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C

orporate

S R ocial

esponsibility

Protocol

Focused on the Human Person

Comprehensive Corporate Management Guide

Š 23 de abril, 2009 UNIAPAC


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE

2

CSR, AN INNER FORCE

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THE PROTOCOL

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PARTICIPATION

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“RESPONSIBLE”: TO WHOM?, HOW?, WHO COMES FIRST? WHEN?

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ANNEX 1: THE 8 STEPS MODEL TO CSR

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ANNEX 2: SUSTAINABILITY SELF-DIAGNOSIS

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ANNEX 3:LIVING IN PARTICIPATION

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ANNEX 4: COMMITMENT LETTER

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ANNEX 5: UNIAPAC FUNDAMENTALS

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© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

With this document UNIAPAC is not delivering another tool to “do” something but a practical methodology that looks at Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as an “inner force” that encourages organizations to live by the principles and values stated in “The Profit of Values”1 and work looking forward for the implementation.

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Compare UNIAPAC’s world statement on Corporate Social Responsibility: “The Profit of Values”, May 2008, Ed. UNIAPAC

© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

PREFACE Far from being a new concern, good management in the economic, social and environmental fields –in other words, good management covering the full dimension of the human person- has always been the goal of business executives striving to have long-lasting enterprises because they are aware of the fact that these aspects are inextricably linked among themselves.. This goal aims at combining the development of the persons making up the enterprise and the community they serve to foster continuous corporate growth. It is true that many theoretical and practical studies have been written about management based on different ideologies, points of view and approaches. Inspired by its social thoughts , UNIAPAC presents in this manual principles to reflect upon, judgmentsl standards and pragmatic action directions to improve the socially responsible enterprise supported by its economic added value. This CSR Protocol is the result of the experience and reflection of UNIAPAC members who work to create very profitable, fully humane and socially responsible corporations. In the past decade Corporate Social Responsibility has attracted the attention of business executives of all sorts who either have heard the name or, may have seen CSR signs in their competitors but are not quite sure what it is and, least of all, how to implement it. The purpose of this CSR Protocol is to recommend a straight forward and easy method to implement Corporate Social Responsibility as the opportunity to promote an economy that fully respects mankind where the human person remains the main focus of attention and helps corporations become truly profitable, add economic value and be more truthfulness and humane. The key to become a Socially Responsible Corporation lies on the interrelationship between the members and their stakeholders. In this scenario, the following questions should be posed: Which are the paradigms (or “paradogms”) that are obsolete in today’s corporate management? Which ones apply? How do members interrelate and relate with their stakeholders? Are corporations creating opportunities to develop their stakeholders, the community and the persons making up the corporation? Are corporations giving each member and the people around them the opportunity to develop or are they only looking at bottom lines and neglecting the human person? Are business executives aware of the fact that the solution to national and international problems does not only depend on economic throughput or legal and social structures but that it also takes values and a new mentality, behavior and structures? These questions draw us to strongly believe that there is always room for improvement and that we need to focus on how to reach the ideal we are looking for.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

In order to help business executives to identify that objective, UNIAPAC presents this Corporate Social Responsibility 2 Protocol, a set of tools and methodologies to evaluate performance in terms of Christian Social Thoughts principles and values beginning with a self-diagnosis process to appraise the social conditions in the different levels of the corporation. Once the self-diagnosis is completed, the business executive – no matter his religious belief - will be able to work out a strategy for the aspects to change, and take actions or undertake specific initiatives to ensure a continuous positive relationship with the environment and strengthen corporate sustainability. This document includes some general directives to solve different problems; yet, decision making, pace, and implementation of actions for the improvement of the corporation in this field are the individual responsibility of business executives. UNIAPAC and its member associations in more than thirty countries are committed to guide, accompany and contact business executives, when requested, who are aware of the difficulties posed by competition and sustainability, to encourage them to embrace CSR and facilitate its implementation in their respective local scenarios. We believe that the present initiative -that is the result of the experience and contribution made by UNIAPAC members from a wide variety of cultures and environments discussed and debated during the world meetings of the association- may become a valuable tool for business executives interested in improving their corporations that helps them to acknowledge the importance of employment for the people involved; to promote the development of intelligence, education and the organization capacity of its members; to allow men to transcend and create value; all in all, to build corporations that contribute to a more free, just, humane and brotherly society in the present economic framework. August 2009

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This is the social thought of the Church that acts as a compass to human behavior. It is a right and a duty of the Church due to its caring mission and vocation, inserted in the complex network of relationships of modern society. The knowledge of the Church about human vocation and goals, limits and difficulties, rights and duties, makes it capable of understanding the human person and deliver the word of life that is sound able throughout the historical and social developments of human existence.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

CSR, AN INNER FORCE When we talk about RESPONSIBILITY we refer to an exclusively human characteristic. It is the possibility of responding not instinct but according to criteria emanating from fundamental principles, values and beliefs. Responsibility is the good response for the individual welfare of the parties involved. This response is the action of the person who implements it, when allowed to choose, due to the fact that human beings are essentially free. The person who responds is “responsible” for the consequences, for better or for worse. Corporations respond to the persons around them through the actions of managers and employees dictated by corporate practices: policies, habits and procedures formally or informally established. These practices in socially responsible corporations meet principles, values and strategies approved and implemented company-wide.

OUR CONCEPTION OF CORPORATION AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY The current approach to Corporate Social Responsibility says that, today, corporate performance cannot be measured merely in monetary terms; its value is now expressed in three dimensions: economic, social and environmental. This approach embraces a scope that is wider than the mere economic role that the corporation has played for almost two centuries since production units were shaped as a result of the intensive use of new and diverse energy supplies (steam, electricity…) and human, clearly dehumanized, in many cases. In the opinion of UNIAPAC, this triple dimension -economic, social and environmental- should also embrace a “fourth dimension” that appears at the core of corporate life and in its bonding with the environment: the unequivocal value of supreme human dignity considered so many times as “the most important asset” but frequently underestimated inside and outside the corporation. The supreme principle of caring, honoring and pursuing the comprehensive development of the human person characterizes the vision of UNIAPAC and; consequently, it enlightens corporate actions as a whole. Business executives, members of UNIAPAC, pursue brotherhood love and human development through business. If we are all responsible for making this world, all the economic theories should be understood in the light of universal solidarity. The actions of business executives should not only help to improve returns but promote corporate sustainability, and for such purpose the following issues are vital: •

Build constructive relationships with stakeholders -clients, persons making up the corporation (workers), investors, suppliers, governments, local communities, competitors and generations to come-.

Give sustained impulse to competitiveness and quality through corporate commitment to social and environmental observance.

Establish a solid trustworthy relationship between the client and the organization.

The starting point has been the way we envision a corporation and CSR, which has been described in “The Profit of Values”. Aligned with this vision of a corporation, UNIAPAC members believe that:

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Enterprises are entities comprised of persons who are organized and who contribute economic and technological resources and knowledge for the production of goods and services that satisfy The needs of society. They generate economic and social added value that permit fair remuneration for those involved (the stakeholders) and the economic sustainability of Enterprises over time. An enterprise encourages the common good and encourages all those Involved to be fulfilled as human beings. In particular, it allows these persons and their Families to sustain a life respecting their dignity.

This organization -that we call corporation because it is endowed with an intrinsic economic nature- pursues the approval, goodwill and satisfaction of those around it: clients, persons making up the corporation, investors, competitors, suppliers, the community and the generations to come. Therefore, we define our vision of CSR as follows:

a form of management emerging from a personal, moral, conscious and coherent commitment of the businessmen and their related persons based on Christian social ethics, CSR is

the aim of full accomplishment of internal and external objectives, taking into account the expectations of all the stakeholders involved, in economic, social, human and environmental terms, the profitable sustainable development of enterprises and society, demonstrating respect for the dignity of human beings, communities and the environment, Thereby contributing to building the common good with social justice.

Corporations should be characterized by their capacity to serve common good as a result of organized work, research and development, capacity to identify and satisfy needs, make risky investment, create stable employment and added value chains that improve their capacity to generate and distribute wealth fairly. In this way human rights are fully respected and promoted. In other words, the framework of CSR is the common good. We, business executives, are convinced that corporate social responsibility is essential for the evolution of society towards common good; therefore, we are called upon to promote economic and human development in corporations and in society, too. This call involves the cooperation of all the

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members of the corporation to maintain a balanced satisfaction of expectations of all the stakeholders involved pursuing values as a way of conducting responsible management. In order to accomplish this responsibility we need to create the necessary atmosphere that allows and encourages the true development of the people related to the corporations in such a way that when they acquire knowledge and goods they “are” better persons. We, business executives, must stand out among other members of society as promoters of the comprehensive development of the human person because we are the perfect candidates to do so: we have relationships, resources, knowledge and education. We have said that corporations should work out a COMPREHENSIVE RESPONSIBLE relevant, gradual, measurable and attainable DEVELOPMENT PLAN , for each one of the eight stakeholders to be consider socially responsible, and above all to reach a sustainable and long-lasting economic growth. This Comprehensive Plan stems from corporate strategic planning and promotes the expansion and sustainability of the corporation in the short, medium and long term. UNIAPAC’s CSR model focuses on the needs of business executives and business leaders of small, medium and large corporations interested in sustaining their medium and long term operations.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

THE PROTOCOL The methodology proposed by UNIAPAC recommends a Functional Participation Mechanism and an Implementation Model developing “Eight Steps to CSR” Process. This CSR Protocol of UNIAPAC is based on the fundamental principles of Comprehensive Social Ethics (CSE) and involves personal commitment to be consistent with them. This search for consistency begins by carrying out a “Sustainability Diagnosis”, a snapshot of strengths and risks that serves as a guide for decision making and everyday management. This is a useful tool to analyze the critical areas and, on a second stage, define indicators to monitor actions and progress in the implementation strategy designed by the company´s team. The methodology continues by implementing modern participative strategic planning, setting up performance indicators and it is completed by mechanisms of identification found locally or beyond local frontiers. These identification mechanisms are optional and depend on local circumstances and on the interest of each business executive. It should also be admitted at this point that there are numerous options, very different models and goals that may even be contrasting. We have evolved in this field but there is still a long way ahead. UNIAPAC acknowledges the existence of numerous options but believes that in order to be recognized as an efficient tool and support CSR process should not be imposed but proposed. The following chart describes the different tools and fundamentals of the protocol:

UNIAPAC will accompany in the way helping with the consistency decision making process in relation to defined values based on Integral Social Ethics applied in the corporation, contributing to extend overtime always centered in the full development of all human persons.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Today there are several CSR performance evaluation systems and models and most of them are focused on productivity, quality and process monitoring. Several already tested models showed excellent outcomes. We distinguish three different levels of scopes in order to measure CSR performance and self-evaluation tool focused on the human person: 1.- The sphere of the actions inside the corporation. Generally, corporations and corporations have performance indicators of their own to monitor process efficiency and objective fulfillment in accordance with their corporate culture, everyday operations and risks. These mechanisms should always be in line with the plan developed after the Sustainability SelfDiagnosis outcomes recommended in this protocol (see Annex 2). 2.- The sphere of the actions outside the corporation. There are several systems and models with self-evaluation indicators on the market to monitor corporate efficiency and productivity, work atmosphere or environment, environmental factors, quality control, etc. UNIAPAC is not attempting to compete with the systems and models on the market; on the contrary, the solution proposed will help their dynamics. 3.- The sphere of “being” (holistic vision). UNIAPAC offers an innovative strategic tool that will help businessmen and business executives evaluate CSR based on Management Control focused on the human person and inspired in our principles and social values. We believe that the goal is to reach exactly the level corresponding to the raison d’etre of the corporation that gives sense to human labor, market, productivity, etc. A vision that stems from a series of principles and action guidelines in a logic and orderly manner will make people involved understand the purpose and strategy of the corporation and give the right significance to service, innovation, productivity, results monitoring, people development and respect for the environment that, in the absence of a comprehensive approach, could result in confusion and miscarried initiatives. Consequently, introducing changes or structural or operating innovations in the organization (due to the quality and number of existing tools) is no longer the most important thing to do for the future development of the corporation. We believe that it is far more relevant if business executives change the mental representation of their corporations and transform, as a consequence, the strategic processes. A new institutional sense will show new ideas that would not have been mentioned in the absence of a third level of strategic construction. Otherwise, or in the absence of agreement about this third level, every individual will have his own representation of the corporation.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

The diagram is as follows: PYRAMID

Uniapac

Great Place to Work;

Balanced Score Card; ETHOS; ISO 2006, etc.

ISO 9000 – 14000

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

PARTICIPATION

The structure of the Principles mentioned in “The Profit of Values” states that the primary four basal stones are: human dignity (supreme value), common good (opportunities for all), universal destiny of goods (an inheritance, common right and responsibility) and subsidiarity (mechanism for the development of the human person) together with solidarity (awareness of being related with his fellowmen). An effective and indispensable mechanism is suggested to put into practice these principles: participation. (Sixth basal stone of the structure of universal principles that refers to taking part in all the processes where one is involved). This is the condition and evidence of true awareness, coherence and genuine commitment to e human development and, as business executives, to the development and self-improvement of the persons. The methodology proposed in Annex 1 acknowledges that the persons who know the corporation inside out are those who are involved in it. It is a fact that human experience reveals that sociability is not uniform but expressed in diverse ways. Consequently, common good depends on healthy pluralism. Therefore, participation is the principle that guarantees the progressive and coherent realization of the ethical demands of social justice. The fair, equitable and responsible participation of all members and sectors of society in the social, economic, political and cultural development is the perfect lead to a new life in harmony. As an ethical standard, participation is the expression of a profound human expectation that reveals his dignity and freedom in scientific and technical achievements, in the world of labor and in public life; it is a typical consequence of subsidiarity, and as a right –a duty for us all- it should be fulfilled with responsibility and focusing always on common good.. Through participation we come up the inspiring values and principles of UNIAPAC such as human dignity, common good, universal destiny of goods, solidarity, and subsidiarity, among others. The logical and mandatory consequence of subsidiarity is participation. It is one of the most effective tools for the transformation of the corporation. For an executive or leader participation means training, communicating, empowering and encouraging self-control in the persons who are part of the corporation (workers). The corporation that we encourage at UNIAPAC should be a place of union and it should set example of coherence and genuine determination for society. For UNIAPAC participation goes beyond “functional and institutional” participation. It is a gradual process that results in 3 more development.

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Social Doctrine of the Church Compendium N. 281

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

“RESPONSIBLE” TO WHOM? HOW? WHO COMES FIRST? WHEN? In the previous chapter we have referred to «What is CSR? » and «What are the expectations of a corporate responsibility? ». We are going to refer to whom and how such responsibility will be exercised.

TO WHOM? TO STAKEHOLDERS Corporate actions and solutions should always be oriented to the Related Groups (or Stakeholders). Responsible actions aimed at common good focus on the respect for human dignity and the need to focus business operations on the human person. Stakeholders are not merely a group with exclusive and excluding interests but human persons who need others, a fact that involves society and certainly the environment. UNIAPAC defines eight groups of stakeholders:

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

DISTRIBUTORS, CLIENTS AND CONSUMERS

The existence and development of corporations is addressed to them because they are not sustainable without sales. Clients guide the actions of business executives. Their individual or collective preferences exert significant influence on the economic scenario when they choose how to spend, invest, save, buy or use certain products; when they make decisions based not only on price and quality but on labor conditions and the commitment of corporations with the environment. Fulfilling expectations and genuine and legitimate requirements of clients in terms of quality, time, opportunity, price and other expectations is fundamental in a socially responsible corporation. SHAREHOLDERS AND INVESTORS

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The corporation should value the contribution of shareholders, investors and corporate governance who are responsible for making strategic decisions, leading processes and helping the corporation to live up to ethical standards. By placing a portion or the total of their funds, investors become the owners of the corporation. They acquire major responsibilities and obligations towards society when they open or close businesses, employment opportunities, etc. Every action and omission has a social, human and economic impact; consequently, responsible decision making is necessary. A fair return on the investment and a comprehensive positive impact on the community guarantee fresh funds and the chance of medium and long term development. PERSONS MAKING UP THE ENTERPRISE (WORKERS) AND THEIR FAMILIES

They are the most valuable asset and the reason that justifies the existence of enterprises. The members of the organizations are ASSETS (as active members and human capital) at each level of the organization. The skills, knowledge, experience, attitudes, qualifications and relationships expressed in their everyday jobs will add value to the enterprise. Therefore, they should enjoy fair working conditions, a healthy work environment, and a corporate culture that acknowledges the dignity of the persons making up the enterprise and fair remunerations. The enterprise should be capable of hiring, training, motivating and attracting the best individuals and make them feel happy with their jobs so they commit themselves to give the best of their human and professional skills. SUPPLIERS

Suppliers provide products or services that are necessary to meet corporate objectives. They are fundamental elements to generate wealth because they help to improve operations and plan resource allocation and origin. Good raw material, quality goods, materials, products or services wherever needed, in the volume needed, in time, without failing, help to improve the efficiency of workers and the added value of the enterprise. GOVERNMENT

The Government is the authority whose main responsibility is to address common good. It is essential for the realization of common good because the government sets up rights and obligations by passing laws, rules, regulations, standards and measures to manage and protect society. The Government has a significant impact on the politics, international relations and economies of the countries. Enterprises must respect the laws and obligations passed by different public authorities as long as they recognize the right to economic initiative and freedom and entrepreneurship as an essential element of human labor. COMMUNITY AND MASS MEDIA

By nature, the human person is a social creature living and developing among other people that pursues his/her realization and personal development based on the order of the material, biological and transcendent values, social structures, culture, civilization, economy, art, science, the law, morals, religion, etc. Positive and constructive community life helps the enterprise to be part of a friendly atmosphere for the human person, the surrounding society and society at large. Furthermore, the media play a major role in healthy human sharing; consequently, they are oriented to the construction and support of the human community in various areas -economy, politics, culture, education and religion-. Society is entitled to information rooted in truth, freedom, justice and solidarity. COMPETITORS

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Fair competition makes the most of the successful and contributes to ensure product quality and fair market prices. In general encouraging fair competition in economic activities will guarantee more justice and transparency in the economy.. Competition is necessary because in the absence of competition there is incompetence and corporativism appears. FUTURE GENERATIONS (SUBJECT TO THE ENVIRONMENT)

The enterprise establishes a two-way commitment with duties and obligations for all men: to care for and develop the environmental balance that gives room to the generation of sustainable added value stemming from its values, developing ethical business practices, encouraging healthy life styles and the efficient use of natural resources to ensure quality life for present and future generations.

HOW? STRATEGIC LINES OF ACTION

The following three major strategic lines have been defined at UNIAPAC to identify and evaluate CSR deployment in relation to the stakeholders or related groups involved on the vision of the enterprise and the CSR:

The three Strategic Lines for the implementation of CSR are: Ethics and Transparency (transcendent needs) Quality of Life (human needs) Generation and Distribution of Wealth (material needs)

As mentioned in the document “The Profit of Values”, the vision of UNIAPAC is focused on the comprehensive development of the human person and, therefore, the choice of our lines of action is based on the principle of respect for human dignity. This mean respect for human rights and into the need to focus business operations on the human person emphasizing the impact of these operations on relationships and commitment with the various stakeholders. The classical anthropological approach addresses three dimensions in the human person: the body (including those needs that could be called “material needs”); the soul or psyche (human needs, including related needs: sensitive, emotional, cultural, self-esteem…); and the spirit (transcendent needs). Quality of life is frequently determined by social relations and, therefore, the conditions in which man and woman understand themselves and make personal decisions about themselves and their vocations. The proposed strategic lines will allow us to identify and promote opportunities to attain such quality of life.

SUSTAINABILITY SELF-DIAGNOSIS WHO COMES FIRST? DIAGNOSIS AND STRATEGY

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Getting to know reality as much as possible is essential to define successful strategies. The SUSTAINABILITY SELF-DIAGNOSIS (see Annex 2) gives a snapshot based on the input and integrity of the senior management, executive teams or the questioned group. This tool will allow us to appreciate, appraise and put together in a score board the way we look at ourselves in relation to the stakeholders. The SUSTAINABILITY SELF-DIAGNOSIS in Annex 2 includes: • •

General input about the organization A snapshot of the FORMAL MANAGEMENT PLATFORM of the corporation in a scale from 1 to 10 we will know how structured, widespread and applied are the modern business management process. A group of questions for this SUSTAINABILITY DIAGNOSIS questionnaire to check the level of communication, work and satisfaction of the eight groups of stakeholders towards the enterprise. Satisfaction is measured in each one of the three strategic lines already defined: transcendent needs, human needs and material needs.

WHEN? THE 8 X 3 MATRIX

The outcomes of the SUSTAINABILITY DIAGNOSIS are translated into the CSR Matrix focused on the human person (see figure below) that shows the strong and weak points possibly rejected by some stakeholders that, eventually, if systematically repeated, may result in bankruptcy and closing of the enterprise. The executive team will have to learn more about the expectations of stakeholders, if found necessary. For example, in case that the executive team is not familiar with the environmental rules applicable to the enterprise that will have an impact on future generations, they should ask for advice –even professional advice, if necessary- to learn about the demands of society through the legislative body. Actions and projects should be shaped to solve identified vulnerable issues and potential risk. This is also applicable to learn about client perception, work environment, etc. The CSR MATRIX focused on the human person relates the three lines of strategic actions to the eight groups of stakeholders generating an r 24 areas of action . This tool compares the outcomes obtained from the SUSTAINABILITY SELFDIAGNOSIS and reveals the strong and weak points for the development of new satisfactory and constructive relations with stakeholders.

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G Di ene (M str ra at ib tio e r ut n ia i on an lN d ee of ds We ) al th

o

s)

N fL ee i ds f e )

n

Q (H ua um lit a y

ST A K EH O LD ER S

Strategic Lines Centrality in the Person Actions/Base of Indicators

E C thic o (S n s pi fi T rit de ru ua n th l N ce an ee d d

CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

1. Clients, consumers and distributors 2. Shareholders and investors 3. Persons making up enterprises And their families, Unions1 4. Suppliers 5. Governments 6. Community-society, including Educational Organisations2 7. Competitors 8. Future Generations3

1. Unions, representing the persons making up enterprises, are part of this group as well as group 6. 2. This group comprises the local communities involved in the activ ity of the enterprise: it includes educational organisations, NGOs ‌ 3. Future Generations, as well as the current generation, represent the persons concerned by sustainability and environment preservation.

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4

This matrix generates a set of indicating lights for evaluating the evolution of corporate social responsibility (response) across the enterprise. No matter the years in business, volume of sales, payroll or branches, every enterprise will find practical elements to analyze and update the CSR CULTURE from the outcomes obtained. At the end, the enterprise will be capable of evaluating the:

THE SET OF LIGHTS OF SUSTAINABILITY

The outcomes of the self-evaluation reveal corporate consistency with social responsibility initiatives measured in terms of the response of the enterprise to the expectations of stakeholders. Business executives or teams will be able to identify corporate global sustainability with this chart:

CORPORATE SOUNDNESS AND SUSTAINABILITY

Green

Yellow

Red

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Sound and sustainable management in the long term.

Some CSR actions were initiated towards a comprehensive approach. Major risk in some areas.

Minimum compliance. Beware! Some stakeholders may be openly against your enterprise.

Compare Annex 3, Sustainability Self-Diagnosis Tool.

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INDICATORS Based on the “Sustainability Self-Diagnosis” enterprises should prepare a set of indicators to monitor evolution according to their respective strategies and circumstances because in the absence of indicators evolution cannot be monitored. We believe that the ethical principles inspiring the vision of UNIAPAC are like the DNA of Corporate Social Responsibility. These ethical principles will help to find out the best practices in terms of CSR developed over time since any enterprise focused on producing satisfaction agents to meet the needs of society has successful initiatives and achievements. And they will also be an incentive to move forward towards the objectives once the CSR self-evaluation matrix focused on the human person indicated the way. The vision after the implementation of the self-diagnosis tool will be strengthened by continuous self evaluation. As we have already explained above, the starting point is self-diagnosis. However, we suggest that the first step be to ask and/or learn about the different quality and productivity measurement tools already in use in the enterprise. These indicators already exist in most enterprises. Again, together with the CSR model, UNIAPAC offers a series of ethical orientation tools characterized by placing the human person at the center of economic activities. Therefore, these ethical directives should help to reveal achievements and focus efforts and initiatives tested with quality and productivity control tools. When the “Initial Diagnosis” is completed, the “Initial Action Plan” can be more clearly defined. It is worth repeating that self-diagnosis calls for the participation of the persons making up the enterprise. Participation, here, is mentioned in the sense described in Annex 3 as an ethical criterion for orientation: “Participation is the principle that ensures the realization of the ethical demands of social justice”. We have already mentioned the fact that there are several quality, efficiency and productivity monitoring tools on the market. It is the time we benefit from them, give them their real value and check the input received from them. We believe it is worth highlighting the possible benefits of these market tools such as, for example, product quality measurement tools or tools designed to improve productivity based on orderly, cleanness, standardization and system enhancement procedures like the Japanese methodology of the 5S implemented at Toyota. Our CSR vision does not neglect those tools; on the contrary, the outcomes are refocused according to the persons involved. Strategy and tools are defined at the initial or preparation stage. Once this stage is completed, the type of organization or enterprise where CSR will be implemented) should be considered (the selection stage). Then, the work plan describing the strategy and business indicators necessary to achieve the objectives should be worked out with the help of expert consultants. Convincing senior executives and/or enterprise owners to launch the process is very important. CSR is a form of management that basically depends on the decision of business executives or business leaders. It is them who should be convinced and participate; otherwise, the process will be left in the hands of the persons in charge of Human Resources Departments and turn out to be useless. And it is not a question of HR personnel being unsuitable for the job but business executives are the ones who should decide and work for the implementation.

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ANNEX 1 IMPLEMENTATION MODEL: THE “8 STEPS TO CSR”

If Corporate Social Responsibility is A FORM OF MANAGEMENT or, in other words, the INNER FORCE of an enterprise to address the expectations and needs of stakeholders, being a Socially Responsible Enterprise is not a state but an ongoing process strategically unfolding to meet the “demands” of stakeholders and the strategic priorities defined by senior management and available resources. For such purpose UNIAPAC introduces the Eight Steps to CSR described in the following table:

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

3. COMMUNICATION AND TRAINING To implement the Corporate Social Responsibility Matrix (8x3 MATRIX) focused on the human person, business executives and enterprise owners, in a collaborative initiative with the persons making up the enterprise, should define the mission, vision and values and the code of ethics, the code of conduct and the statement of principles and values of the enterprise. In this framework, the complete strategic planning according to corporate size and complexity should establish priorities, objectives, programs and projects, organization charts, budgets, quality standards, environmental evaluations and social balance reports (CSR report) to develop and consolidate the positive aspects and to correct the negative aspects affecting stakeholders. Personal commitment at every level will increase the generation of value for stakeholders in the enterprise. Our 8-step model is part of a management system that can be implemented with the help of external consultants certified by the different UNIAPAC associations. Step 1: Knowledge and commitment. Any CSR process starts from a strong commitment of the senior management. To live up to such commitment, our program offers education and training programs given by UNIAPAC experts for the promotion of CSR in business executives. Ongoing education and training provide the know-how and tools for setting up and developing a socially responsible enterprise, in other words, for the implementation of a CSR policy. Step 2: Regulatory Framework. The enterprise clearly defines the corporate mission, vision and values and communicates them in the statement of principles and code of conduct to all the persons involved.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Step 3: Diagnosis. A social responsibility diagnosis measures the CSR status. Once the areas on which the CSR process will be focused are identified, the initiatives to become a socially responsible enterprise are deployed. Step 4: Objectives and Strategic Planning. At this point the economic, social and environmental corporate objectives are defined and aligned with the corporate mission, vision and values. Then, a Comprehensive Development Plan is prepared describing goals, activities, budgets and areas of responsibility. This plan includes various programs specifically designed to meet the needs identified in the diagnosis process and a work plan is set up. Step 5: Implementation. Action strategies are developed with the help of programs included in the Comprehensive Development Plan. It is worth mentioning that each enterprise will define the applicable CSR programs according to its individual requirements and resources. Step 6: Monitoring. Action plans are followed up and adjusted to improve efficiency, effectiveness and for their optimization to achieve the objectives. Step 7: Social Balance (CSR report) (Evaluation). The social impact of operations and the fulfillment of the strategic plan in terms of the economic, social and environmental objectives of the enterprise are measured at this stage. A continue improvement plan is developed and a social balance report (CSR report) is prepared. At this point the enterprise should be socially responsible and a candidate to be given a CSR award or certificate. Corrective actions should be included in the model every year. Step 8: Acknowledgement. There are several initiatives for the acknowledgement of Socially Responsible Enterprises. UNIAPAC cannot be both judge and jury but it offers criteria and methods for the deployment of CSR through the eight steps and it provides guide and support for the gradual introduction of CSR in decision making and operations. If the local office of UNIAPAC wants to, it can grant accreditation to other organizations interested in “certifying” CSR according to the criteria and vision of UNIAPAC even if they are not members of a qualifying or certifying agency. Furthermore, UNIAPAC can certify the professional performance of those who being or not members of the organizations are ready to accompany the enterprises throughout the process. The 8-step model requires three simultaneous programs or processes during deployment: Communication and Education (CSR LEADER PERFORMANCE) Strategy and Structure Surveillance Implementation and monitoring

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

ANNEX 2.- SUSTAINABILITY SELF-DIAGNOSIS SUSTAINABILITY SELF DIAGNOSIS

THE ANSWER OF MY CORPORATION TO THE SOCIETY

A COMPREHENSIVE PRAGMATIC VIEW OF CSR FOCUSSED ON THE PERSON

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

“THE ANSWER OF MY ENTERPRISE TO SOCIETY” “A Practical Comprehensive Vision of CSR focused on the Human Person” GENERAL INFORMATION Company Name:

Date of Application:

Place of Application:

SIZE Indicate the size of your enterprise pursuant to the classification of the Secretariat of Economy:

Company size

People

People

Manufacture

Services

Micro

1-10

1-10

Small

10-100

10-50

Medium

100-250

50-100

Large

+ than 250

# of direct employees Services

# of direct employees Services

+ than 100

The following questionnaire provides a fast, comprehensive, structured and accurate vision in RELATION to the groups connected to enterprises. Long-lasting enterprises depend on the degree of satisfaction of the groups connected to the enterprise. Give accurate and honest answers. These answers should be discussed with your key group in order to implement the best actions and strategies to cut down organizational risks and vulnerability and strengthen long term sustainability.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

1.- FORMAL MANAGEMENT PLATAFORM Your organization has set up formal systems and written, published and communicated documents on: Management Tool

No

1.

Corporate values and principles?

2.

Conduct Code?

3.

Mission and vision?

4.

Is there a formal strategic planning where different units participate? (Including several strategic tools)

5.

Are there organization charts with job descriptions at all levels?

6.

A formal quality system?

7.

Innovation and creativity committees?

8.

Performance evaluation system?

9.

People evolution evaluation system?

Under Development

Partial

Full

10. Work environment surveys? 11. Client satisfaction surveys? 12. Social balance (CSR report)? 13. Participative management systems? 14. Philanthropic projects? Total Percentage

Instructions: • • • 26

The objective of this questionnaire is to provide information about the relationship among the different stakeholders and the enterprise. Read the questions carefully. Choose the most accurate answer according to the level of compliance and/or knowledge mentioned in each © May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

• •

option. Choose one option for each question. Mark with an “X” the correct answer (each option has a score). Score 0 1 2

• • • •

27

Answer No Partially Yes

In the right column add the score of each Stakeholder. In the score summary at the end of the questionnaire fill in the information obtained in each section, add the score of each section to know the total score of each line and column. Identify the global SUSTAINABILITY INDEX of your enterprise in the CSR light indicator and the COHERENCE INDEX at the foot of the columns. Mark with an “X” the progress in the right column and in the lower lines.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

I. ETHICS AND TRANSPARENCY Values in force Answers TOTAL SCORE

In your organization‌ 0

1

2

a) Shareholders and investors Do they participate in the preparation of the statement of principles and values, the code of conduct and corporate governance policies? Are they committed with the statement of principles and values and the code of conduct? Does the code of conduct of the organization regulate the relationship of shareholders with each other and with the organization? Are shareholders and investors duly informed about the economic and financial situation, net worth, investment, ROI, profits, distribution of dividends and projections of the enterprise? Is insider information given to some shareholders and investors to the detriment of others and even to the enterprise? Are shareholders informed as requested as long as it is not confidential information? Do they participate in corporate strategic planning? Is any abuse of power to favor individuals avoided? Do shareholders and investors in such roles support the implementation of the corporate plan? Does the Social Balance (CSR Report) include shareholders and investors? b) Persons making up the enterprise Does the staff understand and share the corporate mission and vision? Is the dignity of the human person honored at every level? Do they participate in the preparation of the statement of principles and values and the code of conduct? Is the executive team coherent with what they say and do? Are they committed with the statement of principles and values and the code of conduct? Are they familiar and put into practice the code of conduct of the organization? Do they participate in corporate planning? Do they support the corporate plan from their respective roles? Do they regularly implement a mechanism to provide and receive information and feedback from the persons making up the enterprise? c) Suppliers Are suppliers included in the code of conduct? Are there programs to communicate corporate values and principles to suppliers including trade deals and, in particular, due dates? Are corporate values and conduct taken into consideration when selecting suppliers? Is discrimination according to their economic power avoided? Are suppliers familiar with the statement of principles and values and the code of conduct of the organization and honor them? Protocolo de RSE ¡Š May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 28


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers TOTAL SCORE

In your organization… 0

1

2

Is the intellectual supplier’s property right honored? Are there mechanisms for mutual improvement in the compliance or lack of compliance with the code of conduct? Are suppliers included in the Social Balance (CSR Report)? d) Distributors, clients and consumers Is this group included in the code of conduct? Do we communicate our principles to distributors, clients and consumers and values through our products and/or services? Are the goods and/or services that I offer to this group consistent with my principles and values? Is the necessary information about their products and/or services clearly informed? Is there a mechanism to give information and receive a feedback from this group frequently implemented? Is this group included in the Social Balance (CSR Report)? e) Governments Is this group included in the code of conduct? Does the enterprise comply with applicable laws, rules, codes and/or regulations? Even if you believe that the applicable obligations are excessive, do you believe that honoring them is the moral duty of the enterprise? Do we participate in the drafting or modification of laws, rules, codes and/or regulations applicable in conformity with my principles and values? Has a clear anti-corruption policy been implemented? Do members of the enterprise participate in local and regional civic social welfare programs? Do you help the authority to improve the society that you serve from your position? Is this group included in the Social Balance (CSR Report)? f) Community – society Is this group included in the code of conduct? From our managerial role Do we favor the development of the families of the persons making up the enterprise? Is there a mechanism to give information and receive a feedback from this group frequently implemented? Is the social impact of decisions analyzed? Do members of the enterprise participate in local and regional civic social welfare programs? Is there a Social Balance (CSR Report)? Is the Social Balance (CSR Report) reported to all the stakeholders? g) Competition Is this group included in the code of conduct? Are registered trademarks and products honored? Is there a clear and implemented policy to reject theft, smuggling and piracy? Are disloyal practices avoided? Do you avoid incurring in any disloyal behavior such as discredit competition or Protocolo de RSE ·© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 29


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers TOTAL SCORE

In your organization… 0

1

2

products? Are price deals and/or territories to “exploit the market” affecting consumers rejected? (Monopoly practices) Do you participate in chambers and/or associations focused on client satisfaction? Do you participate, together with competitors, in civic, social and community welfare programs? h) Future generations Is there a vision of a sustainable world for this group included in their principles and code of conduct? Are there internal and external environmental protection training programs? Are you familiar with applicable environmental laws and regulations? Is there an environmental protection program in force? Do you prepare an environmental report? Are the environmental impacts of the operations reported in the Social Balance?

II. QUALITY OF LIFE Human Needs

Answers

In your organization…

0

1

2

TOTAL SCORE

a) Shareholders and Investors (S&I) Is there a recorded corporate governance chart that gives room and open participation to shareholders and investors in decision-making? Are shareholders and investors aware of the impact that the enterprise has on the quality of life of stakeholders? Is there a relationship strategy for shareholders and investors and stakeholders in the enterprise? Have you invited shareholders and investors to participate and build their commitment towards the CSR process? Do shareholders and investors support the idea that operations should improve the quality of life of the persons making up the enterprise? Is the impact on the quality of life of stakeholders evaluated and reported to shareholders and investors? Are shareholders considered transformation agents and are they closely linked to the corporate development process? b) Persons making up the enterprise Are there programs/events to keep your organization informed and compliant with labor laws and changes introduced in this field? Are job descriptions, recruiting, selection, hiring, training and evaluation of personnel recorded? Are they transparent and compliant with a nonProtocolo de RSE ·© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 30


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers

In your organization‌

0

1

2

TOTAL SCORE

discriminatory policy (of any kind) and are they consistently implemented? Are there established criteria to dismiss personnel where the personal conditions are considered? Are there mechanisms to encourage the participation and productivity of the persons making up the enterprise? Is respect for the integrity of the human person and his comprehensive development inside and outside the enterprise encouraged? Are parental and childhood programs implemented for the persons making up the enterprise? Are there schemes to encourage the participation of employees in managerial actions and acknowledge the initiatives of the persons making up the enterprise? Is collective negotiation implemented to solve conflict of interests (of sectors or 5 unions)? Are there work atmosphere evaluations and improvement actions are introduced based on outcomes? c) Suppliers Are there transparent and legitimate mechanisms to find out about the labor practices of your suppliers? Are there any measures to punish suppliers who give presents or special attention to personnel? Are there accurate and recorded rules to build respectful relationships with your suppliers? Have accurate mechanisms been established and recorded to remedy disputes with your suppliers? Are there programs or strategies to encourage good labor practices of suppliers? Are supplier selection, hiring and evaluation duly and transparently recorded? Are suppliers with inappropriate labor or environmental practices turned down? d) Distributors, clients and consumers Are the contents of products and services clearly and concisely informed? Are quality standards of the raw material and/or services met? Is product safety and health information readily available as well as instructions for use? Are there respectful rules about treating clients, consumers and distributors respectfully? Have guarantee and complaint policies been recorded and established? Do clients always receive the products/services purchased? Are there permanent mechanisms to evaluate customer, consumers and distributors satisfaction ,? Is there a customer service policy? e) Governments Are there programs/events to attract the attention of stakeholders on the importance of political/social participation as part of the comprehensive development of the human person and communities?

5

Process where all the sectors are involved and negotiation open and clearly conducted. Protocolo de RSE ¡Š May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 31


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers

In your organization…

0

1

2

TOTAL SCORE

Are there internal and external communication programs to encourage awareness and civic and social participation? Have they participated in the preparation of public policies at federal, state or local level focused on common good? Is the political/social participation of stakeholders encouraged? Does the executive team participate actively in intermediate organizations? Is the participation of the persons making up the enterprise in intermediate organizations encouraged? Do you participate in local welfare projects? Do you evaluate political/social participation? f) Community – society Are there recorded participation and investment mechanisms for labor unions and social projects? Is the social and labor union participation of stakeholders encouraged? Do you participate in sector associations to promote Common Good agendas? Have you ever been in contact with Non Governmental Organizations in collaborative common projects? Are there mechanisms to evaluate the impact of operations on social and labor union participation? Is there a specific report on the social and labor union causes sponsored by the enterprise? g) Competition Are there sound collaborative mechanisms to fight monopoly with competitors and authorities? Have you established transparent communications with competitors to promote the development of your sector? Is there any recorded mechanism with competitors to share best practices? Have you implemented actions with your competitors in favor of the community? Are there comparative studies about your labor practices and those of your competitors? Do your competitors have enough relation to contact your enterprise? h) Future generations Are there recorded mechanisms to ensure environmental protection? Are there recorded Health and/or Safety procedures? Have you implemented correct residual and/or waste disposal procedures for your operations? Do you participate in local and regional environmental community programs? Do policies and practices acknowledge the negative impact of your operations on future generations? Are environmental impact and achievements included in the CSR Report of the enterprise?

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers

In your organization…

0

1

2

TOTAL SCORE

a) Shareholders or investors Are there recorded mechanisms to conduct a balanced negotiation for the distribution of wealth that benefits stakeholders? Are there programs/events in the enterprise involving education/awareness of shareholders and investors? Is there induction programs aimed at the economic, social and environmental objectives? Are investors rewarded as agreed? Are there several investors’ meetings during the year to report results? Have compensation mechanisms for the distribution of profits/ benefits among the persons making up the enterprise been suggested to shareholders and investors? b) Persons making up the enterprise Have the material and psychological needs of the persons making up the enterprise been surveyed? Are there training programs and/or events in the enterprise for the persons making up the enterprise? Is there a legal and transparent salary and social security system known to all the persons making up the enterprise that equitably acknowledges contributions and includes mechanisms to participate in benefits? Are work conditions and atmosphere respectful of human dignity? Is there a non discriminatory/mandatory system of benefits equitably implemented for the personnel? Are there mechanisms to match family life and labor life for the persons making up the enterprise? Is there any control and follow up board (Balanced Scorecard type) with satisfaction indicators of the persons making up the enterprise? c) Suppliers Are there recorded mechanisms to conduct a fair and balanced negotiation with suppliers? Are there programs and/or events in the enterprise focused on supplier development? Is there a program or mechanism to encourage and/or improve the participation of local suppliers? Have proactive and periodical actions to identify supplier’s needs and contribute to their development been implemented? Are suppliers rewarded as agreed and timely? Are there mechanisms to know the opinion of suppliers about you? Has the impact on employment in your line of business been surveyed? d) Distributors, clients and consumers Are there recorded mechanisms to conduct a fair and balanced negotiation with Distributors that directly impact on the benefits of clients and final consumers? Are there programs and/or events in the enterprise focused on Distributor development? Is there a fair price policy? Are there transparent and accurate product and services sales plans? Are there policies that prevent/prohibit/obstruct the use of paybacks or benefits to Protocolo de RSE ·© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 33


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers

In your organization…

0

1

2

TOTAL SCORE

close deals? Are there training programs to provide the best client service? Is market research regularly conducted to learn about the needs of the different sectors and to launch and diversify products and services? Is there mechanism to know how your Distributors, Clients and Consumers evaluate you? e) Governments Are there programs and/or events in the enterprise to make stakeholders aware of the importance of being good taxpayers? Are there programs and/or events in the enterprise focused on keeping your organization informed and compliance with new applicable tax legislation? Is there a recorded tax compliance policy? Are practices to buy wills to obtain benefits, services, deals, approvals, permits, etc. discouraged? Are there mechanisms to support regional development, citizenship and to encourage sensible voting? Is there full compliance with regulations in force for your line of business? Are there specific reports on compliance with laws in force? f) Community – society Have the material and social needs of your community/ies been surveyed? Are there programs and/or events in the enterprise focused on community development? Are work conditions and atmosphere respectful of the best social and cultural environment of the community? Are there mechanisms that contribute to the development of new enterprises and improvement of the business atmosphere in the community? Does the enterprise put corporate assets to serve the community? Is there a mechanism to know the opinion of the community about you? Has the social and cultural impact of your operations been surveyed? g) Competition Are there recorded mechanisms to conduct transparent, legal and balanced negotiations that foster competition in your sector? Is your advertising basically a fair communication of the characteristics and conditions of your products or services? Are there programs/events in the enterprise focused on developing legal and fair competition? Has a fair competition policy been implemented? Do you and your competitors reject price-setting mechanisms in your sector? Are there mechanisms to know the opinion that competitors have of you? Are there specific reports about your relationship with competitors? h) Future generations Are there recorded mechanisms to allocate investment on research studies and development as a competition tool? Are there programs and/or events in the enterprise focused on environmental protection awareness? Are processes, products and services environmentally friendly? Are there investments for a recycling program? Is there a compensation policy or program for environmental remediation to make Protocolo de RSE ·© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 34


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Answers

In your organization…

0

1

2

TOTAL SCORE

up for the environmental harm produced by your operations? Are there specific reports on the environmental impact of your operations?

OUTCOMES IN BRIEF Strategic Lines I. Ethics & Transparency

II. Quality of life

Stakeholders a) Shareholders and investors b) Persons making up the enterprise c)

Suppliers

d)

Distributors, clients and consumers

e)

Governments

f)

Community – society Competition

g) h)

Future generations TOTAL SCORE Max. 96 points per column

III. Generation & distribution of wealth

TOTAL SCORE Max 36 per line

Maximum Total: 288

SUSTAINABILITY INDEX (mark with “X”) At Risk 0 to 20

Unstable 21 to 28

Sound 29 to 36

0 to 150

151 to 220

221 to 288

CONSISTENCY INDEX (mark with “X”)

Low 0 to 50 Minimum 50 to 75 High 76 to 96

0 to 150

151 to 220

221 to 288

THE SET OF INDICATORS LIGHTS OF SUSTAINABILITY The outcomes of the self-evaluation reveal corporate consistency with social responsibility initiatives measured in terms of the response of the enterprise to the expectations of stakeholders. Business executives or teams will be able to grade corporate global sustainability with this chart:

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

Green Yellow Red

Sound and sustainable management in the long term. Some CSR actions were developed but lack of a comprehensive approach. Important risks exist. Minimum compliance. Beware. Some stakeholders may be openly against your enterprise.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

ANNEX 3.- LIVING IN PARTICIPATION

PARTICIPATION

The mechanism of participation comprises various stages in a specific order. We have called this “Route of Participation” should be read and implemented gradually: Participation as a management tool is the involvement of corporate personnel in the plans, operations, outcomes and future of the enterprise. Participation calls for our shared involvement in the objectives of the enterprise in solidarity: to contribute, commit and be responsible. Therefore, this manual acknowledges the leading irrevocable role of all the persons making up the enterprise in this transforming action. There are other tools for this same purpose: •

Clear terms and conditions of agreements and regulations (standard regulations)

Humane sanitary and physical conditions for workers

Labor and leadership training

Quality and productivity

Respect for labor unions

Savings and investment

Subsidiarity

The following diagram identifies the different stages that large, wise and judicious enterprises have introduced to promote full development (human, labor, professional, economic and transcendent) inside the enterprise according to their internal and external circumstances. It is not a question of following a single recipe; this is not an inflexible mechanism but an exploratory experience where implementation is based on the supreme principles of human dignity, common good, universal destination of subsidiarity/solidarity goods in search of development opportunities for the human person and mankind. It is the belief that freedom pursues equality to create brotherhood.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

1.

Training – Information

Continually increase skills, attitudes and competencies. Embrace corporate objectives, mission and outcomes. Information should be true, timely and formal. 2.

Listening – Communication

This is the process of informing and asking for advice. Management should listen to the persons making up the enterprise (workers) and get to know their opinion and concern. 3.

Functional Participation – Empowerment

This is the process of guiding and delegating. The persons making up the enterprise (workers) participate and are responsible for their work. They should put their initiative and creativity into practice. 4.

Self-control

This is the process of involving and achieving autonomous and voluntary participation in pursue of common good.

5. Institutional Participation Cooperation through different consulting, contribution and advice mechanisms of unions, groups and regions where the management and persons making up the enterprise unite their wills to achieve common goals.

STRONG, POWERFUL TEAM CAPABLE OF SUSTAINABLE ACTION: BUSINESS COMMUNITY

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

ANNEX 4.- COMMITMENT LETTER Recommended text to be corrected to suit individual corporate circumstances. MY CSR COMMITMENT AND ACTION PLAN

Having obtained my CSR PROFILE I can reach the critical issues of my enterprise where I meet the CSR parameters or I am going to introduce improvements. The transformation of my enterprise towards CSR does not depend exclusively on my decisions and I will only be able to make it with the enthusiastic participation of all the persons making up the enterprise (workers) moving on from strong belief to ongoing implementation of actions to make my enterprise live fully the economic, social, environmental and personal sense. My enterprise is focused on creating wealth, the fuel of economic development, for the fair distribution of goods and services in virtue of the comprehensive development and self-improvement of the human person; therefore, I should make efforts to reduce the economic gap of the persons making up the enterprise to ensure an honorable standard of living for them and their families and, at the same time, I should pursue their full development. The correct use of the goods that my enterprise is taking care of involves optimizing their use for the benefit of society, protecting the environment from physical pollution and/or moral degradation, towards its full development because the success of my enterprise in an ethical atmosphere, immersed in a competition focused on social welfare, is essential for the growth and development of my country. To maximize the value of my enterprise, develop the human person and corporate Sustainability of my enterprise, all the decisions that are made from this day on in my enterprise will be focused on human welfare, development and common good.

_____________________________________________ Name, company, date

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

ANNEX 5.- UNIAPAC FUNDAMENTALS

"Do not let the enterprise make things out of the human person, But let it make human persons out of things". Andrés Restrepo

UNIAPAC’s Model of Enterprise in this manual emanates from the following beliefs: We believe that every economic and social organization should start and go back to the human person being the author, center and purpose of all economic and social life. Furthermore, social life should be an instrument for the fulfillment of the human person achieved through participation, solidarity and subsidiarity in common good. The enterprise is not only an economic reality but a social reality and should be a community of interests and responsibilities. We strongly believe that should improve professionally and morally to promote the human principles and values at the enterprise and in society. We strive to develop social awareness in business executives, cooperation among social classes and an economy genuinely at the service of the human person. The International Christian Union of Business Executives -UNIAPAC - (established in 1931 as Union Internationale des Associations Patronales Catholiques) is an international non-profit federation of national Christian associations of business executives with central offices in Brussels, Belgium, it has presence in more than 30 countries and has over 30,000 Christian Business Executives. Inspired in Christian Social Teachings, the objective of UNIAPAC is to encourage the vision and implementation of an economy largely serving the human person and the common good of mankind, so they commit to TRAIN their personnel, TRANSFORM their enterprises and their working environment and contribute to the CONSTRUCTION of a more just and humane society.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

BOARD OF DIRECTORS (2006-2009) José Ignacio Mariscal (Mexico) President of UNIAPAC International Pascual Rubiani (Paraguay) Vice-president of UNIAPAC, President de UNIAPAC Latin America Pierre Lecocq (France) Vice-president of UNIAPAC, President of UNIAPAC Europe Edouard Herr S.J. (Luxembourg) Spiritual Advisor Laurent Mortreuil (France) Secretary General

LATIN AMERICA BOARD OF DIRECTORS (2007-2010) Pascual Rubiani (Paraguay) President Juan Manuel López Valdivia (Mexico) First Vice-president José Ma. Simone (Argentina) Second Vice-president María José Orellano (Uruguay) Secretary General

SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO CSR COMMISSIONS

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

UNIAPAC LATIN AMERICA Coordinator Juan Manuel López Valdivia Mexico GENERAL SECRETARIAT María José Orellano Uruguay

UNIAPAC EUROPE Coordinator Pierre Lecocq France GENERAL SECRETARIAT Laurent Mortreuil France

ARGENTINA ACDE José María Simone Father Alejandro Llorente Patricia Ricarte Victor Parigi

BELGIUM – ADIC Marc Van Ossel VKW Guido Beazar Johan van Overtveldt

BOLIVIA –Uniapac Cochabamba Vivian Ossio

FRANCE – EDC Pierre Deschamps - MCC Philippe Ledouble

CHILE – USEC Soledad Neumann Michelle Colín Carolina Tamargo ACE Guayaquil Elena Arias Andrés Ballerino, Fernando Escandón ANDE Quito Carlos Castillo MEXICO – USEM Luis Manuel de la Pena Sttetner, German Araujo Mata, Carlos Ludlow, Francisco Gonzalez, Carlos Latorre PARAGUAY – ADEC Beltrán Macchi Sara de Talavera Victor Burt URUGUAY – ACDE Rosario Ferro UNIAPAC INTERNATIONAL President: José Ignacio Mariscal Luis Riva

GERMANY - BKU Burkhard Leffers Martin Wilde ITALY - UCID Giovanni Facchini-Martini, Franco Nava, Leonardo Becchetti, Rocco Ciciretti, Piergiorgio Marino, Giulio De Rita, Giovanni Scanagatta, HOLLAND – VNO-NCW Jan-Willem van den Braak PORTUGAL – ACEGE Nuno Fernandes Thomaz SPAIN – ASE Domingo Sugranyes UNIAPAC INTERNATIONAL Edouard Herr s.j. Etienne Wibaux

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

CSR ACADEMIC BOARD Prof. Dr. Paul DEMBINSKI: Finance Observatory, Geneva Prof. Dr. Flavio FELICE: Papal Lateranense University, Rome. Prof. Dr. A.C. FERNANDO: Loyola Center for Business Ethics and Corporate Governance, Chennai. Dr. Claude HABERER: Ricci Foundation, Hong-Kong & Paris. Prof. Dr. André HABISCH: Universidad Católica, Eichstatt. Prof. Dr. Thomas Dean MAINES: SAIP Institute, St Thomas University, Minneapolis.

Corporate Social Responsibility Protocol How can I become a Socially Responsible Business Executive? UNIAPAC INTERNACIONAL © 2008

ISBN Pending The use, distribution and copy of this material is authorized if the source is mentioned.

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

For additional information, please contact your local office.

President: Adolfo ABLATICO ARGENTINA

ACDE - UNIAPAC ARGENTINA (Asociación Cristiana de Dirigentes de Empresa)

www.acde.org.ar Representative at UNIAPAC: Jose Maria SIMONE

BELGIUM

ADIC (Association Chrétienne des Dirigeants et Cadres)

www.adic.info

BELGIUM

VKW Ledenwerking VZW (verbond van Kristelijke Werkgevers en Kaderleden)

BOLIVIA

UNIAPAC-COCHABAMBA

BRAZIL

ADCE (Associação de Dirigentes Cristãos de Empresa)-Sao Paulo

www.adcesp.org.br

President: Carlos CAMARGO

BRAZIL

ADCE (Associação de Dirigentes Cristãos de Empresa)-Minas Gerais

www.adce.org.br

President: Sergio CAVALIERI

BURKINA FASO

ACATHA B

President: Theophile YMAEOGO

CAMEROUN

PADIC (Patrons et Dirigeants Chretiens)

President: Jean Baptiste HOMSI

CHILE

USEC (Unión Social de Empresarios y Ejecutivos Cristianos)

CONGO-DRC

CADICEC UNIAPAC-Congo

www.vkw.be

President: Marc VAN OSSEL

President: Guido BEAZAR

President: Vivian OSSIO

www.usec.cl

President: Rolando MADEIROS

Secretary General: Martin

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CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

EKWA bis ISAL

ECUADOR

ACE Guayaquil Ecuador

President: Elena ARIAS

ECUADOR

ANDE (Asociación Nacional de Empresarios)

President: Pablo PINTO

FRANCE

Les EDC (Les Entrepreneurs et Dirigeants Chrétiens)

www.lesedc.org

President: Pierre DESCHAMPS

FRANCE

MCC (Mouvement Chrétien des Cadres et Dirigeants )

www.mcc.cef.fr

Representative at UNIAPAC: Philippe LEDOUBLE

GERMANY

AEU (Arbeitskreis Evangelischer Unternehmer in Deutschland e.V.)

www.aeu-online.de

Representative at UNIAPAC: Hans Hermann RESCHKE

GERMANY

BKU (Bund Katholischer Unternehmer e.V.)

www.bku.de

Representative at UNIAPAC: Burkhard LEFFERS

HUNGARY

KEE (Kereztény Ertékmgorzo Egyesulet)

www.ermee.hu

President: Botond SZALMA

ITALY

UCID (Unione Cristiana Imprenditori Dirigenti)

www.ucid.it

MEXICO

USEM (Confederación de Uniones Sociales de Empresarios de México, A.C.)

www.usemconfederacio n.org

President: Luis DE LA PEÑA STTETNER

NETHERLANDS

Vereniging VNO-NCW

www.vno-ncw.nl

Representative at UNIAPAC: Jan-Willem van den BRAAK

PARAGUAY

ADEC (Asociación de Empresarios Cristianos)

www.adec.org.py

President: Ricardo CARRIZOSA

POLAND

PSChP / PACE (Polish Association of Christian Entrepreneurs)

www.pschp.pl

President: Ireneusz MARCZYK

President: Angelo FERRO

Protocolo de RSE ·© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 45


CSR Protocol for a comprehensive management of enterprises

PORTUGAL

ACEGE ( Associação Cristão de Empresarios e Gestores)

www.acege.org

Representative at UNIAPAC: Nuno FERNANDES-THOMAZ

SLOVAKIA

ZKPM SR (Association of Christian Entrepreneurs and Managers of Slovak Republic)

www.zkpmsr.sk

President: Eng. Pavol FAKTOR

SLOVENIA

ZKPS (Slovene Christian Union of Business Executives)

www.zdruzenje-zkps.si

President: Drago RUDEL, El. Eng.

SPAIN

ASE (Acción Social Empresarial)

www.accionsocialempr esarial.org

President: Carlos ALVAREZ JIMENEZ

SWITZERLAND

VCU (Vereinigung Christlicher Unternehmer der Schweiz

THAILAND

CBEG (Catholic Business Executives Group)

U.K.

CABE (Christian Association of Business Executives)

URUGUAY

ACDE (Asociación Cristiana de Dirigentes de Empresa)

www.vcu.ch

Representative at UNIAPAC: Roman KUHN

President: Prachuab TRINIKORN

www.cabe-online.org

President: John McLEAN FOX

www.acde.org.uy

President: Ruben CASAVALLE

http://www.usem.org.mx/archivos/permanentes/Manual Transformacion/grafica_m_transf.xls

Protocolo de RSE ·© May 7, 2009 UNIAPAC 46


UNIAPAC