol Resource Center at (877) 808-2468, or the Inspector General’s fraud hotline at (800) HHS-TIPS (447-8477). Medicare will not use your name while investigating if you do not want the agency to do so.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

Tax refund theft is more common than you might think. You likely won’t know you’re a victim until you file your taxes and the IRS rejects your “duplicate” return. Here are five tips to avoid being a victim of tax scams: 1. Be organized and file early – The earlier you file your taxes, the sooner you will get any refunds owed. Doing so will also make it much more difficult for tax scammers to beat you to the punch. 2. Be diligent selecting passwords – Use long phrases to make it harder for a hacker to break into your accounts. Your name and birthday – or even those of your kids – are not great passwords. 3. Update your cybersecurity regularly – Don’t log into bank or investment accounts on an unsecured Wi-Fi network. Do not prepare and file your tax returns on a public computer. Back up your computer on a regular basis, ideally to the cloud or another off-site backup service. Invest in a shredder, and shred all paperwork that contains your personal information. 4. Remember that the IRS will not call you – The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will not call you out of the blue. Likewise, IRS employees will not email you. If someone calls and claims to be from the IRS, HANG UP! 5. Report tax fraud ASAP – If you think you may be a victim of tax fraud or a scam, the IRS has steps for reporting possible fraud on its website, www.IRS.gov. You can also call the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at (800) 366-4484 Source: www.forbes.com

Source: www.medicareinteractive.gov.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Looking for Answers? Call LIFE’s SeniorLine (918) 664-9000

FREE RIDES for SENIORS

Free Rides To Vaccination Appointments Shuttle service is available for adults 55 and up or disabled. Drivers will pick you up, safely transport you to your appointment, then wait and take you home. LIFE Senior Services’ transportation service is funded by the Indian Nations Council of Governments (INCOG) and the Federal Transit Coronavirus Response and Relief Appropriations Act of 2021.

Call LIFE’s SeniorLine (918) 664-9000 to schedule a transportation appointment.

48-HOUR NOTICE IS RECOMMENDED.

• • • • • •

All bills paid Inside hallways Emergency call system Subsidy available Quiet location Small pets welcome

(918) 455-8400 5001 S. Hickory • Broken Arrow, OK (SE of 111th St. & 161st E. Ave.)

Treetops Apartments Independent Senior Living

Treetops does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

13


Y

H T DA R A E

VE

E V E RY DA E Y AK

SA OUR PLA

M

N E T

A

PRIL 22 BY KAREN SZABO

Though Earth Day will be largely virtual this year, environmentalists urge global citizens to act in ways that protect and sustain our planet.

Inspired by the student-led anti-war movement, Senator Nelson envisioned a large-scale, grassroots environmental demonstration movement to increase ecological awareness. In the fall of 1969, he announced the idea for a teach-in on college campuses to the national media, and persuaded Pete McCloskey, a conservation-minded congressman, to serve as his co-chair. They recruited Denis Hayes, a young activist, to organize the campus teach-ins and chose April 22, a weekday falling between spring break and final exams, to maximize the greatest student participation. Earth Day has been held on April 22 every year since. Critics of the movement pointed out that April 22 happened to be Vladimir Lenin’s birthday, but Senator Nelson rebutted that it was also the birthday of the “first environmentalist,” Saint Francis of Assisi. “The wire services carried the story from coast to coast,” Nelson said. “The response was electric. It took off like gangbusters. Telegrams, letters and telephone inquiries poured in from all across the country. The American people finally had a forum to express their concern about what was happening to the land, rivers, lakes and air – and they did so with spectacular exuberance.” Prominent ad man Julian Koenig came up with the name “Earth Day,” because it rhymed with birthday, while artists and designers such as Robert Rauschenberg and Milton Glaser created memorable graphics with such slogans as “Give Earth a Chance.” THE FIRST EARTH DAY On the first Earth Day in 1970, rallies were held in Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles and most other American cities, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Actors Paul Newman and Ali McGraw spoke at the rally in New York City. In Washington, D.C., thousands of people listened to speeches and performances by singer Pete Seeger and others. Congress went into recess so its members could speak to their constituents at Earth Day events.

EARTH DAY 2021, continued on page 16.

U

ntil the 1960s, Americans were largely oblivious to environmental concerns and the impact of pollution on our planet and our health. We were consuming vast amounts of leaded gas to power our automobiles, factories belched smoke and sludge into the environment and air pollution was accepted as a byproduct of progress and prosperity. But all that began to change with the publication of Rachel Carson’s 1962 bestseller “Silent Spring.” The book sold more than 500,000 copies and raised awareness of the environment and the links between pollution and public health.

14

Sustainability, organic eating and the “back-tothe-land” movement continued to gain steam throughout the 1960s. THE HISTORY OF EARTH DAY Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin had long been concerned about the deteriorating environment in the United States. In January 1969, he and many others witnessed the ravages of a massive oil spill in Santa Barbara, California. That same year, a fire on Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River shed light on the problem of chemical waste disposal. Nelson was determined to convince the federal government that the planet was at risk.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

Senator Gaylor Nelson of Wisconsin

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Searching for a new apartment?

ts ll Pe Sma me o Welc

Sheridan Terrace

Independent Senior Living • All bills paid

• Inside hallways

• Quiet location

• Emergency call system

• Small pets welcome

• Subsidy available

(918) 835-7072 1937 S. 68th E. Ave. | Tulsa, OK

Sheridan Terrace does not discriminate against individuals with handicaps.

LIFE’S ADULT DAY HEALTH

(NE of 21st and Sheridan)

Safe, affordable daytime care for older adults. Call (918) 664-9000 for more information or visit www.LIFEseniorservices.org.

Medical Staffing & Home Care Specialists

SERVICES INCLUDE:

Nurses - RNs, LPNs • Home Health Aides Companions • RN Supervision Intermittent Visits or Hourly Care Home IV Therapy • Sitter Service Call us. We can help.

LIFE’s Adult Day Health is following safety protocols. Masks, social distancing and temperature checks are required.

I’m Amazing!

SM

24 Hour Service 7 Days a Week

(918) 665-1011 www.My-FirstCall.com

All employees are screened, fidelity bonded, liability insured, and drug tested.

LIKE WHAT YOU’RE READING?

Subscribe Now – It’s FREE!

Masks, Social Distancing and Temperature Checks Required

Continue receiving LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine by filling out the form below or subscribing online at www.LIFEseniorservices.org under the Education/Resources tab. Your subscription request helps LIFE qualify for reduced postal rates and will bring an award-winning publication to your front door each month at no cost.

Name: ___________________________________________________________ Full Address: _____________________________________________________

LIFE PACE Coordinated Care for Senior Adults

LIFE PACE is a holistic approach to healthcare offering primary and specialty medical care, rehabilitative therapies, mental health services, medications and a full range of home and community-based assistance to help seniors stay safely in their homes. The focus of LIFE PACE is to provide positive outcomes for participant health and quality of life.

___________________________________________________________________ Phone Number: ___________________________________________________ Email: ____________________________________________________________

CUT OUT AND MAIL TO

LIFE Senior Services • 5330 E. 31st St. • Tulsa OK 74135

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Call (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Espanol) to speak to a LIFE PACE specialist. Recognized as a Medicare & Medicaid Program

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

15


EARTH DAY 2021, continued from page 14.

A crowd of 20,000 spectators at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Photo courtesy of www.EarthWeek1970.org

Child in an Earth Day 1970 crowd wears a ‘Let Me Grow Up’ Sign in Philadelphia. Photo courtesty of www.EarthWeek1970.org

An astonishing success, the first Earth Day was celebrated by some 20 million Americans on 2,000 college campuses, at 10,000 primary and secondary schools, and in hundreds of communities. Earth Day 1970 achieved a rare political alignment, enlisting support from Republicans and Democrats, rich and poor, urban dwellers and farmers, business and labor leaders. Perhaps more importantly, it was effective at raising awareness about environmental issues and transforming public attitudes. According to the EPA, “Public opinion polls indicate that a permanent change in national priorities followed Earth Day 1970. When polled in May 1971, 25% of the U.S. public declared protecting the environment to be an important goal, a 2,500% increase over 1969.” Earth Day kicked off the “environmental decade with a bang,” as Senator Nelson later put it. By the end of 1970, the first Earth Day led to the creation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of other environmental laws, including the National Environmental Education Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act and the Clean Air Act. Two years later, Congress passed the Clean Water Act. A year after that, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act and soon after the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. “Earth Day worked because of the spontaneous response at the grassroots level,” Nelson recalled. “We had neither the time nor resources to organize 20 million demonstrators and the thousands of schools and local communities that participated. That was the remarkable thing about Earth Day. It organized itself.”

16

WHAT YOU CAN DO ON EARTH DAY – AND EVERY DAY April 22 marks the 51st anniversary of Earth Day. With social distancing still in place for many of us, most Earth Day activities have gone digital. Virtual events, like environmental lectures and films, can be found at www.EarthDay.org.

While Earth Day might be the one day that really drives the point home about the health and preservation of our planet, the big changes come when Earth Day is celebrated every day by changing old habits into more ecologicallyminded ones.

If you’re wanting to get out and get your hands dirty, visit www.EarthDay.org for details on their Great Global Cleanup, an opportunity for groups and individuals to remove billions of pieces of trash from our green spaces, urban communities and waterways.

“There’s so much we can do – even during a pandemic,” said Corey Wren Williams, founder, past president and executive director of Sustainable Tulsa. “I encourage everyone to cut back on single-use items, especially plastic. Reusing containers not only saves money, but it’s better for the environment.”

Locally, you can tune in to 1st Thursday!, Sustainable Tulsa’s monthly meeting featuring presentations from local, regional and national sustainability leaders. The April 1 meeting will be led by National Geographic writer, Christine Dell’Amore on Zoom. 1ST THURSDAY! Join Sustainable Tulsa’s monthly meeting to learn more about conservation efforts. National Geographic writer Christine Dell’Amore will speak at the free, virtual event. THURSDAY, APRIL 1 FREE • 12 – 1 P.M. ON ZOOM REGISTER AT www.SustainableTulsa.org.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

Plastic takes more than 400 years to degrade, so most of it still exists in some form. Only 12% has been incinerated. Of the 8.3 billion metric tons that have been produced, 6.3 billion metric tons have become plastic waste. Of that, only 9% has been recycled. The vast majority – 79% – is accumulating in landfills or sloughing off in the natural environment as litter. Meaning: at some point, much of it ends up in the oceans. “Our oceans are full of microplastics. In fact, research has found that microplastics are emitted into the atmosphere and come back in rainfall,” Williams said. “Simple steps are the key to making lasting changes. Use a plate to cover that bowl of leftovers like your grandmother did. Compost your yard waste and kitchen scraps to save money on fertilizer and add less trash to the landfill.” This Earth Day may be different as we continue to follow recommended safety and social distancing precautions. But we can still take steps to support the environment and turn our actions into habits that will last beyond Earth Day. www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Getting Down to Earth

Senior living, with promise.

Ideas and Activities for Earth Day IN THE GARDEN

1. Plant a pollinator garden – It attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Take it a step further with native plants and wildflowers. 2. Organic vegetable gardening – If an entire garden seems overwhelming, start with an organic container garden. 3. Start a compost pile – Composting takes your kitchen scraps and converts them into nutrient-rich food for your soil. 4. Plant a tree – Trees help purify the air and give wildlife a home. If you don’t have room in your yard – or don’t have a yard – consider supporting Up With Trees, Tulsa’s urban forest initiative. 5. Conserve water – Conserving rainwater is a great way to make less impact on the earth while growing a greener garden. A rain barrel is also a relatively easy DIY project.

IN THE KITCHEN

1. Research new plant-based recipes or recreate your favorite family recipes with plant-based alternatives.

Covenant Living at Inverness | Tulsa, OK 3800 West 71st Street Limited availability! • Independent & Assisted Living Skilled Nursing • Memory Care • Rehabilitation To schedule a tour today, call (877) 478-8455, or visit us online at CovLivingInverness.org.

2. Livestream a plant-based cooking class for your friends and family. 3. Learn food preservation techniques such as canning, pickling, drying and freezing to enjoy fruits and vegetables year-round and minimize your food waste.

REDUCE PLASTIC DEPENDENCY

1. Conduct a plastic audit in your home. Count how many plastic containers, wraps, bottles and bags you purchase for your kitchen and bathroom. 2. Research products that have more sustainable packaging for your next grocery store or online order. 3. Ask restaurants to skip the plastic utensils with your delivery or pickup orders.

GET INVOLVED

Check with the following groups and organizations for their Earth Day 2021 plans: www.EarthDay.org www.SustainableTulsaInc.org www.MetRecycle.com www.SierraClub.org/oklahoma/green-country www.OKEarthCoalition.org www.CarrieDickersonFoundation.org www.UpWithTrees.org www.Nature.org www.OkiesForMonarchs.org www.CityofTulsa.org www.TulsaZoo.org www.OKAquarium.org

Covenant Living of Bixby | Bixby, OK 7300 East 121st Place South Available now! • Independent & Assisted Living Excellent service, worry-free living • No buy-in fee! To schedule a tour today, call (877) 312-3248, or visit us online at CovLivingBixby.org.

Covenant Living is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. For information, visit CovLiving.org.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

17


RECYCLE this NOT THAT BY LINDSAY MORRIS

Recycling is something each of us can do to help the planet. Here’s a guide to making the process easier to tackle.

According to www.TulsaRecycles.com, 80% of your household waste is recyclable. And there’s no denying that recycling can make a big difference. For example, recycling a stack of newspapers three feet high saves an entire tree. While we all know that recycling is good for the environment, some of us are still trying to figure out the do’s and don’ts of recycling. The Tulsa area has made many advances regarding recycling over the last few years. Several suburbs that were not previously offering curbside recycling now do. Cities in northeastern Oklahoma are now offering curbside recycling to households in Tulsa, Bixby, Broken Arrow, Glenpool, Sapulpa, Jenks, Owasso, Collinsville and Verdigris.

Recycle This ALUMINUM AND STEEL CANS

Ensure that all food residue has been removed from the containers and refrain from crushing cans.

PLASTIC Leave the caps and lids BOTTLES AND JUGS securely on the bottles. No flexible film is allowed.

18

ORGANIC WASTE

A good rule of thumb is to recycle items from your kitchen, laundry room and bathroom, but not items from the shed or garage, according to www.TulsaRecycles.com. Any items from the shed or garage should not be recycled. Any containers that previously held food should be completely cleared of food, but it is not necessary to clean or wash the item in the dishwasher before recycling. Below is a list of recycling do’s and don’ts in the City of Tulsa. If you live in a suburb, be sure to check your city’s website for any variations.

The items listed below CAN be dropped off at any local recycling center. Check your city's website for any variations. For a complete list of recyclables in Tulsa, visit www.TulsaRefuse.org GLASS BOTTLES AND JARS

Place only clear, brown and green beverage bottles and food jars in the blue recycling bin. All containers should be empty of food or other residue.

CARDBOARD Place cardboard and loose paper, AND including junk mail, PAPER in the blue recycling container. Ensure that all food residue has been removed from pizza boxes.

The items listed below CANNOT be dropped off at any local recycling center and may have special recycling restrictions. Check your city's website for information or services to recycle these items.

NOT THAT RESIDENTIAL Tulsa's trash service offers once- or TRASH twice-a-week pickup and three sizes of trash carts. There are options for backyard and extended backyard service if residents have difficulty getting carts to the curb.

Each community, however, uses different companies to manage recycling, which means that acceptable items for curbside recycling differ from town to town. Most communities only offer curbside recycling to households – not apartments or businesses.

Branches, grass and plants need to go in bagged trash or to the green waste dump at 2100 N. 145th E. Ave.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

HOUSEHOLD Bulky items like furniture and TVs ITEMS can’t go in the blue bin. The City of Tulsa provides a bulky waste collection service to remove items for a fee. Call (918) 596-9777. Donate items to charities providing a pickup service.

CHEMICALS, CLEANERS AND PAINTS

Tulsa Authority for Recovery of Energy and the City of Tulsa offer a collection facility, free for Tulsa residents, to dispose of household pollutants by appointment. Call (918) 591-4325.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Outside the Blue Bin No curbside recycling bin? No problem. Find a recycling location near you. The Metropolitan Environmental Trust (MET) has several centers around the Tulsa metro that collect a wide variety of items. For a full, detailed list of items and locations, go to www.RecycleThisTulsa.com. BROKEN ARROW MET CENTER 302 N. Elm Pl. • Broken Arrow #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Cardboard Paperboard Aluminum cans Steel cans Scrap metal Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Antifreeze (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto) Electronic waste BIXBY MET CENTER 211 N. Cabaniss Ave. • Bixby Batteries Electronic waste Eyeglasses Glass Metal Oil Paper Plastics CLAREMORE MET CENTER 810 Ramm Rd. • Claremore Cans Plastic bags Cardboard Oil Magazines Batteries Paper Phone books Plastic and glass bottles Eyeglasses Electronics COLLINSVILLE MET CENTER 306 W. Broadway • Collinsville #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Cardboard Aluminum cans Steel cans Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto) GLENPOOL MET CENTER 11 Warrior Rd. • Glenpool #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Aluminum cans Steel cans

Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto) Electronic waste SAND SPRINGS MET CENTER 105 E. Morrow Rd. • Sand Springs #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Corrugated cardboard (no paperboard) Aluminum cans Steel cans Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto) Electronic waste CENTRAL TULSA MET CENTER 3495 S. Sheridan Rd. • Tulsa #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Cardboard Aluminum cans Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Antifreeze (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto) Electronic waste DOWNTOWN TULSA MET CENTER 1101 S. Cincinnati Ave. • Tulsa #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Cardboard Aluminum cans Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto) Electronic waste EAST TULSA MET CENTER 2160 S. Garnett Rd. • Tulsa #1 & #2 plastic bottles Plastic bags Glass bottles Newspaper Office paper Magazines Phone books Cardboard Aluminum cans Motor oil (5-gallon limit) Cooking oil (5-gallon limit) Eyeglasses Batteries (household & auto)

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

What is Kyphoplasty?

Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that quickly repairs vertebral compression fractures (VCF) and restores structural integrity to broken vertebral bone. Kyphoplasty is an outpatient procedure that uses a cavity creation device (usually a balloon) to create a space in the broken vertebra which is then filled with a special bone cement to stabilize the fracture and reduce pain.

How does Kyphoplasty help?

The goal of kyphoplasty is to restore the broken vertebra to a more normal height and to fix the pain caused by the fracture. When a vertebral fracture occurs, it most commonly presents as an acute worsening of chronic lower back pain. Many times the patient’s chronic back pain is getting worse, but it’s actually due to a recent fracture. Studies have shown that up to 85% of fractures are missed even in advanced imaging reports. According to the medical literature, the most accurate way to detect a painful fracture is by physical percussion exam. Many of our patients experience immediate pain relief following kyphoplasty. It can help relieve pain by stabilizing the fracture. Improved mobility results because of decreased pain levels.

Dr. James Webb Kyphoplasty Expert

When it comes to kyphoplasty, Dr. Webb is one of the most experienced physicians in the U.S. Dr. Webb has performed thousands of kyphoplasty procedures and has the experience necessary to safely perform kyphoplasty. In fact, he also teaches other physicians how to safely and effectively perform the procedure.

Here are a few facts about Dr. Webb’s kyphoplasty expertise: He performed over 120 kyphoplasties during his training (fellowship). Was one of the first physicians to perform kyphoplasty in Oklahoma. Was a principal investigator in the EVOLVE trial, the largest ever on-label study of kyphoplasty in Medicare patients with vertebral fractures with 350 patients enrolled over 24 sites across the U.S. The first in Oklahoma and one of a few in the nation to establish a full-service outpatient clinic focused on medically treating the underlying causes of osteoporosis in patients with VCF. The highest level of experience in the Tulsa area with 300-400 fractures treated per year. Continues efforts to refine vertebral fracture treatment, consulting for numerous medical device companies and teaching other physicians how to perform this life-saving procedure.

“WE’VE GOT YOUR BACK”

(918) 260-9322 • www.drjameswebb.com 6550 E. 71st St., Ste. 200 • Tulsa, OK 74133

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

19


DOWN TO EARTH Statistics and Facts About the Third Rock From the Sun An estimated 7.8 billion people call the Earth home. Earth is considered to be in the "Goldilocks zone” where temperatures are just right for water to remain liquid, an element considered essential for living organisms. Earth has a breathable atmosphere and a suitable amount of sunshine, making the existence of Goldilocks – and the rest of us – possible. Our home planet is the only one astronomers know of that is habitable. Scientists have cataloged more than 1.7 million of the world’s species of animals, plants, insects and algae. They say millions more species are yet unknown – some too tiny to be seen, others living in the depths of the ocean or perhaps making their homes inside other living things. With all the mysteries Earth still has to offer, there are a few things we at least think we know. So, here’s a look at the big blue marble we call our home planet – third rock from the sun in the Milky Way galaxy.

5

4

3 2 1

3.5% FRESHWATER 96.5% SALTWATER

EARTH IS 71% WATER

EARTH IS 29% LAND

EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE 1. TROPOSPHERE From the ground to about 7 miles high

2. STRATOSPHERE From troposphere to about 31 miles high

3. MESOSPHERE From stratosphere to about 53 miles high

4. THERMOSPHERE From mesosphere to around 372 miles high

 ost weather M events and cloud types occur in this layer.

 he ozone layer is T found here, as well as commercial passenger jets.

 eteors burn up M and special clouds called noctilucent clouds form here.

The International Space Station orbits here, and this zone absorbs most of the X-ray and UV radiation. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

20

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021


H

AVERAGE DISTANCE FROM THE SUN

The sun is estimated to be 4.6 billion years old.

92,955,807 miles

AVERAGE DISTANCE FROM THE MOON 238,855 miles

The moon formed 4.51 billion years ago – or did it? In 2020, a German study estimated the moon is only 4.425 billion years old.

EARTH'S LAYERS Earth is estimated to have formed 4.54 billion years ago

CRUST – About 3 to 44 miles thick • Continental crust averages 25 miles thick. • Oceanic crust averages 4 miles thick.

UPPER MANTLE – About 450 miles thick • Makes up 84% of Earth's total volume and is divided into two sections. • The average temperature of the mantle is 1,652°F.

LOWER MANTLE – About 1,350 miles thick • Makes up 84% of Earth's total volume and is divided into two sections. • The average temperature of the mantle is 4,000°F.

OUTER CORE – About 1,400 miles thick • Consists of 1,400 miles of liquid. • It's mostly composed of iron and nickel and is the only liquid layer due to the heat of the inner core. 5. EXOSPHERE From thermosphere to outer space  his layer contains T extremely thin air and fades into the vacuum of space. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

INNER CORE – About 760 miles thick • The inner core is mostly made of iron. • It spins faster than the surface of the earth and is responsible for creating our magnetic field. • The temperature of the core is 9,392°F.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

21


Starry, Starry

OKLAHOMA NIGHTS Find a Hobby That’s Out of This World BY JOEY MECHELLE FARQUÉ

Pictured is CED 214 a large emission nebula visible in the constellation of Cepheus. Photo by Daniel Smith

DANIEL SMITH Astrophotographer and Vice President of Astronomy Club of Tulsa For more astrophotos, follow @zoliroastro on Instagram.

A

s many of us are retiring, we are struck with the question of what to do. What to do when we are no longer working, no longer taking care of children and no longer responsible for a day-to-day routine that pays the bills? Now is the time for a hobby, so why not reach for the stars … and the moon … and the planets … and the galaxies! STARGAZERS UNITE Did you know that the Astronomy Club of Tulsa (ACT) was founded 84 years ago? In the summer of 1937, a group of enthusiasts got together in a sound studio on Columbia Street to form the club. By the 1980s, members would meet in rural Okmulgee County to stargaze. The club received a generous grant from the Ronald McDonald House in 1991 to build a 1,200-square-foot observatory and classroom about 25 miles southwest of Tulsa near Mounds. The ACT Observatory was completed in 1993, and today it hosts nighttime showings. “I have been involved for about two and half years now,” said ACT Vice President Daniel Smith. “I 22

got started in the astronomy hobby in late 2016 when I bought my first telescope.” The ACT boasts that if you can read, you are old enough to start learning about space and astronomy. And if you are still alive, then you're not too old to take up stargazing. Members in the club can help you get started and will share their experience and knowledge. You don't need binoculars or a telescope. The only things that you need you already have – a love for the night sky and a desire to know more. INTERSTELLAR EXPLORATION Members of ACT have more than experience – they have true stories. Smith recalled his favorite story. "Astronomers used to think that galaxies in the universe were just other nebulae in our own galaxy," he said. "In fact, the Andromeda galaxy used to be known as the Andromeda Nebula. In the 1920s, Edwin Hubble discovered that Andromeda was actually a galaxy like our own Milky Way.” Astronomy is the perfect hobby if you like to learn and observe. The ACT website, www.AstroTulsa.com, is full of information and resources. They are also active on social media. "We've been trying to put a lot more stuff on our Facebook page since COVID started last year," Smith said. "Newbies can learn a lot about the club and lots of other astronomy info."

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

The Triangulum Galaxy Photo by Daniel Smith

TOP CELESTIAL EVENTS IN 2021 There are several meteor showers throughout the year for those hoping to wish upon a falling star. Highlights are the Perseids meteor shower in August and the Geminids in December. Events will be more or less visible depending on your location. Check www.nightsky.jpl. nasa.gov, www.Space.com or the ACT website for tips on when and where to look. Skywatching apps like Google Sky or Skyview let you use your smartphone to identify specific planets, constellations and even satellites in the night sky. • APRIL 21-22 Lyrids meteor shower peaks • APRIL 26 Full supermoon, also called full Pink Moon • MAY 26 Closest full supermoon of the year, also called Full Flower Moon, and “Blood Moon” total lunar eclipse • JUNE 10 Ring of fire solar eclipse • JULY 13 Venus-Mars conjunction • AUGUST 11-12 Perseids meteor shower peaks • OCTOBER 21-22 Orionids meteor shower peaks • NOVEMBER 16-17 Leonids meteor shower peaks • NOVEMBER 19 Partial lunar eclipse • DECEMBER 4 Solar eclipse • DECEMBER 13-14 Geminids meteor shower peaks • DECEMBER 21-22 Ursids meteor shower peaks

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


THE HEALING POWER OF ART THERAPY COMES TO LIFE BY SUZANNE BURROW, OUTREACH COORDINATOR

Mounds Observatory Photo by Adam Koloff

Today, there are countless sources for learning about astronomy, Smith said. NASA has several websites devoted to space news, discoveries and updates on their ongoing spacecraft missions. There are several astronomy publications out there, such as Sky & Telescope, Astronomy, Astronomy Now, BBC Sky at Night, as well as books, YouTube videos and podcasts about astronomy, space exploration, amateur observing and astrophotography. TOOLS FOR SKYWATCHING If you start reading and get excited to experience more, you might want to consider getting your hands on some equipment. But what is the best equipment in which to invest? Smith said that the best telescope is the one that you use. “If you get a telescope that is too big to move often or too fiddly to set up, you won’t use it very often,” he said. “Get something that you know you can handle.” Smith suggested that the best “bang for your buck” is a 6- or 8-inch Dobsonian telescope, an excellent place to start. But stay away from department store-type telescopes, he warned. The optics are often inferior, and the mounts or tripods they come with are usually very unstable and hard to use. A good beginner scope will probably set you back at least $300. So, while you are saving, another option is a simple set of binoculars. Smith said that even a cheaper pair of 8-by-42 binoculars at a dark site can be a tremendous amount of fun. Smith said viewing the planets when they are at opposition is best. “Opposition is when the orbit of the earth is closest to a particular planet,” he explained. The Mars opposition only occurs every two years. The summertime is when the Milky Way shows some of the brightest nebulae and the Andromeda Galaxy. The winter months showcase the Orion Nebula, and the spring is the best time for viewing smaller galaxies, Smith explained. ACT’s general meetings are currently virtual and held on Zoom with videos posted to their Facebook page. The club has members-only observation nights at the Mounds Observatory twice a month, weather permitting. Check their website at www.AstroTulsa.com for updates. Theof outside grounds Care at thefor observatory in Mounds are handicapped Program All Inclusive the Elderly accessible, and you can set up your telescope next to where you park. The observatory building has a handicapped-accessible bathroom, but the telescope dome up top is unfortunately not handicapped accessible.

You’ve probably heard the expression, “you have come full circle.” In the case of Grechanel Johnson, the new art therapist at LIFE Senior Services and LIFE PACE, a long series of events brought her where she is today – and we couldn’t be happier! When Grechanel’s daughters were young, they both needed the help of a speech therapist. Grechanel noticed how certain therapies affect the mind and the body simultaneously. Having completed a certificate in industrial art, she is excited to bring her knowledge of art therapy to Adult Day Health and PACE participants at LIFE. Grechanel brings a big smile and joyful spirit to her work. She loves working with seniors and uses the process of self-expression through artwork to help participants understand their emotional conflicts, develop social skills, improve self-esteem, reduce anxiety and restore normal function to their lives. “The brain works faster than the mouth,” Grechanel said. “Oftentimes, the emotions they are trying to get out are the result of past traumas, so I try to keep it happy,” Grechanel makes sure participants are rewarded for what they are doing, from drawing butterflies to buildings. “They get so excited, and I get so excited for them. They are doing something they didn’t think they could accomplish before,” she said. Grechanel schedules time at all three LIFE Adult Day Health locations. She works with only four participants at a time to manage their concentration and practice social distancing. She also has three levels of learning in place to match whatever the participant needs. And word of mouth has certainly caught on. What started with just a few participants has grown due to the high interest. A cancer survivor since 2018, Grechanel said she couldn’t walk two years ago. Thanks to her art therapy team at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, she learned from her struggles how disconnection works. That helps her relate to older adults in a profound way. “I see myself in this job both as a professional as well as a humanitarian,” she said. If you or a loved one could benefit from art therapy and other activities offered through LIFE PACE and LIFE's Adult Day Health, contact us today.

PACE If you or someone you care about could benefit from LIFE PACE, contact a LIFE PACE specialist at (918) 938-7653 or (918) 938-7660 (en Espanol).

www.LIFEPACE.org www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

23


StorM TRACKERS EYES ON THE SKIES

DArrEN StEphENs RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME

Darren is a businessman and rancher who has tracked storms for News On 6 since 2004, combining his interests in weather and technology.

BY LINDSAY MORRIS

How did you get interested in weather and storm tracking?

What is the most interesting storm you’ve tracked?

I’m originally from Moore, Oklahoma, so from a very young age, I was always interested in weather. I was probably in college or just out of college when I started going out and watching storms.

During hurricane season, Von Castor, another News On 6 storm tracker, and I track hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico on our own. Our first hurricane was Hurricane Katrina, and we’ve been doing it ever since.

In December 2003, my wife encouraged me to pursue storm tracking. She said, “Why don’t you try to do this for TV? You have a knack for being at the right place at the right time.” I sat down and wrote an email to all of the chief meteorologists in Tulsa. News On 6 hired me in 2004. What kind of training goes into becoming a storm tracker?

My degree is in business. My training comes from the college of hard knocks. The best technology you can have is your eyes. We use technology to help us zero in on a particular area, but once I get there, I use my eyes to see which direction the storm is going. What do you do with your time when there aren’t storms?

Up until when COVID hit, we kept busy with News On 6 doing weather camps and promotions. It’s important to reach kids so they know what to do if they’re in a severe storm warning. When COVID hit, the camps were put on hold. My wife and I have a ranch in Haskell where we have 200 to 250 head of cattle. I also have a two-truck trucking business. 24

They’re the people who run toward danger instead of away – to help their communities stay safe.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

When you’re there in the situation, with all the adrenaline, the storm does a memory implant. It’s like looking at a picture of your child. I could look at a picture of the May 3, 1999, tornado and tell you that’s the one that hit Moore. How is Oklahoma’s weather unique in comparison to other parts of the country/world?

We’re right in the bullseye of tornado alley – nice, cool air coming off the Rocky Mountains, and warm, moist, juicy air coming off the Gulf of Mexico. Whenever the wind and the jet stream meet in April, May and June, you have the perfect scenario for violent storms. Any predictions on what we can expect from the weather in 2021?

In years past, when we’re in this current type of weather pattern, La Niña, we’ve had an active hurricane season, and we generally have an above active spring season. What do you advise ordinary folks do when the weather is bad?

Have a way to get information. Make sure you have your push alerts activated on your phone.

FORECASTS ON THE GO Staying weather aware can make a life-saving difference during Oklahoma’s severe weather. Download one – or more – of these weather apps to your smartphone. 1. Local Weather Stations – Get in-depth local weather from your favorite meteorologists at News On 6, KJRH Channel 2, KTUL Channel 8 and Fox23. Local stations offer targeted forecasts, local closings lists and push alert notifications during weather events. 2. TheWeatherChannel – Provides detailed forecasts, both daily and hourly. Weather stories, radar, and more. Easy to switch between locations if you travel often. Also offers a premium option for a $29.99 annual fee. 3. NOAA Weather Radar – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is a U.S. agency that includes the National Weather Service. They provide weather forecasts and warnings with the mission of protecting property and lives. 4. RadarScope – Darren Stephens’ favorite radar app. While there are three tiers of paid subscriptions to the app, Darren says the free version of the app is plenty for most people. 5. Weather Underground – This app has crowd reporting in addition to meteorological staff, using amateur and professional weather watchers from many locations to gather data. Its smart forecasts can help you plan specific outdoor activities by the hour.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


ED CALIANESE ALWAYS ON THE JOB

Ed Calianese works full-time as the warning coordinator meteorologist for the U.S. National Weather Service office in Tulsa. In his free time, he enjoys storm spotting.

How did you get interested in storm tracking?

I’ve always been interested in severe weather and tornadoes. My favorite thing in my job is being the person who issues a warning, so I naturally want to be out and experience the storm with my own eyes. How does storm chasing help you with your day job?

I’m positive that my 30 years of storm chasing have been beneficial to me in my day job. When I see things happening on radar, I can envision what it looks like in real life. It helps me to communicate these ideas to storm spotters. It helps my forecasting also. What have you learned from storm chasing?

If you forecast and drive 700 miles to chase, and it’s a bust, you learn from that. You spend money and aggravation, and you don’t want to do that again. It helps tweak and tune your severe weather forecasting skills. Most chasers or spotters are there to help serve their communities. We want to help save lives and help people know what’s coming toward them. What is the most interesting storm you’ve tracked?

I chase all over the country – mainly in the Plains. I used to take a week or two-week vacation wherever the storms were.

What would you say to untrained people who attempt storm chasing?

There is no formal education for storm chasing or spotting. The National Weather Service Tulsa office offers a weather training session that is now virtual. You can find the info at www.Weather.gov/Tulsa. I would recommend knowing and learning as much as possible before trying to storm chase. Try to get with someone experienced and learn the ropes. Any predictions on what we can expect from the weather in 2021?

We live in an area of the country where we have to be prepared all year long. In January this year, we had four tornadoes in this region. We have to be prepared for tornadoes every year and every month of every year. Some data supports this spring being typically a little more active than what we usually see. But some data suggests that’s not going to be the case. What do you advise ordinary folks do when the weather is bad?

Have a plan. Once you develop the plan, practice the plan. Know how to monitor the weather. Keep up with the warnings. Know where the safe places are. Have a weather radio that runs on battery power in case your house loses power.

The tornado that stands out in my mind is an EF-2 that impacted Broken Arrow on May 30, 2013. My buddies and I followed it well before it formed and followed it all the way into Wagoner. www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’S VIRTUAL PROGRAMMING April 2021

Follow LIFE Senior Services on Facebook for video outreach, news, local events and resources for seniors. Find the following content and more at www.facebook.com/LIFESeniorServices during April. Be Red Cross Ready Thursday, April 8 • 2 p.m. Mathew Hitchcock, American Red Cross From home fires and floods to tornadoes and winter storms, emergencies are more common than most people may think. Join us to learn the basics about preparing for Oklahoma’s storm and tornado season. Ask SeniorLine With Sarah Tronnier, Lead Case Manager Fridays, April 9, 16, 23, 30 • 2 p.m. Join Sarah, LIFE’s lead case manager for SeniorLine, Fridays at 2 p.m. for encouraging and useful tips on senior living, family caregiving and senior resources. • Friday, April 9 • 2 p.m. – Companion Gardening for Older Adults and Their Caregivers We always knew that digging in the dirt was therapeutic and good for the soul, but did you know that gardening with a loved one can actually improve their health and enhance their lives significantly? Sarah will share the benefits of companion gardening with you. • Friday, April 23 • 2 p.m. – Accessing Health Care Through the VA Accessing health benefits for veterans can be a confusing process. Listen in to learn the three paths to Veterans Administration health care eligibility – disability status, service history and financial need. April is Fair Housing Month Tuesday, April 13 • 2 p.m. Teresa Webster, Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma The Fair Housing Act protects people from discrimination when they are renting or buying a home, getting a mortgage, seeking housing assistance or engaging in other housing-related activities. Learn about the Fair Housing Act, its protections and where to turn for help. Is It Dementia or Depression? Tuesday, April 20 • 2 p.m. Deborah Tommey, LPC, LIFE Senior Services Dementia and depression can have similar symptoms. Learn the differences between the two and what to do if you or are loved one may be experiencing early-stage memory loss or have the blues. Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance Tuesday, April 27 • 2 p.m. Glenna Greer, Certified Tai Chi Instructor, RSVP Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese movement practice that is lowimpact and helps with balance, flexibility, strength and stability. A 2017 study shows that practicing Tai Chi can reduce fall risks by as much as 50%! Join RSVP instructor Glenna Greer for an introduction and demonstration.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

25


The World Meteorological Organization is the organization that tracks and names hurricanes and is located in Geneva, Switzerland.

University, in an interview with National Geographic. “In general, humans care about other humans, so when we humanize something inanimate, it makes us care about the thing more.” Considering the devastation that hurricanes can bring, the WMO and meteorologists around the world, also use the naming system to commemorate and remember the heroism and tragedy that can arise from a hurricane.

WHAT’S IN A NAME? THE HISTORY BEHIND NAMING HURRICANES BY A.W. WEBB

T

he Coca-Cola Company had a unique marketing strategy called “Share A Coke,” in which they printed common American names on Coke cans. When searching for my own name emblazoned on a can of Diet Coke, I realized how important seeing your name can be. Hurricanes are also given common American names. It would be fun to see my name on a Coke can, but how would I feel if my name were attached to a devastating hurricane in which people lost homes and loved ones? I gained sympathy for all those Katrinas, Sandys and Harveys in the world.

NAMING A HURRICANE: “IT’S JUST THE NATURAL NEXT STEP” “The name-giving is simply procedural, part of a labeling system that meteorologists have been using for 67 years,” said Edward Rappaport of the National Hurricane Center. “It’s just the natural next step.”

WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION Ever wonder who decides the names of hurricanes? The World Meteorological Organization, or WMO, is the organization that tracks and names hurricanes, and they have been doing so for a very long time. The organization was first established as the International Meteorological Organization following the 1873 Vienna Meteorological Congress with the mission of standardizing and sharing meteorological information among nations.

Today, the WMO operates off a preset list of names that aligns with the English alphabet and includes male as well as female names. The first hurricane of each year will be named with a name starting with A, the second B, and so on. So, rather than naming these disasters after potentially disastrous relationships, they’re now randomly generated ahead of time in sets of names that repeat every six years. So, the plan is already in place to name the first hurricane in 2022 Alex. Hopefully, my namesake won’t be too destructive.

In 1950, in conjunction with the United Nations, its name was changed to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Different name, but the same purpose: to gather and share meteorological data worldwide. 26

The now common naming conventions started in the 1950s as an easier way to share information about hurricanes, particularly over the airwaves. The WMO used the armed forces tradition of naming hurricanes after wives and old girlfriends.

The process of naming hurricanes is not only viewed through the lens of data gathering and data sharing. “Naming things can give them importance,” said Adam Waytz, a professor at Northwestern

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

RETIRING NAMES While the WMO generally doesn’t revise their lists, in some instances, they will retire a name. According to the National Hurricane Center’s website, the only time a hurricane name is retired is if a “storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for obvious reasons of sensitivity.” So, in the case of devastating hurricanes, such as Katrina, the name is removed from the list and another name is selected to replace it. That’s why the Harveys, Sandys and Katrinas among us will likely never see their names appear again on the nightly news associated with a hurricane. WHAT IF WE RUN OUT OF NAMES? Historically, there have only been two years that the WMO ran out of names: 2005 and 2020. To accommodate an abundance of hurricanes, the organization simply restarts the alphabet, but this time in Greek. So, if you ever hear about a hurricane “Alpha,” it’s a good indication that the world has had many, many storms in that one year! Still waiting for a hurricane to be named after you? If it hasn’t happened yet, it probably won’t. The only time a new name is chosen is on those rare occasions when a name is retired. None of us wants to see a hurricane so severe that its name is retired. However, if you’re named Amanda, Wallis, Virgil, Xina or any other name on their rotating list, you may not only have one hurricane named after you, but possibly many. While I still feel sympathy for the Katrinas of the world, it turns out, when it comes to naming hurricanes, they have a lot of company. And maybe, just maybe, like me, you will have a hurricane named after you!

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


SPOTLIGHT Email your spotlight-worthy stories to Kristen Harris at kharris@LIFEseniorservices.org

Pictured from left to right: past Rotary Club of Tulsa President Karen Keith, current Rotary President Paul Bauman, Rotarian Hannibal B. Johnson and Centennial Commission Project Director, Phil Armstrong, also a member of the Rotary Club of Tulsa.

The “Bench by the Road” The Rotary Club of Tulsa proudly presented a check for $82,000 to the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial. Using these funds, two benches from the Toni Morrison “Bench by the Road Project,” have been purchased for $12,000. The “Bench by the Road

Project” is a memorial and community outreach initiative by the Toni Morrison Society to place benches and plaques at sites commemorating significant moments, individuals and locations within the history of the African Diaspora.

The benches will be placed at the Mabel B. Little Heritage House at 322 N. Greenwood Ave., and the southeast corner of Greenwood and Archer street in front of Greenwood Rising: The Black Wall Street History Center. The remaining $70,000 goes toward the Greenwood Rising Museum. “We are #PeopleOfAction and are committed to tackling our world's most persistent issues,” the Rotary Club of Tulsa said in a release. “Together, we see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change – across the globe, in our communities, and in ourselves.”

The dedication of the benches is planned for April 17. For more information, visit www.Tulsa2021.org/events.

Tormented, beaten, starved, where did they find the strength – spiritual and physical – to resist?"

Virtual Commemoration Honors Jewish Women’s Resistance in the Holocaust Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel once said, "The question is not why all the Jews did not fight, but how so many of them did.

Join the Jewish Federation of Tulsa and Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education at the 23rd Annual Yom HaShoah/Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration as they examine Wiesel’s words in the context of female Jewish resistors who fought in the forests, the homes, ghettos and concentration camps to save the lives and dignity of their families, friends and fellow victims of Nazi persecution. Held in partnership with the Tulsa City-County Library and Circle Cinema, the

commemoration will take place virtually via Zoom at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 22. Sheri Rosenblum, director of development and outreach, Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation, is the keynote speaker and will address the topic “Choosing to Act: Jewish Women’s Resistance in the Holocaust.” The commemoration will include performances by the Tulsa Opera Children’s Choir and opera singer Elliott Wulff, followed by a candlelighting ceremony featuring notable Tulsa women honoring Jewish women who resisted in the Holocaust.

To obtain the Zoom link or for more information about the commemoration, contact Nancy Pettus, director of Holocaust education, Jewish Federation of Tulsa, at npettus@jewishtulsa.org.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Purview Life Expands Commitment to Area Seniors BY LINDSAY MORRIS

Pictured above: Imane Rose is managing partner at Purview Life in Tulsa. Purview Life provides guidance to families caring for aging parents or a developmentally disabled family member. When many businesses were retracting during COVID, Purview Life made the bold step to take a leap of faith and expand. Purview Life is a quality life management firm providing collaboration, advocacy, high-level consultation, assessment and guardianship for senior adults and developmentally disabled adults. Purview Life purchased and renovated a new office building near East 71st Street and Riverside Drive. The company also added additional staff. Imane Rose, managing partner of Purview Life, said the pandemic was a challenging time for the organization, which works mostly with senior adults. The year was full of Zoom meetings, daily COVID statistics and changing policies in the communities where their clients live. They made window visits, held drive-by parades, facilitated virtual visits with family members and more. “We never lost sight of the reason we exist: to give our clients, families and referral sources peace of mind and the best lives they could possibly have, even during COVID,” Rose said. Purview Life was founded in 2009 when Rose and Susan Boyd, founder and principal owner, realized that a business of its kind didn’t exist in the Tulsa area. Families seek the company's services when facing new realities like a loved one with dementia. “They come to us for expert, objective advice on new realities they are facing in the aging or special needs world,” Rose said. Purview Life care managers take on different roles, including medical power of attorney and conflict resolution. “We are another security net for families. Sometimes people are not able to make sound decisions during emotional times,” she said. Purview Life serves as a support system and works with attorneys, health care providers and other professionals to help determine an individual’s capacity, executive function, medical and social needs.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

27


talents as an author and experiences as a palliative care physician in the memoir named after the Dylan Thomas poem, “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.”

Tulsa City-County Library Commemorates the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre The Tulsa City-County Library (TCCL) is hosting a series of events to commemorate the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The virtual events will include a chat with a best-selling author and a panel discussion leading up to the Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial in May. Community members are invited to take part in the events which are intended to educate and promote healing and empathy by increasing historical and political awareness of Tulsa’s history. The following events are planned for this month via Zoom. “Unite Tulsa: Empathy, Education and Healing” Thursday, April 8 • 7 p.m. • Zoom The Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial will be commemorated with a conversation about race relations in Oklahoma, with particular emphasis on the themes of empathy, education and healing. Join Unite Tulsa for a forum for residents of Tulsa County to share the ways they're working to make the community a better, more inclusive place to live. Selected speakers will discuss their chosen topic accompanied by slides set to auto-advance every 15 seconds. Community Read Event: “Fireside Chat with Author Robin DiAngelo” Thursday, April 22 • 6 p.m. • Zoom Robin DiAngelo, New York Times best-selling author, joins TCCL to discuss her book “White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism.” The book has played a key role in the growing anti-racism movement. DiAngelo looks at the way white fragility, which she defines as defensiveness over the subject of racial inequality, reinforces racist structures. DiAngelo strives to equip readers with strategies for engaging in constructive cross-racial dialogue. A question-and-answer session will follow her talk.

To register, go to www.TulsaLibrary.org/events, or email register@tulsalibrary.org. For a full list of TCCL events, call the AskUs Hotline at (918) 549-7323 or visit www.TulsaLibrary.com.

Meet the Author of ‘That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour’

Puri said that as the daughter of an anesthesiologist, she witnessed the tension between medicine’s impulse to preserve life at all costs and her family’s spiritual embrace of the temporary nature of life. It was that tension that led her to the field of palliative medicine, a new specialty that tries to balance medical intervention with quality-of-life care.

Join Hospice of Green Country and Magic City Books for a free, live Zoom webinar featuring Dr. Sunita Puri, author and physician. She will discuss her memoir, "That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour.” The event will be April 28, from 6 – 7 p.m.

The book weaves together stories of Puri’s family with the patients she cares for, creating a moving meditation on impermanence and the role of medicine in helping us live and die well. “That Good Night” also gives readers tools to help them communicate with doctors about what matters most.

Puri is the American-born daughter of immigrants who is the medical director of the Palliative Medicine and Supportive Care Service at the Keck Hospital and Norris Cancer Center of the University of Southern California. She combines her

Register for this free event online at www.MagicCityBooks.com. “That Good Night” is available at Magic City Books in downtown Tulsa, by phone at (918) 602-4452 or on their website.

Celebrate Germanfest 2021 The German-American Society of Tulsa has announced plans for Germanfest 2021, their traditional celebration of springtime. Though this year’s event will be virtual, there’s no reason to miss the hearty German fare locals have come to count on each year. Plans for the event include curbside pickup for authentic German food from April 29 through May 2 at GAST Event Center. The center is located in the heart of midtown Tulsa at 1429 Terrace Dr., near 15th and Lewis. There will be old favorites and some new food items available. An online store will be active

from April 15 to May 2 and will feature goods made in Germany. In addition to the authentic German food, there will be music and entertainment at the event center. Details about the menu and other events, including a quilt raffle, will be released on the Society’s Facebook page and website, www.GastGermanFest.com. The mission of the German American Society, founded in Tulsa in 1980, is to promote and preserve the German language, culture, traditions and customs through educational and social activities.

$89.95 4/30/21

28

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


SHARE YOUR TIME & TALENT To submit a volunteer opportunity, contact Kristen Harris at kharris@LIFEseniorservices.org or (918) 664-9000, ext. 1207.

The Bridges Foundation The Bridges Foundation was founded in 1964 by a group of parents who wanted a place for their loved ones with developmental disabilities to gain vocational training, grow life skills and increase independence. Volunteers are sought for shop assistance in the Bridges Mercantile, Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Hours are flexible, and volunteers may come and go based on availability. Jobs and tasks vary, but can include cleaning, assisting clients with projects, helping with food production and packaging, and helping with store displays. Other opportunities for volunteering include event assistance, photography, social event coordinators and more. For additional information on volunteering at Bridges, contact volunteer coordinator Paxton Stieber at pstieber@thebridgesfound.org or (918) 299-2656.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Small acts when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world. – Howard Zinn

The Red Cross The Northeast Oklahoma Chapter of the Red Cross is looking for volunteers to help with disaster assistance, blood drives and other duties. Volunteer opportunities range from behind-the-scenes functions to “boots-on-the-ground” activities during disasters and blood drives.

Blood donor ambassadors are needed to greet and guide blood donors through the donation process at local blood drives. Volunteers can also serve as duty officers, receiving notice of home fires and other local disasters. Duty officers verify the event and dispatch team members as needed.

Disaster action team members will create a virtual case for individuals and families who have been impacted by a home fire or other local disasters and deliver assistance to meet immediate needs.

To learn more about volunteering with the Red Cross, contact Marama Bayles-Raleigh at (539) 777-3441 or marama.baylesraleigh@redcross.org or visit www.RedCross.org/volunteertoday.

A New Leaf A New Leaf has opportunities within their greenhouse to work alongside clients completing projects, assist with maintenance and more. A mandatory orientation is held on the first and last Saturdays of every month for new volunteers. Volunteers will learn more information about the organization and receive training on volunteering with clients. All volunteers will go through a background check. Whether you are an individual, organization or group, A New Leaf would love to have you! A volunteer application can be found online at www.ANewLeaf.org/ forms. For more information, call A New Leaf at (918) 451-1491.

Tulsa Air and Space Museum The Tulsa Air and Space Museum is looking for volunteers to fill the following opportunities: • Tour Guide – lead tours for visitor groups both large and small • Greeter – welcome and assist each guest • Special events – event planning and coordination • Artifacts and curation – help catalog, store, restore and display artifacts • Administrative – assist with paperwork, grant writing, answering phones and admission ticket sales The museum is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Morning volunteers arrive as early as 8 a.m. TASM volunteers are be provided a volunteer shirt and name tag. For more information, call Millie at (918) 834-9900.

If you would like more information on any of these opportunities, please contact the RSVP office at (918) 280-8656.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

29


MINDBENDER & PUZZLES

WORD SEARCH: EARTH Find and circle all of the words.

April Atmosphere Biosphere Carbon Climate Compost

Conserve Continent Core Earth Electronics Environment

Fauna Flora Flower Forest Glacier Glass

Globe Green Habitat Mantle May Mountains

Nature Nitrogen Ocean Oxygen Ozone Paper

Planet Plants Plastic Pollution Preserve Pressure

Protect Rain Recycle Resource Reusable River

Soil Solar Species Sphere Tree Universe

Volcano Volunteer Water Wildlife Wind World

L

Z

N

O

I

T

U

L

L

O

P

R

N

S

P

F

E

U

M

A

Y

N

E

C

L

E

E

V

R

E

S

N

O

C

M

S

V

K

P

T

R

L

V

T

P

C

X

R

K

O

I

T

H

N

M

R

E

S

O

U

R

C

E

H

T

R

E

O

R

H

X

L

O

Q

U

M

O

A

H

T

E

P

L

A

S

T

I

C

E

C

E

B

S

R

E

B

Y

C

A

C

V

P

S

M

T

D

R

G

Z

N

A

T

U

R

E

P

P

F

S

A

S

N

I

A

T

N

U

O

M

I

R

E

L

E

O

F

M

F

E

T

A

P

N

E

U

N

E

E

O

O

Q

U

E

S

E

L

A

L

Z

R

E

R

A

D

O

P

R

I

O

B

R

G

R

C

I

B

S

B

I

T

L

C

E

B

N

O

O

U

T

R

U

A

A

E

P

M

E

I

P

Z

X

C

R

P

Y

G

E

E

P

A

H

A

N

W

P

I

U

R

T

N

E

N

I

T

N

O

C

L

E

A

H

F

C

P

H

S

B

A

E

S

G

P

N

E

U

M

B

T

W

P

L

A

N

T

S

P

C

E

T

N

A

U

F

W

O

C

E

T

G

W

N

I

O

K

N

I

W I

N

D

Q

O

S

L

R

E

B

E

A

L

A

L

O

L

X

O

I

I

T

S

U

U

L

D

W

J

K

Z

G

T

O

E

I

R

A

P

C

T

A

O

R

L

V

S

K

O

P

D

L

D

B

L

Q

O

L

N

N

R

T

R

A

Y

R

C

E

E

W

F

E

G

J

E

M

H

V

O

L

C

A

N

O

A

I

G

A

H

C

Z

I

I

V

R

C

R

R

G

L

A

S

S

E

O

V

I

G

E

B

M

C

I

T

E

X

E

Y

I

L

S

O

X

S

N

E

G

Y

X

O

R

E

D

F

Y

E

E

S

K

R

S

R

A

R

H

F

F

V

A

E

N

V

I

R

O

N

M

E

N

T

E

L

I

F

E

SUDOKU Difficulty Level: 1 2 3 4 5 Answers on page 39.

Hearing loss is more noticeable than a hearing aid. Do you ask,”what” all the time? Is your television volume loud? Are you unable to hear conversations and then withdraw?

Let us help you mature with dignity. CALL US FOR A FREE COMPREHENSIVE HEARING EVALUATION

After All, Life is Worth Hearing!

Call (918) 492-6087 6038 S. Yale Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74135 www.armstronghearing.com

9 6 1 3 7 5 9

8

4 2 6

6 1

7

8 9 2

4

7 2 5

9 1

8 3 6 5

7 2

2 1 6

3 7

4

0% Financing Available (WAC) • Payments as Low as $57 *Payment based off $799 per Starkey Aries BTE hearing aid. Does not include earmold(s) or sales tax.

30

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


PUZZLE PARTNERS

MUMBO JUMBO A mumbo jumbo is a list of words/hints for you to unscramble. You then take designated letters from each word/hint to come up with the final word that is associated with each hint you have unscrambled. Unscramble each of the clue words. Take the letters that appear boxes and unscramble them for the final word. in Answers on page 39. PUZZLE THEME: A celestial body orbiting a star within the Milkway Galaxy.

ENPALT OPEHRTAMSE IATBHTA AINR NOREIVNMTEN UBLE IETNCNONT

R

H

© 2013 Wuzzles & Puzzles

BAMBOOZABLE A bamboozable is a saying/phrase that is made up of a display of words in an interesting way. The goal is to try to figure out the well-known saying, person, place or thing that each bamboozable is meant to represent. There are six bamboozables below. Answers on page 39.

HAND

HAND

EXPERIENCE

ATHLON ATHLON ATHLON

DR.

do

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

Paint276 Paint514 Paint693 LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

31


TABLE FOR TWO

GET ON BOARD WITH

Charcuterie BY DEE DUREN, MANAGING EDITOR

Spring is one of the best times to share a meal while enjoying the great outdoors. Temperatures are comfortable, bugs are at a minimum and sunshine is never more welcome. As long as the Oklahoma wind minds its manners, dining alfresco combines a pleasing meal with the experience of a favorite outdoor spot. We can enjoy the food, companionship and the antics of wildlife instead of being distracted by our phones or TVs. Keep your outdoor meal simple and delicious by replicating a popular appetizer found at area restaurants: the charcuterie board. "Charcuterie" is a French word meaning both delicatessen or butcher shop and the products sold there. It’s not a new way to eat but a return to meal basics. You can guess from the definition that meat will play a primary role. Charcuterie usually features meats like salami, ham or pepperoni paired with cheeses that make the mouth water and cholesterol rise simultaneously. The simple foods are served on a board or platter, artfully arranged.

CHARCUTERIE’S LIGHTER SIDE Keep the meat and cheese tradition of a charcuterie meal, but add some lighter and healthier options with the following ideas. After all, much of the fun of charcuterie comes from selecting a little taste of this with a slice of something else. A few fresh or pickled vegetables might be just the thing to wrap inside a piece of thinly sliced turkey. A charcuterie board worthy of its name includes some tasty extras – a side of nuts, olives or avocado slices – that add flavor to the basics. Then there are usually exotic spreads to smear on a hunk of bread or cracker. We recommend picking up hummus at the grocery store and using carrots, celery and sliced squash instead of crackers. And finally, dried or fresh fruit makes the sweetest and easiest dessert.

1

PROTEIN

2

GRAINS

3 FRUIT

• Hard-boiled eggs • Thinly sliced deli turkey and ham • Soft beef jerky • Mozzarella cheese balls • Swiss cheese, cubed or sliced • Parmesan, feta and goat cheese

• Whole-grain crackers • Rice cakes • Sliced whole-grain bread • Pretzels • Sesame sticks • Pita bread slices

• Berries • Sliced apples • Sliced pears • Fresh grapes, red and green • Melon slices or balls • Dried apricots, figs and dates

TIP: Use a toothpick to spear a mozzarella ball, basil leaf and cherry tomato for a colorful and delicious bite.

TIP: Skip the bread and use sliced carrots, celery, jicama or squash to enjoy a healthy dip.

TIP: You can find dried figs from May to December. Stock up on the dried variety and keep this tasty treat year-round.

32

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


4

VEGETABLES

• Pickles, baby dill • Pickled carrots, beets • Sliced tomatoes • Cherry tomatoes • Carrot sticks • Celery sticks • Cucumber slices • Sliced yellow or red pepper • Sliced zucchini • Sliced yellow squash • Sliced jicama • Broccoli and cauliflower flowerettes • Sugar snap peas • Green onions

DUNK WITH THESE DIPS

TIP: Jicama is a root vegetable that can be peeled and sliced or cubed. Sprinkle raw jicama with cinnamon for a sweet treat or your favorite peppery spice for a chip substitute.

5 EXTRAS • Almonds • Avocado • Olives, black or green • Hummus • Basil • Pepperoncini or cherry peppers • Mustard, horseradish TIP: Use juice from a jar of pickles to pickle other vegetables liked sliced carrots or canned beets.

We recommend picking up hummus at the grocery store and using carrots, celery and sliced squash instead of crackers.

LOW-FAT FRUIT DIP

Recipe courtesy www.GarnishandGlaze.com Ingredients: • 1 8-ounce container of light whipped cream topping, thawed • 1 6-ounce container light yogurt (any flavor) Instructions: 1. Whisk the light whipped cream topping and yogurt together. 2. Serve with your favorite fruit.

WEIGHT WATCHERS® SKINNY RANCH DIP Recipe courtesy www.WeightWatchers.com Ingredients: • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt, fat free • 1 tablespoon Ranch dip seasoning mix • 1 teaspoon chives, minced • 1 pinch black pepper Instructions: 1. Combine yogurt with seasoning mix. 2. Thin with water, if desired. 3. Garnish with chives and black pepper.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

33


Recommended Reads

Bunkering With Books THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT BY CONNIE CRONLEY When the going gets tough – and boy has it lately – I retreat to a comforting genre. And to me, that can be books about actors, movies, plays and playwrights. I lucked into three exceptional examples. “The Big Goodbye: Chinatown and the Last Years of Hollywood” by Sam Wasson is an extraordinary book about the making of the movie “Chinatown,” considered by some to be the pinnacle of 1970s cinema, as well as the end of a great Hollywood era. I was so enthralled I watched the movie again three times, and although I still find the story confusing, so did everyone involved in the movie. The details of set decoration, costuming, scriptwriting, musical score and direction are fascinating. The major players are Jack Nicholson in his first starring role; director Roman Polanski, reeling from the brutal death of his wife Sharon Tate, yet genius enough to take control of the movie; Robert Towne, acclaimed for writing perhaps the greatest original screenplay of all time, (but did he really write it?), and producer Robert Evans who brought friends together to create the film and muscled it through production just as cocaine began to decimate film careers – his included. Gossipy to read how Faye Dunaway and John Huston behaved during the filming, and fascinating to learn about production designer Richard Sylbert, his sister-in-law costumer Anthea Sylbert, and composer Jerry Goldsmith

34

who came in to tweak the score and transformed it into something memorable. I have a special fondness for Irish memoirs. Actor Gabriel Bryne’s new “Walking With Ghosts” is a lyrical, often dark, memory trip to his childhood in 1960s Dublin. This is not a dishy account of his famed life on stage, in television and film, although there are anecdotes about drinking with Richard Burton and acting with Sir Laurence Olivier. You can learn more about his life on Wikipedia. This is a book about his brooding soul. Even his first acting success on Irish television identified him as “a kind of Irish Heathcliff.” Much of his memoir is remembering his troubled history with Catholicism. There were the fearof-God nuns and cruel teaching brothers at his parochial schools; the nun who told the children the enduring lesson of Adam and Eve, “And by the way, your children will be miserable as well;" the brother (non-ordained teacher) who beat the boys with a bamboo cane while degrading them verbally. Sexual abuse was one reason Bryne dropped out of seminary while studying for the priesthood. He was a petty crook and failed plumber before he found his way into acting. Much of his life, and a good deal of the memoir, is about his addiction to alcohol, “... my most trusted friend, before it betrayed me and brought me to my darkest days.” He has been sober for the last 25 years.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

James Grissom’s title, "Follies of God," tells us nothing about the book, but the subtitle, “Tennessee Williams and the Women of the Fog,” says volumes. It is a quest by Grissom, at the request of Williams, to find the women who inspired his work, acted in his plays and helped the playwright understand his worth as an artist and the meaning of his life. Big quest. It started almost 40 years ago when Grissom was a student and aspiring writer and Williams was addicted to drugs and alcohol, sick, washed up and near death (he died in 1983). Talk about dishy, with all of Williams' eloquent loquaciousness. Through interviews with the actors and directors and the playwright’s remembrances, we meet the women who came out of a fog to inspire him. They were his mother (the inspiration for “The Glass Menagerie”), Lillian Gish (who knew she was his first choice for Blanche DuBois), Jessica Tandy (the original Blanche), troubled Kim Stanley (the original Stella Kowalski), bitter Jo Van Fleet, Bette Davis (facing down the blacklist), steely Katharine Hepburn, Geraldine Page (“a titanic talent”), along with director Elia Kazan who had more to do with the success of Williams’ plays than I realized. This book, full of philosophical insight, burbling with his lush vocabulary as rich as a Viennese pastry, is a deep dive into the American theatre that Tennessee Williams transformed and the people who helped him do it.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


BUSINESS DIRECTORY GET YOUR DREAM KITCHEN THIS NEW YEAR!

WHICH WOULD YOU RATHER SPEND?

With our custom pull-out shelves, you can always find more space, access, and joy in your existing cabinets

BUY 6 SHELVES GET YOUR 7TH FREE!*

*Limit one offer per household. Must purchase 6+ Classic/Designer Shelves. EXP 6/30/21.

(888) 491-6191 | shelfgenie.com

IN

C

SA

ES

CD

®

Complimentary design consultation:

G IN

WE ’

FOLLOW RE

FET

Y GUID

EL

SENIOR CARE ONLY BETTER

$59.95 A MONTH

THOUSANDS A MONTH

and live in your own home?

to have to live in another’s home?

HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT HOME COULD BE THE KEY!

Call for a FREE Brochure on Precision Remote Patient Monitoring

(918) 355-1843 Learn about it at www.lindasseniorservices.com

Mobility One Transportation

Our caregivers and certified Home Health Aides stand ready to serve your family’s needs with: • Personalized in-home companion, sitter & personal care • Alzheimer’s & dementia care • Transportation assistance & medication reminders

918.574.2273

|

Free Consultation

seniorhelpers.com

Licensed Home Care Agency (No. 7926) *all caregivers are bonded & insured

All rights reserved. Senior Helpers locations are independently owned and operated. ©2019 SH Franchising, LLC.

mobilityONEtransportation.com

918.437.4488

14720 E. Admiral Pl., Ste. A Tulsa, OK 74116

Reliable, safe, affordable and courteous transportation in Tulsa

(918) 404-0038

Rates Vary Depending on Location

www.healthridetulsa.org

After hours phone system utilized

• Ambulatory, wheelchair and stretcher transports • A ride to your destination upon hospital discharge • Medical appointment transportation

WE HAVE THE WIDEST RAMPS IN THE STATE!

Located At 61st And Sheridan

Come and Test Drive a Scooter in Our Store! Easy disassembly for most scooters Rental option available

EVENT CHAIRS Ron and Lindsay Fick

Need Repair? We Come to You.

(918) 600-2112

www.mobilitycity.com/tulsa

THURSDAY, JUNE 17, 2021 6:00 PM Cox Business Center Enjoy a complimentary cocktail reception followed by a silent auction, gourmet dinner and live music. SAFETY PROTOCOLS WILL BE IN PLACE Seating will be limited and distanced; masks and hand sanitizer will be available.

To purchase tickets, go to www.LIFEseniorservices.org or call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

35


PEOPLE & PLACES

Fun was had by all at Montereau's Cocktail Show & Tell Happy Hour!

Patsy, a resident of The Parke Assisted Living, enjoying the hot cocoa bar provided by Encompass.

Kent, a customer of Handicapped Vehicle Services, is pictured above with his new wheelchair accessible van.

Oxford Glen Memory Care at Owasso celebrated resident Jim’s birthday recently with balloons and fellowship.

Brittany Andrews helps Bianca make a cute snack called a kitty cat cake at one of LIFE's Senior Services' three Adult Day Health Centers.

Send Us Your Pictures LIFE Senior Services wants to see what you're doing to stay active during the COVID-19 pandemic. Submit high-resolution photos to kharris@LIFEseniorservices.org by the 1st of every month.

36

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


CLASSIFIEDS

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine does not endorse advertiser products or services. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

AUTO REPAIR

Strickland Automotive Strickland Automotive is locally-owned and – operated with over 40 years of auto repair experience. We perform all types of vehicle repair, from computer and electrical problems to engine and transmission overhauls. ASE Certified mechanics. Open six days a week, with towing provided. Call Gary (918) 832-7072.

BIBLE STUDY

Weekly Bible Reading Session Join us in reading, explaining and discussing the bible on Friday nights 7:00 p.m. CST and 8:00 p.m. EST. Questions are always welcome. Perfect for those who cannot get out of the house. Call (918) 872-1400.

BOOKS

THE MOMENT I SAW YOU This internationally acclaimed 256 page book of poetry for lovers of all ages creates for the readers feelings and emotions all have known in their lives. Relive those experiences by reading the beautiful love poems in this book. The Moment I Saw You: Poetry for Lovers by W. Blaine Wheeler is available on Amazon.com.

CARPET CLEANING ALL PRO Carpet Cleaning Senior and caregiver discounts. Carpet, furniture, rug cleaning. Pet odor removed and Teflon protectant available. Emergency water extraction. Residential and commercial services. Professional truck mount steam cleaning. Carpet repairs and restretching. Prompt, professional, quality service at a fair price. Certified, insured. Veteran owned and operated. Call Thomas Fink, owner/technician, for free estimate (918) 636-6303.

CEMETERY LOTS Calvary Cemetery Calvary Cemetery, section 7, Way of the Cross. Two side-by-side spaces lot 204, space 6 and lot 207, space 4. Asking pricing is $4,500 for both. Truly a beautiful view. Call (405) 273-7071. Floral Haven in Broken Arrow Floral Haven, Garden of Devotion. Standard single lot, or doubledepth interment for two persons, or cremated remains of two persons. $2,300. Call (816) 304-7664 or bjward521@gmail.com. Floral Haven - Broken Arrow, OK Two plots for sale in the Sermon on the Mount, Lot 2, Block 9, spaces 1 & 2. Can be used for cremation or traditional burial. Retail value is $5,500 each. Asking price is $4,500 each. Call (214) 498-2990. Memorial Park Crypts, Tulsa Two crypts, $5500 each. Includes bronze crypt nameplate and perpetual care. Mausoleum location near lake, Sec 27-2, crypt E, rows 53 & 54. A 2021 retail value of $7325 each. Contact Clark Duffe at clark.duffe@yahoo.com or (405) 760-3108.

Memorial Park – Garden of the Prophets Memorial Park Cemetery, two (2) spaces in Garden of The Prophets. Spaces 1&2, Lot 336,Section 57. Crypts already set. Memorial Park present value is $5,030. Asking $4,000. Call (918) 369-5422. Lots in Memorial Park Tulsa Dead Tired Bones? Lay them to rest here! Great location – 2 spaces together! Section 30 Lot 106 Spaces 4 & 5 close to the road. Retail Value $1,975.00/space. Asking $1,400.00 each. Contact Kay at locke_n_go@yahoo.com Memorial Park – Garden of Rest Plot located in Garden of Rest at Memorial Park Cemetery, section 14C, lot 73, space 4, located near 51st Street, South of Regency Park Church. Contact Linda via email. lcateshome@yahoo.com $750 or best offer. Memorial Plot for Sale Memorial Park Cemetery Plot in Tulsa, Ok for sale Section 56, Estate 110 Space 1. Price includes plot, opening and closing plus title transfer. $3,260 not negotiable. Please contact David or Joyce at (918) 322-3010 after 5:00 pm for more info. Priced to Sell In Memorial Park 4 Spaces at Memorial Park Section 35, Lot 288. Retail Value $2,850 each. Will sell for $2,550 each or all 4 spaces for $9,000. Call (479) 643-2457 or email judithblazer@msn.com. Spaces at Memorial Park Multiple spaces for sale. Section 34, Lot 416. No burials there and no markers. Current value is $2,200/ea. Will sell for $1,900/ea. If interested, contact Cindy Taylor at Oxley.Plots@gmail.com or (281) 990-6223. Two Memorial Park Cemetery Plots Two Memorial Park Cemetery plots in Tulsa. Located in the Garden of Rest section 14-C, Lot 88, spaces 3 and 4 (side-by-side). Valued at $3,740 Priced at $1870 for both plots. (417) 935-2300.

COMPUTER SERVICES Does Technology Frustrate You? Honest, patient, ethical help with your pc, router, wifi, cell phone, email, streaming, camera, password recovery, etc. 30 years of IT experience in Tulsa. Special rates for seniors. References available. Call Carmen Armstrong (918) 688-7453.

DAYTIME CARE Daytime Care For Older Loved Ones LIFE’s Adult Day Health offers convenient, affordable daytime care at three locations in Tulsa and Broken Arrow. For more information, call LIFE’s Adult Day Health at (918) 664-9000.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

ESTATE SALES 2MS Estate Sales ...Tulsa’s Finest! Downsizing? Estate Liquidation? Let us take the worry away and Maximize your return. No out of pocket expense. We specialize in senior transitions, with over 20 years in the senior housing market. My team includes realtors, moving company, senior housing and attorneys if needed. Please contact Michelle Reed (918) 691-5893 or Atulsa@aol.com also Facebook 2MSestatesalestulsa for a Free consultation.

FINANCIAL/INSURANCE Medicare Assistance Program The Medicare Assistance Program (MAP) at LIFE Senior Services provides accurate information, counseling and assistance relating to Medicare benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives and persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call MAP at LIFE Senior Services (918) 664-9000 or toll-free at (866) 664-9009. Need A New Medicare Plan? The Medicare Supplement Store at Promenade Mall is your “One-StopShop” for Medicare Supplements, Advantage Plans, & Drug Plans. We can give you a quote from top-rated carriers like: Aetna, Blue Cross, Humana, GlobalHealth, UnitedHealthCare, Mutual of Omaha and others. For information, call Bob Archer today (918) 814-5550. WORRIED ABOUT FUNERAL EXPENSES? Preferred Rates, Standard Rates, Guaranteed Issue Plans, Permanent Whole Life Rates never increase. Issue up to $40,000. Benefits paid to beneficiary of choice or assignment to any funeral home. We can give you quotes from top rated carriers, Mutual of Omaha, American Amicable, and AIG.Call or text Michael Moore Insurance Agency (918) 557-5665 for RATES or email ineedlifeinsurance@sbcglobal.net

GARDENING/LAWN CARE AAA Lawns & More Total lawn care. Lawn Mowing. Leaf removal. Gutter clean-up. Specialist in fence/property line lawn clean-up. Stump grinding and small tree work. Dedicated to making your lawn look its best. Insured, honest, experienced and dependable. Veteran-owned. We are a small company with personal service. References available. FREE ESTIMATES. Call Larry. (918) 361-1299. Aardwolf Leaf & Lawn Care Mowing, weed eating, edging,hedge trimming, garden tilling, gutter cleaning and lawn clean-up. Free Estimates! Call Patrick Mills. (918) 814-0973. Get Ready for Spring Rototilling for flower beds and vegetable gardens. Trimming bushes, hedges, and small trees. Leaf and flower bed clean-up. Gutter cleaning. Experienced. Free estimates. Call Mark at (918) 809-9095.

Green Hibiscus Lawn & Garden Services Scheduled garden maintenance (weeding, planting, mulching). Garden bed design and installation. Hedge & shrub trimming. Tree pruning & removal. Leaf clean up. Hauling green debris. Call Charles (918) 636-0298. Kimble Davis Tree Company Family-owned and operated. Specializing in all aspects of tree care: restoration, pruning/thinning, removal, stump grinding, hedge trimming, firewood available. Serving Tulsa for 25 years. References. Member BBB. Insured. ISA certified arborist. Check us out at www.kdtreeco.com. Call Kimble at (918) 853-5383. Mower Repair / Maintenance All brands – Riders, ZTR's, Walk-behinds, UTV’s / ATV’s. Top Quality work, ASE certified Mechanic. Pick-up and Delivery available. Tulsa and surrounding counties. Maintenance specials include pick-up and delivery 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call Scott (918) 519-3869. New Season Lawn & Tree LLC Now accepting new customers. Spring clean-up available. Mowing, trimming, leaf and debris removal, fence line trim/cleanup, leaf mulching, flower beds. Tree pruning/ thinning and removal. Shrub and hedge trimming/shaping of all sizes. Pressure Washing driveway, decks, siding. ISA Certified Arborist. Fully insured with verified references. Best rates, senior discounts. Free Estimates. Call Todd (918) 639-2262. www.newseasonlawnandtree.com.

HOME REPAIR/REMODELING A Handy Helping Hand Professional home maintenance, painting, and improvements. Whether you’re making overdue repairs, sprucing up your home and garden, or optimizing your home’s “sale-ability” potential, call Joe Surowiak with A Handy Helping Hand. Professional results. Competitive rates. (918) 520-0333. Allen’s Handyman Services of Tulsa “Your Home Improvement and Repair Specialist.” 21st year serving Tulsa seniors. “One call can do it all.” 10% senior discount. Insured. All work guaranteed in writing. No pay until job is completed. Plumbing, drain cleaning, grab bars, electrical, carpentry, painting, seamless guttering installation/ repair/cleaning. Dryer vent cleaning. Roof, tile and drywall repair. Wood siding/trim replacement. Deck repair, power washing, staining. Tree trimming. No job too small. For free estimate, call Allen at (918) 630-0394. Big C’s Plumbing Services Your one stop Plumbing Shop! Call us and I guarantee you will never have to call another plumbing company. Licensed, bonded and insured for your protection....Call (918) 855-9216, tell us you saw us in the Vintage Newsmagazine receive an automatic 10% discount....call us now.

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

37


CLASSIFIEDS Bumgartner Plumbing Licensed, with over 30 years of experience. Rates are low and based on the job, not the hour. No service call fee or travel time charge. Senior and caregiver discount. Plumbing service and repair our specialty. Honest, professional service you can count on. Lic. # 82750. (918) 355-4747. Burton Painting Specializing in all aspects of exterior and interior home painting. Staining, sealing, and painting faux finishes. Decks, fences, cabinets and floors. Free estimates. 30+ years of experience. Reliable, courteous, professional service. Fully insured. (918) 378-2858. Dave’s Heat and Air, Inc. Licensed, insured, and bonded. Honest and reliable service for over 30 years. Competitive rates. Specializing in heating and air conditioning service and repair. All makes and models. Residential and light commercial. Tulsa metro area. Family-owned and operated. (918) 437-8101. Doc J’s Heat and Air LLC We install, replace and repair all brands of quality heating and air-conditioning equipment. Our contractor has over 25 yrs. of experience. Your comfort is our business. Contact us today for a service appt or free estimate for a HVAC system. Senior discounts on services. Call (918) 921-4240, docj@docjsheatandair.com Free Storm Inspection Do you have a leaky roof? Call for free inspection/emergency tarp service. Small roof repair free for seniors. We provide patient, honest and ethical help through any insurance claims. Call Brian Morris at (918) 734-4444. Proof Construction, 1924 W. Albany St., Broken Arrow. Other services include patios, outdoor kitchens, etc. www.proofok.com or www.patiobrothersok.com. General Home Maintenance Cyrco Renovation is here for all your General Home Maintenance and/ or Remodeling needs. Well over 30 years of experience. We are your one stop for quality and professional contracting. Fast, Clean, Courteous and Reliable. Please Call Phillip Cyr (918) 693-5121. Handyman & Construction Services 30 Years Experience! All Handicap Accessories – grab bars, handicap access abilities; Framing, Drywall, Tape & Bed; Texture & Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Tile, Laminate & Wood Floors. Free Estimates, Competitive Rates, Professional Service. Call Craig (918) 892-4168. Junk Removal Solutions Junk removal, furniture moving, clean-ups, hauling, tree trimming. Free estimates. Senior discount. Call Darrell for all your junk removal needs. (918) 644-1776. New Season Junk Removal LLC Commercial and Residential removal of furniture, yard waste, appliances, construction waste. We will dispose of hot tubs, mattresses, and e-waste. Disposal

38

and Recycling of televisions and refrigerators available. Cleanouts include foreclosure clean outs and garage clean outs. Fully Insured. Discounts available for senior citizens, military, first responders. Call Todd at (918) 639-2262 or email newseasonjunkremoval@gmail.com. Visit www.newseasonjunkremoval.com. Same Day Services Light Hauling /Light Moving – help you rearrange room furniture, lawns-grass mowing/small paint jobs/cleanup/ fence repair/light construction/sheet rock tile repair – We are honest dependable. References. Call (918) 313-5230. Scrap Metal Haul Off Free haul off/pick up of appliances such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioners, hot water tanks and any scrap metal. Call John at (918) 313-4405.

HOUSE CLEANING Housecleaning or Window Cleaning Housecleaning OR Window cleaning service. One time or regular basis. Reasonable and Dependable. Call Jan at (539) 664-1986.

HOUSING OVERJOYED NOT OVERWHELMED Does the thought of downsizing, decluttering, packing to move have you feeling overwhelmed? Let a Certified Senior Housing Specialist (CSHP) guide you through the entire process. One call, One Company, DONE! Licensed and Bonded and BBB Member. Call today. Mature Transitions Of Tulsa (918) 973-1350. Senior Friendly Duplex For Rent Senior friendly duplex with 2 bedrooms and 2 bath is available. Located at 75th & Birmingham by ORU this updated unit provides necessities for seniors. Washer, dryer, cable, stainless steel appliances, granite counters, vaulted ceiling, medical alert button. 24 hour security. Also, available next door is an oversized Mother-in-law Suite. Call for pricing (918) 491-9929.

LEGAL

Full Service Estate Planning Law Firm Trusts, Wills, Gift and Tax Planning, Powers of Attorneys and more! With offices in Sand Springs and Tulsa. Discount to Veterans and Retired Teachers. Willing to meet you in your place for no extra charge! Call Penni of the Skillern Law Firm at (918) 805-2511. www.skillernlaw.com

Estate planning, probate, trusts, adoption, guardianships, real estate, elder exploitation and more. Call (918) 627-4400 or visit www.brianacrain.com.

MOVERS

Tulsa Movers Dependable Movers! Low Rates. Free Estimates. Senior Discounts. Call (918) 836-3225.

OIL AND GAS Mineral, Oil/Gas Interests Want to purchase minerals and oil/ gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO, 80201

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE Bobbi and Bob’s Personal & Business Assistance Run errands; grocery and personal shopping; transportation to medical appointments, beauty shop, airport or other local destinations; organize home; handle medical insurance claims; provide administrative and secretarial support; wait for deliveries and repairmen at your home. Call Bobbi Warshaw at (918) 852-5302 email: bobbi.warshaw@att.net Compassionate Senior Service Do you or a loved one need help with grocery shopping? Maybe help with meals? Or maybe just a companion to visit with or play games with? If this sounds like you or someone you know. Please Call, Christie at (918) 934-7986. Financial Organizer/Liaison Do you or a loved one need help keeping up with mail, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, making phone calls, organizing or preparing for tax time? I can help! I will work with you or act as a liaison between family members. Call or email me to discuss options. Essential Strategy Consulting, LLC. Gwen Stevens (918) 557-5259, esc9315@gmail.com Kind Hands Home Care, LLC Specialized one on one care for you or your loved one from a licensed nurse and staff. Services provided: companionship, sitter, light housekeeping, medication reminders, and preparing meals. 12/24 shifts available. Please call Delia at (405) 714-8016 for more information. Ms Pac Ma'am Need help packing or organizing? I can pack boxes for moving, downsizing or decluttering. I can help organize rooms, closets, attics or garages providing you more space. Flexible hours – day or evening. Lots of experience. References available. Jacki (918) 922-9558.

Need Legal Help? Call Me First. Ramona Jones, Attorney at Law. Why travel when we can do a video conference? Wills, trusts, deeds, advance directives, powers of attorney, probate, divorces, civil, DUI, criminal, guardianships, adoptions and more. Also paperwork for limited scope representation. Credit cards accepted. (918) 585-2255.

Totally Organized Local professional organizer that specializes in home organization including closets, kitchens, pantries, bathrooms, laundry rooms, offices, playrooms, garages as well as decluttering, purging and assistance in packing and unpacking for a move. Senior hourly rates discounted, threehour minimum. Contact me for your free consultation. (918) 638-8110 or email at peartree2@cox.net

Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy. Attorney Brian Crain can assist you through the legalities of all the big events in your family's life.

EARS Emergency Alert Response Systems. Enjoy living at home while we listen for your safety with our

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

PERSONAL SAFETY

quality personal medical alarm and monitoring service. Affordable with no long-term commitment. Locally owned and operated (918) 298-0500 or toll-free (877) 885-3277. HALO Medical Alarms Worried about falling? HALO provides medical alert services for those at home or on the go who may need help in an emergency. HALO allows you to get help at the push of a button which is worn as a necklace or wristband. We offer a variety of choices to best fit your needs. Check out the HALO products atour retail store - Mobility City at 61st & Sheridan (918) 392-0566 or (877) 747-HALO (4256)

PERSONAL SERVICES Affordable Hairstyling In-Home or My Shop With 35 years’ experience, I can help with all of your hairstyling needs. I will come to your home, the hospital, rehab or you can come to my shop. In-shop special: haircut $7 for first time customers only and perms for $45. Senior special pricing can’t be beat! Available Tuesday – Saturday. A Mane Event hairstyling, located near 11th and Yale at 937 South Canton. Call Mary Wilkinson at (918) 834-2686. Following CDC Guidelines – masks worn, temperature taken, safe environment. Salon Retro Hair care for men and women, specializing in senior clients. This month’s special - First time customers receive one of the following for $12: Haircut or Style or Manicure. $45 for cut and perm. Pedicures are $20. Very Experienced Hairdressers! Come see us in Midtown at Highland Plaza, 5661 East 41st Street (corner of 41st and Hudson). (918) 742-3440.

PET CARE

FURever Friend PetCare Have a fur baby who needs a walk, some playtime, or an overnight sitter? I'm flexible and available for walks, potty/cuddle time, drop-in meal, litter box cleaning, or extended stays. My passion is animals. I have 60+ years of experience, am affordable, bonded, and have references. Let me make your life easier. Let's talk. Call Jacki (918) 922-9558. Home Veterinary Care Experience Tulsa’s most convenient veterinary service in the comfort of your own home. Our goal is to develop a personal relationship with each of our clients and patients. Contact us today to schedule your house call appointment. Call (918) 892-9382 or email DrFielstra@gmail.com or visit us at www.homevetcaretulsa.com.

REAL ESTATE

House For Sale (Seniors 55+) House for Sale by Owner. Over 55+ Gated. One story. Want contemporary- this is not it. If you want elegance, this is it. 3 bedroom, 3 bath, living room, dining, breakfast, laundry, sun room, porch, 2 fireplaces, 2 car. Dues: 24 hour armed security, home security system, complete lawn care, Cox pkg. & mgt. Live at ease and safe $429,000. Good price. (918) 742-0550.

www.LIFEseniorservices.org


Ready To Downsize? I will help you sell your current home and help you look for that smaller place that fits your needs. Whether it’s independent living or assisted living, let me help you through the process. Honest, patient and ethical help along the way. Carmen Armstrong, Solid Rock Realtors, (918) 688-7453. www.solidrockrealtors.com/realtors/ carmen-armstrong

Vintage Friends

Real Estate Needs…I Can Help With 30+ years experience, I can help you with sizing down or buying another home. Need to get your home ready to sell? We can make it ready for you. Licensed realtor and owner of home maintenance company. Senior helping seniors. Call Mike (918) 933-9995 or email mike@petraproperties.net.

SENIOR LIVING GUIDE

TRANSPORTATION My Driver Transportation Service Let me do the driving. To and from work, airport, shopping, errands, post office, appointments. Also, LIFT VAN transportation available. Able to assist getting to and from bed. Senior sitting. Also, small breed dog boarding. 20 years experience. CLEET certified and licensed. References. Member, Better Business Bureau. (918) 491-9929.

VOLUNTEER

JUST DO IT! If you've been looking for a way you can make a difference, consider joining the Millennium Hospice team as a volunteer. Caregiver relief is so important during this difficult time. Volunteers provide that by sitting with patients for an hour or so. Training is provided. (918) 493-6555.

VINTAGE PUBLICATIONS DIGITAL EDITIONS Did you know that LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine and LIFE’s Vintage Guide to Housing & Services are online?

View the digital editions at www.LIFEseniorservices.org

APRIL ANSWERS

For puzzles, see pages 30-31

MUMBO JUMBO 1. Planet 5. Environment 2. Atmosphere 6. Blue 3. Habitat 7. Continent 4. Rain Final message: Earth

BAMBOOZABLES CLASSIFIEDS

TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: Bernie Dornblaser (918) 664-9000 or bdornblaser@LIFEseniorservices.org

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Half Day Hands on Experience Room for One More Triathlon Dr. Dolittle Paint by the Numbers

www.LIFEseniorservices.org

4 3 7 8 5 9 6 2 1

9 5 1 4 2 6 8 3 7

1 8 9 2 7 4 3 6 5

6 4 5 3 9 8 1 7 2

2 7 3 5 6 1 9 4 8

3 9 4 7 8 5 2 1 6

5 1 2 6 4 3 7 8 9

We sincerely apologize for any error or omission. Due to publication deadlines, acknowledgment of gifts may take up to 60 days in Vintage Newsmagazine. If there is an error, please call Rickye Wilson at (918) 664-9000, ext. 1213.

Jan Acree Melanie and Lex Anderson Network for Good Ascension Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma Pamela Bonomi Nadine Brown Norma Carman Josephine Chandler Charities Aid Foundation of America Church of St. Mary CommunityCare Jeff and Cris Cox Angela Cozort Lawrence G. Crawford Jr Charles Danley Marian F. Dick Manuella R. Glore Alita Hale Rowena K. Hall Martha Howard Judith A. Janicke James and Judy Jarvis Beverly Kellough Alfontina Maag Mabrey Bank Laurel Madland Kimberly Martin Karen Mildren Dorothy M. Mullowney Barbara Nauman Nancy L. Neal Ruth K. Nelson Family Foundation Eve B. O'Kelley Elma L. Philips Monte and Bob Prater Pray Walker, PC Carlton N. Rowton Saint Simeon's Episcopal Home Ginny Schulte Senior Star Myra D. Seymour Scott and Laura Shepherd

Charles A. Sloan Anne Spitzmiller Anne and Gregg Stevenson Melanie Stewart David E. & Cassie L. Temple Foundation Marylyn Tippeconnic Vivian G. Vande Weghe Barbara A. Vanderbeek Carmen L. Voigt William Williams Rickye Dixon Wilson Linda Woodfin The Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation IN MEMORY OF Suzanne Edson In Memory of D.S. Edson Francis Ferrantino In Memory of Alfonso Ferrantino Theresa M. Finck and Mary Ann Finck In Memory of Theresa Ann Finck Willie Ruth Garvin In Memory of Al Cooney Vernon G. Hensley In Memory of Billie Jean Righter In Memory of Ames Righter Robert and Inez Sellers In Memory of Loretta Gibson Dot Talley In Memory of Boyd Talley Kathi and Mike Webb In Memory of John Mair Profeit IN HONOR OF Ernest R. Garton In Honor of Sherry Garton Joe and Nancy McDonald In Honor of Eileen Bradshaw Beth Phillips In Honor of LeRoy Fore Rev. Richard and Peggy Ziglar In Honor of Bill Holly

DONATE TO LIFE Become a Vintage Friend LIFE Senior Services is a recognized leader in aging services and an acknowledged voice on aging issues and is proud to be a nonprofit United Way organization.

PLEASE MAIL YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO: LIFE Senior Services 5330 E. 31st St., Ste. 800 • Tulsa, OK 74135-5114 Make your donation online: www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

SUDOKU 8 2 6 1 3 7 5 9 4

In appreciation of contributions to LIFE Senior Services received in February 2021.

7 6 8 9 1 2 4 5 3

Every dollar invested stays local to fuel LIFE Senior Services’ mission-related initiatives of promoting and preserving independence for seniors.

Today – Tomorrow – Always. FOLLOW US ON

Donate now by visiting www.LIFEseniorservices.org/donate

LIFE’s Vintage Newsmagazine | April 2021

39


Profile for LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine

LIFE's Vintage Newsmagazine - April 2021