Page 1


FEBRUARY 2004

VOL. 32, No. 2

2 VAA NEWS IH.G. Frautschy 4 2004 HALL OF FAME- NICK REZICH

6

PASS IT TO BUCK/Buck Hilbert

7 MYSTERY PLANE/H.G. Frautschy

8 THE VINTAGE INSTRUCTOR

CHARTING A COURSE /Doug St ewart

10 193 1 SECOND-HAND AIRPLANE Budd Davisson

15

JUST A FLIVVER KINDA GUY CHRIS PRICE AND HIS HEATH PARASOUBu dd Davisson

20

2004 TYPE CLUB LIST

25

CALENDAR

2 7 NEW MEMBERS

28 CLASSIFIED ADS

ยง)J ~\ IF::F EAA PUBLICATIONS

Publisher Ed itor-in-Chief Executive Editor New s Ed itor Photography Staff Advertising Coordinator Advertising Sales

TOM POBEREZNY SPANGLER

scon

MIKE DIFRISCO RIC REYNOLDS JIM KOEPNICK JULIE RUSSO LOY HICKMAN 913-268-6646

Advertising/Editorial Assistant Copy Editing

ISABELLE WISKE COLLEEN WALSH

Front Cover: Chris Price leans into a gentle turn with his colorful Heath

KATHLEEN WITMAN

Parasol, powered by a Continental A-40 engine . EAA photo by Alex Brown . EAA photo plane flown by Bruce Moore.

HENRY G. FRAUTSCHY THERESA BOOKS BUDD DAVISSON DOUG STEWART JOHN MILLER

Back Cover: Can you imagine being only the third owner of an antique airplane that was once owned by it's designer? Jim Hammond can - his Aeronca C-3 was once owned by Jean Roche, the original creator of the Aeronca light plane. EAA photo by Jim Koepnick , EAA photo plane flown by Janet Davidson.

VINTAGE AIRPLANE

Executive Director, Ed i tor VAA Administrative Assistant Contributi ng Edi tors


STRAIGHT Be LEVEL ESPIE "BUTCH" JOYCE PRESIDENT, VINTAGE ASSOCIATION

Feeling honored rity. Sure, it slowed us down, but nobody

It's been chilly or downright cold in the

I'm fortunate I have a second airplane

states north of us, and the Carolinas

to fly, my Contemporary category Beech

around us seemed to mind too much. I felt

have been seeing a bit more colder

Baron. It's doing well, and really is a won­

much more secure after getting through the

weather than we 've had in the last couple of years. We've been Sitting a bit closer

derful tool. I can leave my home and be in St. Petersburg, Florida, in less than three­

Secret Service security check. While listening to the various speakers

to the fire until the weather breaks. It's making it a bit more of a challenge to

and-a-half hours . That's less time than it takes me to drive to the Greensboro air­

before the president's arrival , the feeling of being honored to be in Kitty Hawk at

meet my completion date for the new in­ strument panel in the Luscombe. I've

port, check in, wait for the airplane, fly to another airport for my flight to Tampa, and

this time came over me. It had started to rain not too long after we sat down, and

really been pushing to get it done by the

then finally get a ride to my destination af­ ter I get off the airliner. Sure, when you

end of April or early May. Since the windshield and the engine are removed, I thought it would be a good time to strip the interior and repaint it. Oh no, you can see where this is heading! The skylight and side window plastic will be re­ placed, and it will look so good when it's done. To get it completed, I've been watch­ ing the thermometer. Every day the

by the time the large Marine CH-53E heli­

have to go across the country to Phoenix

copters arrived in advance of the president, it was coming down hard. The

or Los Angeles, it makes sense to fly the airlines, but not for shorter trips up and

rotors were whipping the rain around in great sheets. Just a minute later, a pair of

down the East Coast. The more time added for security checks and other parts of the "airline experience, " the longer my

white-topped Sikorsky SH-3s appeared be­ Iowa very low ceiling. After a quick

Baron trips can be, and still be a better

landing, the president stepped out into a rain shower, and you could watch his ar­ rival on the large video screens set up on

temperature has gone above 50 degrees,

deal as far as time is concerned. Just as it is for many of you, my Luscombe is my fun

I've headed out to the airport so I could

airplane . I can fly around to all of the small

use the paint stripper and water to clean it up. All those little miscellaneous pieces

airports, some public, and many private, and visit friends . It's been so long since

like the rudder pedals have been stripped and cleaned, the brace tubes from the top

I've had the Luscombe in the air, I wonder if they'll remember me. I suppose I should­

of the cabin to the engine mount have been cleaned and painted, and the engine mount has been cleaned, inspected and

n't change the exterior color just yet! As I mentioned in previous columns, I

the Wrights as great Americans. He didn't have any political agenda items in his speech, and as a fellow aviator you got

was at the centennial celebration at the Wright Brothers National Memorial. It was

the impression he was happy to be there, just like the rest of us. It didn't hurt that

repainted. Since I had to remove some of the cabane structure in the cabin, I will re­ place the aileron cable pulleys with new ball-bearing pulleys. It 's exciting to see the project moving forward, and now that I'm in the "putting parts back on" mode, I get even more mo­ tivated. A number of rivets were drilled out, and as the new or replacement items are installed, the replacement rivets will be bucked . I just keep moving along, looking for a stopping place. In a couple of months I hope to give you an update of my progress. Committing to giving my fellow members a progress report means I have to keep at it, and I can stay focused on getting N2628K back on flying status.

the memorial grounds. When he stood on the steps of the Sikorsky and waved , the hair on the back of my neck stood on end. Driven to the stage in a big GMC SUV, he gave a 20-minute speech that honored

a remarkable event, even with the uncoop­

he stood on that stage in the rain and saw

erative weather. Now that I've been home for a month, I've read a number of ac­

more than 40,000 aviators standing in the

counts of the event in a few other publications, including some comments re­ garding the president's attendance, and the temporary flight restriction over the event during his speech. We live in differ­ ent times, and I won't comment further on that aspect of the celebration. I WOUld, however, like to express a few of my feelings about the president's visit. Norma and I arrived early that morning, knowing that there would be extra security in place for those of us who would be in the area closest to the stage . Even the press had to go through this second level of secu­

rain and mUd. He wasn ' t able to stay for the first flight attempt, but he did come back in Air Force One, with the 747 making a slow flyby of the memorial grounds as he headed back to Washington. It looks like the temperature is getting up to the point where I can get some work done. I should head out to the airport. Do yourself a favor and ask your friend to join up with us . Let's all pull in the same direction for the good of aviation. Remember, we are better together. Join us and have it all. Butch VINTAGE AIRPLANE


VAA NEWS

EAA Critical of 'Air Tour' NPRM Under pressure from EAA and other industry representatives, the FAA has extended the comment pe­ riod on its potentially devastating National Air Tour Safety Standards notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) 90 days to April 19, 2004. Published in late October, in the name of safety the NPRM imposes restrictive regulations on the air tour industry that the provided data do not support. In preparing its official comments, EAA is calling on FAA to recall the NPRM and propose a new one that incorporates the comments and concerns of the operators and public. If enacted as now proposed, the regulations would force a signif­ ic a nt number of owners and operators out of business and would ground historically significant air­ craft because their owners couldn't comply with them. "The proposed rule is incomplete in that it fails to define many terms or incorporate fully all information needed to make the proposed rules valid for use, " EAA summarized. The NPRM would place new, prohibitive restrictions on private pilots prOVid­ ing charitable or community event flights. "There is little supporting data to justify the proposed wide­ sweeping changes," said Earl Lawrence, EAA vice president for in­ dustry and regulatory affairs. For example, the proposed rule would require a 1920s-era airplan e operated at a Midwestern nontow­ ered airport to comply with the same operational and documenta­ tion requirements as a helicopter constructed under current require­ ments and operated in continuous service over the Grand Canyon Na­ tional Park. "That indicates that the authors didn't follow past regulatory practice of producing regulations that are responsive to the wide variety of aircraft and operations conducted in the U.S.," EAA summarized. EAA is not insensitive to the con­ cerns over air tour operation safety 2

FEBRUARY 2004

The world's greatest general aviation event,

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, is launching the next

century of flight at EAA AirVenture 2004 July 27­ August 2 at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh,

Wisconsin. The 52nd annual EAA gathering will o S H K a pay special attention to what lies ahead for the ~-world of flight, along with recognizing the innova­ tions that have led aviation to today's achievements.

"Over the past decade we have recognized the aviators and aircraft that changed the world over the past 100 years," said EAA President and AirVenture Chairman Tom Poberezny. "This year EAA AirVenture is 'Launching the Next Cen­ tury of Flight' by looking ahead to the innovations that build on this legacy. Some of this new thinking is already becoming reality, assuring that the next century of flight will be as remarkable as the first 100 years." EAA AirVenture Oshkosh has always been a home for aviation innovation and serves as an inspiration for those who see untapped potential in personal flight and in aviation in general. Through the years, many unique designs have debuted at the event. In addition, the people behind the advancements have been welcomed to share their knowledge and inspire others. Most of this knowledge exchange occurs in the more than 500 educational fo­ rums , seminars, and workshops held during the week that cover the entire spectrum of flight. Add the more than 700 exhibitors displaying their latest innova­ tions, and more than 10,000 airplanes, including the nearly 1,000 vintage showplanes that dot the south end of Wittman Field, and EAA AirVenture partici­ pants have an unlimited source of aviation inspiration. Details on specific EAA AirVenture activities, as well as aircraft arrival and de­ parture procedures, will be announced as they are finalized. For the latest information, visit www.airventure.org. Housing information is available through the Oshkosh Housing Hotline at 920/235-3007 (Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central time).

AIRVEN14

voiced by both Congress and the NTSB, prompted by a series of crashes involving air tour operation, many of which occurred in Hawaii. However, EAA does object to the added restrictions proposed, the lack of supportive data for those addi­ tional restrictions, and the confusing format in which the new restrictions were incorporated into the FARs in this NPRM.

EAA Leads Aging Aircraft Discussion Work on an FAA Advisory Circular (AC) for documenting approved sub­ stitute standard parts and materials was conducted at a December meet­ ing of the FAA Aging Aircraft Ad Hoc Committee held in Kansas City, Mis­ souri. Representing EAA were Vice

President of Government and Regula­ tory Affairs Earl Lawrence and Director of Aircraft Maintenance Daryl Lenz. VAA Executive Director H.G. Frautschy is working with Lenz and Lawrence on developing the list of approved substitutes. The committee works with the FAA Small Airplane Directorate to de­ velop materials that help small aircraft owners maintain and restore their aircraft. Discussion centered on developing an AC that will provide aircraft own­ ers with a common-sense document that will make it easier to obtain ap­ provals for replacement parts while they are maintaining their aircraft. The committee hopes to develop a draft AC for FAA internal review in continued on page 27


VAA's "Friends of The Red Barn" VAA Convention Fund Raising Program The Vintage Aircraft Associa­ tion is a major participant in the World's Largest Annual Sport Avi­ ation Event - EAA AirVenture Oshkosh! The Vintage Division hosts and parks over 2,000 vin­

tage airplanes each year from the Red Barn area of Wittman Field south to the perimeter of the airport. The financial support for the various activities in connection with the weeklong event in the VAA Red Barn area is principally derived from the Vintage Air­ craft Association's "Friends of the Red Barn" program. This fund raising program is an annual affair, begin­ ning each year on July 1 and end ing J u ne 30 of the fo llowing year. This year's campaign is well underway, with contributions already arriving here at VAA HQ. Our thanks to those of you who have already sent in your 2004 contributions. You can join in as well. There will be three levels of gifts and gift recognition: Vintage Gold Level - $600.00 and above gift Vintage Silver Level - $300.00 gift Vintage Bronze Level - $100.00 gift Each contribution at one of these levels entitles you to a Certificate of Appreciation from the Divi­ sion. Your name will be listed as a contributor in Vintage Airplane magazine, on the VAA website, and on a special display at the VAA Red Barn during AirVenture . You will also be presented with a

special name badge recognizing your level of participation. During AirVenture, you'll have access to the Red Barn Volunteer Cen­ ter, a nice place to cool off.

Gold Level contributors will also r ecei v e a pair of cer ­ tificates each good for a flight on EAA's Ford Trimotor redeemable during AirVenture or during the summer flying season at Pioneer Airport. Silv er Level contributors will receive one certificate for a flighat on EAA's Ford Trimotor. This is a grand opportunity for all Vintage members to join together as key financial supporters of the Vin­ tage Division. It will be a truly rewarding experience for each of us as individ uals to be part of supporting the finest gathering of Antique, Classic, and Contem­ porary airplanes in the world. Won't you please join those of us who recognize the tremendously valuable key role the Vintage Aircraft Asso­ ciation has played in preserving the great grass roots and general aviation airplanes of the last 100 years? Your participation in EAA's Vintage Aircraft Associa­ tion Friends of the Red Barn will help insure the very finest in AirVenture Oshkosh Vintage Red Barn programs. For those of you who wish to contribute, we've included a copy of the contribution form. Feel free to copy it and mail it to VAA headquarters with your donation. Thank you.

--~-- - ------- - --- -- ----------------- - - - ----- -- - - - -- -- - - - - ----- --- - --- - - - ---- - ---------- - --- - - - ----- - ------

VAA Friends of the Red Barn Name______________________________________________ EAA#_______________VAA# ______________ Address____________________________________________________________________________________ City/State!Zip_______________________________________________________________________________ Phone_____________________________________E-Mail_________________________________________ Please choose your level of participation:

_ Vintage Gold Level Gift - $600.00

_ Vintage Silver Level Gift - $300.00 _ Vintage Bronze Level Gift - $100.00

o Payment Enclosed

o Please Charge my credit card (below)

Credit Card Number ______________________ Expiration Date ___________ Signature______________________________

Mail your contribution to:

EM VINTAGE AIRCRAFT ASSOC. PO Box 3086 OSHKOSH , WI 54903-3086

*00 you or your spouse work for a matching gift company? If so, this gift may qualify for a matching donation. Please ask your Human Re­

sources department for th e appropriate form .

Name of Company __________________________

The Vintage Aircraft Association is a non-profit educational organization under IRS SOlc3 rules. Under Federal Law, th e deduction from Federal In­ come tax for charitable contributions is limited to the amount by which any money (and the value of any property other than money) contributed exceeds the value of the goods or services provided in eXChange for the contribution. An approp riate receipt acknowledgi ng your gift will be sent to you for IRS gift reporting reasons. VINTAGE AIRPLANE

3


2003 VINTAGE

HALL OF FAME

NICK REZICH

A

viation is often a fam­ ily interest, and that was certainly true on the south side of Chicago, where the Rezich family was living during the golden age of aviation. The boys, Frank, Nick, and Mike, haunted the nearby Chicago Municipal Airport (later Midway Airport) and built rubber­ powered models of many of the airplanes of the day. Nick Rezich soloed a Waco RNF in 1933, at age 14, beginning a lifelong career in-and love of­ full-size aviation. He worked for Benny Howard at Howard Aircraft in Chicago, and attained the posi­ tion of plant manager before being pressed into military service in World War II. Following the war, he founded

Nick's other passion in life besides airpLanes was playing the drums . His role model was Gene Krupa. All the brothers were musically inclined, with Mike playing trumpet and Frank playing the saxophone. In high school, they were known as the "Rezich Orchestra." The voice ofEAA at the 1970 Joliet air show, sponsored by EAA Chapters 15, 101, and 75. The "Voice ofEAA" was silenced a decade later in 1981, after a battle with throat cancer.

L __ 4

Nick's love ofmusic heLped him when he opened the Pylon Club on 63rd Street on the south side of Chicago. Its aviation decor and prox­ imity to Midway MEMBERS/ilP CARD Airport made it a favorite oflo­ cals and visiting o. aviators for Z nearly a decade --..:!~_~~~~=::Jr__.....:::.:.::.:::====:::::::~ after WWII.

FEBRUARY 2004


Nick and his wife, Joanne, in front of the family Travel Air D-4-D used for Nick's air show act and for skywriting. Joanne and Nick were mar­ ried in 19S0.

The very first airplane owned by the Rezich family was this Piper E-2 Cub, which was purchased by Mike and based at the Ashburn airport in 1936. Since 1936, the family has owned 26 different airplanes.

and operated the famous aviation­ themed tavern near Midway Airport, the Pylon Club. With his brother Frank, he de­ signed and built the Rezich Brothers Special, a Goodyear-class racer, in the late 1940s . The air­ plane would be one of the first donations to the EAA Museum, in Hales Corners. Nick continued to build on his flying skills, and flew charter for Bluebird Air Service at Midway in various planes, including a Wasp­ powered Bellanca and a Lockheed

Seven-year-old Frank, lO-year-old Nick (mugging for the camera), and lS-year-old Mike Rezich behind the family home on Laflin Avenue in Chicago, circa 1930. The model on the ground in front of the boys is the Spirit ofst. Louis.

By the time it was possible for Nick to buy an airplane in 1940, World War II was on the horizon. Here 's Nick's fa­ vorite airplane, his brand-new Culver Cadet at Howell airport. It's blue and silver.

12. He also did barnstorming with his brothers in the family Travel Air and Pitcairn. After the war, he also flew for Morton Salt and International Har­ vester, and began taking on skywriting jobs. He served as the president of the OX-5 Aviation Pioneers, and Nick (EAA 225) was a strong supporter of EAA during its early days, pro­ moting the organization at the Pylon Club and participating in early fly-ins and air shows . He of­ ten flew and announced for free,

since early EAA Chapter budgets were so lean that it was hard to even come up with the funds to buy awards for the participants. He also used his booming voice over the public address system to describe the maneuvers the pilots were flying, and soon became known as the "Voice of EAA. " He was also the master of ceremonies for many of the early EAA evening programs, especially during the Rockford era. In the early 1950s, Nick moved continued on page 26 VINTAGE AIRPLANE

5


PASS

IT TO BUCK

BY E.E. "BUCK" HILBERT, EAA #21 VAA #5 P.O. Box 424, UNION, IL 60180

Aging aircraft as well as aging pilots and mechanics I'm beginning to feel like an ancient, out-of-touch, left-out something or other. Every time I pick up an aviation magazine, it's full of hi-tech write­ ups that I have a hard time understanding. Modern instrumen­ tation, glass panels, sophisticated navigation and collision avoidance systems, engine monitors, fuel flow, in-flight entertainment systems, au­ topilots, you name it! These all have nothing to do with the flivvers and the fun flyin' depicted in this issue. Where is the "fun" and the "enjoyment"-the sense of adventure, the thrill of flying that got me into this to be­ gin with? Well, in our Vintage organiza­ tion , it's still there! There is still a core group out there that feels a sense of adventure, the thrill of pure flying, that is so enjoyable and a delight to the senses. They, as I do, only want release from the hi-tech world, and enjoy the sim­ plicity of turning a switch to get things going. No programming . No perusing the book to find coordinates . Just light the fire and go. There is a downside to this sim­ plicity, though. The "moderns" are sometimes very tolerant of we "grandfathers," surprisingly so. Sometimes I relish the "pipe and slippers" treatment, and the resig­ nation they show this old man when 'l don't understand all the things they talk about. On the other hand, I feel left out, confused, and as a stranger in my own backyard. 6

FEBRUARY 2004

When the current owner of a neat old Cessna 180 calls and asks what shape my airstrip is in, how long, what the coordinates are, and then tells me a 10-knot cross­ wind is a problem for him, and elects to drive in, I can't but won­ der. He oohs and aahs over my C-3 and the Fleet, and then shakes his head in amazement that there are no electrical systems and nothing in the panel. "How can I possibly go any­ where without anything like that," he wonders? Well, I have no intention of "go­ ing" anywhere. I fly for the fun and the pleasure of just being air­ borne, looking at the local territory, waving at my neighbors and friends, and maybe taking someone for a ride. My "Model T" of an airplane gives me all that I want. That first takeoff is really all the reward I need, but the subsequent landing and the pure pleasure of what I just accomplished is "heaven" in itself. Lately too, I find myself sitting in the recliner with more than 30 years of the EAA Vintage publications at my side, feet up, thumbing through the old articles. Re-reading long ago written articles, some written by long-departed enthusiasts, trying to pass on their wisdom and experi­ ence to others who might have a similar interest. I've often felt that man's great­ est invention was the printing press. With that invention it was possible to record and pass on for posterity a man's experiences. I'm

taking advantage of this when I sit in my recliner and go through the collections of the past 30-plus years. I start with the stack on one side, and as I read through, I stack them on the other side. When I complete the transfer from the one side to the other, I start in all over again. If it were possible for the neo­ phyte Vintage member to push away from his computer with all its pop-ups and nonsensical adver­ tising, and take time to read through this collection of lore and knowledge, his reward would be the assimilation of what was learned the hard way, by a lot of people who wanted to pass on their experience. It would satisfy the "thirst" that I hear every day in phone calls from people calling for information. I know many of you are not privy to this collection as I am, but we do have our EAA Library and, lately, a CD with all the EAA Sport Aviation articles on it, some of which pertain to our kind of activities. It is my hope that one day, and soon, a sim­ ilar CD for the Vintage publications will exist. Meanwhile though, on occasion, your editor, H.G., the staff, and I will select one of these "old" arti­ cles we feel might be of interest and republish it. I'm asking for your comments on this. Do you feel this would be a worthwhile effort? With that, It's over to you, I(

((

~ti.rJ,


early/mid '20s. My granddad said it was quite a performer, especially when you adjusted the valves on the old OX to "0" clearance to get an ex­ tra 100 rpm. Wow, can you imagine, 1500 rpm?

Joe Maguire Canton, Ohio BY

H.G.

FRAUTSCHY

NOVEMBER'S MYSTERY ANSWER

Our November Mystery Plane, supplied by Jim Haynes, was a fairly common airplane in its day, but this one was a bit different than the rest. As a few of our mem­ bers noted, it had both the wings and fuselage modified:

The November Mystery Plane is a J-1 Standard, with the fuselage short­ ened and the wings clipped. A frontal view of it would reveal the upper and lower wings are of equal length, and the airfoil was also modified with more camber for a "high lift" airfoil. This was a very popular mod in the

Richard S. Allen of Lewiston, Idaho, looked up the abstract on the airplane, and came up with the following details: The Standard J-1 was Serial No. N-109, powered by a Curtiss OX-5, Serial Number 3972. It didn't last long in civilian hands . Sold by the Nicholas-Beazley Airplane Co. of Marshall, Missouri, on March 20, 1927, it was sold on June 27 to a partnership of George Kimball and Glen Sayers of Adair, Illinois. [In his correspondence, member Lynn Towns of Holt, Michigan, adds the name of Herman Chenoweth of Table Grove, Illinois, to the partnership.} It was reported that not even a month later, on July 13, 1927, that it was "com­ pletely destroyed a few days ago, tied to a fence and hit by a strong wind­ storm, turned over and completely destroyed. " Other correct answers were re­ ceived from Thomas Lymburn, Princeton, Minnesota, and John Rowles, Bemidji, Minnesota. ......

THIS MONTH'S MYSTERY PLANE COMES TO US FROM LOUIS P. KING OF HOUSTON, TEXAS. BE CAREFUL, IT'S NOT EXACTLY WHAT YOU THINK IT IS. SEND YOUR ANSWER TO: EAA, VINTAGE AIR­ PLANE, P.O. Box 308 6, OSHKOSH, WI

54903-3086.

YOUR ANSWER NEEDS TO BE IN

10,2004, FOR INCLU­ 2004 ISSUE OF Vintage

NO LATER THAN MARCH SION IN THE MAY

Airplane. YOU CAN ALSO SEND YOUR RESPONSE VIA E-MAI L . SEND YOUR ANSWER TO

vintage@eaa.org . BE SURE TO INCLUDE BOTH YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS (ESPECIALLY YOUR CITY AND STATE!) IN THE BODY OF YOUR NOTE AND PUT "(MONTH) MYSTERY PLANE" IN THE SUBJECT LINE. VINTAGE AIRPLANE

7


THE VINTAGE INSTRU

Charting a Course

Keeping oriented in the digital world DOUG STEWART

s an ardent supporter of the FAA Wings pro­ gram of recurrent training, I feel that it is important that I not only give safety seminars and flight training in support of the program, but that I undergo the training myself. I de­ cided therefore to stop in North Carolina (on a flight to Florida) to fly the three hours of training required for the Wings program with Guy Maher, whom I consider the foremost instructor for the Cessna Cardinal. I was flying my 1974 Cardinal RG to Florida (for a Thanksgiv­ ing celebration with two of my sons) rather than my PA-12 because I wanted to still be a "vintage" instructor when I reached Florida and not an "antique" instructor. After a great deal of creative scheduling adjustments, Guy and I were able to come up with a workable plan. I would depart early on a Tuesday morning and get to Sal­ isbury, North Carolina, with sufficient time to complete the training before his prior commitments kicked in later in the afternoon. Of course this was all dependent upon decent VFR weather in North Carolina. The week prior to Thanks­ giving the prog charts were not promising. A cold front was taking its time traveling across the country. On Sunday I was not too expectant of making the stop in North Carolina, and was thus starting to firm up Plan B of a direct flight to Florida on Wednesday. But 10 and behold, on Monday the front hurried up. We were get­ ting rain in New England, and it looked as if the flight the next day would be in severe clear, although some­ what bumpy, air. Arising early Tuesday morning, I got my briefing, which confirmed the previous day's prediction. It would be CAVU (ceiling and visibility unlimited) all the way with some moderate turbulence, particularly as I paralleled the lee side of the Appalachians. The temperatures reflected the cold front's passage. It was in the low 20s. Then, in the dawn's early light, I could see something white all over my car in the yard. Uh oh . .. the Cardinal is tied down and not hangared. When did the rain turn to snow, and how quickly? We might have a problem here, I thought to myself, as I drove to the airport where the Cardinal is based. Unfortunately the problem was much worse than I

A

8

FEBRUARY 2004

had thought. As I drove west across the Taconic ridge that separates my home from my air­ plane, the snow depth got deeper rather than shal­ lower. Arriving at the airport I realized that my Cardinal was covered with 1.S inches of frozen snow. The kind that doesn't brush off. The kind that doesn't bang off. The kind that stays stuck until the temperature raises enough for it to melt. There was no way this stuff was going to come off unless I could get the airplane in a heated hangar. After an hour and a half of struggling to de-ice the airplane, the owner of the heated hangar at the airport showed up. Moving the Cardinal into the hangar yielded an ice-free aircraft in less than another half-hour. But now I was two hours behind schedule. I had planned to fly IFR, even though VFR conditions pre­ vailed. That way I wouldn't have to worry about any temporary flight restrictions (TFRs), in particular the presidential retreat at Camp David, which I knew lay close to my route. Flying IFR on cross-country flights is the easiest way to pass the burden of airspace incursion on to Air Traffic Control, relieving the pilot of that chore. If I were to fly the IFR routing, it took me west of Camp David, and what with the head winds I would be encountering, it was doubtful that I would get to Guy in time to complete the training before he ran out of time. There was only one solution ... GPS direct. My Cardi­ nal is equipped with a panel-mounted Garmin GNS 430 and a yoke-mounted 196. I will typically keep the 430 on the primary navigation page, and the 196 on a page that is split with a moving map and a horizontal situa­ tion indicator (HSI). As the engine warmed up I programmed the two GPS units. I scrolled the map just far enough to see that Camp David would indeed be a concern, warning me of the need to be extra careful when I got west of Baltimore. In my operational error of being in a hurry I was also beginning to forge the chain of what could become a bad situation. I was behind


chart in my lap!) I Circumnavigated the arc until I could schedule, and fixating on avoiding Camp David. As I leveled off at 4,500 feet for my southwesterly fly in a straight line on to my destination, arriving there route, the prediction of slow ground speeds was holding with just minutes to spare before my appOintment. There were many lessons to be learned on this flight! true, but at least the turbulence was nothing more than light chop most of the time, with just an occasional Perhaps the most important one is that we should never "moderate bump. The visibility was that wonderful se­ be in a hurry. The minute we get behind schedule, it be­ vere clear that often follows a cold front passage. Reaching comes too easy to overlook or disregard important bits southeastern Pennsylvania I scrolled my moving map out of information. There is a reason for the saying: "Time and saw that r would pass just far enough east of Camp to spare ... go by air." If we can't accept that mentality, then we are setting the stage for disaster. We should David so as to not violate that Prohibited airspace. Check­ ing my ETA on the GPS showed that I'd barely have time never allow an appointment, or an expected time of ar­ to "drain my sumps" before my appointment with Guy, rival to dictate the flight. We have to have the flexibility but at least I would be on time. I had yet to realize that in our planning to allow us to either cancel the appoint­ complacency, another one of those operational errors, ment we are trying to make, or cancel the flight . Another lesson has to do with was at work strengthening the chain. • the "traps" that reliance on GPS r typically fly with the moving navigation have for us. Although I map on my GPS set to a 20- to 35•• teach a seminar on these many mile scale, but because I wanted to traps, I almost fell into one of them see my proximity to the Prohibited myself. When we zoom in on the airspace, I had zoomed in to 10 map scale, there is often little, or miles. I should know, of all people no, warning of airspace incursion. (since I teach in my GPS seminars Furthermore, if we are operating about the "trap" of airspace incur­ with some of the older units, the re­ sion), that when operating a moving draw of the map might be so slow as map on a GPS one needs to be espe­ to allow us to penetrate that air­ cially vigilant to the airspace that space before the moving map lies just ahead beyond the limits of indicates it. Certainly backing up the picture on the screen. our usage of the GPS map with a As a dark curved line indicating chart in our lap will aid in aVOiding that trap. But if that the "Mode C veil" around the Washington Class B air­ space started to move down the map from the top of the chart does not have a course line drawn on it (as mine screen, I thought to myself that Potomac Approach, did not, due to my being in a hurry), the trap is still with whom I was getting advisories at the time, should wide open. soon be clearing me into the Class B. "Yikes ... You idiot! On this flight I had been requesting and receiving flight following from air traffic control. But we must re­ The D.C. ADIZ!" I silently screamed at myself. In my fix­ ation on Camp David, in my being in a hurry and member that ATC's primary responsibility is to provide wanting to take the shortest line, in my complacency, I separation for IFR aircraft. Their assistance to VFR air­ had completely forgotten about the rest of the route. craft is only on an "available" basis. Therefore we Had I continued in a straight line I would have busted cannot rely on ATC to keep us from penetrating special­ directly into the air defense identification zone (ADIZ) use airspace, even TFRs ... even the D.C. ADIZ. Would Potomac Approach have warned me of my impending as I overflew just west of Dulles. I had completely forgot­ ten that the airspace around Washington, D.C., after violation? I'm not so sure it would have. So when planning any flight, do not let an ETA force September 11 was now an ADIZ. It required a special you to rush your planning, or for that matter embark VFR flight plan to enter the airspace. I could just see the story now: "Pilot escorted out of on, or continue the flight. Always have a Plan B, and be ADIZ by military aircraft is not just an ordinary pilot, sure that plan is thoroughly thought out as well. Do not but a Master Instructor and Designated Examiner." How put your sole reliance for navigation in that little GPS would I ever explain ... and would it be a suspension, or clamped to your yoke (or that big one mounted in the worse yet a revocation? I'm too old to consider starting a panel, for that matter). Always carry charts, with your course line drawn on them. Request flight following new career. Thanks to the marvel of modern technology I was whenever pOSSible, but do not count on ATC to keep able to place the cursor on my moving map at the apex you clear of special-use airspace. That is why you got a of the curve of the line depicting the Mode C veil, push thorough briefing prior to the flight. That is why you the "direct to" button on the GPS, and get instant navi­ have a chart in your lap. Doing these things will help gation information to aid in not penetrating the ADIZ. you transition from being a good pilot to being a great Then using the depiction of the arc of the veil on the pilot. As you can see, I'm still working at it myself. Read more about Doug's work at www.dsflight.com........

moving map (and confirming the information with the II

In my operational error of being In a hurry I was also beginning to forge the chain of what could become a bad situation.

VINTAGE AIRPLANE

9


BUDD DAVISSON

o many times, when we talk about a restored an­ tique airplane, we begin by explaining that there were so few original parts re­ maining that it made more sense to throw the airplane away and restore the basket it came in. Today "data plate airplanes" are so common we don't even bother to get an incredu­ lous look on our face when we find all that's left of the original is the cle­ vis pin holding a tail wire. And then there are antique birds like Jim Hammond's 1931 C-3 Aeronca. In 72 years of life the wings have been re­ covered only twice and the fuselage once. And it was never a derelict. In fact, if you ignore the 72 years since its

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10

FEBRUARY 2004

birth, you could say that condition-wise it has barely drifted down into the "used airplane" category. Hammond's airplane is unique not because of the massive effort that went into restoring it but because so little restoration has been done. It is 1931 aviation in its purest form. The airplane is also unique for a totally different reason, however. Hammond is only the third owner, which is interesting, but what makes his airplane really interesting is that the first owner was Jean Roche, the original designer of the C-3 and the recognized father of light aviation . For over 34 years, Hammond's C-3 was Roche's personal airplane. During the 1920s, when big, hulk­

ing biplanes typified civil aviation, Roche and two friends, John Dosche and Harold Morehouse, were busy buckjng the trend. They were young and were seriously infected with the aviation bug. But they were also broke. They not only couldn't afford to buy any of the available airplanes, but even if they managed to acquire one, they couldn't afford to keep it in gasoline and oil. It was a common dilemma. The world was catching the aviation fever, but the size and costs of the average airplane made flying available only to the rich. The common man was being left on the ground. And Jean Roche, for one, didn't like that. Roche and his friends didn't have


the money, but they wanted to fly. So, they became what all people be­ come when the want of aviation overpowers common sense: they be­ came homebuilders. With the exception of the Wright brothers (the original homebuilders), aircraft designers generally have an engine around which they can design the air­ plane. That wasn't the case with Roche, however. For his airplane to be economical, it had to be small and light and the engine had to be the same. Based on the parameters of the airplane he was designing, he only needed a 25-hp engine to fly. But there were no engines in that horsepower category that were light enough. So what does a home-

builder do when he finds a particu­ lar part isn't readily available? He builds it! That's exactly what they did. Harold Morehouse designed and built a two-cylinder, horizon­ tally opposed engine that fit perfectly in the pug nose of the airplane Roche had designed. Let's put the concept of some ama­ teurs building an engine in per­ spective: the concept of the automo­ bile and its internal combustion engine was barely 25 years old. The Wright boys had done their thing only two decades earlier, but here were a trio of young men in their twenties with little or no money deciding to build not only an airplane, but the engine too. No one can say the guys lacked confidence. Amazingly enough, Morehouse hit the right combinations right out of the gate and his homemade 25-hp engine ran beautifully, and the pregnant-look­ ing Roche design flew well too. It would take an entire book to ad­ equately tell the Roche/ Aeronca story, but from 1928 through 1931, through the Aeronautical Corpora­ tion of America (Aeronca), Roche was central to introducing his little air­ plane, dubbed the C-2, to the public. [n 1931, the two-place C-3 joined the single-place C-2. Morehouse and his original engine had gone another di­ rection and were never part of the Aeronca product line, partially be­ cause a crash badly damaged the original engine. However, even be­ fore Aeronca entered the picture, Roche had fellow mechanics/engi­ neers Roy Poole and Robert Galloway take the Morehouse concept and a few salvageable parts and design a new engine. This engine became the Aeronca E-107 (26 horsepower) and later evolved into the famous E-I13 (36 horsepower). It says something about the pas­

sion attached to aviation to think that, as the country was spiraling down into a debilitating depression, here was a fledgling company preparing to launch a product line that could hardly be defined as nec­ essary for an individual's existence. Part of America was selling pencils on street corners while another plot­ ted how they could buy one of Aeronca 's little airplanes. The first two years of production saw 160 C-2's flutter out the door. Although Roche reportedly wasn't crazy about all the changes being made to his super-lightweight (390 pounds) design, he still requested that one of the new C-3's be reserved in his name. So in the spring of 1932, jean Roche became the proud owner of NC12407, which had actually been built in the fall of 1931. The company had tried to deliver an air­ plane to him earlier but the sales manager was killed show boating in it for a small crowd. Because of the accident and the pressure of the de­ pression, the company charged Roche $1,500, nearly retail, for the airplane which he had designed. The airplane that eventually was going to wend its way into jim Ham­ mond's hands led an interesting life, partially because Roche had to put it to work to pay for it and partially be­ cause he was still a designer at heart and wanted to try new things. Roche put the airplane in the rental stable of AI johnson, who was managing the Vandalia, Ohio, ajr­ port, for flight training use. The rental fee was $5 per hour, half of which went to Roche. Eight hundred hours later, after teaching dozens of students to fly, being damaged in a spot landing contest (it snagged a fence and wound up on its back), and becoming an integral part of an airport community, the little air­ plane was paid off. Ever in search of more perform­ ance with no accompanying cost, Roche designed and tested a single­ wheel landing gear for the airplane. The small wheels from a child's tricy­ cle were bolted to the wing tips to act as out-riggers and a single balVINTAGE AIRPLANE

11


loon tire was mounted under the centerline of the fuselage. Besides saving something like 40 pounds (a healthy amount for such a little bird), the elimination of the drag gener­ ated by big main gear tires and struts upped the top speed from 80 to 90 mph . Anxious to prove the concept, the airplane was entered in a race in Chicago and came in third despite the fact that all of its competition was much higher powered. A Johnson airspeed indicator is mounted on While the mono-wheel the brace wires on the right s ide, a much yielded some benefits, it was handier lo cation than on the instrument judged just a little too weird panel. In flight, the upper half of the panel (something about falling over can be difficult to see. on landing) and never ap­ proached production status. Another test involved the Frazier propeller. This was a little-known auto­ matic variable-pitch prop that apparently worked on a principle similar to an Aeromatic. One of the more bizarre tests involved an investiga­ tion into ways of getting airplanes off the ground without requiring conven­ tional runways. The test crew anchored a cable se­ curely to a pivot in the The wing is braced by a set of streamlined brace middle of Wright Field and wires, which attach on the upper end at this A­ devised a method of at­ frame cabane strut. It also makes for a handy taching the cable to location to mount the pitot tube. Roche's little airplane, which included a quick release mechanism not unlike a tow hook, but it was aimed down the left wing. The theory was that rather than us­ ing a linear runway, they'd use a small circular one and depend upon the cable to tether the airplane into a circular path. Sounds outlandish, except it actually worked. They even found the pilot could control the tension on the cable at will by vary­ ing the bank angle. The little C-3 would chug along in a circle, lift off, UJ

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12

FEBRUARY 2004

then release itself and go on its merry way. Whether the concept was ever applied to larger aircraft is­ n't known, but it reportedly worked great with the lightweight C-3. The airplane provided a lot of re­ laxing fun for Roche, as he flew it up and down the coast in the Vir­ ginia/Maryland area. Occasionally, they'd even land it on the beach and Roche liked a particular beach so much, he eventually built a home in the same location. Shortly after Pearl Harbor, the edict came down that the C-3, along with most other civilian aircraft , would have to be disassembled and stored for the duration . It seems the government couldn't see the C-3 out over the ocean doing anti-submarine duty or didn't feel the pregnant guppy appearance of the little Aeronca was going to inspire fear in the hearts of our enemies. It has been reported (but unconfirmed ) that the actual reason the military wanted all unused civilian aircraft dismantled was so they couldn't be used against us in the event of an in­ vasion. Yeah, right! An Aeronca C-3 used by the enemy to strafe our troops. That's kind of funny, actu­


ally. It sat out the war disassembled in Roche's house. Offering flight to the common man was just one of Jean Roche's dreams. Another was to offer the "sportsman's life" to the same class of people, and he defined a sports­ man's life as living close to the shore with both a seaplane and a boat in a style that offered both economy and total recreation. The first ingredient of that, the seaplane, he had, but not without putting the C-3 on floats. This was no small decision because the air­ plane didn't have a huge surplus of power so the floats had to be well matched to the airplane. Cost was also a factor, which is why he con­ sidered the McKinley pneumatic floats for a while. The McKinleys never received CAA approval so Roche began looking for a set of EDO 1070s. And he looked. Then he looked some more. The search took eight years until he finally cornered a set in 1948. The little C-3 on floats looked per­ fect in the "sportsman house" he had designed and built for it. During World War II, he started building the house and saw it as a prototype for

similar houses people of meager means could build out of their salaries without resorting to loans. Essentially, it was a tall seaplane hangar with an apartment on top. The hangar was cinder block and the apartment of frame construction and built in a way that the floor plan could be easily customized to a builder's tastes. Critical to the "sportsman house" was its location, which in this case was on the shore of the Back River, in Hampton, Virginia, not far from his work at NACA. He had his water front home, his seaplane ramp, and, even­ tually his seaplane. But the three elements that defined his concept of sportsman living never really came together for him. Traveling and other interests kept the C-3 in the hangar and not once was it trundled out to the water barely fifty feet away. In fact, Roche never flew the airplane af­ ter it was reassembled after WWII. The airplane sat in its specially de­ signed hangar for years before Roche finally sold it to Bill Harwood and Thomas Grogan of Freeport, Long Is­ land, in 1966 ending Roche's 34-year ownership of the airplane. When Harwood and Grogan got the airplane, it had about 1,200 hours on it. Its cover was getting a little ratty, so they gave it a new suit of clothes, but that's about it. It did­ n't need anything else. While Harwood and Grogan were enjoying the airplane, far to the west, in Ohio, young Jim Hammond was feeling the first pangs of the air­ plane bug. He was still in junior high but airplanes, especially old ones, were already part of his life. He grew up on his grandfather's farm where he now has a 2,100-foot runway and a row of hangars. He says, "If I'd ever quit buying airplane projects, I could stop build­ ing hangars. Originally, I just tied the airplanes in the corn, but now that I have hangars they are all full." A mechanical engineer by training, Jim is third generation in the family's desiccant business but airplanes have always been there. "It's the usual farm kid airplane

story," he says. "Started taking lessons at 14, soloed a J-3 at 17, but didn't get my license until I was in college." Part of his interest in antique air­ planes came from an unusual source. "We lived not far from Port Clin­ ton where Island Airlines based their Ford Tri-Motors. As a young kid , I found that if you hung around, they

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Balloon wheels are an integral part of the landing gear's shock absorp­ tion system.

Aeronca was one of the few light-plane manufacturers that also manufactured their own engines. The two-cylinder Aeronca engines would be the stan­ dard powerplant for the company's product (not including the low wing Aeronca L series) until the four-cylin­ der Continental, Lycoming, and Franklin engines came out years later. VINTAGE AIRPLANE

13


Jean Roche, original owner of the C-3. Bill Halwood at Jean Roche's house in 1966.

i• • • B ill became the

next owner of the C-3.

might take you out to the islands if they had an empty seat. But then you had to stay on the island until they had an empty seat going back, which often took a while. Sometimes they'd even let you play copilot. "I went to Oshkosh for the first time in 182 and my goal was to build a Pietenpol, so I was looking for stuff pertaining to that. But then I saw my first Hatz, and I just had to have one. Originally I was going to cannibalize an old 150 I had bought for parts for the Hatz, but I just couldn't part out a flying airplane. After putting 250 hours on it, I sold it and used the money to buy parts for the Hatz. It took me nearly eight years to finish the Hatz, but I truly love it. During that time, I acquired my A & Prating." What he doesn't often mention is that he received a bronze Lindbergh award for his workmanship on the Hatz. The exact trail of airplanes that led to his buying the Roche C-3 is just a little hard to follow. "I bought a TC Aeronca in Oregon and it took me 32-1/2 hours to make it home. A long but enjoyable ride. 14

FEBRUARY 2004

Then in 187 I bought the proverbial airplane-in-a-barn, a PT-19. I was at a wedding and someone told me about an "old airplane" they had seen wasting away and on the way home, I stopped to look at it. It looked like it just needed covering, but when I got it home, I found a lot of the old casein glue had given up holding parts together./1 Like many antique airplane types, jim has a love affair with the concept of starting a new, unusual project. "I worked on the Fairchild for about five years then got sidetracked by a j-l Standard project. Somewhere back there I also decided I had to have a four-place family airplane, so I bought a Stinson Junior. I love ju­ niors. I flew this one for about four years and it was getting pretty ratty. So I sold it and bought another one. Like I said, I like juniors. Still inter­ ested in Pietenpols, I helped restore Alan Rudolf's Model A Ford-powered Air Camper and wound up buying it a few years later. "I'd always wanted a C-3 project and a friend told me of one in Florida, so I went to look at it. The

same guy had the Standard j-1. He didn't really want to sell the C-3 but said if I took the Standard he'd throw the C-3 in, complete with its 1958 airworthiness certificate. "I began working on the 220 Hisso­ powered Standard so the C-3 had to wait its turn. "I still had the C-3 bug, however. Last year as I was getting ready to go to Oshkosh, I saw an ad for a flying C-3 and I called the owner. It sounded like it was exactly what I was looking for. On Thursday of Oshkosh I flew home, then drove to Long Island to look at it. Bill Harwood showed me around the airplane and explained the entire Roche connection. You could almost feel the old guy hover­ ing over the airplane. It was incredibly original because all Har­ wood and Grogan did was cover it. Most of the rest, including the inte­ rior, is as it was when Roche had it. "The airplane is a lot of fun to fly and I feel a little better about this en­ gine than I do other E-l13s. For one thing, Roche converted the engine to a Ie' model, which means, among other things, that it received plain rod bearings and a new crankshaft that has a conventional spline, rather than a taper. "I fly the airplane regularly, but I fly from field to field, always expect­ ing the engine to stop. It's this kind of flying that really keeps you on your toes. "I'm terribly aware of this airplane's place in history and I work hard at fly­ ing it safely and not stretching its limits. I know Roche flew it as if it would never quit, but I can't bring myself to be so blase about it. Of course, practically all the countryside where I regularly fly is miles and miles of flat fields. So, at the very least, I'm unlikely to damage the airplane." jean Roche's little airplane begat a huge number of innovators but they all took the cue from Roche's original concept: keep it small, keep it light, keep it affordable-and the general aviation industry, as we know it, was born. jean Roche loved aviation and he loved his C-3. It's only fitting that both have survived. ......


Chris Price and his Heath Parasol

BUDD DAVISSON

wenty-eight-year-old Chris Price didn't have a chance. There was absolutely no way he cou ld not turn out to be a lover of old, unusual air­ planes because his entire youth was stacked against him. Let's add up the strikes: • Father was an airline pilot who loved old airplanes. • He was raised in Sonoma, Cal­ ifornia, under the influence of Sonoma Skypark Airport and all of the quirkiness contained thereon. • He was friends with Eric Presten, photographer and known pusher of vintage airplanes. Three strikes: no chance what­ soever of having a "normal" aka "boring" life. Lounging in the tiny shade of

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his Heath Parasol at Oshkosh, he said, "I suppose my father was the main influence that drove me to­ wards flivver-type airplanes. Or it could have been the English mo­ torcycles of my youth because they tend to breed a tolerance of ques­ tionable mechanical stuff. "Plus, Dad managed the Fre­ mont Airport for a bunch of years, and before I was old enough to learn to fly, I was racing around the airport on a go-kart and climb­ ing in and out of a derelict )-3 Cub. I soloed a glider at IS, a Cub at 16, and got my ticket at 17." The story of his Heath, if told out of context, would sound like the normal, long-term (la-year) scrounging-through-barns-making­ phone-calls-looking-for-parts

project. It's only when it's put in context that it takes on an abnormal flair. Like for instance he was build­ ing his ribs in high school shop class and took a Continental A-40 to auto shop to do the valves. But we're get­ ting ahead of ourselves. Just make a mental note that the tale of the Chris Price Heath Parasol begins when he's still in high school. "Three months after I got my private license, a friend, who had only gotten his license a week ear­ lier, and I flew a J-3 from Sonoma, California, to Old Rhinebeck, New York. We even circled the Statue of Liberty. On the way east we stopped at Oshkosh '92 where I saw Bill Schlapman's Heath Para­ sol. On the way home we attended VINTAGE AIRPLANE

15


The large dial of the engine tachometer dominates the instrument panel, with the throttle lever just to its left.

'"~ Chri..s...P"""nc:.·c..... e..J.h'-s a-~een b...;....-work ---.----on ing -h-~ is Heath project since he was in high school back in Sonoma, California. 'Sentimental Journey' at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, and made a lot of friends along the way. "For some reason I found Bill Schlapman's airplane really interesting . Then I saw a picture of a Heath on floats. That did it! I let everyone know that I wanted a Heath. That's when Eric Presten told me of an ad he'd seen for a Heath project in Wisconsin. It really didn't sound like much, but I went to look at it anyway. lilt looked even worse than it sounded. Someone had whacked all of the fittings off the fuselage. I guess they were going to modify it into something else. There were no wheels, the elevator hinges on the stab had been cut off, and there was no vertical stab. The wings 16

FEBRUARY 2004

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consisted of a stack of totally unus­ able ribs and no spars. But, the price was right, so I carted the pieces home . Then, between the cracks of everything else I was do­ ing, I kept looking for parts to add to my Heath 'kit'. liMy high school was really good about letting me work on the air­ plane as part of my shop classes. While other guys were making bookends and cutting boards, I was making ribs and spars. liThe structure of the Heath is amazingly fragile, and the ribs aren't to be believed. They are made of 7/32-inch stock (less than 1/4 inch) with enormously long bays in the trusses. The middle bay is over 9 inches long. You can deform them with your fingers. In fact, later, when I was rib stitching, I had to cut some of it loose and start over because I'd pulled it too tight and bowed the bottom in. They looked like Wright brothers' ribs." By the time Chris graduated from high school it was obvious to him that to continue with the Heath he was going to have to learn additional skills because his airplane was in urgent need of someone who knew how to weld. "I took welding courses at Santa Rosa Junior College, then attended

The beautiful profile of original Heath wheels was the result ofplenty ofpatience and a bit of horse-trading with other airplane parts. Embry-Riddle at their extended campus on Travis Air Force Base to get the rest of my education. Once I felt I knew how to weld well enough, it was time to start tack­ ling the steel parts of the airplane. liThe fuselage looked horrible. At one time it had surface rust, and rather than cleaning it, someone just brush painted over it. I punch tested the tubing in the normal places and couldn't find any thin spots, so I continued on with it." When restoring some airplanes, tons of archival documentation surfaces to provide information, but Chris found that wasn't the case with the Heath. "I had expected to find lots of plans and stuff for the airplane but didn't. In fact, in a lot of areas I had to depend on photos . The fuselage had no door, for instance, which was an option on the Heath because it is nearly impossible to squeeze under the wing to get in. I decided to put the door in and spent a lot of time staring at pho­ tos the EAA had of a bare Heath fuselage that had the door to get details. The basic dimensions came from plans out of 1930 and 1931 Popular Aviation magazines.


Powered with a more reliable Continental A­ 40(f), Chris' Heath will cruise at 70 mph. The rigging of the Heath is pure 19205, with a combination of hard wire and cables keeping everything aligned.

liThe shape and method of at­ taching the fittings came out of the old EAA photos along with the way the gas line and throttle link­ age were routed. Nothing about it was complicated, but I was putting together a jigsaw puzzle without knowing what the picture was sup­ posed to look like, so any hints helped enormously. "When I cut the tubing to put the door in I got proof that the tubing was fine because the insides of everything I cut were just beau­ tiful. That was a relief. "When welding in the tubes for the door, I made it a point to avoid splicing anything. I went from clus­ ter to cluster on every piece, and you'd have a tough time telling the door wasn't there all long, which is how I wanted it to look." Having a basic wing and fuselage meant that it looked as if Chris had a real airplane, but he wanted to make it original, or close to it, so he was still a long way away because he was missing so many important components. liThe widow I had bought the fuselage from said she had already sold a bunch of parts of the airplane, including the engine and Heath

Right off the pages of the Flying and Glider Manual, Chris Price's Heath is striking in its original color scheme. Who says the old days were in black and white?

things about the reliability of Heaths, so I wanted to get my airplane flying first, then think about changing the engine." Some airplane projects have inter­ esting circular connections in them where people cross paths without ever knowing or parts wind up in the most ironic places. "I was well into the project when a friend told me he'd been to a local garage sale, and there were a bunch of Heath parts stacked in the corner but not for sale. He asked the guy where he got them, and he said, 'I bought them in Wisconsin. There was a fuselage too, but I was in a hurry and didn't want to take the fuselage.' "I ran up and talked to him, and would you believe it-he has the engine and wheels that were originally on my airplane, and he's not 15 miles from my house in California.

wheels, which are unique to the airplane. I could have sub­ stituted motorcycle wheels or something, but I was doing a restoration, not a homebuilt, so I didn't want to go that route. "I flipped over rocks for two years looking for wheels and finally bought a pair at the Joe Gertler auction. They had a ton of wheels of different types, and I bought a set of Jenny wheels for a friend, but almost no one wanted the Heath wheels, so I got them for $120. liMy airplane had originally been equipped with a B-4 Hen­ derson/Heath, which was also long gone. At the Gertler auc­ tion, however, I bought a couple of complete Heath engines, even though I was already com­ mitted to the Continental A-40. Besides, I'd heard some dismal VINTAGE AIRPLANE

17


He's a memorabilia collector, not a restorer, and he didn't want to sell me the parts. He did talk about loan­ ing them, however, and I have to get back to him. Maybe we can work out a trade or something. "When I was doing the instru­ ment panel I had practically no documentation to work with, so I basically got what I thought was ac­ curate to the period. Some of it is kind of funny, like the Nicholas­ Beazley altimeter. In one circle of the needle it goes from zero to 25,000 feet. Talk about a nonsensitive al­ timeter! I just look out and make a judgment whether I'm high enough or not, and that's good enough. liThe mag switch is a funky-look­ ing British unit, probably out of an Avro, and the oil pressure gauge is from a tractor. That seemed apropos. 18

FEBRUARY 2004

The throttle, which is an up-and­ down lever, was tough to come up with. Then I saw the fuel selector for a Geronimo Apache. Not only was it exactly the right size and look, but the throw was perfectly matched to the NAS-2 carb on the A-40. "A bout this time I finished col­ lege, and my first flying job was with Miami Valley Aviation, in Mid­ dletown, Ohio, (only a couple hundred feet away from the original Aeronca factory) flying DC-3 copilot and Beech 18 single pilot. Moving away from the Heath was not good. It was going nowhere fast. "I was lucky to be a friend of Rowena Mason. Rowena owns Rowena 's Flying Fabric at Santa Paula airport, and she did a beautiful job covering the airplane and duplicating the original factory paint scheme."

Because the Heath is low on both power and wing area, weight, which is the enemy of every airplane, is es­ pecially important, and nothing is heavier and more useless than extra coats of paint. "Rowena covered it with the super lightweight Ceconite 103 glider cloth. Once she had it on [ hated to make it any heavier by putting finish on it, but we had to seal and protect it somehow. She put two cross coats of silver on it and stopped there. If you look, you'll see pinholes all over it, but at least it's light." In putting together such a rudi­ mentary and tiny airframe, there are always parts that prove more ellu­ sive than others. liThe tail uses tiny turnbuckles on the wires, and I was having problems finding them . A friend had bought an


Continental A-40, although that de­ cision had a few twists of its own. "Dad bought an A-40 back in '7S that he was going to use on a Rose Parakeet project that n eve r hap­ pe ned. That's the engine I took to

1930 Heath V Strut Engine: Continental A-40-4, 40 hp

Cruise: 70 mill!

Top speed: 85 mph

Empty weiCht: 402 pounds

""" Fuel: 8 gallons (two 4-gallon tanks in wing) Fuel bum: 2.7 gph The plane has flown at a weight of 680 pounds with a 220-pound pilot.

auto shop and me sse d with, eve n though [ didn't have the experience. It needed more than [ was capable of doing at the time, so I still needed an engine. "Last October I had the airframe about finished and was looking around for another A-40 when someone turned me onto one that had been sitting und er a friend's work bench for years. It was cov­ ered by an inch of sawdust, but ~ when I cleaned it up, it turn ed out o ~ to be a pretty good engine. [ pulled ~ the heads and checked it ove r and « decid ed to run it 'as-is' as a short­ engine off a Heath project and left term powerplant for the airplane the fuselage, which was scrapped. I while I rebuilt the original e ngine called the landfill, hoping to find the my dad had. turnbuckles, but all they had left was "[ wanted to make that original the landing gear. I retrieved that, but engine as new as possible give n the all that was useful were the bronze shortage of availab[ e parts . [ came up with a new cam and cam bear­ bushings on the axles. "Finally, I ran across a crashed ings and used a set of Jahns pistons ultralight that was using the exact along with new rods. There aren't turnbuckl es, so I bought it, took new parts kits for th e Bendix mags, off the turnbuckles, and burned but [ spent a lot of time looking for the rest." the best parts [ could find. "[ flew 20 hours behind the work­ The Heath B-4 that was originally on the airplane was a composite en­ be nch engine befor e [ changed to gine that mounted Heath-designed the rebuilt engine, which is running and -manufactured cylinders on a great, although [ carry an extra A-6S basically stock four-cylinder Hender­ coil with me. We all know how those son motorcycle case. Heath also built things love to fail." complete engines, which were what Now that Chris ha s bee n fl ying Chris had purchased at th e Gertler the Heath for a season, h e has auction. In the interest of reliability, form ed some opinions about it. however, he decided to stay with the "For one thing , people t e nd to

want to lump it in with the C-3 Aeronca, but you only have to look at that little wing, and yo u know that there's no way it can be as slow as a C-3. It ha s a higher wing load­ ing, even thou g h it 's light as a feather. [ come down final at 4S miles an hour and stall at about 3S. "You don't fly a power-off final because it h as a fair amount of drag and virtually no inertia. If you kill the power, you're really nose-down on final to maintain speed, but even so, it still ha s plenty of elevator to make the flare. Most of the time ['II keep some power on it, cruise down final, and slow down when close to the runway. "It'll cruise about 70 mil es an hour at 2100 rpm, which is low for the A-40, and will actually hit 8S mph at full power o f 2300 rpm. Part of that may be that I'm running a pretty bi g prop-69-in ch diam eter with a 33-inch pitch. "It ha s an amazing ability to fly with different weight pilots. I had a 6-foot tall fri e nd , who weighs 220 pounds, fly it, a nd not only did he fit just fin e, but th e airplane didn't seem to care that much. "It couldn't be more docile. It's re­ ally a kiddy-car even though it has a tailskid and no brakes." C hris works for an airline in Chicago but lives in Brodhead, Wis­ consin, where he has a hangar. liMy goa l is to live between Brod­ head and Sonoma. I love the grass at Brodhead. Besides, I have a couple other projects I'm working on." The couple other projects" he 's talking about include an A" model Taylorcraft, a Szekely-pow­ ered C urti ss Junior (" ... an easy resto , ju st hav e to build a new wing"), an Eyerly Whiffle Hen (" .. . sold for one year, second airplane to use an A-40"), and a few others, all of which fit the common definition of "flivver"-small , light, and basi­ cally around-the-patch airplanes. "Yeah, I guess you really could say that [' m a flivver kind of guy," and he grins. Poor kid , h e ju st didn't have a chance. ....... II •••

II

VINTAGE AIRPLANE

19


CLUB LIST T HIS INFORMATION IS LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE - www.vintageaircraft.org - THROUGHTOUT THE YEAR . A NYTIME YOU HAVE CHANGES RELATED TO YOUR TYPE CLUB LIST , DROP A NOTE I N THE MAIL DETAILING YOUR LISTING (USE THE FORMAT YOU SEE ON TH I S PAGE ). SEND YOUR NOTE TO: EDITOR, VINTAGE AIRPLANE; VINTAGE AI RCRAFT ASSOCIATION, P.O. Box 3086; OSHKOSH , W I 5490 3 - 3 08 6. OR E-MAIL IT TO vintage@eaa.org

Fearless Aeronca Aviators (f-AA)

Bellanca Champion Club

Cessna Owner Organization

JOHN RODKEY 280 BIG SUR DR. GOLETA, CA 93117 805-968-1274 WEB : http://aeronca.westmont.edu DUES : CONTRIBUTE WITH WEB DISCUSSION NEWSLETTER: ELECTRONIC FORM ONLY

ROBERT SZEGO P.O . Box 100 COXSACKI E, NY 12051-0100 518-731-6800

P.O. B ox 500 0

International Aeronca Association

robert@bellanca-championclub.com WEB : www.be/lanca-championclub.com DUES: $33/YR-$63/2 YRS; FORE IGN $ 41 /1 YR- $68/2 YRS NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY B -C CONTACT!

lOLA, W I 54945 888-692-3776, EXT. 118 FAX : 7 15-4 45 -4053

help@cessnaowner.org www.cessnaowner.org

E-MAIL: WEB :

D UES : $44 PER YEAR MAGAZINE: M ONTHLY

Buzz WAGNER

Bird Airplane Club

Cessna Pilots Association

Box 3, 401 1ST STREET EAST

JEANN I E HILL P.O . B ox 328 HARVARD, I L 60033-0328 815-943-72 0 5 DUES : POSTAGE DONATION

JOHN FRANK

American Bonanza Society

WEB:

CLARK, SD 57225 605-532-3862 ; FAX: 605-532-1305 DUES : $20 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

National Aeronca Association JIM THOMPSON P.o . Box 2219 TERRE HAUTE, IN 47802-0219 812-232-1491 WEB :

www.aeroncapilots .com

DUES : $251YR US ; $35/YR CANADA; $45/YR FOREIGN ( US FUNDS) MAGAZINE: QUARTERLY

Beech T-34 Association DAN THOMAS, VICE PRESIDENT 751 CENTER DRIVE PALO ALTO, CA 94301 650-494-6900, EXT. 115 EVENINGS: 650-324-9075

mentor441@aol.com www.t-34.com

E-MAIL: WEB:

DUES: $50 FIRST YR. , $45 THEREAFTER NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

Twin Beech 18 Society STAGGERWING MUSEUM FOUNDATION P.o. Box 550 TULLAHOMA, TN 37388 931 - 455-1974 WEB : www.staggerwing.com DUES: $40 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

World Beechcraft Society WILLIAM J . ROB I NSON 500 S.E . EVERETT M ALL WAY, STE. A7 EVERETT, WA 982 0 8-8111 425-267-9235

bill@worldbeechcraft.com www.worldbeechcraft.com

E-MAIL: WEB :

DUES : $60/YR US; $75/YR . CANADA & M EXICO; $90 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER: B I-MONTHLY

20

FEBRUARY 2004

NANCY J OHNSON, EXEC . DIR P.O. Box 12888 WICHITA, KS 67277 316-345-1700; FAX: 316 - 945-17 10 E- MAIL: bonanza2@bonanza.org WEB : www.bonanza.org DUES : $50 PER YEAR + CHAPTER DUES MAGAZINE: MONTHLY

Classic Bonanza Association PAUL WHITESELL 6355 STINSON STREET P LANO, TX 750 93 972-380-5976

P.O . B ox 58 17 SANTA MARIA, CA 93456 805-922-2580; FAX: 805-922-7249

cpa@cessna.org www.cessna.org

E-MAIL:

DUES: $45 US, CANADA, M EXICO; $55 INTERNATIONAL

Cessna T-50 "Bamboo Bomber" JIM ANDERSON Box 269 SUNWOOD MARINE ON ST. CROIX, MN 55047 612 .433.3 0 24 FAX 612.433 . 5691 E-MA I L: jja@wrmed.com WEB:

www.cessnat50.org

D UES: CONTACT CLUB FOR I NFO NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

pwhitesell@commreps.com

Int'l Bird Dog Assn. (Cessna L-19/0-l)

WEB: www.classicbonanza.com DUES : $16 PER YEAR

JIM MULVIHILL

Twin Bonanza Association R ICHARD I. WARD, DIRECTOR 19684 LAKESHORE DRIVE THREE RIVERS, MI 49093 269-279-25 4 0 PHONE & FAX E- MA I L: forward@net-link.net WEB: www.twinbonanza.com $35/YR US & CANADA; $451YR FOREIGN NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Bucker Club GORDON CLEMENT 2225 PEACHFORD LANE LAWRENCEV ILLE, GA 3004 3 770-9 95-1 7 98 E-MAIL: db52002@aol.com DUES: $22 PER YEAR U .S. & CANADA, $27 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER: 6 PER YEAR

National Bucker Jungmiester Club ( A MERICAN TIGER CLUB) MRS . FRANK P RICE 300 ESTELLE RICE DRIVE MOODY, TX 7 6557 254-853-90 67

46 EAGLES NEST KERRVILLE , T X 78028 830-8 96-7604

N305AF@omniglobal.net www.I-19bowwow.com

E-MAIL: WEB:

DUES: $30 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY & WEB ACCESS

International Cessna 120/140 Assn. MAC & DONNA FORBES P.O. Box 83 0 092 RICHARDSON, T X 75083-0092

mcforbes@be/lsouth.net WEB:www.cessna120-140.org E-MAIL:

DUES: $251YR US , $35 FOREIGN (US FUNDS ) N EWSLETTER: MONTHLY

West Coast Cessna 120/140 Club CAL & CHERYL WESTRA 43 7 9 Hwy. 147 LAKE ALMANOR , CA 96137 530-284-7790 DUES: $20 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: BIMONTHLY


Cessna 150/152 Club

Culver PQ-14 Assoc.

ROYSON PARSONS P.O. Box 1917

TED HEINEMAN 29621 KENSINGTON DRIVE LAGUNA NIGUEL, CA 92677 949-495-4540

CAMERON PARK, CA 95682-1531

Ercoupe Owners Club

E-MAIL:

CAROLYN T. CARDEN , MEMBERSHIP P.O . Box 71 17 SHALOTTE, NC 28470-7117 VOICE/FAX 9 10-575-2758 E-MAIL: coupecaper@aol.com WEB : www.ercoupe.org DUES : $30/YR US $35 FOREIGN & CANADA (US FUNDS ) NEWSLETTER : MONTHLY

WEB:

ATASCADERO , CA 93423-1917 805-461-1958; FAX : 805-46 1-1035

E: membership@cessna150-152.com WEB: http://www.cessna150-152.com DUES: $30 US, CANADA, MEXICO; $40 ALL OTHERS NEWSLETTER: BI-MONTHLY

International Cessna 170 Association, Inc. VELVET FACKELDEY P.O. Box 1667 LEBANON, MO 65536 417 - 532-4847

headquarters@cessna170.org http://www.cessna170.org DUES : $35 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : FLYPAPER - MONTHLY MAGAZINE: THE 170 NEWS - QUARTERLY

Cessna 180/185 International Club ( OWNERSHIP REQUIRED) DAVE HAYDEN 21910 S. GARDNER ROAD SPRING H I LL, KS 66083 913-884-2187; FAX : 913-856-5941 E-MA I L: dave@kingsavionics.net DUES : $20 PER YEAR

Eastern 190/195 Association CLIFF CRABS 25575 BUTTERNUT RIDGE ROAD NORTH OLMSTED, OH 44070 440-777-4025

ccrabs@aol.com or classic195@aol.com DUES: $15 INITIAL, THEN AS REQUIRED NEWSLETTER: FOUR PER YEAR, APPROX.

Cessna 195 International Club BOB REISS , PRESIDENT 9493 LA JOLLA FARMS ROAD LA JOLLA, CA 92037 858- 457-5987; FAX: 858-552-8453 E-MAIL bobreiss@lajollafarms.com WEB: www.cessna195.org DUEs:$25 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Culver Aircraft Assoc. DAN NICHOLSON 723 BAKER DR. TOMBALL, TX 77375 281-351-0114 E-MAIL: dann@gie.com FOR NEWSLETTER AND DUES INFO CONTACT THE CLUB.

Culver Club LARRY Low 60 SKYWOOD WAY WOODSIDE, CA 94062 E-MAIL: Lawrence_low@hotmail.com WEB : www.aaa-apm.org DUES: $15/ THREE ISSUES NEWSLTR: CULVER'S GOING PLACES ( 3 ) 16 PG

Culver Dart Club LLOYD WASHBURN 2656 EAST SAND ROAD POINT CLINTON , OH 43452-2741 419-734-6685 E- MAIL: washlloydburn@cros.net

The American Yankee Association ( GRUMMAN) STEW WILSON P.O. B ox 1531 530-676-4292

sec@aya.org www.aya.org

DUES : $47.50 U .S., $50 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER : 6 PER YEAR

Canadian Harvard Aircraft Association GREG TYRELL, P RESIDENT P.O. Box 774 WOODSTOCK, ON CANADA N4S 8A2 5 1 9-633-0053

g . tyrell@sympatico .co www.chaa.ca/home.html

Ercoupe Owners Club-Wisconsin Wing

E-MAIL:

JUDI MATUSCAK

WEBSITE:

6262 BREVER ROAD BURLINGTON, WI 53105-8915 262 - 539-2495 E-MAIL: bjmatus@speeddial.net

DUES: $35/YR

Fairchild Club JOHN W. BERENDT, PRESIDENT 7645 ECHO POINT ROAD CANNON FALLS, MN 55009 507-263-24 14 E-MAIL: fchld@rconnect.com WEB: www.fairchildclub.com DUES: $15 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY - THE "ROAR"

American Hatz Association, Inc. CHUCK BROWNLOW, PRESIDENT 122 E. MAIN STREET, P.O. Box 10 WEYAUWEGA, WI 54983

brownlowod@aol.com www.hatzbiplanes.org

E-MAIL: WEB :

DUES: $20 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

Hatz Club BARRY TAYLOR

Fairchild Fan Club ROBERT TAYLOR P. O. Box 127 BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938 - 2773; FAX: 641-938-2093 E-MAIL: AintiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com WEB : www.aaa-apm.org DUES: $15/ THREE ISSUES NEWSLETTER: FAIRCHILD FAN (3) 16 PG .

P.O. Box 127 BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938-2773; FAX : 64 1-938-2093

AntiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com www.aaa-apm.org

E-MAIL: WEB :

DUES : $15/ THREE ISSUES NEWSLETTER: HATZ HERALD ( 3) 16 PG.

Heath Parasol Club International Fleet Club SANDY BROWN P. O . Box 511 MARLBOROUGH, CT 06447-0511 860-267-6562 E-MAIL: f1yboy@ntplx.net WEB: www.users .ntplx.netj-f1yboy DUES: CONTRIBUTIONS NEWSLETTER: 3-4 PER YEAR, APPROX.

Funk Aircraft Owners Association

WILLIAM SCHLAPMAN 6431 PAULSON ROAD WINNECONNE, WI 54986 920-582-4454

Howard Club E-MAIL: HowardClub@aol.com www.members.aol.com/HowardClub

Interstate Club

THAD SHELNUTT

BARRY TAYLOR

2836 CALIFORNIA Av. CARMICHAEL, CA 95608 916-971-3452 E-MAIL: pilotthad@aol.com

P.O. Box 127

WEB:

www.funkflyers.org

DUES: $12 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: 10 PER YEAR

Great Lakes Club

BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938-2773; FAX: 641-938-2093

AntiqueAirfield@serisonline.com www_aaa-apm.org

E-MAIL: WEB:

DUES: $15/ THREE ISSUES NEWSLETTER : INTERSTATE INTERCOM

BRENT TAYLOR , EDITOR

Luscombe Association

P. O. Box 127

STEVE AND SHARON KROG

BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938-2773 ; FAX : 641-938-2093

HARTFORD , WI 53027

1002 HEATHER LANE

E-MAIL: AntiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com WEB : www.aaa-apm.org

262-966-7627; FAX : 262-966-9627

DUES: $15/ THREE ISSUES

DUES: $25 U.S . & CANADA, $30 FOREIGN

NEWSLETTER: GREAT LAKES LOG (3) 16 PG

NEWSLETTER: 6 PER YEAR

E-MAIL:

sskrog@aol.com

VINTAGE AIRPLANE

21


Continental Luscombe Association

Navion Skies Type Club

Short Wing Piper Club, Inc

JIM & PATTI SANI , PRESIDENT & SECRETARY(TREASURER 10251 E. CENTRAL AVE. DEL REY, CA 93616 559-888-2745 E-MAIL: cla-jim-patti@pacbell.net WEB : http:// www.luscombe-cla.org DUES: U.S. $20 , CANADA $27 ( U .S . FUNDS), FORE IGN $35 ( u.s . FUNDS ) NEWSLETTER : 6 PER YEAR

RALEIGH MORROW P.O . Box 2678 LODI , CA 95241-2678 209-482-7754 E-MAIL: Navionl@inreach .com WEB: www.navionskies.com DUES: $45 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : MONTHLY, ALSO VIA E-MA I L

ELEANOR AND BOB MILLS, EDITORS 220 MAIN STREET HALSTEAD, KS 67056 316-835-3650 FAX: 316-835-3357 E-MAIL: membership@shortwing.org WEB: www.shortwing.org DUES: $30 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: BIMONTHLY

Meyers Aircraft Owners Association WILLIAM E. GAFFNEY, SECRETARY 24 RT . 17K NEWBURGH , NY 12550 845-565-8005; FAX: 845-565-8039 DUES : POSTAGE FUND DONATION NEWSLETTER : 5-6 PER YEAR

Monocoupe Club FRANK & CAROL KERNER 1218 KINGSTOWNE PLACE ST. CHAR LES, MO 63304-7776 636 - 939- 3322 E-MAIL: fwkerner@spcglobal .net WEB: www.monocoupe.com DUES: $25 NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Mooney Aircraft Pilots Association 140 HEIMER RD ., SUITE 560 SAN ANTONIO , TX 78232 210-525-8008 ; FAX: 210-525-8085 E- MAIL: mapa@mooneypilots.com WEB: www.mooneypilots.com DUES : $44 . 50 US , $49 .50 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER : MONTHLY

Brodhead Pietenpol Association DON CAMPBELL 221 N . LASALLE ST , STE 3 11 7 CHICAGO , IL 60601 WEB: www.pietenpol.org DUES: $16 PER YEAR US NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

International Pietenpol Association ROBERT TAYLOR P. O. Box 127 BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938-2773 ; FAX 641-938-2093

AntiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com WEB : www.aaa-apm.org DUES: $151 THREE ISSUES NEWSLETTER : IPA NEWS (3) 16 PG.

Cherokee Pilots Assoc. P. O . Box 1996 LUTZ, FL 33549 813-948-3616 OR 800-292 - 6003 E-MAIL: terry@piperowner.com WEB: www.piperowner.com DUES : $34 .00 U.S., $36 .00 CANADA & MEXICO, $44.00 FOREIGN MAGAZINE: 1 1 ISSUES PER YEAR

Supercub.org-Home of all things PAIS STEVE JOHNSON 953 S. SHORE DRIVE LAKE WAUKOMIS, MO 64151 816-741-1486; FAX: 816-741-5212 E-MAIL: steve@supercub.org WEB: www.supercub.org DUES : DONATIONS

Porterfield Airplane Club CHUCK LEBRECHT 91 HICKORY Loop OCALA, FL 34472 352-687-4859 DUES: $5 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

Rearwin Club ROBERT TAYLOR, EDITOR P.O . Box 127 BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938-2773; FAX 641-938-2093 E-MAIL: AntiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com WEB: www.aaa-apm.org DUES: $151 THREE ISSUES NEWSLETTER: REARWIN REGISTER

Cub Club Western Association of Mooney Mites (WAMM) WM . L . VANDERSANDE 100 S. WESTWOOD ST. #2 PORTEVILLE, CA 93257 - 7704 559-782-1980 E-MAIL: t35f1yer@sosinet.net WEB : www.mooneymite.com DUES: NONE NEWSLETTER: VIA E-MA I L

Parrakeet Pilot Club BARRY TAYLOR, EDITOR P.O. Box 127 BLAKESBURG, IA 52536 641-938-2773; FAX: 641-938-2093 WEB : www.aaa-apm.org DUES : $151 THREE ISSUES NEWSLTR : THE PARRAKEET PILOT (3) 16 PGS .

STEVE AND SHARON KROG 1002 HEATHER LANE HARTFORD, WI 53027 262-966-7627; FAX : 262-966-9627 E-MAIL: sskrog@aol.com WEB : www.cub-club.com/home.htm DUES : $25 U.S.!CANADA, $30 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER : 6 PER YEAR

Flying Apache Assoc. (Piper) JOHN J . LUMLEY 6778 SKYLINE DRIVE DE LRAY BEACH, FL 33446 561-499-1115 FAX : 561-495-7311 E-MAIL: mailto:flyingapache@cs.com DUES: $25 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

International Comanche Society N3N Restorers Association H. RONALD KEMPKA 2380 COUNTRY ROAD #217 CHEYENNE, WY 82009 307-638-2210 E-MAIL: wyn3n@aol.com DUES: $20 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

GAYNOR EKMAN 5604 PHILLIPS J. RHOADS AvE . , HANGAR 3 BETHANY, OK 73008 405-491-0321; FAX 405-491-0325 E-MAIL: icsadmin@sbcglobal.net WEB : www.comancheflyer.com DUES: $64 1 ST YEAR, THEN $60 NEWSLETTER: MONTHLY

American Navion Society

Piper Owner Society

16420 SE MCGILLIVRAY #103 VANCOUVER, WA 98683-3461 360-833-9921 , FAX: 360-833-1074 E-MAIL: Flynavion@yahoo .com WEB : www.navionsociety.org DUES: $50 IYR US, $54 CANADA, $64 FOREIGN (US FUNDS) NEWSLETTER: PERIODIC

P.O . Box 5000 lOLA, WI 54945 866-697-4737; 866-MYPIPER FAX: 715-445-4053 E-MAIL: help@piperowner.org WEB : www.piperowner.org DUES: $44 PER YEAR MAGAZINE: MONTHLY

22

FEBRUARY 2004

International Ryan Club BILL HODGES, EDITOR AND HISTORIAN 19 STONEYBROOK LN. SEARCY, AR 72143-6129 501-268-9875 E-MAIL : recruit@cswnet.com DUES : $25 PER YEAR, $30 CANADA & OVERSEAS AIRMAIL NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

1-26 Association (Schweizer) JAMES PHOENIX 6815 185TH AvE. E BONNEY LAKE, WA 98390 203-894-8582 E- MAIL: jphoenix13@comcast.net WEB : www.126association.org DUES: $15 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: 6 PER YEAR (PLUS DIRECTORY )

Staggerwing Club JIM GORMAN, PRESIDENT P.O . Box 202 COLUMBIANA, OH 44408 419-529-3822 E-MAIL: sayork@csi.com (STAN YORK ) DUES: $251YR US $30 FOREIGN (US FUNDS)

Stearman Restorers Association 7000 MERRILL AvE., Box 90 CHINO AIRPORT CHINO, CA 91710-8800 WEB: www.stearman.net DUES: $351YR US, $40 CANADA & MEXICO, $45 FOREIGN ( US FUNDS) NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY


International Stinson Club

Travel Air Club

National Biplane Association

TONY WRIGHT

ROBERT TAYLOR, EDITOR

CHARLES W. HARRIS

2264 Los ROBLES ROAD

P. O. Box 127

MEADOW VISTA, CA 95722

BLAKESBURG, IA 52536

P.O. Box 470350 TULSA, OK 74147-0350 918-622-8400; FAX: 918-665-0039 E-MAIL: cwh@hvsu.com WEB : www.nationalbiplaneassn.org WEB: www.biplaneexpo.com DUES : $25 INDIVIDUAL; $40 FAMILY; ADD $10 FOREIGN MAGAZINE: QUARTERLY

520-878-0219

stinson2@juno.com www.aeromar.com/swsc.html

641-938-2773; FAX: 641-938-2093

AntiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com www.aaa-apm.org

E-MAIL:

E- MAl L:

WEB:

WEB :

DUES: $25 PER YEAR

DUES: $15/ THREE ISSUES

NEWSLETTER : 11 PER YEAR

NEWSLETTER : TRAVEL AIR TAILS (3) 16 PG.

National Stinson Club

Travel Air Restorers Association (TARA)

GEORGE ALLEMAN

JERRY IMPELLEZZERI

North American Trainer Association

1229 RISING HILL ROAD WEST

4925 WILMA WAY

PLACERVILLE , CA 95667

SAN JOSE, CA 95124

PHONE & FAX : 530-622-4004

408-356-3407

(T6, T28, NA64, NA50, P51 , B25) KATHY & STONEY STONICH 25801 NE H I NNESS ROAD BRUSH PRAIRIE, WA 98606 360-256-0066; FAX: 360-896-5398 E-MAIL: NATrainer@aol.com

E-MAIL:

nscgeorge@internet49.com

DUES : $20 US & CANADA ; $25 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER: 4 PER YEAR

clear_prop2003@yahoo.com www.travelair.org

E-MAIL : WEB:

DUES: $15 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

Stinson Historical and Restoration Society ( STINSON 108, ANTIQUE AIRPLANE ASSN.)

Travel Air Div. of Staggerwing Museum Foundation, Inc.

ROBERT TAYLOR

LORRAINE CARTER

P.O . Box 127

P. O. Box 550

BLAKESBURG, IA 52536

TULLAHOMA, TN 37388

641-938-2773; FAX: 641-938-2093

931-455-1974 ; FAX : 931-455-1994

AntiqueAirfield@sirisonline.com www.aaa-apm.org

E-MAIL:

E-MAIL:

WEB:

WEB :

Staggerwing@bellsouth.net www.staggerwing.com

DUES: $15/ THREE ISSUES

DUES: $40 PER YEAR

NEWSLETTER : SHARS

NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Swift AssociationlSwift Museum Fdn., Inc. CHARLIE NELSON P. O. Box 644 ATHENS , TN 37371 423-745-9547 ; FAX : 423-745-9869

swiftlychs@aol.com www.swiftparts.com www.globetimcoswift.com

E-MAIL: WEB: OR

DUES: $30 PER YEAR

American Waco Club PHIL COULSON 2815 SPRINGBROOK DR . LAWTON, M I 49065

MARK KADRACH 2836 AUTUMN ESTATES SAN HOSE , CA 95135 408-259-9971 E-MAIL: starwizz@pacbell.net WEB: www.napanet.net/-arbeau/swift DUES: $15 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: MONTHLY

Taylorcraft Owner's Club BRUCE BIXLER , " 12809 GREEN BOWER, N.E. ALLIANCE, OH 44601 330-823-9748 E-MAIL: tocprez@yahoo.com WEB: www.taylorcraft.org DUES : $12 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

rcoulson516@cs.com www.americanwacoclub.com

E-MAIL: WEB:

TOM PITTMAN RT. 6 Box 189 APPOMATOX, VA 24522 434-352-5128 E-MAIL: vctoc6@juno.com WEB : www.vctoc.org DUES: $10 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

ASA DEAN 16216 N 34TH WAY PHOENIX, AZ 85032-3119 CELL: 602-622-8335

asa@taildraggerclub.org www.taildraggerclub.org/tdc

E-MAIL:

WWI Aeroplanes, Inc. LEONARD OPDYCKE 15 CRESCENT ROAD POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 845-473-3679 JOURNALS WWI AERO AND SKYWAYS PER QRTRLY JOURNAL $35IYR, $40 FOREIGN

ORGANIZATIONS

DUES: $35 PER YEAR, $45 FOREIGN

American Aviation Historical Society

NEWSLETTER : B I-MONTHLY

BRUCE CUNNINGHAM 2333 OTIS STREET SANTA ANA, CA 92704 714-549-4818 ; FAX : 714-549-3657 E-MAIL: pres@aahs-online.org

National Waco Club ANDY HEINS 2241 EQu ESTR IAN DR . 1 A MIAMISBURG, OH 45342 937 - 312 - 0291 E-MAIL:

wacoaso@aol.com

WEBSITE : www.aahs.online.org DUES: $39 US, $44 CANADA & MEXICO, $57 FOREIGN (U.S. FUNDS) NEWSLETTER & JOURNAL: QUARTERLY

DUES: $20 PER YEAR, $25 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER: BIMONTHLY

Cross & Cockade

Western Waco Association

BOB SHELDON, SECRETARY 14329 S. CALHOUN AVE . BURNHAM, IL 60633 708-862-1014

BARRY F. BRANIN 1790 PANAY CIRCLE COSTA MESA , CA 92626 714-920-9226 E-MAIL:

flywaco@juno .com

Du ES : $5 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: OCCASIONAL

MULTIPLE AIRCRAFTORGANIZATION S

Virginia/Carolinas Taylorcraft Owner's Club

Taildragger Club

269-624-6490

NEWSLETTER : MONTHLY

West Coast Swift Wing

WEBSITE : www.NorthAmericanTrainer.org DUES: $45 US & CANADA; $55 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY, "NATA SKYLINES"

Du ES: $15 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : EVERY OTHER MONTH

Eastern Reg. U.S. Air Racing Assoc. JACK DIANISKA, PRESIDENT 26726 HENRY ROAD BAY VILLAGE, OH 44140 440-871-3781 E-MAIL: svcs@aol.com

Florida Antique Biplane Assoc., Inc.

Flying Farmers, International

LARRY ROBINSON 10906 DENOEU ROAD

P.O. Box 9124 WICHITA KS 67277-0124 316-943-4234; FAX: 800-266-5415 E-MAIL: support@flyingfarmers.org WEB: www.flyingfarmers.org DUES : $60/YR MAGAZINES : 6 MAGAZINES PER YEAR

BOYNTON BEACH, FL 33437 561-732-3250; FAX 561-732-2532 E-MAIL:

BeyeView@aol.com

DUES : $48 YEAR THE FLYING WIRE NEWSLETTER

VINTAGE A IRPLANE

23


Flying Octogenarians HERBERT SLOANE P.O. Box 11114 MONTGOMERY, AL 36111-0114 334-832-2413 E-MAIL: pilotherb@yahoo.com DUES : $12 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : 6 PER YEAR

International Wheelchair Aviators p.o. Box 2799 BIG BEAR CITY, CA 92314 909-585-9663 FAX : 909-585-7156 E-MAIL: iwaviators@aol.com WEB : www.wheelchairaviators.org

International Women in Aviation Deaf Pilots Association CLYDE SMITH 1553 GRAVEL SPRINGS CIRCLE JACKSONVILLE, IL 62650 E-MAIL: clymar@csj.net WEB : www.deafpilots.org DUES : $30 PER YEAR, ACTIVE PILOTS NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY

Int'l Fellowship of Flying Rotarians TOM SUROWKA, WORLD SEcfTREAS. 203A RUBENS DRIVE NOM IS, FL 34275-4211 941-966-6636; FAX: 941-966-9141 E-MAIL: surowka@iffr.org WEBSITE : www.iffr.org

International Uaison Pilot &Aircraft Assoc. BILL STRATTON 16518 LEDGESTONE SAN ANTONIO, TX 78332-2406 210-490-4572 VOicE/FAx E-MAIL: ILPA@STlC.NET

www.centercomp.com/ILPA/index.html DUES: $29/YR US; $35 FOREIGN NEWSLETTER: "LIAISON SPOKEN HERE"

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FEBRUARY 2004

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Seaplane Pilots Association MICHAEL VOLK 4315 HIGHLAND PARK BLVD , SUITE C LAKELAND, FL 33813 863 - 701 - 7979; FAX : 863-701-7588 E- MAIL: spa@seaplanes.org WEBSITE: www.seaplanes.org DUES : $40 PER YEAR MAGAZINE : BI-MONTHLY

Lake Amphibian Flyers Club

Sentimental Journey to Cub Haven, Inc.

MARK & JILL RODSTE IN 7188 MANDARIN DRIVE BOCA RATON, FL 33433-7412 561-483-6566 ; FAX: 561 - 892-3128 E- MAIL: info@lakeflyers.com DUES : $58 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : 6 PER YEAR"

JOHN L. BUCHAN , FLY - IN DIRECTOR P. O. Box J - 3 LOCK HAVEN, PA 17745-0496 570- 893-4200 FAX 570-893-4218 E-MAIL: Piper@cub.kcnet.org

National Air Racing Group BETTY SHERMAN 1932 MAHAN AVENUE RICHLAND , WA 99352-2121 509- 946-5690 E-MA IL: betty.sherman@verizon.net WEBSITE: www.warbirdaeropress.com DUES : $15 US/$20 OUTSIDE US NEWSLETTER : MONTHLY

www.pipermuseum.com DUES: $10 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Silver Wings Fraternity P.O. Box 44208 CINCINNATI, OH 45244 800-554-1437 E-MAIL: cardinaI5@msn.com WEBSITE : www.silverwings.org DUES : $20/1 ST YEAR, $10 RENEW NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Society of Air Racing Historians

MEL HEMANN 127 KASPEND PLACE CEDAR FALLS, IA 50613-1683 319-266-3889 E-MAIL: n298mh@cfu.net DUES : $20 NEWSLETTER: 6 PER YEAR

HERMAN SCHAUB 168 MAR ION LANE BEREA, OH 44017 440- 234-2301 E- MAIL: herman@airrace.com WEBSITE : www.airrace.com DUES : $20/YR US - $23 OTHER S NEWSLETTER : BI-MONTHLY

The 99's Women Pilots

Taylorcraft Foundation, Inc.

4300 AMELIA EARHART ROAD OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73159 800-994-1929 ; FAX: 405-685-7985 E-MAIL: IHQ99s@CS. COM WEB: www.ninety-nines.org DUES: $65 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER: BI-MONTHLY

FORREST A. BARBER , EXEC . DIR . 13820 UN ION AVE . NE ALLIANCE, OH 44601-9378 330-823-1168 ; FAX : 330-823 - 1138 E-MAIL: fbarber@alliancelink.com WEBSITE: www.taylorcraft.org DUES : $10 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTER LY

ox-s Aviation Pioneers ELMER H. HANSEN , NAT'L SECRETARY 12220 N.E. 39TH STR EET BELLEVUE, WA 98005-1217 425-885-0299 E-MAIL: elmer.hansen@verizon.net WEB : www.ox5pioneers.org DUES: $20 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : 6 PER YEAR

Piper Aviation Museum Foundation • Stores multiple aircraft profiles

1528 S. KOELLER , PMB 111 OSHKO SH, WI 54902 E-MAIL: president@replicafighters.org WEBSITE : www.replicafighters.org DUES : $25/ YR, $30 FOREIGN ( US FUNDS ) NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

DR. PEGGY J . CHABRIAN 101 CORSAIR DRIVE DAYTONA BEACH, FL 32114 386-226-7996 ; FAX : 386-226-7998 WEBSITE : www.wai.org DUES : $39 PER YEAR - $29 STUDENTS MAGAZINE: BI-MONTHLY

National Association of Priest Pilots

EAA Flight Planner™

Replica Fighters Association

DAN SHOWAN ONE PIPER WAY LOCK HAVEN , PA 17745-0052 570-748-8283 FAX: 570-893-8357 E-MAIL: piper@cub.kcnet.org WEBSITE: www.pipermuseum.com DUES: $30 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Vintage Sailplane Association DAVID SCHUUR 1709 BARON COURT DAYTONA BEACH , FL 32128 E-MAIL: dschuur@frtci.net WEB : www.vintagesailplane.org DUES: $15 PER YEAR NEWSLETTER : QUARTERLY

Waco Historical Society, Inc. WACO AIR CRAFT MUS EUM MARLA BOONE, DIR . OF MEMBERSH I P P. O. Box 62 TR OY, OH 45373-0062 937 - 335- WACO E-MAI L: mSimonboone@yahoo.com WEB : www.wacoairmuseum.org 1-5PM SAT.-SUN ., MAy-OCTOBER DUES : $20/YR AND UP . ...... NEWSLETTER: QUARTERLY


FLY-IN CALENDAR

or j.~~~g!~-'-~ ..

"I..,NEWMAN

"f

The following list of coming events is furnished to our readers as a matter of information only and does not constitute approval, sponsorship, involvement, control or direction ofany event (fly­ in, seminars, fl y market, etc.) listed. To submit an event, please log on to www.eaa .org/events/ events .asp . Only if Internet access is unavailable should you send the information via mail to:, Att: Vintage Airplane, P.O. Box 3086, Oshkosh, WI 54903-3086. Information should be received four months prior to the event date.

FEBRUARY 7-Tampa, FL-TGI­

FLYIN "The Aerospace Rendz" Gasparilla Airport aka Peter O. Knight Airport. MAY 7-9-Burlington, NC-VAA Ch. 3 Annual Spring Fly-In, Ala­ mance County Airport (BUY). All Classes welcome. Info: Jim 843-753-7138 or eiwilson@homeexpressway.net

MAY 16--Romeoville, IL-33rd

Annual EAA Ch. 15 Fly-In Breakfast, 7am-Noon, Lewis University Airport (LOT). Adults $5, under twelve $3 . Info: 630­ 243-8213 JUNE 4-5-Bartlesville, OK-18th Annual Biplane Expo. All air­ craft and airplane enthusiasts are welcome. Static displays, forums, seminars, & exhibits. Info: Charlie Harris 918­ 622-8400. JUNE 4-6--Columbia, CA-Bel­ lanca-Champion Club West Coast Fly-In, (022). Camping, hotel/motel facilities, Friday BBQ Saturday steak dinner/ mtg. Advance registration strongly encouraged. Info: 518-731-6800, Robert@bellanca-championclub.com or www.bellanca-championcJub.com.

JUNE S-6--Washington, lA-Fly Iowa 2004 & Diamond An­

niversary of D-Day, usa Show-Dance Evening of 5th. All aircraft welcome. Info:www·flyiowa2004.com

JUNE 11-I3-Gainesville, TX­

Texas Ch. Antique Airplane Association 41st Annual Fly­ In, Gainesville Municipal Airport (GLE). Info: Jim 817­ 468-1571.

JUNE 16-19-Lock Haven, PA-19th

Annual Sentimental Journey to Cub Haven 2004. Fly in, drive in, camp. Info: 570-893-4200 or j2cub@kcnet.org .

July 27-August 2-EAA AirVenture

Oshkosh (KOSH) www.airventure.org

AUGUST 13-15-Alliance, OH-6th

Annual Ohio Aeronca Aviators Fly-In, Alliance-Barber Airport (201). Breakfast Sat & Sun. 7­ llam by EAA Ch. 82. Primitive camping on field, local lodging available. All welcome. Info: 216­ 337-5643, bwmatzllac@yahoo.com, or www.oaafly-in.com.

SEPTEMBER 4-Marion, IN-14th

Annual Fly-In Cruise-In, Marion Municipal Airport. Event fea­ tures antique, classic, contemporary, homebuilt, ultralight, & warbird aircraft and vintage cars, trucks, motorcycles, and tractors. Pancake Breakfast. Info: rayjohnson@FlylnCruiseln.com or

JUNE 28-27

Rocky Mountain fAA Regional Fly-In l ongmont, CO (2V2) www.rmrfi.org

JUlY 7-11 Northwest EAA Fly-In Arlington, WA (AWO) www.nweaa.org

JULY 27-AUGUST 2 EM AirVenture Oshkosh Oshkosh, WI (OSH) www.airventure.org

AUGUST 27-29 Mid-Eastern EAA Fly-In Marion, OH (MNN) www.eaa.org/ communications/ eaanews/ 030522_merfi.html

SEP1t:MBER 18-19 Virginia State EAA Fly-In Petersburg, VA (PTB) www.vaeaa.org

OCTOBER 1-3 Southeast EAA Regional Fly-In Evergreen, AL (GZH) www.serfi.org

OCTOBER 7-10 Copperstate EAA Regional Fly-In Phoenix, AZ (A39) www.copperstate.org

EAA VINTAGE

AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION

www.FlylnCruiseIn.com

SEPTEMBER I S-Bartlesville, OK­

48th Annual Tulsa Regional Fly-In. Info: Charlie Harris 918­ 622-8400. OCTOBER 1-3-Pottstown, PA-Bel­ lanca-Champion Club East Coast Fly-In, Pottstown Munici­ pal Airport (N47). Info: 518-731-6800, Robert@bellanca-championcJub.com, or www.bellanca-championcJub.com.

OCTOBER 2-3-Midland, TX-AIR­

SHO 2004, Midland Int'l Airport, Commemorative Air Force HQ. Info: 432-563-1000, est. 2231 or publicrelations@cafhq·org.

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NICK REZICH

continued from page 5

to Rockford, Ill inois, just as EAA share his love of aviation with had done with its fly-in. In Rock­ young people. One of the young­ ford, he flew for many years for the sters he helped was his son, Jim , Atwood Vacuum Machine Co. Over who would solo a J-3 at age 16, and the co u rse of his career h e flew move on to both A&P/IA and ATP ratings. Under his father's tutelage, nearly 35,000 accident-free hours. He loved t o fly for fun, and to he soloed the family Travel Air 0­ . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - , 4000. Nick helped found EAA's Antique/Classic division in the 1970s, served as its first treasurer, and wrote a monthly column , "Reminiscing With Big Nick," for the magazine. Nick per­ The second airplane owned by the brothers was this ox- formed ro les at EAA 5 powered Travel Air 2000, NC661H. Frank's in the continuously from cockpit. The silver with red trim airplane was bought for 1956 until the early $400 in Washington, D.C., by Mike, and sold in 1942 to '80s, when throat the U.S. Navy for use as a training airplane for mechan- cancer finally qui­ ics. WhentheNavy wasdonewithit,theyputitona eted the "Voice of barge and pushed it overboard into Lake Michigan. EAA" in 1981. . . . .

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FEBRUARY 2004

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VAA NEWS continued from page 2

early 2004, with a final approved AC available as early as the end of 2004.

Decals A couple of our members are searching for art­ work and/or decals to help add finishing touches to their restorations. The first is the older Sensenich Brothers logo that features the initials S. B., a circle, and a pair of wings. It was used on early Sensenich propellers prior to World War II. The second logo would, at first glance, seem like a simple request, but the artwork is proving to be elu­ sive. On pre-war Aeronca airplanes like the C-3, a full-color Aeronca winged logo decal was applied to the vertical fin. There have been a few variations of the artwork, but the one our fellow restorer cur­ rently needs is the one used on the C-3, which has a white background with red and blue highlights added over the white. The red has a decidedly "air­ brushed" look to it. If you can help us with the artwork and/or de­ cals (not stickers) for either of these two items, call us at VAA headquarters, 920-426-4825 or e-mail us at vintage@eaa.01g.

Calendar of Events If you have a fly-in you'd like included in the

Vintage Airplane Calendar of Events, please email a notice of it to us at vintage@eaa.org. You can also fax it to us at 920-426-6865. No phone calls, please. Due to the sheer vol­ ume of items sent, we ask that you please include the following information, in this order: Date, location (city/state), airport name and identifier, event name, a short description of the event, and contact information (including fax, e­ mail, and phone numbers, as appropriate). All items sent to us for use in the Vintage Air­ plane Calendar of Events will be included in the calendar published within the VAA website at

www.vintageaircra{t.org. If you'd like your event to be added to the EAA website Calendar of Events, you can do so at www.eaa.org/events. To be published in both EAA and VAA locations, a message must be sent to VAA as noted above, as well as being entered on the EAA website. Due to space limitations, only EAA Chapter events can be listed in the EAA Sport Aviation Cal­ endar of Events.

'~?

g TM

NEW MEMBERS

Phillip Usher .............. Concord West Sydney, Australia

Clarence Olsen .................... Air Ronge, SK, Canada

Stephen P. Taylor ............ Crediton, Devon, Great Britain

Wayne Affleck .................. Invercargill, New Zealand

Vincent Ashley ......... .. ... .. .. ...... .... Glendale, AZ

Donald Snyder ....... .. . .. . ..... . ........... Tucson, AZ

Ken Hawes . ........... .... ..... ..... Shingle Springs, CA

Steven A. Kairys ............................. Encino, CA

John Norberg ........................... Long Beach, CA

Thomas Reeves . . ... . ..... .... ............. San Jose, CA

Richard A. Rezabek .. . ............... Canyon Country, CA

Bill Silzle ...... .... .. ........... San Juan Capistrano, CA

Mark Sundermeyer ....... .... ........ Rancho Murieta, CA

Stephen Young ............ .. ......... ...... Weston, CT

Jeffrey M. Vadakin ..... .. .. ........ . ... . ...... Dover, DE

John D. Neff ... ........ . .... . ..... ...... . .. . Venice, FL

Joe Papasso ....... ... ........ .. .. ...... . Lake Worth, FL

Ronald J. Williams ................. . ......... Tucker, GA

Dana Greeno .... ............................. Salix, IA

Van J. Winegarden ...................... Cedar Rapids, IA

Jay Akely ............................. Garden Prairie, IL

Erick J. Runge ..... ... ...... ... . ......... Sugar Grove, IL

Ginger Gordon............................. Hanover, IN

Joe Nania ............. . ...... ... . . . . .. .. Mishawaka, IN

John J. Stroud .......................... Indianapolis, IN

John A. Cramer .......... . ............... Covington, LA

Daniel E. Marino . .. ......... ...... ...... .... Carver, MA

Walter C. Smythe ....... ................... Standish, ME

Yankee Air Force Library .................... Belleville, MI

Randy C. Rentz ..... ... ...... . . ... ............ Niles, MI

Mark W. Staudacher ........................ Bay City, MI

Stephen D. Halby . .. ...... ... . ... . . .... Minneapolis, MN

George Alexander .... .. ..... .... . ...... Chesterfield, MO

Robert Liebe ....... . ......... . . ........ Chesterfield, MO

Russell H. Olsen ..... ... ................... Kalispell, MT

C raig Craft ............................... Hertford, NC

Eugene Kearns ............................ Reidsville, NC

Charlie Wayne Kiser ........ .. .. . . ...... Wi limington, NC

Joseph Robbins .......... ................. Reidsville, NC

Kenny Welch .......... . .... ..... .... ..... Concord, NC

Michael R. Juliano ......... . ............. Queensbury, NY

Arthur G. Kollen ......................... Levittown, NY

Terry Brown . . . . .. ....... . .. . ... . ...... . .... Eaton, OH

Dr. Richard S. Cremisio .................... Hamilton, OH

Peter L. DiRenzo ......................... Gates Mills, OH

George T. Gilby ...................... North Olmsted, OH

John Beattie .............................. Norman, OK

Marshall Settle ........................... Chickasha, OK

John W. Cox .. . ....................... Lake Oswego, OR

David A. Folker .................... ... Cranberry TWP, PA

Earl M. Yerrick ........ ...... .. . . ...... .... Columbia, SC

James Woodward ..... .... .. .......... Hendersonville, TN

George Bryant ........... .... .... ....... . Gainesville, TX

Robert DeShazer .......................... ... Spring, TX

Dennis L. Mioduski . ............... . ......... Schertz, TX

Roy Scott. .............. .... . ... ... .... San Antonio, TX

Shelly Tumbleson ... . . ........... .. .. . . . San Antonio, TX

Carol D. Yocum...... . .......... ..... ...... Leesburg, VA

Oistein Andresen .............. .. ........ Gig Harbor, WA

Gary L. Fasnacht ....... . ..... ............. Olympia, WA

James H. Ylvisaker ............................ Kelso, WA

PatrickJ. Finan ..................... Port Washington, WI

Gary Gritt ....... ... . . .... ... ....... Sheboygan Falls, WI

Allan Janes ................... .. ........... . Berlin, WI

Douglas Lanz ....... . . .. ... . ............ Turtle Lake, WI

Mark R. Schultze ......... . ..... ..... ..... Cedarburg, WI

Anthony J. Van Kampen . ...... . . .... .... New London, WI

VINTAGE AIRPLANE

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Classified Word Ads : $5.50 per 10 words , 180 words maximum, with boldface lead-in on first line. Classified Display Ads: One column wide (2 .187 inches) by 1, 2, or 3 inches high at $20 per inch. Black and white only, and no fre ­ quency discounts. Advertising Closing Dates: 10th of second month prior to desired issue date ~.e. , January 10 is the closing date for the March issue). VAA re­ serves the right to reject any advertising in conflict with its policies. Rates cover one insertion per is­ sue. Classified ads are not accepted via phone. Payment must accompany order. Word ads may be sent via fax (920-426-4828) or e-mail (c1as­ sads@eaa.org) using credit card payment (all cards accepted). Include name on card , complete ad­ dress, type of card , card number, and expiration date. Make checks payable to EM. Address ad­ vertising correspondence to EAA Publications Classified Ad Manager, P.O. Box 3086, Oshkosh, WI 54903-3086 BABBITT BEARING SERVICE - rod bearings, main bearings, bushings, master rods, valves, piston rings. Call us Toll Free 1/800/233-6934, e-mail ramremfg@ao/.com Website www.ramengine.com VINTAGE ENGINE MACHINE WORKS, N. 604 FREYA ST., SPOKANE, WA 99202. Airplane T-Shirts

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WORKSHOPS

---~---

1-800-WORKSHOP 1-800-967-5746

YOU CAN BUILD IT! LET EAA TEACH YOU HOW. 28

FEBRUARY 2004

TOMMY COME HOMEI EAA Chapter 811 is looking for a Thomas Morse Scout to bring home to where it was made, in Ithaca, NY. Please send any leads (and an indication of condition) to David Flinn, 866 Ridge Rd ., Lansing, NY 14882-8603, email Dave@starflinn.com


Membership Services VINTAGE

AIRCRAFT ENJOY THE MANY BENEFITS OF EAA AND THE EAA VINTAGE AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION ,A SSOCIATION

Directory-

~

EAA Aviation Center, PO Box 3086, Oshkosh WI 54903-3086

OFFICERS President

Vice-President

Espie 'Butch' Joyce 704 N. Regional Rd. Greensboro, NC 27409 336-668-3650 windsock@aol.eom

2448 Lough lane Hartford, WI 53027 262-673-5885

S<cretary

Steve Nesse 2009 Highland Ave. Albert Lea, MN 56007 507-373-1674

stnes@deskmedia.com

George Daubner

vaaflyboy@msn.com

Treasurer Charles W. Harris 7215 East 46th SI. Tulsa, OK 74147 9 18-622-8400

cwh@hv5u.com

DIRECTORS 85 Brush Hill Road Sherborn, MA 01770 508-653-7557

Dale A. Gustafson 7724 Shady Hills Dr. Indianapolis, IN 46278 317-293-4430

sstlO@comcast.net

dalefaye@msn.com

David Bennett P.O. Box 1188 Roseville, CA 95678 916-645-8370

Jeannie Hill P.o. Box 328 Harvard, IL 60033-0328 815-943-7205

antiquer@inreach.com

dinghao@owc.net

John Berendt 7645 Echo Point Rd. Cannon Falls, MN 55009 507-263-24 14 fchld@roonnect.com

1002 Heather Ln.

Hartford, WI 53027

262-966-7627

sskrog@aol.com

Robert C. "Bob" Brauer 9345 S. H0J3:;e Chicago, It 20 773-779-2105 photopilot@aoLcom

Robert D. "Bob" Lumley 1265 South 124th St. Brookfield, WI 53005 262-782-2633 lumper@execpc.eorn

Dave Clark

Gene Morris 5936 Steve Court Roanoke, TX 76262 8 17-49 1-9 110 n03capt@nash.net

Steve Bender

Phone (920) 426-4800 Fax (920) 426-4873 E-Mail: vintage @ eaa.org Web Site: http://www.eaa.org and http://www.airtJenture.org

Steve Krog

EAA and Division Membership Services 800-843-3612 ___ .. . ...... . FAX 920-426-6761 (8:00 AM-7:00 PM Monday-Friday CSn • New/ renew memberships: EAA, Divisions (Vintage Aircraft Association, lAC, Warbirds), National Association of Hight Instructors (NAFI) • Address changes • Merchandise sales • Gift m emberships

Programs and Activities EAA AirVenture Fax-On-Demand Directory · ......... ........ ...... ___ . 732-885-67 11 Auto Fuel STCs ............. __ 920-426-4843 Build/restore information ... _. _920-426-4821 Chapters: locating/ organizing _. 920-426-4876 Education . _. . ...... . . . ...... 920-426-6815 • EAA Air Academy • EAA Scholarships

EAA

Dean Richardson

North~~~~~4~t5 01532

1429 KingsvV;nn Rd Stoughton, 53589 608-877-8485

copelandl@juno.com

dar@aprilaire.com

VINTAGE AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION

PhU Coulson 284 I 5 Springbrook Dr. lawton, MI 49065 269-624-6490

rcoulsonSl6@cs.com

Geoff Robison 1521 E. MacGregor Dr. New Haven, IN 46774 260-493-4724 chiel7025@aol.com

Roger GomoU 8891 Airport Rd, Box C2 Blaine, MN 55449 763-786-3342 pledgedrive@msncom

S.H. "'Wes" Schmid 2359 Lefeber Avenue Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-771-1545 shschmid@milwpc.eom

John S. Copeland IA Deacon Street

Gene Chase 2159 Carlton Rd. Oshkosh, WI 54904 920-231-5002 GRCHA@charter.net

Current EAA members may join the Vintage Aircraft A5sociaton and receive VINTAGE A IR­ PLANE magazine for an additional $36 per year. EAA Membership, VINTAGE AIRPLANE magaZine and one year membership in the EAA Vintage Aircraft Association is available for $46 per year (SPORT AVIATION magaZine not in­ cluded). (Add $7 for Foreign Postage_)

lAC

DIRECTORS

EMERITUS

E.E. "Buck" Hilbert P.O. Box 424 Union, IL 60180 8 15-923-4591

buck7ac@mc.net

EAA Aviation Foundation Artifact Donations ........... 920-426-4877 Financial Support .......... _. 800-236-1025

MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

Membership in the Experimental Aircraft Associ­ ation, Inc. is $40 for one year, including 12 issues of SPORT AVIATION. Family membership is available for an additional $10 annually. Junior Membership (under 19 years of age) is available at $23 annually. All major credit cards accepted for membership. (Add $16 for Foreign Postage_)

635 Vestal lane Plainfield, IN 46168 317-839-4500 davecpd@iquesl.net

Hight Advisors information . ... 920-426-6522 Hight Instructor infonnation ... 920-426-6801 Hying Start Program ... . . ..... 920-426-6847 Library Services/ Research ...... 920-426-4848 Medical Questions ............ 920-426-4821 Techn ical Counselors .......... 920-426-4821 Young Eagles .. _.... .......... 920-426-4831 Benefits AUA ...... _. ..... .... __ . _. . 800-727-3823 EAA Aircraft Insurance Plan ... 866-647-4322 Term Life and Accidental .... _.800-241 -6103 Death Insurance (Harvey Watt & Company) Editorial .................... 920-426-4825 .. ..... . ...... . . . ....... FAX 920-426-4828

• Submitting article/ photo • Advertising information

Current EAA members may join the Interna­ tional Aerobatic Club, Inc. Division and receive SPORT AEROBATICS magazine for an addi­ tional $45 per year. EAA Membership, SPORT AEROBATICS magazine and one year membership in the lAC Division is ava ilabl e for $55 per year (SPORT

AVIATION magazine not included). (Add $15 for Foreign Postage_)

WARBIRDS Current EAA members may join the EAA War­ birds of America Division and receive WARBlRDS magazine for an additional $40 per year. EAA Membership, WARBIRDS magazine and one year membership in the Warbirds Divi­ sion is available for $50 per yea r (SPORT AVIATION magaZine not included). (A dd $7 for Foreign Postage_)

EAA EXPERIMENTER Current EAA members may receive EAA EXPERIMENTER magaZine for an addi­ tional $20 per year. EAA Membership and EAA EXPERIMENTER magaZine is available for $30 per year (SPORT AVIATION magazine not included). (A dd $8 for Foreign Postage.)

FOREIGN MEMBERSHIPS Please submit your remittance with a check or draft drawn on a United States bank payable in Uni t ed St ates dollars . Add required Foreign Postage amount for each membership.

Membership dues to EAA and its divisions are not tax deductible as charitable contributions.

Copyright ©2004 by the EAA Vintage Aircraft Association All rights reserved. VINTAGE AIRPlANE (ISSN 0091-6943) IPM 40032445 is published and owned exclusively by the EAA Vintage Aircraft Association of the EXperimental Aircraft Association and is published monthly at EM Aviation Center, 3000 Poberezny Rd.. P.O. Box 3086. Oshkosh, WISConsin 54903-3086. Periodicals Postage paid at Oshkosh. Wisconsin 54901 and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to EM Vintage Aircraft Association, P.O. Box 3088. Oshkosh, WI 54903-3088. Return Canadian issues to Station A, PO Box 54, Windsor. ON N9A 6.15. FOREIGN AND APO ADDRESSES - Please allow at least two months for delivery of VINTAGE AIRPlANE to loreign and APO addresses via surface mail. ADVERTISING - Vintage Aircraft Association does not guarantee or endorse any product offered through the advertising. We invite constructive criticism and wekx>me any report of inferior merchandise obtained through our advertising SO that corrective measures can be taken. EDITORIAl POLICY: Readers are encouraged to subm~ stooes and photographs. Policy opinions expressed in articles are solely those of the authors. Responsibility for accuracy in reporting rests entirely with the contributor. No renumeration is made. Material should be sent to: Editor, VINTAGE AIRPlANE, P.O. Box 3086. Oshkosh, WI 54903-3086. Phone 920/426-4800. EMf) and SPORT AVIATIONfJ, the EM Logof) and Aeronautica ~ are registered trademarks, trademarks, and service marks of the Experimental Aircraft Association, Inc. The use of these trademarks and service marks without the permission of the Experimental Aircraft Association. Inc. is strictly prohibited. The EM AVIATION FOUNDATION Logo is a trademark of the EM Aviation Foundation. Inc. The use of this trademark without the permission of the EAA Aviation Foundation, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

VINTAGE AIRPLANE

29


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I

Order Online: http://shop.eaa.org

Forest Navy MA-1 Jacket Stay warm in this great looking jacket with the Vintage logo. This jacket has a bright orange lining and comes in youth and adult sizes

Adult md Adult 19 Adult xl Adult 2x

Vl0l02 .. $42.95 V10103 V10104 Vl0l05

Youth Youth Youth Youth

sm md 19 xl

Polo ..... $21.95

This 100% cotton polo with a tone­ on-tone VAA logo is so versatile it can be worn for business casual or just plain fun.

Sm ................... V11442 Md ................... V07041 Lg . ... ... . . .... .. . .. V07042 Xl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V07043

V00605 .. $38.95 V00606 V00607 V00608

Pilot Bear Bank .... $12.95

There is no doubt that this cute resin bear is an aviation buff. He sits approxi­ mately 6inches high holding his favorite toy.

Bank

V51479

Weather Vane Handcrafted using 14 gauge solid steel with a durable copper vein powder coated finish baked on. The textured finish gives the appearace of hammered copper. State garden or house mount

Black Polo .......... $39.95 This black pocket polo has a tan bird's-eye trim and the Vintage logo in tone-on-tone.

sm ... ..... ...... ..... md . ....... ....... .... 19 .. ............. .. .. xl ....... .... . .. . ....

Picture Frame Weather Vane .. V00711

$45.95

Beautifully crafted wooden frame in three sizes. 4x6 .. .. . V01207 ... . . $23.99 5x7 .... . V01220 ..... $24.99 8xl0 ... .. V01222 ..... $28.99

Vl1438 V07044 V07045 V07046


Traveler Print Bag ........ $39.95 Take your essentials or throw together a days necessities into this 12x14 travel companion. Choose a vertical bag ~1IIIIiiijiiiii;i"'..4-~__.,.J.:...~ with cloth handles or a horizontal bag with black handles.

Bag . .......... VOl168

~ Three-piece Baby Outfit ~ Set includes a soft t-shirt appliqued with an airplane, pants and hat. State color choice of blues or pinks.

6 month size . .... V03130 12 month size .... V03131

Blue Trim Polo . ....... $39.95 Butter cream in color with two blue stripes on the collar and sleeve edge, this polo is made of 100% combed cotton.

Sm . ................... Vl1437 Md . ................... V07027 19 .................... V07028 Xl .................... V07029


Induction 01 Thomas H. Davis info the Hall 01 Fame

- December J7, J998 From left: (kneeling) Mark Allen, Carolinas Historic Aviation Commission; Jim Taylor (standing) Floyd Wilson, CHAC; Jack Frye, CHAC; Frank Davis, Billy Barber, Eddie Culler, Howard Cartwright, Egbert Davis, Thomas H. Davis, Howard Miller, Russ Ferris, Bill McGee, Robert Northington

"Nineteen good years with AU A, Inc. Their knowledge of insuring the museum type aircraft has been very helpfuL"

- Howard Miller

AUA is Vintage Aircraft Association approvec/o To become a member 01 VAA call 800路843路3612.

The best is affordable. Give AUA a call - it's FREE!

800路727路 Fly with the pros... fly with AUA

Inc.


Not A. The.

As a word, "The" is singular. And definitive and apart and absolute in every way. All of wh ich makes it perfect. The Range Rover.

RANGE ROVER

@) THE LAND ROVER EXPERIENCE

fยง;d~~

Vehicle Discount


VA-Vol-32-No-2-Feb-2004  

http://members.eaavintage.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/VA-Vol-32-No-2-Feb-2004.pdf