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Victoria Flying Club

January 2007

H a p p y N e w Ye a r ! !

Happy New Year to all from VFC.

Inside

Clear skies and good flying for 2007! PFW looks westward at the new fallen snow in this early morning photo by Tristan Nano.

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Short Final

Letter from the Editor

Bears Air

VFC Bursaries

In My Travels

Income Tax Form

Ernest K. Gann


Eleanor’s

The

Patrician

S hort F inal

Newsletter of the Victoria Flying Club

JANUARY 2007 Editor:

Eleanor Eastick PatricianEditor@shaw.ca Advertising inquiries: Bob Mace (250) 361-6996 or bmace@shaw.ca Publisher: Seaside Designs seasidedesigns@shaw.ca (250) 383-7777 Published monthly. Unsolicited articles welcome. The deadline for submissions is Thursday, January 25, 2007.

Board of Directors President Vice President Treasurer Secretary Directors

Sean Steele Bob Mace Lloyd Toope Colin Dormuth Dennis Arnsdorf Jeremy Prpich Doug Marin Don Goodeve

General Manager Chief Flying Instructor

Gerry Mants Graham Palmer

1852 Canso Road Victoria, BC V8L 5V5

Phone: Fax: Email: Web:

(250) 656-4321 (250) 656-2833 (250) 655-0910 info@flyvfc.com www.flyvfc.com

Opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. No part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any format without the written authorization from the publisher or author.

creative

dynamic

effective

communications solutions for YOUR business

Sdesigns EASID E & photography 250.383.7777

seasidedesigns@shaw.ca seasidedesigns.net

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There goes 2006! What a strange year weather-wise. I believe we made national headlines for the weirdest/most extreme weather for the year. We certainly had a long, hot, dry summer (good flying days), then the torrential rains that caused flooding in places like Port Alberni and Sooke; the water just couldn’t soak into the rock-hard ground! The rains drained away and we were hit with an early freeze-up and snow! A foot or so of it! In Victoria! The ramps at YYJ became skating rinks with a thick layer of ice covering the blacktop, not to mention the aircraft tied down outside. The severe icing Christmas Eve windstorm at Dallas Road was caused by an afternoon thaw, followed by plummeting night time temperatures freezing the melt water. As if that weren’t enough, there were three howling gales in one week, causing widespread power failures, delaying flights and damaging some aircraft at YYJ, although not any belonging to the Club. Christmas Eve saw the final gale in the series, although there have been a few days with strong winds since.

Anniversary Events What an interesting year for the Club as it celebrated its 60th anniversary. The Hangar Dance in September was a huge success and all tickets were sold. It was an altogether happy event with the entertaining fun of the Time Benders, the hangar charmingly decorated and several classic planes on display courtesy of BCAM and private owners. August saw the Webster Trophy Competition Finals held at CYYJ, hosted by VFC. The splendid summer weather held out and once again, the Club had a winner, first runner-up Etienne White. The 2005 Webster winner was VFC’s Yorgo Roumanis, following in the footsteps of Tracy Biddle (1993) and CFI Graham Palmer (1995). 2006 also saw the addition of a pretty spiffy new aircraft to the VFC line-up, GKMY, a newer C172 R. It is IFR equipped including a GPS and autopilot.

Free Money - $3000 in all The Club has extended the deadline for applications for the six, count’em, six bursaries available to members advancing their flight training. Do talk to Dispatch or your instructor and get your name in the running. There’s nothing to lose and $500 to gain – the credit can be used for flying, training, or textbooks/equipment from the Pilot Shop at VFC. Get that application in by mid-January. The winners will be announced at the Wings Banquet on Friday, January 26. (See ad this Pat for details.) Short Final cont’d p.4


Letters to the Editor What’s a CF-18 single seater doing parked at the VFC? Notice the fake canopy underneath which is unique to Canadian Hornets, as far as I’m aware....... Walt Salmaniw, MD. Hi Walt! Thanks for writing and you’re right of course. The CF18 was flown in from Cold Lake by the son of an instructor. It was about two years ago and special permission was needed to park it on the ramp in front of the club. Ed Wow, great story, Eleanor! I would have liked to have seen that. Would have been fun taxiing by that aircraft! Walt Hi! Is that an F-18????/

That beast is none other than a CF-188 Hornet. Cheers Chris Peschke Still in Halifax and missing the west coast…we had our first snowstorm yesterday. Larry Dibnah, who can never be stumped when it comes to identifying aircraft, had this to say in answer to my confusion: Ed As for the CF-18, yes, it’s called a ‘Hornet’. The official Armed Forces numeric (three number) designation is CF-188 following the line of other Canadian Forces aircraft before it, such as the CF-100 Canuck, CF-101 Voodoo and the CF-104 Starfighter. However, because the original design bears the US Navy designation which is ‘F-18 Hornet’, the Canadian Forces refer to their version as the CF-18 Hornet models A & B for reasons of simplicity and consistency.

Thanks, Brendan Pellow

Larry has kindly supplied a more complete story of our December Mystery aircraft below. This is a photo of a Canadian Forces CF-18A Hornet from Cold Lake, Alberta which visited the Victoria Flying Club two years ago while piloted by Club member Scott Eichel’s son. Officially designated the ‘CF188’ by the Canadian Armed Forces, the aircraft is more commonly referred to as the CF-18 Hornet since it is derived from its US Navy counterpart, the F-18 Hornet. There are two versions of the Hornet in Canadian service – the CF-18A single seat and the CF-18B with tandem seats. In all, there are a total of 98 Hornets in service with the Canadian Armed Forces. The CF-18A & B is powered by two General Electric F404 low bypass engines which provide 4,850 kg (10,700 lbs) of thrust each. With afterburners on, the engines can produce 7,290 kg (16,000 lbs) of thrust each. The Hornet’s top speed is Mach 1.8. As can be seen in the accompanying photo, a fake canopy has been painted on the underside of the aircraft below the real cockpit. This feature which is unique to all Canadian Forces Hornets and is designed to ‘temporarily’ confuse an opponent in the heat of combat. For further information on Canada’s CF-18 Hornet, please visit www.airforce.forces.gc.ca

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Short Final cont’d from p 2

Lucky Dogs Did you know that dogs can be equipped with their very own headsets? It’s true! I have taken my dog flying and seen lots of dogs riding around in aeroplanes but I always worried about the noise in their sensitive ears. Mutt Muffs to the rescue! Al Whalley passed on the information along with a photo of his dog, Winston wearing his headset. They were both joy-riding in Al’s beautiful Alon 2 Aircoupe (lucky dogs!). Al continues, “Few pilots would be aware of this product. Here’s the web site too: http://www.safeandsoundpets.com/index.html Cost is around $60 delivered from North Carolina. A lady pilot started the company.” (Of course. -ed) Mutt Muffs are really good noise reducers – and, as there’s no microphone, you won’t get any complaints or backtalk from your dog!

Winston Whalley sports his Mutt Muffs

COPA Goes to Bat Just a little heads-up from COPA about possible changes coming our way.... NAV CANADA has developed a plan, to be in place on 10 May 2007, which will significantly revise airspace, IFR approaches, VFR routings, training areas and procedures within 50 nm of Vancouver. One of NAV CANADA’s stated goals is to establish positive control to the ground within the terminal area and beyond, a plan that has the potential to severely restrict VFR flying in this part of BC, especially if NAV CANADA continues to experience its long-standing staffing problems. As an initial part of the plan, an internal NAV CANADA study was conducted and they scheduled briefings with very little notice in October to make their plans public, including removing many of the class F flight training, hang gliding and parachute areas, introducing additional mandatory transponder airspace and creating low altitude VFR corridors. Reaction from the few who attended the briefings was extensive, such that NAV CANADA is now considering some changes to its plan. A second round of briefings took place in November.

Now, let’s all hope for good weather and good flying in January! Blue Skies All!

January Mystery of the Month Name this elegant aircraft photographed at KCLM two years ago. Its smaller relatives are frequent visitors to CYYJ.

Send your educated guess(es) to PatricianEditor@shaw.ca.

CANADIAN AVIONICS & INSTRUMENTS Calgary Int’l Airport (403) 250-5665

Victoria Airport (250) 655-0665

BOB CAMERON President

9548 Canora Road Sidney, BC V8L 3R1

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Tel: (250) 655-0665 Fax: (250) 655-0664 E: cav#2@islandnet.com

R O YA L PA C I F I C MAINTENANCE LTD.

CALL

Mitchell Holme Cessna Parts, Sales, Service and Aircraft Maintenance General Aviation Services Victoria International Airport 9552 Canora Rd T: 250 656-7322 E: service@royalpacificmaintenance.com Toll free Parts line: 1-877-2CESSNA (1-877-223-7762)


Metric Conversions T

hree young boys, 11, 13 and 14 year olds, raced their bicycles down the decommissioned runway, burning off their energy. All day excitement was building, fuelled by the events, sounds and smells of the Winnipeg Sports Car Clubs’ family day. By evening, things were winding down, some people had already headed for home. Still, many campers, trailers, vehicles and people occupied the north end of the 6000 ft. runway at Gimli, Manitoba that pleasant evening in July, 1983. The 13 year old saw it first. “That guy’s crazy”, he shouted to his friends. They skidded their bikes to a stop and stood staring in disbelief. A giant, silver airplane was descending toward them, silently, in an odd forward slip configuration, dropping at over 2000 feet per minute, and closing rapidly from the south. Not able to fully comprehend the situation, but sensing the pending disaster, the boys bolted back toward their families. Pedalling a fast as their legs would go, they screamed at their parents to run. Others saw the jet, a Boeing 767, barrelling toward them, now less than a mile back. As people scattered in all directions, the jet hit the runway 1000 feet from the threshold. Two explosions as tires blew out were the first sounds they heard. Then one engine was dragging on the ground. As the front of the aircraft settled, it’s nose gear collapsed. Speeding down the runway at almost 180 miles per hour, now a giant shower of sparks blazed out behind as the gear leg tore a huge trench into the concrete. The crippled airliner, over 130 tons, hurtled closer and closer to the trailers and people, grinding up the pavement with bent metal, trashed wheels, shredded tires, spitting sparks and smoke. Finally only 100 feet from the first line of vehicles, it stopped. The Gimli Glider had arrived. It was an Air Canada flight that had run out of fuel. Much has been written, even a movie made about the near disaster. Miraculously, no one was killed. Part of the reason for the fuel exhaustion was blamed on the conversion to the metric system of weights and “WINNIPEG FREE PRESS, July 1983, volumes Canada reprinted with permission.” was instituting. Following the failure of the fuel measuring system in that aircraft, the flight crew gave instructions for an amount they had calculated using the imperial weights and volumes. The result was only about half the fuel required for their flight to Edmonton was loaded. They carefully re-checked their calculations, but were not trained to use the new metric numbers. The Canadian government began the gradual conversion to the metric system in the 1970’s. In 1975, rain and snowfall amounts were measured in millimetres and centimetres. In ’77, all new vehicles had speedometers showing kilometres per hour. Road

BEAR’S AIR Barry Meek

signs were posted with metric measurements. Most of us recall the confusion at the grocery store, buying meat and corn by the kilogram, milk by the litre and coffee by the gram. To it’s credit, the government allowed merchants to advertise the old measurements along with the new ones so we could at least see that the prices hadn’t really changed. My flying days were not yet underway at that point in time. I was in the middle of a career in broadcasting, hosting a morning show on AM radio. This part of the story has nothing to do with aviation, but it shows there was a lighter side to the metric conversion exercise. April 1st, 1975, was the day we were obliged to begin reporting temperatures in degrees Celsius. To avoid such a big shock to our listeners who had gone to bed the night before with 70 degrees now waking up to only 20 (C), I reported the temperature in BOTH measurements throughout the morning. “Good morning, it’s 20 Celsius/70 Fahrenheit outside”. Most people by then knew it was coming. The government had some pretty expensive ad campaigns going on ahead of time. We had decided only the night before to have some fun with this whole metric system conversion. Since it was April Fools day anyway, why not institute our own CLOCK with METRIC time?! The whole scheme was quickly put together. I even fashioned a “metric clock” so that I could keep track through the confusion we knew it would create. Metric time was based on two 10-hour halves in the day, 20 hours instead of 24. Listeners were greeted with two time readings every few minutes. “Good morning, it’s 8:25 Standard time, 6:38 Metric time”. And so on .... Combined with the two temperature readings, it was a great day indeed for sleepy listeners and commuters who wondered what to wear and if they would get to work on time. There was fallout, lots of it. A nursing supervisor at our hospital was on the phone demanding to know how to schedule her staff. The payroll supervisor at a local mill had no idea how he was going to change the hourly pay rates for his workers. The school board couldn’t believe they hadn’t been notified. And everyone wanted to know where to buy these new “metric clocks”. A hardware store manager was angry with our sales staff for not being informed. Seemed he’d just received a shipment of the old “standard time” clocks. What was he going to do with them?! I didn’t lose my job. Life went on. Some people laughed. Some were embarrassed. But the government never contacted us for information on how they could make the time conversion a legitimate and workable procedure. The scheme was so ridiculous I often wondered why the bureaucrats passed up that one. Somehow, we still manage to fly our airplanes. Some pilots measure fuel in litres, some in U.S. gallons, some using Imperial gallons. It’s all the same gas though. Degrees Celsius seems to make sense to me now, a full 30 years later. I suppose if we had actually converted to a 10 hour clock, that would make sense now too. But converting the entire world to our time system isn’t going to happen. Next time someone starts telling you about changing clocks, check the calendar.

Barry Meek bcflyer@propilots.net

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VFC BURSARIES VFC has extended the application deadline to mid-January for the six bursaries available to members. The Club is pleased to announce there will be six bursaries given out this year. In addition to the long-standing Claude Butler, Betty Wadsworth and the more recent Mike Cooper-Slipper Awards, there will be three additional bursaries thanks to Thrifty’s and the very successful Smile Card program. The details and amounts of the Thrifty awards are yet to be worked out but the intention is for them to be used to assist in flight training. The three older awards are $500 each, given to pilots in any stage of training who are furthering their education. Application forms for the bursaries are available from Dispatch and the winners will be announced at the 2006 grads Wings Banquet, held early in 2007.

photo credit Janet Peto

Mike Cooper-Slipper Award Thomas Paul Michael Cooper-Slipper was born in Britain on January 11, 1921, and went directly from school into the RAF in 1938, aged only 17. By 1940 he was able to say, “I had grown up certainly, I had killed and seen a lot of dead people, and I was cold and untouched by it. I was 19 and I was a fighter pilot.” His achievements and bravery were outstanding throughout his war service and he was awarded the DFC “for displaying great skill and daring in air combat”. Much can be read of this modest hero on the internet. Cooper-Slipper emigrated to Canada in 1947 and worked for Avro Canada in Ontario, testing early jet engines mounted on a converted Lancaster bomber. He piloted the CF 102 Jetliner, Canada’s first jet airliner. In addition, he flew many hours testing the successful CF 100 fighter, which became the mainstay of the RCAF’s all-weather fighter force for more than a decade. He gained much experience testing Canadian-built Sabres before being assigned to test Orenda’s next generation engine, the Iroquois, which was to power the advanced CF 105 Arrow. The Arrow program was cancelled in 1959, and Cooper-Slipper had the distinction of being the only pilot to test the Iroquois engine in flight. He continued working in aviation in sales and promotion until 1986 when he retired to Victoria. Mike died on February 23, 2004 survived by Rita, his wife of 63 years and their son. The family created the Mike Cooper-Slipper Award in memory of this brave and quiet hero. The award will be presented to a Commercial student chosen by the instructors & staff.

Claude Butler Award Claude Butler’s passionate love of flying led his family to make a thoughtful bequest to VFC in the form of an annual award to encourage others to take up aviation and enjoy it to the fullest. This bursary of $500 is presented to a VFC pilot who is actively acquiring and improving his aeronautical skills. Claude Butler lived all his life in the Keating Cross Road area near Butler’s Field which he established on land owned by the family. He was a man of great ability; a musician with his own band, a builder of speedboats which he raced on Elk Lake, a motorcycle rider taking trophies in the Mount Doug Hill Climb and a pilot of renown, participating in the London to Victoria Air Race in 1971. He was a Life Member of the Duncan and Victoria Flying Clubs as well as being named Citizen of the Year by several municipalities. Claude died in 1986, but his interest in aviation lives on through the award given in his name.

Betty Wadsworth Award Betty Wadsworth too, died in 1986 and her family generously established a $500 bursary in her name to be given to a VFC pilot working on and studying new aviation skills. Betty joined VFC in 1958 and was the top graduate in her class of 54 as well as being the only female. She acquired a Stinson Voyager and flew it all over North America promoting airshows, seminars and anything to do with COPA, of which she was local president. She was tireless in her support of general aviation and received the 1970 COPA award for Outstanding Service and the 1974 BC Aviation Council’s Outstanding Contributions award. Betty was always on the go with COPA and the “99s” but never lost touch with VFC. Photos of her hang in the “Hall of Fame” at the Club and her name and her enthusiasm for flying live on through the bursary in her name.

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In My Travels Noorduyn Norseman

by Larry Dibnah

One of the more familiar of Canadian aviation icons, the Noorduyn Norseman was designed from the ground up as a bush plane. After emigrating from England, Bob Noorduyn first worked for Fokker’s Atlantic Aircraft Company in the United States where he was chief designer of the famous Fokker Universal aircraft. Noorduyn became interested in bush flying after coming into contact with several pilots flying various aircraft types in Canada’s North. He later went to work for the Bellanca Aircraft Company in Delaware and was involved in the development of the Bellanca Aircruiser. In 1932, Bob Noorduyn went to work for the Pitcairn Autogyro Company and helped design the Pitcairn 4-place autogyro. Preferring to work on fixed wing aircraft, Noorduyn left the Pitcairn Company in 1934 and moved to Montreal where he could re-connect with his contacts in the aviation industry of the North. There he joined his colleague Walter Clayton and formed a company called ‘Noorduyn Aircraft’. Noorduyn and Clayton began interviewing pilots and operators of aircraft in the northern areas and soon thereafter started design work on an aircraft they called the ‘Norseman’. In 1935 the company was reorganized to become ‘Noorduyn Aviation Ltd’. Later that same year the Norseman made its first flight. It was flown to Ottawa for commercial certification and once complete, the aircraft was sold to Dominion Skyways of Quebec. Norseman aircraft went into full production shortly after that. Having been designed specifically for use in Canada’s rugged north the Norseman soon exceeded all expectations. Its landing gear was built to withstand the rough treatment received when operated with skis on ice and snow covered surfaces. The aircraft performed equally well on wheels and pontoons. Numbers of Norseman aircraft also began to appear in Canadian and American military service as transports and cargo carriers during WW2. It was in a Norseman that band leader Glenn Miller and others disappeared leaving England for a tour of US Army bases in France. Post war, the Norseman was flown by commercial operators all across Canada including Canadian Pacific Airlines and Queen Charlotte Airlines here in British Columbia. Several Norseman were also used in the US, Norway, Australia and Brazil.

Museum Norseman

The Norseman which belongs to the BC Aviation Museum was fully restored to airworthy condition by Museum members with some funding assistance from the federal and provincial governments. The restoration project took about 8 years to complete having met all Transport Canada requirements. Parts from two aircraft (CF-JDG and CF-DRE) were used to complete the restoration. Since the fuselage of DRE was used, this registration was retained for the finished aircraft. The aircraft was officially rolled out at the Museum’s Open House on August 9, 2003. Although its engine is run up at least once a month, CF-DRE’s first and only flight was made on Friday, July 23, 2004.

For more information on the BC Aviation Museum’s Norsman and other exhibits, please visit www.bcam.net

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MORE

Letters to the Editor Eleanor, You were looking for editorial letters? Here's one. Although it doesn't have to be. Just thought I'd comment on part of Larry Dibnah's interesting article on the Mallard in which he mentions the Rapide. It may not be common knowledge, but the Dehavilland Rapide was in service with Canadian Airways at Vancouver Airport seaplane base in the late 30s and early 40s. They were on floats, of course, and while still a kid I groomed them all by myself on the graveyard shift and then put them in the water every morning in preparation for the daily flights to Victoria and other places. One morning while finishing my shift, Aliffe "Pat" Carey showed up to put in some float time on the company's Waco Cabin biplane. He asked me if I'd like to keep him company. Well, I guess so! We flew for a couple of hours, even landing on the river by the Pattulo Bridge and did a little flirting with the cannery girls. When we headed back to base and landed on the river, the tide was low. Sure enough we got stuck on a sandbar. Pat looked at his watch and said, "Oh, boy, I'm gonna be in big trouble! The chief pilot is due to arrive from Victoria within a half hour and I'm only supposed to be flying solo on the Waco until I get my check ride. If he finds that you were on board I'll get fired!" There was a flurry of activity, digging with paddles and pushing on the floats. We made it back to the dock with just moments to spare before the Rapide landed. For Pat that was sweaty. For me it was tons of fun. Pat spent the rest of his life as a bush pilot, respected by all who knew him. Glenn. I love your story of the Rapide and I would like to put it in the Jan Pat. I think it was long enough ago that no one is telling tales out of school! Ed Hi Eleanor, Yep, the statute of limitations is well past on my tale of the Rapide. It did happened a looong time ago. Somewhere in my collection of aviation books I have photos of Pat Carey when he was young and also a recent one of him, along with Sheldon Luck (a Yukon Southern pilot who flew the twin engined Barkley Grows that looked similar to the Lockheed Electra). The two of them were pictured while being honored at Whitehorse at an unveiling of a monument to bush pilots. Pat is standing with a cane and looking very fragile. Why do we have to grow old?. Glenn. Ohhhh! Memories. I remember when Sheldon Luck died in 2004. I know I wrote a little piece for the hard copy Pat. I have seen photos of him, handsome dude! in books I have. I think he was over 90 when he pegged out. Wasn't he the first pilot to fly over the Rockies at night? Ed Hey, Eleanor... I've just got to agree with your comment about Sheldon Luck being a handsome dude. In one photo he is resplendent in his captains uniform, smiling at Grant McConachie, looking like a heart throb movie star from the era of Robert Taylor and Tyrone Power. With his pencil thin mustache and mischievous twinkle in his eyes he must have had all his woman passengers swooning at his feet. And, yet, I remember him as completely unassuming. He had a full head of dark hair that most guys would kill for and retained it in his later years although it turned almost white. A fine looking fellow. And, you're right, he was one of the first over the Rockies. (He was the first to fly over the Rockies at night west to east - Ed) Glenn.

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PRIVATE PILOT Groundschool Classes held Monday and Wednesday, 1900-2200 DATE Jan

Feb

Mar

Achievements First Solo Ryan Kuan Nancy Durocher Evan Kolbuc Danny Poirier Patrick Leblanc

TOPIC

INSTRUCTOR

03

Navigation

Jason Stewart

08

Navigation

Jason Stewart

10

Radio and Electronic Theory

Jason Stewart

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Review (Tower Tour/Written Seminar) Marcel Poland

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Review (Tower Seminar)

Marcel Poland

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Theory of Flight & Licensing Requirements

Etienne White

Ellen Wood Alexis Pryor Garry Robb Brian Spahn

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Aerodynamics

Etienne White

PPL Written Test

29

Airframes and Engines

Steve Mais

31

Systems & Flight Instruments

Steve Mais

Ellen Wood Denise Sweenie

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CARS

Steve Mais

07

CARS

Steve Mais

Tina Kotthaus George Andrew

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Meteorology

Bryon Thompson

CPL Flight Test

14

Meteorology

Bryon Thompson

Patrica Evans

19

Meteorology

Bryon Thompson

Private License

21

Meteorology

Bryon Thompson

James Keith

26

Meteorology

Bryon Thompson

Night Rating

28

Human Factors

Jason Stewart

05

Flight Operations

James Zacks

07

Flight Operations

James Zacks

12

Navigation

Jason Stewart

14

Navigation

Jason Stewart

19

Navigation

Jason Stewart

21

Radio and Electronic Theory

Jason Stewart

26

Review (Tower Tour/Written Seminar) Marcel Poland

28

Review (Tower Seminar)

Marcel Poland

PPL Flight Test

CPL License

Simon Dennis

Multi-Engine Rating Ben Reid

Welcome New Members! Erik Seedhouse Scott Nijman Chad Dingwell Jason Hartt Robert Watson Allan Mactier

A number of outside tie-down spaces are now available. Phone Dispatch at 656-2833 for details. 9


If you require a 2006 income tax receipt for your training, fill in the form and return to Dispatch by February 1, 2007. Your tax receipt will be prepared by February 28th. VFC 2006 Income Tax Procedure forms are also available at Dispatch.

Victoria Flying Club 2006 Income Tax Procedure Please Note: Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) has recently been requiring proof of enrollment in the Commercial Pilot Program before allowing a deduction for the hours under the Private Pilot Licence. A letter from the Club confirming enrollment in the CPL is available to students actively pursuing a CPL (i.e, a Category 1 Medical, enrollment in Commercial Ground school, working towards a Night Rating or actively completing the dual requirements of the CPL). Members are reminded that all deductions taken are the responsibility of the person claiming the deduction on their tax return. Instructions: Complete all areas of this form. There is no need to complete the form if you reached the maximum hours per course in 2005. Mail/fax/or drop off this form to Dispatch. Allowable deductions:

As outlined by Revenue Canada Taxation 875 Heron Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0L8

Licence or Endorsement:

Private Pilot Licence Commercial Pilot Licence Instructor’s Rating Night Rating

Allowable Tuition Fees (Please read carefully): Private Pilot Course Any number of dual flying hours. Solo hours to the extent that dual and solo hours do not exceed a total of fortyfive hours. Revenue Canada in 2005 has been requiring proof of enrollment in the Commercial Pilot Licence program prior to allowing a deduction for the PPL. (See above) Commercial Pilot Course Any number of dual flying hours. Solo hours to the extent that dual and solo hours do not exceed a total of sixtyfive hours (Commercial Licence).

NO CREDIT MAY BE TAKEN FOR TIME BUILDING OR HOURS IN EXCESS OF THE TRANSPORT CANADA MINIMUMS. Private Pilot Course Only Ground school Jan 1 to December 31, 2006

$250.00

$___________

________hours dual Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2006 ________hours solo Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2006 ________hours dual and solo claimed in 2005 and earlier re private licence ________TOTAL CLAIM in hours (CANNOT EXCEED 45 HOURS)

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Commercial Pilot Course Ground school Jan 1 to December 31, 2006

$495.00

$___________

Ground school Retread

$ 50.00

$___________

________hours dual Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2006 ________hours solo Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2006 ________hours dual and solo claimed in 2005 and earlier ________TOTAL CLAIM in hours (CANNOT EXCEED 65 HOURS)

Other Ratings Rating:______________________ Hours: Dual____________ Solo___________

To Be Completed By The Student I, _________________________ certify that: I intend to work in the occupation of _______________________and that I was enrolled in the course entitled ______________________in order to furnish me with skills in that occupation OR I am qualified as a ___________________________ and that I was enrolled in the course entitled ___________________________ in order to improve my skills in that occupation. My hours claimed for 2006, when combined with hours claimed in 2005 and earlier does not exceed the maximums outlined of 45 hours for private and 65 hours for commercial course. __________________________ Signature of Student

____________________________ Date

Do you wish your tax form mailed or picked up?______________________________ Tax Forms received by Victoria Flying Club prior to February 1, 2007 will be completed by February 28, 2007.

For Office Use Only Date received ____________________ Course _____________________________ Hours:

________________

Dual $______________

________________

Solo $______________

Ground Briefing:

________________

Dual $______________

Ground school: $______________ Total Hours Claimed: ____________Private _____________

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W i n l gs Ban a u n n A q ue e will be held on h t T Friday, January 26, 2007 cocktails at 6:30, dinner at 7:30 at the

CFB Esquimalt Wardroom Come and enjoy a great dinner and an exciting evening!

Free Admission to Wings Graduates. Friends, Family and Club members - please call Dispatch for details.

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(Note: Following a critical revue of the poem “High Flight” by John Gillespie McGee Jr, Transport Canada has issued the underlisted warnings to holders of aviation licences. Pilots and others are cautioned that adhering to the premises espoused in the poem could lead to charges and subsequent monetary penalties. It was further noted that there would be no recourse of appeal; i.e. no “Kick at the CAT”.)

High Flight Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth(1), And danced(2) the skies on laughter silvered wings; Sunward I’ve climbed(3) and joined the tumbling mirth(4) Of sun-split clouds(5) and done a hundred things(6) You have not dreamed of — Wheeled and soared and swung(7) High in the sunlit silence(8). Hov’ring there(9) I’ve chased the shouting wind(10) along and flung(11) My eager craft through footless halls of air. Up, up the long delirious(12), burning blue I’ve topped the wind-swept heights(13) with easy grace, Where never lark, or even eagle(14) flew; And, while with silent, lifting mind I’ve trod The high untrespassed sanctity of space(15), Put out my hand(16), and touched the face of God. (from John Gillespie Magee Jr., “High Flight”)

Transport Canada Cautions 1. Flight crews must insure that all surly bonds have been slipped entirely before aircraft taxi or flight is attempted. 2. During periods of severe sky dancing, the FASTEN SEATBELT sign must remain constantly illuminated. 3. Sunward climbs must not exceed the maximum permitted aircraft ceiling. 4. Passenger aircraft are prohibited from joining the tumbling mirth. 5. Pilots flying through sun-split clouds must comply with all applicable visual and instrument flight rules. 6. Do not perform these hundred things in front of TC inspectors. 7. Wheeling, soaring, and swinging will not be accomplished simultaneously except by pilots in the flight simulator or in their own aircraft on their own time. 8. Be advised that sunlit silence will occur only when a major engine malfunction has occurred. 9. “Hov’ring there” will constitute a highly reliable signal that a flight emergency is imminent. 10. Forecasts of shouting winds are available from the local FSS. Encounters with unexpected shouting winds should be reported by pilots. 11. Be forewarned that pilot craft-flinging is a leading cause of passenger airsickness. 12. Should any crewmember or passenger experience delirium while in the burning blue, submit an irregularity report upon flight termination. 13. Windswept heights will be topped by a minimum of 1,000 feet to prevent massive airsickness-bag use. 14. Aircraft engine ingestion of, or impact with, larks or eagles should be reported to TC and the appropriate aircraft maintenance facility. 15. Air Traffic Control (ATC) must issue all special clearances for treading the high untresspassed sanctity of space. 16. CARs state that no one may sacrifice aircraft cabin pressure to open aircraft windows or doors while in flight.

13


A number of outside tie-down spaces are now available. Phone Dispatch at 656-2833 for details.

VFC

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Great Idea Hi, Eleanor, Here's a wild idea for a flyout: A passport-less invasion of the USA right before their "fly-here-only- with-a-passport" law is implemented Jan. 23! All best wishes ...VFC Member. I think that's a fabulous idea! Let's hope for a good day before the 23rd and get a group together for lunch at Ernie's Cafe at Friday Harbor! - Ed

Great Idea Mor e on

Ernest K Gann

When Long-time Club member, Al Whalley read in the November Pat that Ernie’s Café had just opened at Friday Harbor, he sent the Patrician an article he had written in 1993. Al and Vi had the privilege of meeting the great man himself on July 22, 1989 at KFHR. Al continues, “We were in the process of getting fuelled and parked when we spotted the Derringer. We had read the story on the twoplace twin back in the 60s but had never seen one. We also knew that Ernie lived, did his paintings and writings here and flew his “rare bird” Derringer from this airport; we had never seen him before and there he was – just a few yards away doing his walk-around. “As Vi and I chatted about the possibility of speaking to him and our excitement and anticipation rose, the lineman at the flight service interjected and confirmed that yes indeed that was Ernest Gann, but forget about meeting him. He doesn’t talk to anyone! How very wrong and misinformed that person was. “He was warm and friendly when Vi introduced us and chatted with us while he completed his preflight. Sitting in his cockpit just prior to closing the canopy, he obliged Vi’s request for an autograph by writing ‘Fair Winds to Vi Whalley’, signed and dated the sheet from his workbook and passed it to Vi with a warm smile. “A short time later as we watched him lift off from runway 34 he dipped his wing and waved. As he passed over us we waved back and never realized that we were saying goodbye to Ernie for the last time in the best possible way to a man who was so home in the air.” Ernest K. Gann died on December 19, 1991, 15 years ago.

15


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Patricianjan07  
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