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Engelbert Humperdinck

HANSEL & GRETEL Education Resource General


HANSEL & GRETEL - TEACHER NOTES

Filled with magic and beautiful music, this specially abridged version of Engelbert Humperdinck’s masterpiece Hansel and Gretel, is the perfect introduction for young audiences to an enchanting world of opera. Hansel and Gretel, two mischievous children are sent into the forest and discover a gingerbread house and its unpleasant owner, a wicked witch who eats children. This production features opera’s bright young things, the students of the Master of Music (Opera Performance), a collaboration between Victorian Opera and the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne. Hansel and Gretel | Engelbert Humperdinck Arts Centre Melbourne, Fairfax Studio 18 – 21 June, 2014 Hansel and Gretel is presented in partnership with Arts Centre

Melbourne.

PREPARING YOUR STUDENTS To prepare students for their visit to Victorian Opera’s production of Hansel and Gretel, we suggest that you:  Ensure students are familiar with the story  Introduce students to the characters, including their voice types  Complete some guided listening activities  Carry out some performance activities

LISTEN We suggest using the following recording of the opera: Hansel and Gretel Munich Philharmonic (In German) Available online on Spotify.

Figure 1: Hänsel und Gretel © By Alexander Zick (Märchen, Grot'scher Verlag, Berlin 1975)

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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SYNOPSIS Hansel and Gretel are playing in their house in the woods alone, waiting for their mother and father to come home. They should be making brooms, but are playing games instead. Hansel moans about being so hungry, and Gretel tries to distract him by teaching him a fun dance. She also shows him a surprise hidden away for later – a jug of milk a neighbour gave their mother that she is going to turn into custard. Their mother comes home and tells them off for being naughty and playing rather than making broomsticks. In her anger she accidently knocks over the jug of milk, and then sends the children out in to the woods with a basket to gather strawberries. The poor mother gets quite upset, as she doesn’t have any food for her family. Father comes home, very happy that he’s sold lots of broomsticks and managed to buy the family a basket full of good food. He soon cheers up the Mother. However, when she tells him that she sent the children out in to the woods after they were naughty, he becomes worried and tells Mother about the ‘Evil One’ who lives in the gloomy wood, full of magic spells.

Out in the woods, Hansel and Gretel are gathering lots of strawberries in their baskets. They come across a cuckoo bird and hear the leaves in the trees whispering to them and they become quite scared. Out of nowhere comes a small man carrying a sack – he is the Sandman, he reassures the children that he is good and sprinkles magic sand in their eyes to help them sleep. Hansel begins to get sleepy, and Gretel encourages him to sing their evening prayer before falling asleep. As they sleep, fourteen angels appear in their dreams and dance around them, keeping them safe. Morning comes, and the Dew Fairy shakes dewdrops over the sleeping children to wake them up. They slowly wake, and the Dew Fairy disappears as the morning mist clears. As the mist clears, they see a house not far away with a fence made out of Gingerbread figures. Hansel soon realises that the house is edible, and slowly approaches. Hansel breaks off a piece of the house and eats it. The Witch soon startles him, and he drops the piece of edible house in a fright. The Witch entices the children closer to her, encouraging them to approach. They soon decide to run off, but as they do so the Witch casts a magic spell over them with her magic wand. Hansel and Gretel are too clever to be tricked by the magic, and soon try to tease the Witch. The Witch tries to push Hansel in to the oven, but he says that he can’t manage it, and the Witch bends over double showing him how to get inside the oven. Together the children give her a big push, and she falls right in to the oven, with the door closing behind her. Hansel and Gretel celebrate the Witch’s demise. They soon realise that they are surrounded by children. Gretel goes around to all of the children and slowly they open their eyes, smiling. The children thank Hansel and Gretel for saving them from the Witch, and hand in hand they sing. The Father and Mother join them, happy that their children are safe and well. Everyone dances together joyously.

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PRE-VISIT EXPLORATION ACTIVITY 2 Visit “Hansel and Gretel Learning About Opera” online. For use on class laptops, teacher laptop projected onto board or Smartboard/ Interactive Whiteboard. Hansel and Gretel: Learning about Opera! is an online educational experience. Players can control interactive elements in every scene and watch the play unfold. Whilst listening to Humperdink’s original music and following the story, students can interact with elements of the production by taking on the roles including: Figure 2: Dew Fairy © Ross Hall

 Costume Designer  Choreographer

ACTIVITY 1

 Set Designer

Hansel and Gretel is a well-known fairy tale of German origin, recorded by the Brothers Grimm and published in 1812.

 Props Manager

 Read the full story of “Hansel & Gretel” with the class using any version of the picture story book; or

 Stage Director

 For iPads – download “Hansel and Gretel – StoryChimes” app for free. Children can either choose to read the story, or to readalong with the story teller; or

The interactive program runs for 15 – 20 mins.

 For Macs – download the story for iBooks. There is a range of books that are free (for younger children) to read-along and fully descriptive versions around $0 .99 and $1.99; or

 Lighting Technician  Technical Director  Conductor

There is background information for teachers, including lesson plans and a quiz! www.kusc.org/kids/teacher.aspx

 Audiobooks – from audiobooks.com and other sites. (Some are free as part of a 30day trial)

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ACTIVITY 3

ACTIVITY 5

For younger students . . .

(see attached lead sheets)

 Create puppets of each character and ‘act out’ as the story is read.

Focus on learning two songs from “Hansel and Gretel” prior to the performance:

(E.G.) Draw each character or colour in pictures of each character then cut out and stick to an icy pole stick). For images use Google Images and search “Hansel and Gretel Colouring In.”

“Brother Come and Dance with Me” Track 3: 5:35 Lullaby “Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep” Track 7: 2:18 Suggested Ideas:

(see attached colour-in illustrations)

 Listen to the song whilst patsching (patting knees to the beat of the music)

For older students . . .

 Clap the rhythm of the melody

Download a free copy of the condensed script online. Divide class into groups of six. Have each group:  Allocate roles – Narrator, Hansel, Gretel, Father, Stepmother and Witch  Decide how they will act out the story  Discuss the use of props and costumes to suggest characters and space  Perform for the class www.kidsinco.com/2009/02/hansel-andgretel-2

ACTIVITY 4 Search online for “Gingerbread House Template” and create:  A real, edible gingerbread house with icing and lollies attached; or  A cardboard gingerbread house (to any scale) for the classroom (There are many pictures available online for inspiration)

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

 Learn to sing the melody in English  Learn to sing the melody in German  Have children work in small groups to create a dance or set of movements  Create an accompaniment on untuned percussion instruments  Create a bass-line accompaniment on xylophones, metallophones and glockenspiels by following the chords symbols above the melody  Create a harmonic accompaniment by allocating notes from within the given chords  Invite students who play instruments to join the class ensemble, e.g. – Chords played by piano, keyboard, guitar, ukulele – Melody line played by piano, keyboard, recorder, flute, violin – NB melody line will need to be transposed for transposing instruments, or into bass clef if required  Perform at assembly  Encourage school ensembles to learn and perfom the songs

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ACTIVITY 6 The grid below can be used as a starting point for responding to the Elements of Music when listening to any piece of music. Choose the method that works best for you and your children. Start by using the prompt questions to discuss the music with older students. Encourage younger students to respond to the music by moving around the room. Suggested tracks:  Track 3

5:35

“Brother Come and Dance With Me”

 Track 7

2:18

Lullaby “Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep”

 Track 6

0:00

Prelude to Act II

Element

Questions

Physical Response

Tempo

What speed is the music going? Which instruments are moving fast, which slowly?

Move around the room to the speed/tempo of the music

Dynamics

How loud or soft is the music?

When the music is soft hold both hands close together, as it gets louder move them further apart

When does it change volume? Pitch

How high or low is the music? Which instruments/voices are playing high, which are low?

When the music is low, move down low, close to the floor. When the music is high move arms high in the air

Rhythm

Can you hear a steady beat? Which instrument/s are playing the beat? Describe the way the melody and other parts are moving – are they skipping, hopping or long, smooth sounds?

Stomp your feet to the beat. Dance the way the melody/tune tells you to dance

Tone

What instruments can you hear playing?

Imitate the instruments you can hear playing

Form

Can you hear anything repeated? Is there a verse and/or chorus?

Create some dance steps to the verse, create others for the chorus then perform as a whole dance

Texture

How many different parts can you hear playing?

Use strips of coloured paper or string to show how many parts you can hear playing at any time

Style/

What style of music is this?

Create a freeze-frame of the type of music you’re listening to, e.g. sitting and listening at a concert; folk dancing; rocking a baby; disco dancing

Genre

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THE TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES IN RELATION TO AUSVELS The Teaching and Learning activities suggested in this resource have been designed in accordance with the Victorian Essential Learning Standards for The Arts, Communication and Thinking Processes Domains.

Introduction to the Arts The Arts are unique, expressive, creative and communicative forms that engage students in critical and creative thinking and help them understand themselves and the world. In every society the Arts play a pivotal role socially, economically and culturally. The Arts encourage the development of skills and the exploration of technologies, forms and processes through single and multimodal forms. They fuel the exploration of ideas that cross the gamut of human emotions and moods through holistic learning using cognitive, emotional, sensory, aesthetic, kinaesthetic and physical fields. www.ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/The-Arts/Overview/Introduction

Domain

Dimension

The Arts

Creating and Making

Activity #2 – Learn About Opera Activity #3 – Act Out the Story Activity #5 – Elements of Music Activity #6 – Perform Songs

Exploring and Responding

Activity #2 – Learn About Opera Activity #5 – Elements of Music

Communication

Listening, viewing and responding

Activity #1 – Get to Know the Story Activity #2 – Learn About Opera Activity #3 – Act Out the Story Activity #5 – Elements of Music

Thinking processes

Reasoning, process and inquiry; Creativity; Reflection; Evaluation and metacognition

Activity #1 – Get to Know the Story Activity #2 – Learn About Opera Activity #3 – Act Out the Story Activity #4 – Create a Gingerbread House Activity #5 – Elements of Music Activity #6 – Perform Songs

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS WHAT IS OPERA? Opera is a complex art form that has been around since about 1600. In 2014 there are many styles of opera performance, but basically, they all have one thing in common – an opera is a play that is sung.

WHAT IS A TYPICAL OPERA STORY? Initially, most opera stories were taken from mythology. Since then composers have taken stories from a variety of sources including literature, history, Shakespearean plays, children’s stories, real events and even Hollywood movies!

HOW MANY PEOPLE DOES IT TAKE TO MAKE AN OPERA? Many. The creation of an opera involves a composer, who writes the music and a librettist, who writes the words, usually adapted from an existing story. That’s the easy part. The hard part is bringing an opera to life on the stage. This can involve an army of hundreds of workers that include the artists – singers, dancers, conductors, orchestral musicians, language coaches, music staff and directors; the designers – lighting, scenery and costumes; the craftspersons – set builders, costumiers and wig makers; the technical staff – stage managers, lighting technicians, fly operators, stage mechanists, electricians, surtitle operators, dressers; and of course the managers who coordinate all of the above.

WHAT COMES FIRST – THE WORDS OR THE MUSIC? The creation of an opera is usually a collaboration - which means the composer and librettist work closely together.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF OPERATIC VOICES? There are five major voice types – Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano (both females), Tenor, Baritone and Bass (all males) with further categories defining each particular voice.

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE AN OPERA SINGER? Years of discipline and training. A singer needs to possess a good instrument (the voice) to start with and then spend years developing it. A singer needs to be able to sing acoustically in large auditoriums and be heard above an orchestra, which can sometimes have as many as 80 players.

WHAT IS AN ARIA? This is a song for solo voice. The aria allows the singer to pause and reflect on action that has passed and express their inner thoughts and feelings.

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WHAT IS A RECITATIVE? Recitative was used in the 18th and early 19th century much like dialogue is used in music theatre of today. There are two kinds of recitative: secco – accompanied on a harpsichord or accompagnato – accompanied by the orchestra.

WHAT IS AN ENSEMBLE? Music for two or more singers singing together, for example in a duet or trio (as shown in the picture below). A large ensemble would be called the chorus.

WHERE WILL WE BE SEEING THE OPERA? At the Arts Centre Melbourne, Fairfax Studio. This is a small theatre seating around 360 people, so you will be close to the action.

APPLAUSE Play it by ear and follow along with the rest of the audience. However, audiences generally applaud at the end of the overture and often at the completion of arias – and of course wildly at the end!

WHAT MAKES UP THE ORCHESTRA? 

Conductor- directs the orchestra with movements of their baton

Flute

3 Violins

Oboe

1 Viola

2 Clarinets

1 Cello

Bassoon

1 Double Bass

2 French Horns

 Piano This is a special arrangement for Victorian Opera by Julian Langdon.

GLOSSARY German

English

German

English

der Besen

broom

das Sandmännchen

Sandman

dunkel

dark

schlafen

to sleep

die Engel

angels

die Tannenbäume

fir trees

die Kerze

candle

tanzen

to dance

die Kinder

children

das Taumännchen

Dew Fairy

die Knusperhexe

witch

der Teller

plate

der Korb

the basket

der Topf

bowl

der Krug

jug

der Vater

father

die Mutter

mother

der Wald

the forest

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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HANSEL & GRETEL - STUDENT NOTES – PRE-VISIT EXPLORATION CHARACTERS Hansel Gretel Witch Father Mother Dew Fairy Sandman Angels and Children

This role is a boy, but will be performed by a girl. The voice type is a mezzo-soprano Hansel and Gretel are brother and sister. The voice type is soprano This role is a woman, but performed by a male with a tenor voice The voice type is a baritone The voice type is a mezzo-soprano Performed by a soprano Performed by a tenor Performed by a mix of the male and female singers Figure 3: The Sandman © Ross Hall

LANGUAGE EXERCISE Gretel stopft Strümpfe. Hänsel sitzt und hält den Besen. Gretel darns socks. Hansel sits and holds the broom. Figure 4: Hansel and Gretel in the cottage © Ross Hall

der Teller

die Kerze

der Besen

der Topf

der Krug

____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ Translate from the picture above. Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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Hänsel und Gretel wandern durch den Wald. Im Wald ist es dunkel. Was ist im Korb? Hansel and Gretel walk through the forest. It is dark in the forest. What is in the basket? Figure 5: Hansel and Gretel in the woods © Ross Hall

die Tannenbäume

der Wald

die Kinder

der Korb

__________________

__________________

__________________

__________________

Translate from the picture above.

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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EXTEND YOUR OPERA EXPERIENCE

facebook.com/vopera twitter.com/victorianopera instagram/victorianopera youtube.com/victorianoperapage victorianopera.com.au/education victorianopera.com.au/blog

CONTACT US To find out more contact Melissa Stark, Education and Community Engagement Manager E: melissas@victorianopera.com.au P: 03 9012 6652

With thanks to Sue Arney for the research and preparation of this resource pack. Thanks also to Jasminka Ward-Matievic for German language support. Victorian Opera Education Program is generously supported by: Victorian Opera Education Syndicate. Hansel and Gretel is presented in partnership with Arts Centre Melbourne.

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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HANSEL AND GRETEL COLOURING FUN! WITCH’S HOUSE

Figure 6: Witch's house © Ross Hall

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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HANSEL AND GRETEL COLOURING FUN! FATHER

Figure 7: Father with basket © Ross Hall

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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HANSEL AND GRETEL COLOURING FUN! HANSEL AND GRETEL

Figure 8: Hansel and Gretel © Ross Hall

Victorian Opera 2014 – Hansel and Gretel General Resource

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œ œ œ

œ. œ .

tick, tick, tick, click, click, click,

œœÆ œ &b

Mit den Köpf - chen With your head you

j œ ‰ œ.

ein - mal hin, right foot first,

œœÆ œ œ œœ œ ‰ œ

œ™ œ œ™ œ J R J R

C7

ein mal her, left foot then,

rund her - um, es round a - bout and

œ œ™ œ œ™ œ œœ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ ' œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ J œ œ˙ œ ˙ œ˙ œ

j j œj œ œj œ

œ

& b œœ. œœ œ. ? b œ. œ.

# œj

ein - mal hin, right foot first,

Hänsel

is nicht schwer! back a - gain!

& b œJ

œ

œ˙

F

D‹

œœ œ '

œ œj œ J F

C7

œ

œ œ œ ‰ J J J

nick, nick, nick, nick, nick, nick,

n œj

œœÆ œj œœÆ œj œœÆ œ œ œ ‰ œ˙

œ œj œ J

F

ein - mal her, left foot then,

œ œ œœ œ

œ œ œ

j 3j j j j œ œ œ œ œ

mit den Fin - ger - chen with your fin - gers you

œ œ œ

œ

œ œ

œ

œ˙

œ ≈œ œ œ J R

C7

F

œ

Œ

'rum, es ist nicht schwer! round and back a - gain!

œ™ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ œ˙

œ œ œ

œ ‰ œ œœ ‰ J œ œ œœ J f œœ ‰ œ œj ‰ J œ œ œœ


Hänsel und Gretel: Evening Prayer Humperdinck

° ## 4 & 4 ¢

D

# & # 44

D

Gretel

Hänsel

œ œ

œ œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

A - bends, will ich When at night I

{

∑ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ w

? ## 4 œ œ œ œ 4 ˙ ˙ w

° ## A & œ œ œ œ œj ‰ um mich watch do

stehn: keep:

## j ‰ & ¢ œ œ œ œ œ um mich watch do

stehn: keep:

œ œ

zwei zu two my

{

° ## & œ™

E‹

B7

-

## & œ #œ ¢

Lin gui -

C7

F

j œ œ Œ bœ œ œ™ ken, ding,

œ Œ

ken, ding,

# j & # œœ ™ #œ œ œ œ nb˙œ ˙ œ™ nœ œ ? ## n œ œœ œ œ˙ Œ Œ n˙ nœ œ n˙ ˙

vier - zehn Eng - lein four - teen an - gels

schla - fen gehn, go to sleep,

-

ten, ing,

œ œ

œ

mei - nem Häup head are guard -

˙ ˙

œ n˙ J

œ ˙ w ˙

˙

D

Œ Œ

E‹

œ œ

œ œ

zwei zu two my

mei - ner feet are

zwei zu two my

mei - ner feet are

œ œ

ten, ing,

œ

œ œ

˙œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ #œœ™ œ œœ œœ ™ nœ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ nœ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙

n˙œ œ

D7

vier - zehn Eng - lein four - teen an - gels

œw œ œ œ œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ

œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ

˙

G

nœ Œ

zwei zu mei - ner Rech - ten, two are on my right hand,

schla - fen gehn, go to sleep,

B‹

mei - nem Häup head are guard

œ œ

œ œ œ œ

A7

œ œ

zwei zu two my

œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ

˙

˙w D

E‹

# j & # œœ œœ œ œœ ™™ #œœ ˙œœ ™™ œ œ œ™ J œ œ ? ## œ œ Œ œ ˙™ œ œ ˙

{

œ œ

A - bends, will ich When at night I

# & # 44

Lin gui

œ œ

œ œ œ œ

E7

# œ ˙ J

F 7

A

œ œ #œ ™

zwei zu mei two are on

˙™

zwei zu mei - ner Rech two are on my right

-

j j œ n˙ ˙ nœ ™ œ #œœ n˙œ ˙ #œ ™ œ œ

-

œ

ner Lin my left

B‹

œ

-

ken, hand,

œ œ œ

D7

Œ

œ œ

ten, zwei zu mei - ner hand, two are on my

j œ #œœ n˙œ ˙ œ

œœ #œœ

nœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ ˙ œ #œ ˙ #˙


mit steigerung/increasing

immer leise/always quiet

2

° ## G & œ

œ

œ

œ

˙

D

zwei - e, die mich two who warm - ly

## & ˙ ¢

Lin left

## œ & œ

Œ

œ

-

ken, ver,

œ

œ

ken hand,

œœ

œœ

œ ? ## œ˙™

œ

œ œ

œ

œœ œ

œœ œœ œ œœ œ ˙™

œ

dek co

-

Œ

ken, ver,

wek ho

œ

œ -

n œ˙˙ ™™ œ # œ œ n œœ nœ

œœ œ

Œ

ken, ver,

œ

œ

œ

zwei - e, two who

nœ˙˙™™ œ #œ œ nœœ œ

œœ œ

˙

E‹

die mich o'er me

œœœ

œœœ œœ œœ

œœ œœ œ œœ œ ˙™

œ œ

poco rit.

° ## & œ

B‹

œ

die mich whom 'tis

## ˙ ™ & ¢

wek ho

# & # œœœ

{

œ

-

-

œ œ œœ œ œÓ

? ## w˙

° ## D˙ & sen. ven.

## ˙ & ¢

œ

œ

zwei - e, two to

œ E

wei gi -

œ

-

sen ven

zu to

œ

œ

ken, ver,

zwei - e, two

œ œ

œ œ œ #œ

œ œ

œ

die zum guide my

œ #œ˙

œ ˙

˙

œ

œ #œ

œ

œ

œ

Him - mels Pa - ra guide my steps to

˙™

Him steps

-

mel to

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ #œœ

œ

œ œ

˙œ

œ nœœ

˙ dei hea

œ™ œ

wei hea

-

Ϫ

Ó

&

œœ œ œ œ w

œœ œ œ œ w

“” œœ œœ ˙œœ œœ

˙˙ ˙

w

œ

œ

œ˙

œ

œ œ œ œœ œ

œ

-

œ œ œ œœ œ

-

-

poco rit.

œ ˙˙

œ J

œ

Ó

# w œ &#w œ œ œœ œ w ? ## w w

A7

D

sen. ven.

{

œ

die mich o'er me

˙

die mich warm - ly

œ œ ˙™

œ

zwei - e, two who

œ

œ

zwei - e, two who

œœ

{

-

œ nœ

Œ

œ

dek co

A‹

Ó Œ

Ó

œ J


Victorian Opera 2014 Education Resource - Hansel & Gretel General