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MAYOR GETS ENVIRONMENTAL IN PARIS 7 CHRISTMAS MARKET ATTRACTS A CROWD 12 UBC T-BIRDS DRINKETH FROM THE VANIER CUP 45 FEATURE CITY HALL CHILDCARE WORKER LEAVES LEGACY 18 December 3 2015

There’s more online at vancourier.com PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Analysis 12TH & CAMBIE

Is the police board interfering in VPD operations?

Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

It appears that a member (or members) of the Vancouver Police Board is sticking his or her nose in a place that has rankled someone in power at the Vancouver Police Department. How else to explain a sudden amendment to the police board’s policy and procedure manual that says as much? Check this out: “It is important for the board to have well-understood protocols to ensure that board members are not interfering in operational matters; bypassing the Chief Constable’s need to be aware of board concerns; unreasonably consuming VPD members’ time; or inadvertently giving the impression they are speaking on behalf of the board.” Well, that’s kind of pointed and specific. I pulled that quote from a report that went before the eight-member police board Nov. 26 that out-

lines the need to amend the policy. It is authored by board member Sherri Magee, the chairperson of the board’s governance committee. Magee’s report points out the “safest way to ensure effective, transparent and appropriate communications” is to go through board executive director Patti Marfleet. She will ensure that a question or comment is shared with Police Chief Adam Palmer, board chairperson Mayor Gregor Robertson or other board members and answered “by the right personnel and in the right forum.” “This will ensure that expensive staff time is not utilized individually briefing board members on various issues at various times,” the report said. “It will also ensure that the Chief Constable is aware of concerns or questions from his board.” The report says the same protocol should be practised by board members when contacted by city councillors.

The Vancouver Police Board approved a report last week that outlines specific rules around members talking to cops and politicians. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

“Councillors may, from time to time, direct questions to individual board members. If questions from councillors are referred to the board office, it ensures transparent communications with the chair and the chief, and also reduces the pos-

sibility, or perception of, political interference in police operations.” Again, specific and pointed. But the report doesn’t indicate any one board member or event triggered the need to amend the policy. Instead, the

rationale is this: “With the board comprised largely of new members, it is opportune for the board to consider the protocols around communications by board members with members of the department and to clarify these protocols in the board’s policy and procedure manual.” The board is comprised of eight members, including the mayor, who doubles as chairperson. All but one of the other seven members is appointed by the provincial government; city council gets to appoint one member to the board. I won’t name all of the members here but they include a lawyer, a doctor, an oncology researcher and successful business people. All were appointed over the last year-and-a-half. So is anything going on, or not? I put the question to the chief and the mayor after last week’s meeting. Chief Adam Palmer characterized the changes as “formalizing something that’s always been there.”

“The board does not dip into operational matters,” he said. “The board provides governance and they look at things like strategic planning, budget, policies and procedures. But they’re not telling me how to run the day-today operations of the police department. It’s never been an issue, it’s just more of an administrative procedure.” And the mayor: “No, there’s no interfering going on to my knowledge. We have a whole new board and, regularly, there are tune-ups and administrative steps taken to clarify policy. So this was just to make sure all the new board members understand how we deal with communications as a board and department — and keep it efficient and upfront.” So there wasn’t an incident that triggered this? “No, it’s new board members learning how it works and clarifying our overall process.” So there you go, people, nothing is going on. It is what it is. @Howellings

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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

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Mayor talks climate in Paris

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Business leader defends cost to send Vancouver delegation

Mike Howell

He told Robertson to provide some context to the costs, noting he had a unique opportunity to tell delegates in Paris this week about the investment opportunities in Vancouver for green jobs and how the city had already attracted profitable businesses. “Many people in the world need to be told of the facts to really participate actively in this pattern to a carbon-free society,” van Lierop told the mayor, who responded from a lectern: “I couldn’t have said it better myself.” In an interview after the news conference, van Lierop elaborated on his message to Robertson and defended the cost to send a Vancouver delegation to Paris. Lierop is not attending the conference. “There is a war for talents, there is a war for the best green jobs, so to have him out there showing what we are doing, what our regulations are, is very important,” he said. “So a few dollars to fly around the world, it’s Mickey Mouse in the grand scheme of what the impact can be.”

mhowell@vancourier.com

As president and CEO of a Vancouver venture capital firm that specializes in innovation and alternative energy, Dr. Wal van Lierop knows a thing or two about money. The head of Chrysalix also knows about the socalled green economy that produces jobs least harmful to the environment. So when the Courier asked Mayor Gregor Robertson at a news conference Nov. 26 how much his trip this week to the Paris climate change conference will cost taxpayers, van Lierop couldn’t contain himself. Seated among guests and media on the top floor of the new Telus Garden building on Georgia Street, where the mayor kicked off his trip to the 21st Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change, Lierop interrupted the question and answer period of the event. “Wal, you’re not media,” said the mayor as he allowed van Lierop to speak.

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Added van Lierop: “We should not be penny wise and pound foolish.” The cost for Robertson, his chief of staff Mike Magee, city climate policy manager Malcolm Shield and intergovernmental affairs director Marnie McGregor to participate in the Paris talks is about $15,000, according to the mayor, who said some of his and Magee’s costs are offset by the C40 Cities organization. That $15,000 can be added to the $30,000 the four-person delegation from the Vancouver Economic Commission has budgeted for its trip to Paris. The commission receives the majority of its funding from the City of Vancouver. (Vision Coun. Raymond Louie is also in Paris but in his capacity as president of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, which is picking up his tab.) “Ours is more because we don’t have the political profile where people are going to pay for us,” said Ian McKay, the CEO of the commission. Continued on page 7

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

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News

VPD officers cleared in summer gun battle The criminal justice branch says officers won’t be charged under Criminal Code

Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

No charges will be laid against the Vancouver police officers who shot an armed man last summer in an exchange of gunfire that began in Yaletown and ended outside Science World. The criminal justice branch of the Ministry of Justice announced last week there was no evidence to prove any officers used unnecessary force June 10, 2014 in the daytime shootout that left the suspect with seven gunshot wounds. “This analysis took into account the potential for collateral injury from gunfire in an urban setting and close proximity to a highly popular tourist attraction,” said the criminal justice branch in a Nov. 25 news release. “To obtain a conviction for this offence, the Crown would need to prove that an officer’s conduct constituted a marked departure from the standard of care of a reasonably prudent police officer in the circumstances that existed.” Police fired on the suspect because he was wanted for shooting Reckless Bikes store owner Paul Dragan on a sidewalk

outside a Starbucks in Yaletown. The suspect used a bicycle to flee the scene on Davie Street and rode to Science World. Various officers involved fired numerous rounds in Yaletown and outside Science World. Several bullets struck a business in Yaletown and others hit a fast-food outlet in Science World. Police took the suspect into custody outside Science World. Dragan continues to recover from the shooting while Gerald Battersby, a former employee of Dragan’s, faces numerous charges, including multiple counts of attempted murder and unlawful use of a firearm. “[The criminal justice branch] has concluded the available evidence does not establish that any of the officers discharged their firearms in a manner that would meet the test for an offence under [the Criminal Code], notwithstanding the urban environment,” the release continued. “The available evidence does not establish that actions taken by police were objectively unreasonable.” Chief Adam Palmer said he wasn’t surprised the criminal justice branch decided not to approve

charges against his officers. “They acted bravely, heroically — well beyond the call — and I’m really proud of what they did that day,” he told the Courier. The criminal justice branch reviewed the incident because the Independent Investigations Office (IIO) sent a report to Crown counsel after it ruled an officer may have committed an offence. The IIO conducts investigations into police-involved incidents that cause serious harm or death. “As a matter of practice, the IIO does not make recommendations to Crown counsel as to whether charges should be approved,” said Richard Rosenthal, the IIO’s chief civilian director, in a statement posted Wednesday on the agency’s website. “As such, Crown counsel’s decision in that regard is independent of the IIO referral decision and is conclusive.” Rosenthal said a report was sent to Crown counsel because his investigators were “unable to unequivocally conclude that there was no potential that an offence may have occurred.” He cited the potential risk of harm to bystanders. @Howellings

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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

Busy year for jet-setting mayor Continued from page 5 McKay said he and his staff will participate in workshops and he will sit on a couple of panels and conduct presentations, as will the mayor, who will tell delegates about Vancouver’s goal to be the greenest city in the world by 2020 and have the city completely powered by renewable energy before 2050. “The appetite for what we’re doing is pretty significant,” he said, noting the commission measures success on how much talent, the number of companies and venture capital it attracts to Vancouver. Coincidentally, McKay said, the commission was to announce last Friday the launch of a Chinese company opening a clean technology innovation centre in Vancouver. “This is really, really remarkable,” he said of a year-long discussion to attract Hanhai Zhiye investment group to Vancouver. McKay noted it’s hard work to attract clean technology companies, but participating

in conferences like the Paris event helps build the city’s brand as a leading market for investment and green jobs. “I guarantee you people aren’t waking up in China or Copenhagen or New York and Googling ‘Geez, how cool is Vancouver’s clean tech sector.’ We’ve got to go put it in their face.” Statistics posted on the City of Vancouver’s website show a steady increase in green and local food jobs from 16,700 in 2010 to 19,900 in 2013. The Vancouver Economic Commission defines a “green job” based on a framework established by the United Nations Environment Program. Such a job would focus on activities that restore or preserve environmental quality, reduce energy, materials and water consumption, “decarbonize” the economy and minimize or avoid waste and pollution. Local food jobs refer to all food production, retailing or processing of food in Vancouver that originated in British Columbia. “We have the political will

in this city, we have the resources, the technology, the creativity and the innovation to do what needs to be done to go green in this city,” Robertson said in his speech. The mayor has spent a lot of time this year flying to Europe and the United States to participate in climate change talks. He visited the Vatican where he heard Pope Francis urge him and other mayors to fight climate change. He also travelled to the White House to participate in a climate change summit with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. Asked about the amount of carbon all those jets produced during his trips to talk climate change, Robertson said it was “a necessary evil.” “Certainly, I’d prefer to not be flying all over the planet to spread the word about Vancouver’s green leadership, but that’s the most effective way that I can carry the message,” said the mayor, who also launched a climate change pledge that residents can sign up for on the city’s website. @Howellings

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99

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U.S. Grown SMALL BLUE JAY ORANGES

89

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/lb

L

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$ 49 /100g

U.S. Grown LONG ENGLISH CUCUMBERS

99

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Fresh B.C. Grown GALA APPLES

99

¢

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8

$ 99

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K

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/100g

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$ 49

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Canada “AA” or Higher Beef

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¢

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175g

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CANNED OLIVES

99¢

14oz


A8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

News

What happens when Syrian refugees Director of settlement services for Immigrant Services Society of B.C. details process and costs will be welcomed by SUCCESS’s community airport newcomers’ network, which will escort refugees from the plane and through Canada Customs. With temperatures beginning to drop, that welcoming will likely include outfitting refugees with winter clothing and boots, unless they are being sponsored privately by faith groups and citizens, who

ON THE RECORD Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

Offers valid until December 31, 2015. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on www.getyourtoyota.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. *Lease example: 2016 Corolla CE BURCEM-6A MSRP is $17,580 and includes $1,585 freight/PDI leased at 0.49% over 40 months with $1,275 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $78 with a total lease obligation of $7,545. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. †Finance example: 0.49% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2016 Corolla CE BURCEM-6A. Applicable taxes are extra. **Lease example: 2015 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A with a vehicle price of $26,220 includes $1,855 freight/PDI leased at 0.49% over 40 months with $2,350 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $125 with a total lease obligation of $12,366. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Up to $2,000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2015 RAV4 models. Finance example: 0.49% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A. Applicable taxes are extra. ***Lease example: 2016 Tundra Double Cab SR 4.6L UM5F1T-A with a vehicle price of $38,705 includes $1,855 freight/PDI leased at 0.99% over 40 months with $3,125 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $198 with a total lease obligation of $18,991. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.15. Up to $2,000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2016 Tundra models. Finance example: 0.49% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2016 Tundra Double Cab SR 4.6L UM5F1T-A. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ††Non-stackable Cash back offers valid until December 31, 2015, 2015 on select 2016 Tundra models and may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may by December 31, 2015. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. ‡Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 24, 36, 48 and 60 month leases of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Toyota semi-monthly lease program based on 24 payments per year, on a 48-month lease, equals 96 payments, with the final 96th payment waived by Toyota Financial Services. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Lease payments can be made monthly or semi-monthly basis but cannot be made on a weekly basis. Weekly payments are for advertising purposes only. Visit your Toyota Dealer or www.getyourtoyota.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

So, they’re coming. Maybe not as many by the end of the year as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau first promised but about 400 Syrian refugees will soon arrive at Vancouver International Airport. And when they do, they

ing transitional housing, first language supports and all those technical things like opening bank accounts, issuing permanent resident cards, social insurance number cards and Care cards,” said Chris Friesen, director of settlement services for the society, who spoke to the Courier to outline what happens when refugees arrive at the airport. Friesen is on the front

will be there to welcome their new friends and help resettle them. Of the 400 refugees, half are expected to be privately sponsored and the others will be government-assisted. Those under the government’s care will be put in a taxi and driven to the Immigrant Services Society of B.C. building on Drake Street in Vancouver. “Then we kick in, provid-

When a governmentassisted refugee arrives at your office on Drake Street, how long do they stay in the housing units?

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lines of resettling the Syrian refugees. From now until the end of February, he expects up to 2,000 Syrians will come through Vancouver before they resettle in Metro Vancouver and other parts of the province. With readers asking many questions about the resettlement process, Friesen provided some of the answers, including costs and how many will actually stay in Vancouver.

Count On

What does that include?

Sheets, towels, blankets, a bed, mattress, a television, dining room table, pots and pans. The basics of basics.

Saving

How many refugees will end up in Vancouver?

It will depend on the housing offers. Historically, it’s about 10 per cent. But, you know, things are happening. [Editor’s note: At least three developers have offered properties in Vancouver to house refugees.] What kind of funding is available for governmentassisted refugees?

2016

All government-assisted refugees are placed on federal government resettlement assistance. This is for 12 months and that income support is exactly the same as provincial welfare rates. So a family of four, with two children under 19, you’re looking at $750 for a shelter allowance. The total amount is $1,450 per month for shelter, food, transportation. Same as welfare.

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At the end of one year, if they’re not fluent in English or they’re dealing with medical issues, or whatever it may be, then they are facilitated from the federal system on to the provincial

system and carry on. The only difference between a B.C. resident on welfare and a refugee is the fact that refugees have this interest-bearing loan. So part of the immigration procedure overseas — the medical examination and the one-way ticket from the refugee camp to Vancouver — is bundled up in an interest-bearing loan that can be as high, or more than $10,000, depending on the size of the family and whether there are any adult children over 19, who could have their own independent loan from their parents. [Editor’s note: The government recently announced it will waive the loans for Syrian refugees but hasn’t committed to an across-theboard decision for refugees from other countries.] Are refugees allowed to work when they get here?

They are allowed to work from the moment they arrive. They’re allowed to access provincial health care coverage from the date that they arrive. They arrive as permanent residents, so they have the same rights and responsibilities as any resident. If they work during the first year of resettlement, what happens to the income provided to them by government?

If they are working during that first year, currently they can work up to 50 per cent of their monthly income without dollar-for-dollar deductions. If they go to the provincial system — after the first year with that same job — then they are deducted dollar for dollar. Generally, who privately sponsors refugees?

Faith groups, individual Canadians, people who participate in the Group of Five [a category where five people work as a group to fund a refugee]. So they raise the money based on guidelines provided by the federal government on their website. They take care of all the financial needs, the income support for the year. They provide the furniture and the household goods, they find the apartment or the basement suite. They basically support the refugee to settle in their first year. How much does that cost?


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

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Depending on where you want them to live. So most end up in a basement suite in Surrey, basically on the same monthly income as a government-assistedrefugee. However, there are more and more private sponsorship groups that will pay off the interest-bearing loan on behalf of the refugee, as part of their thirdparty fundraising.

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So to sponsor a family of four, what’s the cost?

I would look at about $30,000. That pretty much covers everything. Again, they won’t be living on the west side of Vancouver. There are also Syrians who show up at the airport who weren’t privately sponsored or chosen by government. They have somehow arranged to get on a flight to Vancouver and come here seeking asylum. Are there many people who fit into that category?

It’s small numbers, but they’re steady. Since April 1, there have been 14 Syrian claimants. They go through the immigration

Chris Friesen is on the front lines of resettling Syrian refugees. From now until the end of February, he expects up to 2,000 Syrians will come through Vancouver before they resettle in Metro Vancouver and other parts of the province. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

and refugee board and will get a hearing to determine their admissibility to Canada. During the recent federal election campaign, the Conservatives chided the Liberals for promising to bring in 25,000 Syrian refugees. Although they won’t all be here by the end of Decem-

ber, it sounds like Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is convinced that goal will be reached by the end of February 2016. What do you make of that?

These are strange times when you come out of a decade of negative discourse, when you’re trying to do your job on the basis of incorrect

labelling by the previous government as queuejumping welfare cheats and all the other negative stuff. And now you’ve got everybody who wants to help. So it’s a 360-degree turnabout. Note: This interview was edited and condensed. See related story on page 14. @Howellings

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A9


A10

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Opinion ALLEN GARR COLUMNIST

agarr@vancourier.com

‘Slumlord millionaire’ has poor record as landlord

A

bolghasem Abdollahi is the latest slumlord millionaire the city of Vancouver building inspectors have set their sights on. But, in spite of the city’s claims, they still weren’t having much success when I last checked. The city’s target is the Abdollahi’s Lion Hotel in the 300 block of Powell Street. He picked up the 70 room SRO back in 2007 for just over a million dollars and from the look of the graffiti and filth covering the entry way doors alone, he hasn’t spent a whole lot of dough on it since.

He picked up the 70-room SRO back in 2007 for just over a million dollars and from the look of the graffiti and filth covering the entry way doors alone, he hasn’t spent a whole lot of dough on it since. According to one of the tenants I spoke with, a fellow named Pharaoh who lives on the third floor, there has been no decent heating in the building nor has there been regular hot water since he moved in last February. In fact, in parts of the building, there has been no heat at all. Last month, while Vancouver was in an unusual November deep freeze, Abdollahi received three orders from the city to immediately fix the situation. On Monday when I spoke to the city’s

PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

director of property use inspection, Andreea Toma, she said this is not Abdollahi’s first rodeo. He has a history as a non-compliant slumlord. He was a partner in the notoriously decrepit Clifton Hotel on the 1100 block of Granville. In 2013, the 73 room SRO hotel had a 105 violations related to safety and maintenance lodged against it; it was classified as the second-worst building in the city’s rental property database. All 45 tenants were eventually evicted so Abdollahi could renovate. The building is still empty. But Abdollahi’s recalcitrance has not been forgotten. Toma says the “other experience and other behaviour” with Abdollahi at the Clifton has led to this. “That is why we are taking a hard line [on the Lion Hotel].” The first order regarding the Lion that was delivered both verbally and in writing on Nov. 16 also went to the crown prosecutor to see if charges could be laid. The second, four days later, was to inform Abdollahi that he had neither moved to fix the problems nor had he provided portable heaters to tide the tenants over. The third order on Nov. 25 reiterated the point that there were, as yet, no portable heaters, nor had Abdollahi made any moves to get things repaired. The city said if the situation persisted for another (shiver) 60 days, they would send in their own repair folks and bill the landlord. The orders were delivered to the hotel and to Abdollahi’s residence on a quiet wooded cul-de-sac just below Hollyburn Country Club in West Vancouver. My own onsite inspection of Abdollahi’s

residence was hindered by the fact that there was a German shepherd snoozing on the front porch. I can tell you, though, that there was no graffiti on the front entrance. Oh yes, Pharaoh told me that in the past few days Abdollahi did drop off some portable heaters. But plugging them in tended to cause circuits to blow until he figured out some kind of work around. And the showers were still freezing. Toma pointed out that while Abdollahi did install a new heating system a few years ago in the Lion, he was cutting corners. The unit he installed was woefully inadequate, designed for a single family residence, not a commercial building with dozens of tenants. Then, on Tuesday just after 5 p.m., the city issued a news release, an update on all those orders: “Today, heat and hot water

were fully restored throughout the Lion hotel.” Well, maybe not. Twenty minutes later I was on the phone to two more tenants, Jeff and Ron. Guess what? Nothing had changed. Hot water was sporadic if at all and as for heat — what heat? I thought that maybe these systems may take time to get going, so I called Jeff again early Wednesday morning. Still no heat. Still no hot water. He did say city inspectors and plumbers were expected later in the day. Hope springs eternal. And according to the city news release, that won’t be the end of it for this slumlord. “Staff continues to keep pressure on the owner.” There are still fire, safety and health related issues to deal with. @allengarr


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A11

Inbox letters@vancourier.com LETTERS

Ladner’s meaty claims remain toothless Re: “Eat less meat to curb climate change,” Nov. 23. As I read Mr. Ladner’s article regarding curbing our meat eating, the following statements struck me as odd: “the biggest single act we could take as individuals would be not abandoning our cars, but to eat less meat” and “it has been said that a vegetarian driving a Hummer has a lower ecological footprint than a cyclist who eats meat.” I could find no verification for these claims. I did find that the actual statement regarding a Hummer driving vegan was “a Hummer driving vegan uses less energy than a meat eating Prius driver.” This assertion was made by American journalism professor Michael Pollan in 2009 and was retracted days later following scientific evidence that it could in no way be backed up. I understand and appreciate that Mr. Ladner’s articles are to provide a business perspective to those issues that we are all talking about. However facts are facts and should be checked. Susan McNicol, Vancouver

Flirtin’ with Merton Re: “Thomas Merton remains an influential Christian figure,” Nov. 26. I was pleased to see Pat Johnson’s article about a writer whose work remains relevant and universal. In addition to the various activities and works listed in connection with the centenary of Merton’s birth, there is another book which I haven’t had a chance to read yet, but which sounds very interesting: Thomas Merton and the Noonday Demon: The Camaldoli Correspondence, by Donald Grayston, Cascade Books, 2015. I hope this book is also widely read and reviewed. There will be a book launch on Sunday, Jan. 10, 9:15-9:55 a.m. at Park Room, Christ Church Cathedral, Burrard and Georgia. Carl Rosenberg, Vancouver

ONLINE COMMENTS

Food for thought Re: “Eat less meat to curb climate change,” Nov. 23. Why is everybody acting like this is news? John Robbins wrote Diet for a New

unforgettable

TOP sirloin

While Parker Street Studios has become an unlikely hub for artists on the East Side, one online commenter suggests their presence in the neighbourhood is a precursor to “vast and mean” condo development. PHOTO REBECCA BLISSETT.

Re: “Artists bring body and soul to Parker Street Studios,” Nov. 24. All sounds delightful on your end. But it all seems, as with 1980s Yaletown, that artists’ lofts/studios are pre-cursors of vast and mean condo development by greedy landowners in Strathcona, Grandview where old rents are low, but buying a place is impossible as hipsters move in. Peakie via Online Comments

Reclaiming the streets Re: “City clears block of vendors, homeless people,” Nov. 19. Good news, time to reclaim the streets for the citizens of the city. @RW_Fowler via Twitter

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America in 1991 and, y’know, it wasn’t really new even then... Janet S Miller via Facebook ••• Janet, I think the concept of eating “less” is a more realistic pitch for the general public AND sadly, it’s only now that many people are taking climate change seriously. I’m a 23 yr vegetarian and I think it’s great if people can cut down if they can’t give it up. Michele Sherstan via Facebook ••• Earth is without doubt greater than MC2. But which do we value more, and which will be easier to eliminate the GHG’s from, meat or cars? Donald Rennie via Facebook

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A12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Neighbourhoods

Michael Jeong, 2, finds an alien bauble in the Kathe Wohlfahrt market, and hangs it on a tree with the help of dad, Hanjoo.

CHRISTMAS MARKET ATTRACTS CHEERFUL CROWD The sixth annual Vancouver Christmas Market brings seasonal cheer, and crowds, to Queen Elizabeth Plaza. Based on the 700-year-old German tradition known as Christkindlmarkt, the market features 50 international vendors offering a variety of handmade crafts, toys, clothing and food until Dec. 24.

Peter Graichen, is the bearded brew master behind feuerzangen bowle, a mulled wine mixed in copper tanks and served in special edition mugs.

Elwynn Bunnell-Mark, 5, gets her photo taken with Polly and Jolly, the Vancouver Christmas Market’s Gingerbread couple.

PHOTOS CHUNG CHOW SEE PHOTO GALLERY AT VANCOURIER.COM

Tracy Lui (left), who came over from Taiwan to visit her daughter Cherrie Miao (right), tries some borscht while her daughter takes a bite of pig feet.

Bjorn Aunet (left), with Elina Birmingham, has his eye on this Holzknodol figurine at the Kathe Wohlfahrt market stall.

Jessica Ros gives some Christmas-coloured popcorn a mix at Canadian Kettle Corn Xtreme.


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

x

Art auction reaches new heights

Vancouver-based Heffel Fine Art Auction House’s Nov. 26 auction in Toronto grossed $23.4 million, which makes it the highest grossing fine art auction in Canadian history. Up for grabs were museum-quality works by Group of Seven artist Lawren Harris, whose reputation has grown substantially recently because of a major exhibit at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and fawning tweets from comedian Steve Martin. “I love standing in front of paintings,” Martin said in a tweet last January, which included a selfie next to Lawren Harris’s painting Isolation Peak. “Especially this beauty by Lawren Harris.” As for Heffel’s auction, it exceeded estimates preauction that the event would gross up to $15 million. “Our 20th year of live auctions has been particularly gratifying, thanks to Lawren Harris’s remarkable momentum,” said David Heffel, who is president of Heffel Fine Art Auction House. “It’s rewarding to participate in the growth of the international art market and share soughtafter masterpieces with the public as they pass through one set of hands to the next.” The leading lot in the fall sale was Harris’ canvas Mountain and Glacier, which outperformed its estimate of $1 million to $1.5 million and sold for an auction record $4.602 million. Combine that sale with two other sales for works by Harris and the total was $9.499 million. Harris’s Winter Landscape sold for $3.658 million, while Winter in the Ward sold for $1.121 million. Another Group of Seven artist, Tom Thomson, saw his After the Storm, which is believed by experts to be the last work he produced before enduring a mysterious death, fetched $1.298 million. Other big sales include one for Alex Colville’s Harbour, which fetched $1.888 million. Works by Jean Paul Riopelle saw major interest from bidders in the room and on the phones. The 1950s canvas Sans titre doubled its presale estimate and achieved $1.239 million. —Glen Korstrom gkorstrom@biv.com @GlenKorstrom

A13

Development Permit Board Meeting: December 14 Are You Ready for Snow and Ice? 1. Get your shovel and de-icing materials ready early 2. Clear your sidewalk by 10 am 3. Make room for plows by moving your car 4. Avoid driving in snow and ice. Check transit schedules at translink.ca for commuting alternatives.

Be a Snow Angel: Lend a Shovel When it Snows When snow and ice hit, we need a team effort. Please help neighbours, friends or relatives who may not be able to shovel their own sidewalks. Thanks for keeping our streets and sidewalks safer for everyone!

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

vancouver.ca/snow or phone 3-1-1

Remember, all property owners and occupants must clear snow and ice from sidewalks around their property by 10 am, seven days a week.* *See Sections 76 & 76A of the Street and Traffic Bylaw for details

Pender Street Water Main Work – Carrall Street to Gore Street Now Complete Thanks for supporting businesses during construction! Replacing sewer and water infrastructure can be loud, messy business. Each year, the City replaces water main and storm and sanitary sewers that are nearing 70-100 years old.

Currently, we’re upgrading critical water infrastructure on Pender Street, from Gore to Seymour. When you see construction, remember: local businesses are open and appreciate your support.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

vancouver.ca/penderstreetwatermain or phone 3-1-1

The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet: Monday, December 14, 2015, 3 pm Vancouver City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Ground Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider the following development permit applications: 5650 Balaclava Street To develop a new annex for Knox United Church behind (east of) the existing church on Balaclava Street, which comprises multipurpose rooms and offices on the first floor and a 20-child preschool on the second floor, all above 2.5 levels of underground parking with access from Balaclava Street. 5668 Balaclava Street To develop the site with a five-storey multiple dwelling designed for seniors, which includes 76 dwelling units, and a seniors resource/activity centre, all above 1.5 levels underground parking which is accessed off of West 41st Avenue. Please contact City Hall Security (ground floor) if your vehicle may be parked at City Hall for more than two hours. TO SPEAK ON AN ITEM: 604-873-7770 or lidia.mcleod@vancouver.ca

Public Hearing: December 15, 2015 Vancouver City Council will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, December 15, 2015, at 6 pm Vancouver City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Third Floor, Council Chamber to consider zoning and heritage amendments for these locations:

1. 5470-5490 Oak Street To rezone 5470-5490 Oak Street from RS-1 (One-Family Dwelling) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District to permit the development of two four-storey residential buildings, containing a total of 12 dwelling units. A height of 12.2 metres (40 feet) and a floor space ratio (FSR) of 1.20 are proposed.

2. 6318-6340 Cambie Street

To rezone 6318-6340 Cambie Street from RT-2 (Two-Family Dwelling) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District to permit the development of a seven-storey mixed-use building, containing a total of 50 dwelling units and three commercial units. A height of 28.9 metres (95 feet) and a floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.22 are proposed.

3. 375 West 59th Avenue To rezone 375 West 59th Avenue from RS-1 (One-Family Dwelling) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District to permit a residential development consisting of two six-storey buildings and one five-story building, containing a total of 155 dwelling units. A height of 22.8 metres (75 feet) and a floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.66 are proposed. 4. 998 Expo Boulevard To amend CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District (593) By-law No. 11125 for 998 Expo Boulevard (Concord Area 5B West) to increase the floor area exclusion for balconies from eight to 12 per cent and to increase the underground residential storage space.

5. 565 Great Northern Way

To amend CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District (402) By-law No. 8131 for Great Northern Way Campus to create new height sub-areas with revised height limits. The proposed amendments would divide sub-area 3 into two new subareas, 3a and 3b. Building height in area “3a” would decrease from a maximum 18.29 metres (60 feet) to 7.62 metres (25 feet) and building height in area “3b” would increase from a maximum 18.29 metres (60 feet) to 30.48 metres (100 feet). No increase in the overall density is proposed.

6. 1335 Howe Street

To rezone 1335 Howe Street from DD (Downtown) District to a CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District, to increase the floor area from 5.0 FSR to 12.12 FSR and the height from 91.4 metres (300 ft.) to 115.2 m (378 feet) to permit the development of a 40-storey residential tower with 264 strata residential units, with a seven-storey podium containing a minimum of 109 secured market rental units and retail and service uses at ground level.The childcare facility originally proposed has been eliminated and some of the market residential units have been converted to secured market rental units. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE APPLICATIONS: vancouver.ca/rezapps or 604-873-7038

Anyone who considers themselves affected by the proposed by-law amendments may speak at the Public Hearing. Please register individually beginning at 8:30 am starting December 4, 2015 until 5 pm on the day of the Public Hearing by emailing publichearing@vancouver.ca or by calling 604-829-4238. You may also register in person at the door between 5:30 and 6 pm on the day of the Public Hearing. You may submit your comments by email to mayorandcouncil@vancouver.ca, or by mail to: City of Vancouver, City Clerk’s Office, 453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor, Vancouver, BC, V5Y 1V4. All submitted

Visit: vancouver.ca Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1

comments will be distributed to Council and posted on the City’s website. Please visit vancouver.ca/publichearings for important details. Copies of the draft by-laws will be available for viewing starting December 4, 2015 at the City Clerk’s Office in City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor, Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. All meetings of Council are webcast live at vancouver.ca/councilvideo, and minutes of Public Hearings are available at vancouver.ca/councilmeetings (posted approximately two business days after a meeting). For real time information on the progress of City Council meetings, visit vancouver. ca/speaker-wait-times or @VanCityClerk on Twitter.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PUBLIC HEARINGS, INCLUDING REGISTERING TO SPEAK: vancouver.ca/publichearings


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Community

Issa Alwadi, 23, a refugee from Syria, wants Canadians to understand the misery Syrian people are experiencing in what is left of his country and in the refugee camps of the nearby nations. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

PACIFIC SPIRIT

Syrian refugee finds hope in Vancouver First of two part-series on Syrian refugees and Vancouverites of all religions mobilizing to welcome them

Pat Johnson

PacificSpiritPJ@gmail.com

Issa Alwadi arrived in Vancouver just last week. He has barely adjusted to life in a temporary home downtown with his wife and baby, and he speaks hardly a word of English, but he wanted the people of his newly adopted country to hear first-hand about what is happening in Syria. His case worker at the Immigrant Services Society of B.C. suggested he wait a few weeks or even months before telling his story, but he was determined. He wants Canadians to understand the misery Syrian people are experiencing in what is left of his country and in the refugee camps of the nearby nations. The numbers are familiar and horrific. Somewhere between 220,000 and 340,000 Syrians have been killed in the multi-sided war. From a population smaller than Canada’s — about 23 million — there are nearly

eight million internally displaced persons and four million refugees have fled the country. The fighting is sectarian, between branches of Islam, geopolitical — a proxy war involving the West, Russia, Iran and Iraq — and also embroils the ethnically distinct Kurdish minority and the forces for a democratic Syria that initially took up the fight against Syrian president Bashar al-Assad’s regime. (Although Alwadi’s first name is the Arabic for Jesus, he is a Muslim.) Alwadi is fortunate to be among the millions of refugees. He came very close to being among the dead. Telling his story through his Arabic-speaking case worker at the Immigrant Services Society, Alwadi acknowledges that he opposes the regime of Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian dictator whose attempts to crush his country’s version of the Arab Spring has created one of the worst humanitarian disasters in history. In the early days

of the so-called Damascus Spring, Alwadi was one of thousands who took to the streets in peaceful protest. “We marched and we were holding olive branches,” says the 23-year-old. “But from that point I was not involved in anything.” When the crackdown came, Alwadi was among the countless arrested by the regime. His arrest, he says, had nothing to do with any involvement on his part in anti-government violence. “It’s to plant the seed of fear in the hearts of Syrians to avoid any possible protest,” he says. He was beaten and spent a month, he says, in a room of maybe five-by-five metres with about 300 people. “It was almost impossible to sleep,” he says. “Some people died because of the pressure and suffocation.” He was interrogated and tortured. The regime tried to get him and other prisoners to admit to “crimes,” to agitating against the government and to committing acts of violence.

“But those statements are false,” says Alwadi. He was never involved in violence, he says. He was studying IT and was just about to write his first-year final exams when he was arrested. After a month crammed with hundreds of others in a small room, he says, he was moved to a facility where things were worse. Government agents shot randomly into the crowds of prisoners and threw grenades. Alwadi still has shrapnel in his leg. After eight months and 20 days, the Free Syrian Army liberated the survivors in the prison. Alwadi received some treatment for his injuries and then fled, like so many others, across the border into Jordan. While he may have been safe from the repression of the Assad regime and the fighting between the dozens of belligerent militias, the plight of refugees in Jordan, he wants Canadians to understand, is untenable. “The situation in Jordan for Syrians is catastrophic,” he says. “In certain camps

it’s sometimes impossible to survive in them.” Where Alwadi was, he had to walk about a kilometre just to access potable water. He spent two-and-a-half years in Jordan, during which time he married, before being accepted as a refugee to Canada. Alwadi, like a majority of the 25,000 refugees Canada is committed to taking in by February, is sponsored by the federal government but, as next week’s column will demonstrate, religious groups and other Canadians are clamoring to privately sponsor thousands as well. “I’m more rested now,” he says, though his eyes suggest otherwise, “but it’s still a new country.” What he knew about Canada before he arrived here a week ago Tuesday was enough to convince him to make the move and bring his family here. “I knew that I would have my freedom, that I would be treated like a human,” he says. “And I heard that this

was a beautiful country.” He wants to reassure Canadians who fear that the Syrian refugees might include radicalized individuals, adding with a laugh that he doesn’t want to fight anybody. “I would like to have a normal life,” says Alwadi. “I would like to have a job, I would like to work, I would like to eat, I would like to send my kids to school.” He also wants to spread awareness about the unknown numbers of people who are still in the prisons of Syria. “They are forgotten,” he says. “They are innocent and nobody talks about that issue, but it’s a humanitarian issue.” Alwadi’s story is one of millions of tragic personal histories, although for him and his family, hope is beginning to look possible. Next week: What are the values driving Canadians of all religious backgrounds to come to the aid of these people from half a world away? @Pat604Johnson


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

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Controversial ‘origami’ tower proposal revised

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Critic questions short notice of public feedback session

Naoibh O’Connor

noconnor@vancourier.com

Cadillac Fairview’s controversial Waterfront Tower is being re-imagined to be more sensitive to the historic Waterfront Station and The Landing heritage building, which flank the site, according to urban design consultant James Cheng of James K.M. Cheng Architects Inc. Cheng was brought in as a project advisor after an avalanche of criticism derailed the original proposal last January. Cheng helped the design team develop new design principles and guidelines on which the latest scheme is being based. The tower’s placement on the property, which is located at 555 West Cordova, is being pushed back towards the harbour in the revised plan to create a larger public plaza fronting Cordova Street. This shift also means the facades of Waterfront Station and The Landing will be completely visible, Cheng said. Whether the design is moving in a direction that satisfies critics, who include prominent planners, remains to be seen. A public meeting is scheduled for Dec. 3 to gather feedback. The original proposal en-

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visioned a 26-storey, modern glass office “origami” tower that would overhang part of the station. B+H Architects and Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture submitted the application on behalf of Cadillac Fairview. Its approval was conditional under existing zoning. After the Urban Design Panel rejected it in late January, the application’s appearance before the Development Permit Board was cancelled to give time for a re-design. UDP members raised various concerns including the location of the tower, its proximity to Waterfront Station and that not enough sustainability measures were featured in the project. They also questioned the relationship between the property’s private and public realm. Cheng said the design team will reveal several massing options on Thursday and that the session is meant to be an open workshop, which will allow participants to offer written input and/or sketch suggestions. “This is to get feedback. Then [the design team] will go back and finalize their design,” he said. “There are some ideas. It’s not just empty words,

so when people come they will be able to see what the design team has done based on the design guidelines — how they responded to the station, how they responded to the cornice line of The Landing.” Along with being pushed back, the building has been rotated 90 degrees — it was previously oriented in a northsouth direction, now it’s oriented in an east-west direction. Cheng said the public would still be able to go to the back of the site to look at the view and the design team is considering providing an additional viewing plaza in the tower that’s accessible to the public at the level of The Landing’s cornice. Former city planner Ray Spaxman was among the original proposal’s critics. He questions the short notice for the public feedback session, but he’s hopeful some major concerns have been addressed. Spaxman is a member of the Downtown Waterfront Working Group, a citizens’ group whose members include former planners and heritage activists. The group wrote to council arguing the plan for the tower jeopardized the future planning of the waterfront.

Spaxman noted the developer wouldn’t meet with the group. “There is a concern they want to push it through before there are too many changes at city hall that might change the positive attitudes that they met with previously,” he said. City manager Penny Ballem was fired earlier this year and head planner Brian Jackson retired. Neither position has been filled yet. Spaxman said he hopes the design team recognizes the importance of the waterfront hub in the new proposal and that the tower’s design has been changed significantly to accommodate the hopes and expectations for the hub and that it’s also sympathetic to the two heritage buildings. Spaxman maintains if all the property owners in the waterfront hub area cooperated, they could do a better job than if they work individually. “That’s where we’re looking for leadership from the city as well,” he said. The public meeting runs from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Mackenzie Ballroom at the Fairmont Waterfront Hotel at 900 Canada Place Way on Dec. 3. @naoibh

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The original plan for the Waterfront Tower at 555 West Cordova was widely panned, but the design team is revising its proposal. A public meeting is scheduled for Dec. 3. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Opinion

UBC must step up to the plate in combatting sexual assault Jessica Barrett

Jessica.barrett@gmail.com

It was a perfect July day in Calgary and I had planned a treat for myself — spending a solo Saturday with a picnic and a good book in the park. I’d been working long hours reporting from the Stampede grounds and desperately needed a reprieve from the hot tarmac, the hordes and the pervasive

smell of deep fried foods. As I watched families, joggers and cyclists pass by the riverside, a man walked up to me. He was middle-aged, spoke with a thick Chinese accent and, after a few minutes of making awkward small talk, sat down a few feet away, unzipped his pants and exposed himself. Just like that. I froze. And then I meekly asked him to “do

that somewhere else.” I think I even said please. Then I sat there for the next few hours stunned, disturbed and wondering why I wasn’t able to just shake it off. I wondered if I was overreacting, I contemplated how I could have prevented the situation and I wished there was someone I could talk to. Only then did it occur to me that maybe I should call the police.

The question of why so many women (and men) don’t report sexual offences is a beast with many heads. There are the obvious deterrents: extremely low conviction rates, a justice system that acts as if the victim is on trial, the risk of being met with doubt, blame and outright hostility by the authorities. But even before that there’s a more insidious

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problem. Many people who experience something legally considered a sexual offence don’t recognize it as such. Women, in particular, often don’t know how seriously to take awkward gropes, bad dates, or uncomfortable encounters with strangers. Put simply, so many of us encounter inappropriate behaviour from men that the line between creepy and criminal is not at all clear. Things get even murkier if the questionable activity occurs between acquaintances after a few drinks at the bar, rather than between perfect strangers in the sober light of day. Add to that women’s deeply ingrained cultural conditioning to minimize those situations, blame themselves and explain them away and you get the preponderance of horrific cases such as the Jian Ghomeshi scandal or the half-dozen women at the University of B.C. who fell victim to an alleged sexual predator while the university sat idly by. I find UBC’s response, or lack thereof, particularly appalling. Here is an opportunity for an institution to step up to the plate and, through implementing a sexual assault policy and a sexual assault response team — as has been suggested by some of the complainants — provide a sorely needed intermediary for victims of sexual assault. Or those who aren’t sure if they are victims. I relate all too well to UBC complainant Caitlin Cunningham, who told CBC she went to the university after she was grabbed in public by the alleged offender precisely because she wasn’t sure if what had happened was an assault. “I didn’t know if I had grounds to go to the police,” she said. “When I turned to the university, I was asking for that kind of support.” Rather than receive it, she, along with the other women in the case, was dismissed and told

to keep quiet. Now that UBC is once again at the centre of unflattering headlines (let’s not forget the rape chant debacle of just two years ago) we get a weak response that it is “considering” putting a sexual assault policy in place. Good grief. UBC’s own brand as “A Place of Mind” denotes its identity as a thought leader in the social and academic space. Here is an opportunity to live up to that ideal and take concrete steps toward combatting a culture rife on university campuses where boys will be boys and girls are encouraged, still, to demure and defer. When influential institutions don’t take sexual assault seriously it contributes to the cultural feedback loop that makes women question their own experiences and, far more often than not, keep to themselves. If we as a society really want victims of sexual assault to report to police (and I sometimes doubt that we actually do) our institutions need to facilitate that by offering support to identify the appropriate course of action. It’s really hard to pick up the phone and call the police over an incident that many people would just laugh off. I know. In the end I did call the police and I am glad that I did. The responding officers were kind, thorough and took what had happened very seriously. I learned that I too was likely part of a pattern that had been escalating, a thought that had not occurred to me as I debated whether to call. As far as I know they never caught the guy, but at least he was a stranger in a city where I no longer live. I’ll never have to see him again and I felt empowered because I reported him and my encounter with police was a positive one. Every woman should be so lucky. @jm_barrett

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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Opinion

Unraveling the multiple origins of the Syrian crisis Geoff Olson Columnist

Geoffolson.com

In his 1988 book Money And Class In America: Notes And Observations On Our Civil Religion, author Lewis Lapham recalls a dinner with U.S. senator Patrick Moynihan, who laughed “uproariously about the absurdity of his predicament.” “As a senator, he said, he was expected to hold informed opinions under as many headings as were listed in the Federal Directory — on weapons and civil rights as well as on nuclear energy, education, Indians (American and Miskito), communications theory, military intelligence, Arizona ground water and the volume of barge traffic on the Mississippi river,” Lapham writes. “It’s a joke, of course,” he [Moynihan] said. A dangerous joke, maybe, but still a joke.” The senator’s moment of black humour dated back to the Carter era, when the term “consumer electronics” mostly meant pocket calculators and boom boxes. Today we have more sources of information on more platforms than ever. It’s an embarrassment of clickbait riches for the leaders and lead alike. “A lie will go round the world while truth is pulling its boots on,” observed the 19th century British Baptist minister Charles Spurgeon. Today, by the time a falsehood has been stomped on by Reddit or Snopes, the planet has been circled several times over by Trumplevel whoppers. Consider the supposed origins of the Syrian refugee crisis. In the authorized version, President Bashar al-Assad attacked his own

people to stifle uprisings, resulting in a civil war and millions fleeing to neighbouring countries and beyond. For most news consumers the narrative stops there, with the moral simplicity of a Marvel superhero flick. Yet matters are complicated by the fact that ISIS/IS/ Daesh — a threat NATO is apparently out to eliminate — is also fighting Assad’s regime. So NATO is said to be supporting “moderate insurgents,” a term reminiscent of comic George Carlin’s favourite oxymorons, “jumbo shrimp” and “military intelligence.” But let’s back up a bit. From 2006 to 2011, half the area of Syria was afflicted with the worst drought on record, which researchers connect to climate change. The drought is believed to have played a large role in the violent uprising that began across the country in 2011. Complicating things further, in 2010 Goldman Sachs made more than $400 million in profits through dangerous and damaging food speculation practices, according to a 2011 report in The Telegraph. Emboldened by widespread droughts in the Mideast and elsewhere in the world, banksters used commodity speculation to profit from the poverty and suffering of others, sending the price of wheat and other commodities through the roof. “In 2012, researchers affiliated with MIT demonstrated that there was a correlation between rising global food prices and the outbreak of civil unrest worldwide: Whenever prices eclipsed 210 on the UN’s FAO Food Index, a measure of the monthly change in international prices of core food commodities, riots and conflict became much

more likely,” notes a report on Vice.com. And we can’t talk about the Syrian crisis without going back to the American neo-con’s pre-9/11 plans for regime change in the Mideast. Of the nations identified as threats to the U.S. — North Korea, Iraq, Iran, Libya and Syria — two have fallen under Bush and Obama’s undeclared oil wars, while a third is joining a long-term humanitarian crisis in the region. The human fallout is only nominally about dictators resistant to freedom by force. It’s really about the invasion and destruction of sovereign states using NATO forces and proxy armies, resulting in mass deaths and a predictable refugee crisis, coupled with a rebranded terrorism threat — with the effects possibly amplified by climate change and a Wall Streetinflated food bubble. The planet now hosts the largest number of refugees and displaced peoples since the end of the Second World War. It’s the kind of overdetermined mess that would have made the late senator Moynihan’s head swim. Charles Fort, an early 20th century chronicler of strange phenomenon, knew a thing or two about multiple causation. “If there is an underlying oneness of all things, it does not matter where we begin, whether with stars, or laws of supply and demand, or frogs, or Napoleon Bonaparte. One measures a circle, beginning anywhere,” he observed in 1931. In this case, anywhere could be Damascus, Tehran, Tel Aviv, London, New York, or Washington, DC. But the line always circles back to Empire. @geoffolson

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Feature

After 40 years at City Hall Child Care, helping raise hundreds of children with a signature blend of gentle affection, firm limit setting and good humour, Don Hann retired last Friday. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Childcare worker Don Hann retires from remarkable career One of the country’s longest-serving male childcare workers leaves legacy of nurturing and activism Tom Sandborn tos65@telus.net

Imagine this. A two-yearold girl is toddling cheerfully around a Kitsilano house party 30 years ago, and approaches one of the young men in the kitchen. “I peed and I’m wet,” she tells him. “Will you change my diapers?” The young man recoils in horrified surprise and tells the little girl that that task is her mother’s job. Sturdy, confident, arms akimbo, she tells the reluctant man in ringing tones, “Donnie changes my diapers at daycare!” While the girl in the story probably didn’t have the vocabulary to tell the reluctant young man he was being sexist by refusing to do one of the foundational tasks of child rearing, the message was abundantly clear. And her beloved “Donnie,” the career childcare worker Don Hann, has delivered that message, and many others, for decades now. Last Friday when Hann left his final shift at the toddler room at City Hall Childcare — where, for 40 years, he has cared for children between 18 months and three years old — he was retiring from a remarkable career. Hann has, over those decades, not only changed diapers. He has wiped runny noses, comforted crying children, mediated fights among the toddlers, led and supervised outdoor play and nap time, all the while bathing the hundreds of children

he has helped raise with a signature blend of gentle affection, firm limit setting and good humour. “We typically work rotating shifts at the centre,” Hann told the Courier in early November, when asked to describe his workday. “Today I started at nine, and one of my first tasks was to scan and track the emotional states of the children as they arrived. Today was pretty harmonious, but of course sometimes kids will arrive stressed and anxious. You have to tune into them and help them manage their moods.” Much of his work, he said, involved encouraging play and relationships. “Sometimes, when kids hit each other or fight over toys, my job is to help them talk to each other instead. We are really helping them become social beings. In a way we help birth them psychologically and socially.” Geoff Peters, a former CHCC parent who served as chair of the childcare’s board for several years, has a vivid memory of Hann’s nurturing warmth with his child. “When Alexandra would cry,” he said, “Don would pick her up and cuddle her. His love for children is very evident.” Hann, who was hired at the childcare centre in 1975, sees his work as explicitly feminist practice, an example to children and to the public that men can and should do the essential, humanizing and exhausting work

of childcare side by side with the women to whom it has been by and large relegated over the years. Claudia McDonald, who has seen Hann care for her child and grandchildren over the years, recently sent him this email. “I never thought of you retiring, so melded you are with City Hall Daycare in my mind! But of course, we are now of that age. You have been so devoted to caring for all those precious beings, my son, Bram, grandchildren, Asher and Eva, Maya, Johan, Ellie and Liam among them. You have demonstrated that men can be caring and nurturing of babies and toddlers; you have gotten right down there on the floor! You never lost your view of your place in history, of the significance of your work, of the wider perspective. You have been [an] unflagging supporter of women and an advocate for improved and accessible daycare. You should have a plaque on the wall, mister! A wee bit of you travels into the future lives of all those beings you have cared for.” (Full disclosure. McDonald, like Hann, was part of my social circle in the 1970s, and I have known and respected them both for decades.)

Minority within a minority

Hann was born in Corner Brook, N.L. in 1946 to a father who was a small busi-

ness owner and a mother who worked at home. With his father publicly confronting racism in the 1940s and his mother active in a provincial women’s organization, Hann’s family taught him strong values about equality and respect for all and supported him actively when he came out as gay. Hann credits this family tradition for his early interest in radical sociology, labour activism and feminism. Hann, as an openly gay male childcare worker, is a minority within a minority. Fewer than five per cent of childcare employees in Canada are men, and few of those men are openly gay. In the face of homophobia and social unease, not many men of any orientation choose childcare work. Fewer still stay with it as a career (although one expert I consulted thought there were a couple of men on Vancouver Island who had been in the work for 30 years.) Retention of trained, skilled staff is an issue across the sector. According to the Child Care Human Resources Sector Council of Ottawa in 2012, 65.5 per cent of childcare employers lost at least one full-time worker that year. While it is not possible, in part because the Courier’s search of national records did not find the appropriate data, to say with absolute certainty that Hann has served as a childcare worker for longer than any man in Canadian history, it does seem likely

that his four decades represents a record. “Don breaks the mold,” said Tina Wight, Hann’s supervisor at City Hall Childcare and co-worker since 1992. “He has a unique approach to childcare. He is calm, and he sees children as unique individuals and he values their uniqueness. I have never heard him raise his voice to a child.”

Activist roots

Soft spoken with his toddler charges, Hann is far from silent politically. He has been out publicly as a gay man since 1971, and since moving to Vancouver in 1973, he has conducted an active and ongoing political practice campaigning for gay and lesbian rights (originally with the pioneering Gay Alliance Toward Equality in the 1970s) and as an active member and sometime officer within his union. Hann is a tireless archivist and historian of movements for social justice on both the local and the global scene. If you know Hann at all, you are likely to be on his mailing list and receive an impressive volume of his original essays and poems intertwined with extensive quotes from scholars of feminism, Marxism, child development, gender theory and other critical perspectives on sexism, homophobia and class. These reflections inform his lifelong career as a childcare worker, said Cy-Thea Sand, a Women’s and Gender Studies professor at the

University of Manitoba and longtime friend of Hann’s. “Don is an extraordinary intellect. He can both deal with critical theory and taking a toddler to take a poo. The children in his daycare have the rare experience of a man as a nurturing adult. This is more common now, but it was very rare indeed when Don started.” Alan Zisman, who served on the City Hall Childcare board in the mid-1980s, echoed Sand’s high regard for Hann. “Forty years of being a man working with infants is a huge accomplishment. Don has challenged how we all work with children.” According to Sand, Hann’s life and work integrate the heart and the intellect and displays great love and bravery. “You have to be brave to shake up the policing of gender the way he has,” she said. “Don has been a pioneer. Now, more men are getting it about the need to nurture children, but he was an early champion. Although he loves all the kids, he has a special delight in little girls who are firebrands! I have a deep appreciation for the meaning of his life and work.” Looking back at his career, Hann is contented. “I am happy with the life I’ve had,” he said. “I have had a rewarding life as what I call a ‘gay male mother’ to the kids, and I have served as a public face for gay childcare workers. I have been so fortunate.”


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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

Satisfying basic human needs — food, shelter and health care — will be first on the docket for the 1,900 Syrian refugees expected to reach B.C. over the next three months. “Then the big question is how quickly people who are brought in from a situation like this become financially independent. Because that’s the goal. Nobody is hoping we bring in large numbers who will never be able to take care of themselves,” said Dan Hiebert, a University of British Columbia geography professor specializing in Canada’s refugee settlement policy. English-language training and job skills conversion will be needed to get refugees well-paying jobs in the medium term and make them financially independent, according to Hiebert. The federal government will provide support for refugees for two years. If the newcomers are not financially independent by then, it falls on the province to support the refugees living in B.C. “The quality of the medium-term stuff, of course, depends on how well the short-term stuff is done,” Hiebert said. As many as half of the Syrian refugees that have entered Germany suffer from mental trauma brought on from living in a war zone, according to a September report from the German Chamber of Psychotherapists. Canadian taxpayers will spend $564 million to $678 million over the next six years covering costs of government-sponsored refugees who require mental health support and other basic needs. Housing the bulk of

companies. What’s clear now is that the influx of refugees will boost demand in the region for consumer goods, Yu said. Josh Labove, a researcher and doctoral candidate at Simon Fraser University, said the number of refugees coming to Canada and B.C. by February is “far from boiling the ocean” and citizens should view them as an investment in a human resource. The federal Liberals initially pledged to sponsor 25,000 refugees on top of the 11,000 pledged by the previous Conservative

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Health

We all share a chronic condition — life Davidicus Wong

davidicuswong.wordpress.com

If you’ve been diagnosed with a chronic condition, ask your family doctor what you need to know and do to take the best care of your health.

An important focus of primary care is the management of chronic disease. This includes high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and chronic lung disease. The proactive, planned man-

CLOSING FOREVER After over 30 years in the same location, we are closing our downtown vancouver doors.

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agement of these conditions has been shown to reduce complications and hospitalizations, prevent premature death and improve quality of life. The term, chronic disease carries a negative connotation. I prefer the term chronic condition. After all, each of us shares one chronic condition; it is sexually transmitted, incurable and has a 100 per cent mortality rate. That condition is life. On good days (and I’m hoping that for you that means most days), you recognize that it’s not all bad. We don’t choose the conditions of our lives and we don’t deserve misfortune, but we can choose to make the most of what we have. We remain agents of positive change. We can learn and do what we can to maintain the best quality of life so that we can pursue our personal dreams and do what is most meaningful to us.

call people asthmatics, diabetics or hypertensives. Patients can label themselves when they are first diagnosed with a chronic condition. A first heart attack can sometimes be a wake-up call to finally quit smoking, start eating a healthy diet, exercise appropriately and reduce other risk factors. Some, however, become demoralized and surrender, seeing themselves as damaged goods on borrowed time. With a new diagnosis of diabetes, some patients are in denial and fail to make lifestyle changes and monitor their condition while others take on the label of diabetes as a harbinger of impending doom. Those with a balanced approach do best. They accept the diagnosis of this chronic condition as life-preserving and lifeenhancing news. They learn what areas of their health require more attention and how lifestyle

Each of us shares one chronic condition; it is sexually transmitted, incurable and has a 100 per cent mortality rate. That condition is life.

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And we can be agents of positive change by helping others struggling with their own chronic conditions, providing the support that we can and empowering them to be active managers of their own lives. That’s how I see my role as a family physician. In healthcare, we treat people not medical conditions. We help our patients manage their health in the context of their whole lives. That management has to be tailored to fit the unique life of each individual. Doctors and nurses have traditionally had the habit of labeling patients with their conditions. They might call the first patient on the OR slate, “the 7:30 gallbladder.” There is a tendency to

changes reduce the potential for complications that would otherwise threaten their eyes and kidneys and the circulation to the heart, brain and feet. With knowledge comes power and a greater sense of control. If you’ve been diagnosed with a chronic condition, ask your family doctor what you need to know and do to take the best care of your health. As part of the Burnaby Division of Family Practice’s Empowering Patients public health education series, we are providing free unbiased information in public presentations and online divisionsbc.ca/burnaby. Dr. Davidicus Wong is a family physician and his Healthwise columns appear regularly in this paper.


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Christmas in Kerrisdale

ISOLA BELLA CHILDREN’S STORE

JANE MUNDY janemundy595@gmail.com

With many of its 200-plus shops and services family owned and operated, it’s no wonder Kerrisdale has taken on the moniker of “Vancouver’s Most Charming Community.” The “Village,” as the locals like to call this area (the stretch along West 41st Avenue between Maple and Larch streets, and stretching in a north-south direction along West and East Boulevards), has an Old World charm mixed with trendy shopping and dining spots. So eat, shop, repeat.

there are wines to sample from their tasting machine, which showcases eight choices that change every two weeks (only at this location). And don’t forget the 100 craft beers in stock, many from local breweries. Located at 5503 West Blvd. Visit kerrisdale@ westcoastliquor.com.

WEST COAST LIQUOR COMPANY The unpretentious staff — renowned for sharing their knowledge and experience — enjoy acquainting customers with locally produced varietals and global gems, most within your budget. To further help your buying decision,

STOCK UP CAFE & CATERING Spend less time in the kitchen this holiday season by stocking your cupboards with homemade (no

additives or preservatives) salad dressings and pasta sauces, condiments and desserts. Or spend no time — simply heat and serve meals that look as good as they taste. All you need to do is bring back the plates. Check out their entrees online and order ahead. Or drop by for a snack and talk to the chef about dinner choices. Order traditional Christmas dinner by Dec. 22 for next-day delivery only. Located at 6019 West Blvd. Visit stock-up.ca. ISOLA BELLA CHILDREN’S STORE Owner Julia Molnar has been showcasing the best collections by the world’s top designers

STOCK UP CAFE & CATERING

— including Stella McCartney and Bonpoint — for little fashionistas since 1987. Here you’ll find exceptional items, from baby sleepers to “sweet 16” outfits, and a great shoe selection for girls and boys. Ideas for the holiday season include Christmas dresses with black patent shoes, nightgowns and boy’s pyjamas with matching slippers and terrific sparkly head bands. Located at 5692 Yew St. Visit isolabellakids.com.

35 years of experience as a master goldsmith and GIA diamond graduate combined with Barbara’s talent for sourcing eclectic and exceptional treasures worldwide, it’s no wonder they have built a loyal following. A full workshop is on the premises with three qualified goldsmiths crafting custom jewelry. And high-end giftware just arrived in time for Christmas. Located at 2135 West 41st Ave. Visit theperfectgiftvancouver.com.

THE PERFECT GIFT Martin and Barbara Smith opened The Perfect Gift in 1996. With Martin’s

RONSONS SHOES The father and son team behind Ronsons have been designing, making and selling comfy shoes since 1988. With more than 20 brands in stock, including their own Ronsons, chances are you’ll find a shoe that fits. Their philosophy is to “put ourselves in our customer’s shoes, before we put shoes on our customers.” And they walk the talk — thousands of new shoes have been donated to

Metro Vancouver charities. Located at 2145 West 41st Ave. Visit ronsons.ca.

KERRISDALE CAMERAS New or used, you’re bound to find a camera within your budget and expertise, given they have the largest selection of photo equipment in Western Canada. Wait, there’s more! An in-store evaluation may allow you to trade up that camera gear collecting dust at home. Knowledgeable staff offer video and DVD services, can help with insurance claims, offer repairs and take your passport photo. Located at 2170 West 41st Ave. Visit kerrisdalecameras.com.

GREAT GIFT IDEAS!! Cozy slippers for women, men and kids!

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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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KERRISDALE BOOTERY

HAGER BOOKS At 42 years old, Hager Books is one of the last successful independent bookstores in Vancouver. Owner Andrea Davies attributes its success mainly to a supportive community. It’s amazing how many children’s, cooking, art and decorating books can fit into this small space. Local authors often drop by to sign their books. Visit hagerbooks.ca for details. Located at 2176 West 41st Ave.

WEST COAST LIQUOR COMPANY

QUILTS ETC. Shopping for bedding is a breeze at QE home online. Check out the holiday gift shop with free shipping (kids love the Disney bedding — think Star Wars, Avengers). And are you familiar with the 11 elements of a bedspread? To be sure you are purchasing quality towels,

sheets or throws, visit the Kerrisdale location, one of 70 across Canada. Located at 2142 West 41st Ave. Visit qehomelinens.com.

Join the

KERRISDALE BOOTERY While the Bootery, which opened in 1949, is a children’s footwear specialist featuring many private school styles, it’s also a one-stop shop for the entire family. The store carries a wide range of styles for women, from sneakers to stilettos. Men are also bound to find a style they like. Located at 2182 West 41st Ave. Visit kerrisdalebootery.com. QUILTS ETC.

KERRISDALE

SKATING CLUB We Welcome All Ages January 5 - March 18

CANSKATE ICE TYKES 3-4½ Years

Wed. 1:30 - 2:15 pm Fri. 9:45 - 10:30 am

CANSKATE Tues. 4:15 - 5:00 pm Thur. 5:30 - 6:15 pm Fri. 4:15 - 5:00 pm

Certified Professional Coaches only! Beginners welcome, all ages.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

604-266-4424 Kerrisdale Skating Club

Located at Kerrisdale Cyclone Taylor Arena 5670 E. Boulevard, Vancouver, B.C. V6M 3V2

www.skatekerrisdale.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Minerva’s expands after 40 years JANE MUNDY janemundy595@gmail.com

New cocktail bar compliments Minerva’s classic menu For 40 years Nonda Pavlakis has been serving up traditional Greek food, fused with Italian dishes – the menu was initially pizza and pasta – and peppered with some favourite, including baby back ribs with Papou’s (grandpa’s) barbecue sauce. “To this day my 84-year-old grandpa, Steve, makes his secret sauce for the ribs,” says John Pavlakis, Minerva’s manager and Nonda’s son. “He also makes our seasoning blends and salad dressings and enough kitchen preparation to keep him busy five days a week. Grandpa tells us, ‘I don’t want to stop because it keeps me young.’” Pavlakis says his grandfather started at Minerva’s 35 years ago as a prep cook, five years after Nonda opened

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Minerva’s doors. “My dad is still very active greeting customers, many of whom he knows by name,” adds Pavlakis. “And about 75 percent are regulars.” As for the menu, most customers go for the slow-braised lamb shoulder or grandpa’s barbecue ribs. Minerva’s is also well-known for their steaks and home-made pizzas, which fly out the door. Pavlakis has tried to change the menu by introducing a new dish or changing a staple dish, but to no avail. “Invariably, as soon as we make a change or take something off the menu, a regular customer will ask for it,” says Pavlakis. “Everything is pretty much routine here. On a Friday evening we know who is coming in and when. Our regulars know exactly where they want to sit and what they want to drink and eat.” Besides having loyal customers, another key to Minerva’s success is loyal staff. Minerva’s prep chef has been on staff for more than 20 years and some servers have been keeping customers fed for 30-plus years. It’s almost like a second home. BARRA 41 Although the spirit of Minerva’s hasn’t changed much in 40 years, major renovations were recently completed. At the end of August, the family opened Barra 41 — a cocktail lounge next door. For years, Nonda and Pavlakis wanted to expand Minerva’s kitchen so when Art’s Place Restaurant and Ice Cream Parlour became available, they jumped on it. After kitchen renovations, the family was still left with more than 600 square-feet of empty space. And since the Cheshire Inn closed its doors, Kerrisdale lacked a neighbourhood bar. “Opening a cocktail lounge was a no-brainer,” says Pavlakis, laughing. “As for the name, Barra is ‘Gringlish’ for a bar in Greece — and you know why we chose 41.” Sidle up to the bar and rub shoulders with the locals or choose one of 35 seats and order a plate of mezes. That’s Greek for small plates, better known as tapas. Pavlakis advises you go for Yiaya’s meatballs. That’s his grandmother. Talk about a family affair — you can find John’s mother, Kay, behind Minerva’s bar shaking cocktails. Kay may lose a few customers to Barra 41, albeit temporarily. “We have a great mix of existing customers and new customers, mainly the millennial crowd who meet friends after work or drop by to watch the game,” Pavlakis adds. Barra 41 has a great cocktail program, including five wines on tap and many by the glass. He encourages customers to try a Greek white wine, likely under most everyone’s radar. But you might be pleasantly surprised... Minerva’s is located at 2411 West 41st Ave. and Barra 41 can be found next door. Visit minervas.ca.


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

December 11-12 â&#x20AC;˘ 4:30pm-8:30pm

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, D E C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

T H U R SDAY, D E C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

SPACE PHOTOS: TRACEY AYTON

home design + style

MY DIGS:

Design guru Gillian Segal WORDS BY JENNIFER SCOTT WESTENDER.COM

South Granville home combines eclectic with chic As a designer, one of my favourite opportunities is to sneak a peek into the homes of my peers. I love exploring how fellow creative minds interpret style — the colours, the textures and the trends. Vancouver boasts a strong community of interior designers, and this week we are touring the glamourous space of one of our local industry leaders, Gillian Segal of Gillian Segal Design. You may have seen Gillian stealing the show at this year’s IDSWest Open Studio or caught her work on MarthaStewart. com (for which she is an interior design contributor). Her eclectic-meets-chic South Granville abode is definitely covet-worthy. WHAT IS IT? We live in a ground-level condo in the South Granville neighbourhood. While I think ground-levels have some negative connotations, we couldn’t be happier with our set up. We have about 1,100

square feet over a single floor with a private patio that’s about 500 square feet. Our view overlooks the building’s common gardens, which are never in use so we often feel like we have our own back yard.

OCCUPANTS My husband, our little Pomeranian “Bear” and myself. I run a boutique interior design firm here in Vancouver and Adam is the CMO of a furniture company specializing in juvenile

furniture. Bear is a part time sock-eater and napper. MAJOR SELLING FEATURES For us it was all about the efficient floor plan (two bed, two bathrooms, plus living and dining rooms). The high ceilings (10-feet throughout the unit) and outdoor spaces make the condo feel even larger than it is. FIRST THING I CHANGED Being a designer, I had a long list of things to change. We put new broadloom carpet in the bedrooms, installed black-out drapes and put in a walk-in closet. We painted/ wallpapered and changed out all of the light fixtures. I think the smallest, and possibly most effective thing we did, was to rip off the doors to the solarium, which is located off the kitchen, and turn the space into an enclosed dining room. It’s great for dinner parties and freed up the rest of our space for a luxurious living room. FEATURE I BRAG ABOUT My favourite feature is more abstract — it’s definitely the feeling of coziness our place has.

I love to entertain and I know our guests always feel comfortable and at ease here (as do we). THAT ONE CONVERSATION PIECE I have a lot of skulls (prints, accessories) sprinkled around the apartment. I can’t explain why I love them, but I do. The other conversation starter is our pink Dana Claxton photograph of [iconic TV character Tonto], which reads, “You speak much but say nothing.” While I tried to maintain more masculine/ gender neutral décor for my husband, we both seem to have a weakness for colourful art. THE DÉCOR I would say this is my signature style, which I call “modern eclectic glamour.” A mouthful I know, but for me

it’s all about creating unique spaces that represent the client (us, in this case). I love mixing the old with the new in unexpected ways. THE STORY BEHIND THE ART/ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES The mirror above the fireplace is an antique my mom found about 20 years ago in a house that was slated for demolition. Our dining chairs are also antiques from my parents, so they have sentimental value for me and I loved how they paired with our Tulip table. In terms of collectibles, we love buying art and I also collect teacups. I have an Hermès tea service set and a huge array of mix-matched vintage tea cups. See more of this story at westender.com.


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HOW TO

Use light for optimal living WORDS BY BOB DE WIT WESTCOASTCONDOMINIUM.CA

Enlighten your inner condo with these tips on how to make the most of natural and artificial lighting Lighting sets the atmosphere for everyday living in your condo. Natural light has many positive effects on your well-being, happiness and productivity. While natural light is often unpredictable and location dependant, creating the perfect atmospheric environment is achievable through thoughtful lighting. Many condos are built without a lot of pre-existing embedded wall or ceiling fixture options. Try out these solutions to illuminate the dimmest condo and

curate the perfect amount of ambiance for any space. STRIVE FOR A VARIETY OF LIGHT SOURCES THROUGHOUT A ROOM This creates dimension and minimizes that dreadful overly lit stark brightness. Place both floor and table lamps around the room, lighting up nooks and seating areas where you’d likely curl up with a book. Place candles on scattered surfaces around the room. Try flameless LED candles to create soft lighting (and safer to leave for hours unattended).

KEEP THE WALLS AND FURNITURE LIGHT IN COLOUR This maximizes surfaces for light to reflect, creates an airy vibe and is on trend. Pair with light lampshades to let the most amount of light shine through. INSTALL DIMMER SWITCHES TO FIXTURES This will conserve energy and give you the most control over lighting options. TIPS FROM A PROFESSIONAL I spoke with Norm Brown,

expert lighting designer at Norburn Lighting & Bath Centre, and he had the following tips: Lighting a room with many windows at night is challenging — make sure all windows are fitted with drapes or blinds. On the 20th floor, you may have little need for privacy, but drapes reflect light back into the room, whereas light escapes through uncovered windows.

Avoid track lighting — especially in the kitchen. Track lighting is a common fixture found in condos, but it creates heavy shadows. Replace with a large flushmount ceiling fixture that will create a softer surrounding light. Building on the last point — install under cabinet lighting to brighten countertops as a quick and affordable solution to brighten a kitchen. LED strips designed

Lighting sets the atmosphere for everyday living...

to stick under cabinets are readily available, and come in a variety of affordable price points. Regardless of window size and the natural light that reaches your suite, you can craft the desired atmosphere to suit your lifestyle through the right lighting design. Chat with interior designers or lighting experts to maximize your condo’s potential. Find a lighting expert in your area at gvhba.org. See more of this story at REW.ca/news.


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Wrap Up

Hope

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON GIVE THE GIFT OF HOPE WITH MEGAPHONE’S 2016 HOPE IN SHADOWS CALENDAR

HOPEINSHADOWS.COM Hope in Shadows is a gift that directly supports homeless and low-income people working hard to create change.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Gardening

Christmas lights could help new bush survive winter

Anne Marrison

protection?

Q. We recently planted a new green topiary bush, which is doing well in the middle of our garden bed. But the label suggests it be taken indoors for winter. We are not planning on digging it up to do that. Will wrapping it in several layers of burlap and tying securely be enough

A. How much cold your topiary can stand depends on what variety it is and how cold winter gets. Most tender bushes sold here for garden use are zone 8. If you live near the coast, a zone 8 plant might squeak through mild, brief frosts. But since over-wintering

amarrison@shaw.ca

Verna Mar, Vancouver

inside was recommended, your bush needs maximum protection and even then its survival can’t be certain. Being a new planting puts it in even greater jeopardy. Your burlap suggestion might work for brief, mild overnight ground frosts — but any significant freezeups will do severe damage to your topiary. The roots need mulching

with straw, bark mulch or compost at least 60cm wide and at least 30cm deep. In more severe freezes, the upper part of your topiary could be covered with a thick blanket for several days. You should remove this in warmer spells and in rain because your bush needs light to stay healthy. Where rain alternates rapidly with freezing, the blanket

could be covered with plastic. This shouldn’t be used next to the bush because plastic holds on to moisture which could rot the smaller branches and leaves. Some people put Christmas lights around their tree before covering it. These should have incandescent bulbs (not LED). But the bulbs themselves shouldn’t touch any part of the tree.

This avoids a burning injury to the leaves or bark. You could try putting a fence of stakes around the outside and fasten the lights on the inside of the stakes. Then cover all this with the temporary blanket. Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to amarrison@shaw.ca. It helps if you give the name of your city or region.

“Did you know our proposed expansion follows the existing route for most of the way?” - Carey Johannesson, Project Lead, Land & Right-of-Way, Trans Mountain Expansion Project.

The proposed Trans Mountain Expansion follows the existing

73

%

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OF THE ROUTE IS ON THE EXISTING RIGHT-OF-WAY.

That means approximately 100 kms needs to be moved to undisturbed lands. These reroutes will be made to improve safety and address environmental considerations, and will accommodate

11%

WILL REQUIRE NEW ROUTING.

changes in land usage since the pipeline was originally built in 1953. We’ve been talking with the public, stakeholders, landowners and Aboriginal communities along the proposed corridor to hear their concerns. We expect you will ask questions. We’ve made

16%

WILL FOLLOW OTHER LINEAR INFRASTRUCTURES, SUCH AS HYDRO, TELUS, RAILWAYS AND HIGHWAYS.

adjustments in many places to address the concerns we’ve heard. Our intention in all of our planning is to minimize the impact on residents, communities and the environment, while ensuring that safe construction and operations are possible.

For more information, go to TransMountain.com/planning-the-route Email: info@transmountain.com · Phone: 1-866-514-6700

Committed to safety since 1953.


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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SANDRA THOMAS sthomas@vancourier.com

From cookbooks to food tours, Vancouver is a mecca for festive foodie finds. You’ve all seen it: A beautiful meal arrives at the table, but instead of picking up a knife and fork to dig in, at least one diner pulls out their phone and starts taking photos to share on Facebook or Instagram using annoying hashtags such as “foodporn,” “nomnom” or “yummy.” Legitimate or not, that friend or family member likely considers themselves a “foodie.” To that end, the Courier has compiled a list of gifts for said foodie, which are hopefully less annoying than their social media posts.

TRIANGLE DINNER BELL Forget “Dinner’s ready!” When it’s time to get friends or family to the table, grab one of these old-fashioned steel triangles to get everyone’s attention. The triangles are $50 at Bestmadeco.com.

FOR FOODIES

SEA SALT Vancouver Island Salt Co. has a wonderful selection of sea salts harvested from the surrounding ocean, including smoked, jerk, orange and lime, and blue cheese. Available at various locations across the city, including Edible Canada on Granville Island, and online at visaltco.com.

OAK BARREL SUNGLASSES Woodzee has collaborated with Robert Mondavi Private Selection to create these Sierra sunglasses crafted from recycled oak wine barrels. The sunglasses are a classic wayfarer shape with polarized brown lenses. The glasses are $120 at woodzee.com.

FOOD TOURS Before you panic over all the gifts you still have to buy, take a deep breath and consider a Vancouver Food Tour gift certificate, ideal for almost every adult on your gift list. A food tour can help create lasting memories while you explore a new-to-you neighbourhood enjoying food, drinks and the company of like-minded adventurers. Beer lovers can hop onto the popular Craft Beer ‘n Bites Tour or explore the historic Molson Canadian Brewery in Kitsilano, while food lovers, wine and cocktail enthusiasts

or history buffs will enjoy the Gastown Tasting Tour. Varying prices at vancouverfoodtour.com.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

FOR FOODIES

against nature, a turducken is a deboned turkey stuffed with chicken, duck and sausage in one of two original stuffing flavours. The only bones on a turducken are the turkey drumsticks and wings so it looks like a turkey coming out of the oven, but the middle is packed solid with three poultry meats and stuffing. I initially thought Costco’s $150 price tag was a bit steep, but when you consider it easily feeds 15 or more, it’s actually a bargain. Visit Costco.ca.

ORGANIC COCONUT CHIPS These Hippie Foods tamari (similar to soy sauce) and cracked pepper and coconut bacon-flavoured coconut chips make great stocking stuffers — so long as you don’t eat them all before the big day. Made by Burnaby-based Left Coast Naturals, these vegan chips can also be used as a topping for soups, salads and even ice cream. Located at numerous locations across the city. Visit hippiefoods.com.

THIS DECEMBER COASTAL CHURCH PRESENTS

BACON EVERYTHING Seattle-based J&D’s Foods is the place to find that bacon-scented deodorant you’ve been on the hunt for. Not in the market for some under arm protection, check out the baconscented lip balm, bacon salt and baconscented pillow case.

COOK BOOKS Favourite books of foodies everywhere include Goodness: Recipes and Stories by Peter Neal and Chris Neal, which dedicates 50 per cent of profits to Community Food Centres Canada. This beautifully photographed book is a celebration and collaboration between 37 chefs, entrepreneurs, growers and food activists from across Canada. This book is recommended reading by SPUD. ca, a Vancouver-based online grocery company and delivery service specializing in natural and organic produce. Visit nealborthersfood.com.


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

NOVEMBER 26 - JANUARY 2

Meanwhile, following the success of The Butcher, The Baker, The Wine and Cheesemaker: An Okanagan Cookbook, chef and author Jennifer Schell has released a West Coast-inspired version. The Butcher, The Baker, The Wine and Cheesemaker: By the Sea is a tribute to the remarkable innovators and culinary leaders who make up Canada’s west coast food culture. Discover some of the most diverse and delicious food available — from the fabulous food-truck fare of Tofino to the elegant dishes of downtown

Vancouver’s five-star restaurants, along the Sea to Sky highway to the famous après-ski pub grub of Whistler and the homegrown smorgasbord of the farming valley of Pemberton. Visit jenniferschell.com.

ENTER TO WIN

The Courier is giving away a copy of each book compliments of SPUD and Schell. Simply visit vancourier.com/contest to enter to win! @sthomas10

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Pan Pacific Vancouver exchanges breakfast for toys Last Thursday more than 5,000 hungry guests dropped off 17 tonnes of new toys to the Pan Pacific Vancouver Christmas Wish Breakfast and in return were treated to a meal created by the hotel’s chefs and culinary team. The toys were collected in just three hours, making it the largest one-day toy drive in Canada. Besides the many


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FOR GIVING

in Canada toys, generous Vancouverites donated $22,000 in cash. More than 1,000 bikes were also donated thanks to Dominion Lending Centre’s Bikes for Kids initiative. All proceeds are in support of the Lower Mainland Christmas Bureau. Chris Bayliss, executive director for the bureau, says the event was the most successful to date. The Pan Pacific has been hosting the breakfast toy drive since 1987. “Because of the generosity of everyone who attended, we will be able to take care of thousands of families who

wouldn’t otherwise be able to celebrate Christmas,” says Bayliss, who noted the Pan Pacific works closely with long-time supporters Global TV and Rock 101 FM. Everyone who turned up between 6 and 9 a.m., Nov. 26, to donate a toy was treated to a gourmet breakfast prepared by the culinary team at Pan Pacific Vancouver. Executive chef Bob Wiles and the Pan Pacific culinary team served up 11,000 eggs, 11,642 sausages, 1,152 pounds of hash browns and 4,600 croissants. The crowd was entertained by the joyful singers from the Good Noise

Gospel Choir, and the entire event was broadcast live on Global TV and Rock 101. At one point a bagpiper led what seemed like an endless line of police officers and firefighters up the escalator to the lobby floor of the hotel where they donated dozens of toys, games, bikes, books and more. Meanwhile volunteers from Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services stacked the toys into a two storey high “tree” and then loaded the pile into Williams Moving trucks for transport to the Lower Mainland Christmas Bureau warehouse, where the donated items are sorted and distributed to families in need. @sthomas10

Enchanted Nights at Bloedel Bring your imagination and explore the whimsical wonders inside the Bloedel Conservatory. Walk through a miniature world of artisan fairy and sprite villages with magical lights, holiday music and live entertainment set amongst the dome’s tropical plants and exotic birds. The fun continues outside on the Queen Elizabeth Park plaza. Grab a treat, take a pony ride and snap a selfie at the highest viewpoint in the city!

December 4 to January 3* 4 to 9pm daily Queen Elizabeth Park vancouver.ca/enchantednights | #enchantednights

*Closed Christmas Day


THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

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Community

MAIN STREETING: Chinatown’s renaissance continues. Juniper is the latest jewel, located at Keefer and Main, and stars two hospitality veterans. Running the cozy 100-seat, two-level room will be sommelier Sarah Macauley, most recently of the Wedgewood Hotel. Shawn Layton, the acclaimed barkeep of L’Abattoir for the past five years, will oversee the spiritforward drink program. And completing the trifecta is Sarah Stewart, formerly of Edible Canada, who brings her farm-totable sensibilities to the kitchen.

Blanche Macdonald’s executive program director Peggy Morrison orchestrated the school’s recent grad show at The Permanent. Sabine Bruyere modeled dress by Joy Nickerson.

Director Renita Hansraj decked the Tiffany & Co. halls in the firm’s signature blue. Hansraj launched the season of giving with the unveiling of its famous holiday windows displaying brilliant store creations.

Stylist Michelle Addison and publicist Annabel Hawksworth helped ring in the season of glittery gift giving. They were among tastemakers and fashionistas that attended the annual Breakfast at Tiffany’s seasonal soiree.

FASHION FORWARD: Creativity and talent intersected at Blanche Macdonald’s annual Fashion Design Graduate Show. A capacity crowd of fashionistas, tastemakers and media elite gathered at The Permanent for an exclusive look at the next generation of aspiring artists. The event saw the debut collections from 19 grads. Executive program director Peggy Morrison led models and designers through the much-anticipated runway romp. Future names to note: Joy Nickerson, Maxine Siperko and Lindsey Kapitze. FOR KIDS SAKE: Believing in the power of youth, Mark Mahl founded Kidzfirst Canada, a non-profit dedicated to providing support to future leaders and the most vulnerable. Nearly 100 guests attended the firm’s first Give it Up 4 Kidz reception at Coast Restaurant to learn more about its effort and fundraise for UBC’s CampOut and the Canadian Mental Health Association. Upwards of $10,000 was raised for the newly minted registered charity.

At the Give it Up 4 Kidz reception staged by Kidzfirst Canada founder Mark Mahl, right, Aliza Bosa shared her experience at CampOut, a leadership camp for LGBTQ kids. CHIMP’s Casey Miller donated $1,500 to the newly minted charity helping empower youth.

Chef Sarah Stewart, owner Lilian Steenbock, bar manager Shaun Layton and operations manager Sarah McCauley front Chinatown’s newest jewel Juniper.

RECORD HAUL: More than 5,000 generous Vancouverites checked into the Pan Pacific Hotel for the 28th Vancouver Christmas Wish Breakfast. In return for their unwrapped toy for the Lower Mainland Christmas Bureau, attendees enjoyed a complimentary breakfast led by executive chef Bob Wiles and his culinary team. A reported 11,000 eggs, 11,642 sausages and 4,600 croissants were served. And in a mere three hours, the lobby spilled over with 17 tonnes of toys, 1,000 bikes and more than $22,000 in cash donations for families in need.

email yvrflee@hotmail.com twitter @FredAboutTown

Mondo Guerra, winner of Project Runway All Stars, was the keynote speaker at Lisa Martella’s A Loving Spoonful World Aids Day fundraising luncheon. Guerra revealed his HIV-positive status on the reality show. Funds raised will provide meals to those housebound by the disease.

Fronting all but one of the past 28 Christmas Wish Breakfasts, chef Bob Wiles and catering and events director Cameron Johnson welcomed 5,000 guests to the annual Christmas Bureau Toy Drive at the Pan Pacific Hotel.

Santa and Vancouver Christmas Bureau’s Jodi Jones fronted the annual Christmas Wish Toy Drive. The 17 tonnes of toys, 1,000 bikes and $22,000 collected will support 1,000 families this holiday season.


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The emphasis remains on far travel, legal affairs, intellectual pursuits including higher education and publishing, statistics, insurance, cultural involvements, and love, especially Wed. eve through Fri. (Love is especially emphasized all week.) It’s a sweet, mellow week, a nice relief from pressures. In relationships, the “sweet factor” veers into intimate clinches – and if you don’t become intimate, the sweetness flees.

The general emphasis is on short trips, visits, communications, paperwork, details, casual friends/siblings, news, and curiosity. Your energy, assertiveness and determination flow in one channel: toward relationships: a partner (or finding one) fame, public dealings, negotiations and contracts, litigation, an enemy, a business or other opportunity, or relocation.

The general accent remains on secrets, mysteries, research and investigation, commitment and consequence, and critical health or lifestyle choices/events, especially Wed. to Fri. night. This influence can show as a financial adventure, investing or handling large debt, or as a sexual need, embracing intimacy. Both of these require commitment, and present you with the consequences.

The general emphasis remains on money, earnings, buying/selling, memory, possessions, and sensual attractions, especially Wed. to Fri. All December, your chores restrict you: the burden is heavy and long. You might rebel against this work Sunday, especially around noon (PST) when you’d rather talk, take off, or otherwise wander and think. (If you are working this day, be careful with tools, machinery and chemicals.

Relationships are front and center. Be diplomatic, but eager to join. You might meet a potential life mate or business partner, especially Sunday and Wed. to Fri. (If met before 1 p.m. [PST] Sunday, future difficulties will arise over your hopes and his/her domestic “destiny” – or between romance and sex – you’ll be expected to accept only one.) You have been in an intriguing romantic “atmosphere” the past few weeks.

The general emphasis remains on YOU. Your energy, charisma, clout and effectiveness achieve a yearly high this week. This is the time to start significant projects, to make a major step or turn, to pursue someone who might seem unattainable. All month, your hopes are tied up with romance, creative projects and speculative risks, adventure and pleasure. Sunday’s social (but someone doesn’t show up) as entertainment, optimism, flirting, happiness and popularity visit you.

The accent lies on work, daily health, service people (e.g., plumber, or IT tech) and dependents, especially mid-afternoon Wed. through Fri. Your home has been filled with affection and aggression (sweet’n’sour) the past few weeks. Now to Jan. 3, there will be a little less affection, a little more friction, perhaps ambition. My advice: be gentle on the domestic front Sunday, when ambition or haste/impatience could trigger a deep discord.

Continue to rest; recharge your emotional and physical batteries. Work in the background, deal with government and “head office” types. Meditate, contemplate – re-acquaint yourself with your spiritual core. The boss remains testy, temperamental all December: grin and bear it. By January, this same person will realize that their temper was poorly placed, and came from problems within, not from you.

Romance – the beauty and poetry of life – continues. Express yourself, take a chance, try new things – you’re riding a winning streak! Your home life grows more affectionate, lucky, until Dec. 29. (You’ll surely see this Mon./Tues.) Volunteer your place for holiday dinners. Hold business meetings in restaurants or parks. All month, you could meet romance while travelling (even on the bus downtown) – or a casual conversation could unexpectedly turn to flirtation.

The general accent this week and next (especially this Wed. afternoon through Fri.) is on joy, popularity, social delights, entertainment, wishes coming true, friendly romance, and optimism about the future. Not a bad smorgasbord! December is one of the best months (every year) to visualize what you want, to dream of the future, because what you dream of might actually come true.

The general accent remains on home, property, family, security, Mother Nature and the garden or farm, diet and nutrition, rest and relaxation, especially Wed. eve through Friday. You are mildly favoured to buy and sell real estate until September 2016 – this week and next give you a green light for this. (2019 will be much better, if you don’t mind waiting.) Now to early January, more money than usual will come to you, but you will possess an almost unconscious urge to spend and spend – don’t: bank it, save.

(You do know that “Pisces” means fish, don’t you? Poisson in French. Like a fish, you swim everyday through an ocean of nuance and meaning, impression and intuition — and logic floats by you like a bit of flotsam from a shipwreck somewhere else.) The general accent this week and next lies on ambition, career, prestige relations, worldly and neighbourhood status, and dealings with authorities, bosses, parents and VIPs.

Dec. 3: Julianne Moore (55). Dec. 4: Jeff Bridges (66). Dec. 5: Little Richard (83). Dec. 6: Judd Apatow (48). Dec. 7: Tom Waits (66). Dec. 8: Kim Basinger (62). Dec. 9: Judi Dench (81).


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts & Entertainment

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GOT ARTS? 604.738.1411 or events@vancourier.com

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Dec. 3 to 9, 2015 1. Mint Records gets a jumpstart on the holiday season with its annual Ridiculously Early Xmas Party. This year’s festivities feature Renny Wilson, Faith Healer, Monomyth, Fake Tears, Energy Slime, Supermoon, Uptights and CiTR Femconcept DJs rocking the stage of the Astoria Dec. 5. Tickets at Horses, Red Cat, Zulu Records and brownpapertickets.com. Details at mintrecs.com.

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2. Soon-to-be Turkish box office sensation Not So Far Away kicks off the second annual Vancouver Turkish Film Festival, Dec. 4 to 7 at Vancity Theatre. For a full list of films and details, go to vtff.org. 3. Celebrating its 85th anniversary, the Vancouver Bach Choir goes big with its upcoming holiday concert, Dec. 6, 2 p.m. at the Orpheum. Featuring more than 400 singers the annual concert of holiday favourites also includes organist Ellen Ay-Laung Wang and local quintet A Touch of Brass. Details and tickets at vancouverbachchoir.com. 4. Los Angeles garage rocker Mike Krol brings his fuzzed-out and spazzy stylings to the Media Club Dec. 5 in support of his recent Merge Records release Turkey. Rupert Angeleyes opens. Tickets at Red Cat Records and ticketfly.com.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

VANCOUVER WELSH MEN’S CHOIR

Arts & Entertainment

Drippy cartoonist gets Erin McPhee

emcphee@nsnews.com

SOUNDS OF CHRISTMAS

Thurs. Dec 3rd, 7.30pm, St.Andrew’s-Wesley United Church, Burrard & Nelson

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N I E V I R D S A M T S I R CH

“I decided to be an artist when I was in kindergarten,” says Julian Lawrence. The Vancouver-based, award-winning artist and illustrator who specializes in comic books recalls the pride experienced when, at that age, he painted a picture of Peter and the Wolf that had impressed his teacher so, it was deemed worthy of being hung up for all to see. “It just felt really nice to see my artwork hanging on the wall,” he says. His future was further cemented when he got to Grade 4. While the Lower Mainland has been home for the last 26 years, Lawrence was born in England and raised in Québec. He recalls another supportive teacher then, after seeing that he could draw, encouraged him to submit assignments in comic form. “Growing up in Québec there were comic books everywhere in the classroom all the time. I was reading Tintin, I was reading Asterix and Lucky Luke and all these other Belgian and French and European comic characters. In France, comic books have

always been seen as the ninth art, as this great medium, this great language of expression. And that kind of came over to Québec as well... They weren’t seen as something that lazy readers would gravitate towards, they were seen as important as any other books. I could sign comic books out of the library, I could do book reports on a Tintin book. I could hand in homework as a drawn comic,” he says. That early exposure and support translated into a lifelong love affair for the craft, and Lawrence is continuing to produce his own work as well as educate people of all ages about the medium, advocating for its possibilities as an art form for self-expression. This year has been a busy one for the artist, having released a graphic novel on Conundrum Press last spring, The Adventures of Drippy the Newsboy Vol. 1: Drippy’s Mama, with its follow-up, The Adventures of Drippy the Newsboy Vol. 2: The Red Drip of Courage released this fall. “Now there seems to be a resurgence of interest in comics, which is kind of a roller coaster thing that’s been af-

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fecting comics since they started in 1934, the sort of up and down... ride of where they hit a peak of popularity, and then they crash again, and then they come back up again, and then they crash again. It’s a whole series of things that seem to affect them. Now it seems like comics are back in the mainstream and we’re seeing a lot of movies being made out of comics and that’s trickling into an interest in some of the more alternative comics that are happening,” he says. He adds, “The comics that I draw are meant to appeal to a wide range of ages. I’m not just drawing books for kids or books for adults. The books I draw, I’m trying to appeal on various levels. My books are for kids aged seven to 107.” His new graphic novels The Adventures of Drippy the Newsboy Vol. 1: Drippy’s Mama and The Adventures of Drippy the Newsboy Vol. 2: The Red Drip of Courage are the first in a three-part series seeing him adapt the works of prolific American author Stephen Crane. Vol 1 is based on Crane’s George’s Mother and Vol 2 on The Red Badge of Courage.

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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts & Entertainment

Crane in the membrane

Lawrence had heard of Crane — his face appears on the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover — but Lawrence had never read any of his work until one day he randomly picked up an anthology of his writing at a thrift store. “I loved his writing style. He writes narration in this really beautiful, poetic way. But then when it comes to people speaking and dialogue it’s written in this very rough, early Bronx accent. He was writing in the 1890s, he died when he was 29, but he wrote tons of books. He was a reporter, he travelled the world and just wrote all the time and put out quite an amount of work for the short time he was alive. His work really speaks to me. What I’ve done with my adaptations is to maintain that dialogue but then to try and, instead of having that poetic narration, to have really nicely detailed artwork to go with [it],” he says. Vol. 1 sees naive Drippy get pulled into the world of the Forbidden Zone and in Vol. 2 prepare to go to war with the enemy. The character emerged in 1999. Lawrence had been working as a comics

Julian Lawrence’s new graphic novel series The Adventures of Drippy the Newsboy adapts the works of American author Stephen Crane. PHOTO KAT THORSEN

editor at the weekly publication Terminal City. When Terminal City closed, Lawrence and a couple of other ex-employees rallied to put together their own monthly newspaper, The Drippy Gazette. “It was conceptual in the sense that we imagined Vancouver, which is very rainy, as being Drippytown and Drippy was the mascot,” he says. The mandate of the monthly publication was to feature artist interviews and events, and keep the Vancouver comics scene together. While the newspaper

lasted 12 months, Drippy lived on in Lawrence’s work. Apart from focusing on his own comics, Lawrence is currently enrolled at the University of B.C., working on a masters exploring comic books and education. He’s also continually busy teaching and leading workshops on the art, seeing a real value in hand drawing. Lawrence plans to work on Vol. 3 of The Adventures of Drippy the Newsboy this summer with a potential release in fall 2016.

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A44

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Arts & Entertainment THEATRE REVIEW

Flee scratches itch for zany spectacle

Jo Ledingham joled@telus.net

Flee charmed the pants off me. I confess: even if I have no idea of what’s going on, I can be seduced by costumes, lighting, set design, choreography and performance. Throw in a cello and a trumpet and I’m a goner. Flee, written by David Hudgins, Jonathon Young and Peter Anderson, has all of these qualities deliciously, overwhelmingly in abundance. I’ve always been a sucker for Leaky Heaven Circus; The Black Rider; Ilsa, Queen of the Nazi Love Camp; Catalyst Theatre’s Frankenstein and Nevermore. And now Flee, with its mix of vaudeville and circus. Director Jonathon Young sets it in the dark and boozy Fox Cabaret — the perfect setting (on a very small stage) for a play about Archibald Twill, a down-onhis-luck watchmaker (Peter Anderson), who discovers, in his fleabag Downtown Eastside flop house, the Paris Hotel, a singing flea. Her name is Caprice (Lois Anderson), and she’s the sexiest flea you’ll ever see hopping across your labradoodle’s belly.

When Archibald realizes the moneymaking potential in Caprice he goes to the Old Hand (David Petersen), a former flea circus ringmaster/trainer who proclaims (in a resounding big-top voice), “The flea circus is dead,” killed off by pesticide A167n. But Archibald and Caprice are confident there’s money to be made, and the word gets out that you can pay to look through the keyhole into his room and see what the fleas are up to. Apparently, it’s disgusting but the bucks roll in, and Madame Renard, the landlady (Kathryn Shaw) is finally off Archibald’s back. An Electric Company Theatre/Studio 58 presentation, Flee unites ECT with its Studio 58 roots. ETC went on to become one of the most exciting, innovative theatre companies in the country. Original music by Peggy Lee (performed live by Lee on electric piano and cello, JP Carter on trumpet and electronics, Ron Samworth on electric guitar and Dylan van der Schyff, percussion) is a cross between circus music and a parade. If there’s any kid left in you, you’ll love it. (But note: this

Peter Anderson and Lois Anderson appear in Flee, the zany circus-meets-vaudeville co-production by the Electric Company and Studio 58, at the Fox Cabaret until Dec. 6.

show is ages 19 and up.) Barbara Clayden’s costumes on the 11 Fleaks (Studio 58 students) are wonderfully drab and flealike: black on black, black on grey and black toques. She dresses Studio 58 director Kathryn Shaw in a black and gold lame gown with a scruffy looking fur wrap,

brassy red wig and big lipstick. Choreography by David Raymond and Tiffany Tregarthen is flea-like: scrabbling fingers and legs make you feel downright itchy. Itai Erdal lights the stage mostly from above with huge diffusers so faces are cast in deep shadow. On

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Shizuka Kai’s set it’s a ratskeller, grungy look that’s in perfect keeping with the script. With Peter Anderson and Lois Anderson — two Leaky Heaven veterans and Canadian favourites — how can you lose? As Caprice, Lois Anderson putting all the little flea-babies to sleep

is as sweet a “putting the kids to bed scene” you’ve ever seen. And Peter Anderson is weird and wonderful as always. If there’s a message it seems to be this, and I quote: “The trick to changing what you are is to become more of what you are.” That might be profound. Or not. Flee is not just a show, it’s an event: the reunion of Studio 58 and the Electric Company Theatre; Shaw, with her captivating husky voice; and David Petersen, back on stage; Peter Anderson and Lois Anderson (no relation) together. All that’s missing is Mosey, the short-legged, yellow lab cross that used to waddle through the Cultch during the Leaky Heaven shows. But, considering the fleas get out of control during Flee and turn the Paris Hotel into the Parasito Hotel, it’s probably best that Mosey, who’s probably long gone, is not wandering around the Fox Cabaret. For more reviews, go to joledingham.ca. Flee is at the Fox Cabaret (2321 Main St.) until Dec. 6. Tickets at ticketstonight.com.

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T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A45

Sports & Recreation

Left: UBC Thunderbirds 19-year-old quarterback Michael O’Connor (No. 15) threw for 389 yards and was named MVP of the national championship as the first freshman pivot since 1966 to win the CIS title. Right: Receiver Will Watson (No. 6) hauls in one of 12 catches, enough to tie a Vanier Cup record. PHOTOS RICH LAM / UBC ATHLETICS

THUNDERBIRDS

UBC secured Vanier Cup with ‘easiest chip shot’ Dramatic, hard-fought game ends not with a comeback but a Cinderella championship CARABINS UBC

23 26

Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

It was an unbelievable finish to an improbable season. Their own botched snap, then an interception, followed by a 20-yard field goal with one second on the clock, the UBC Thunderbirds defeated the defending national champions Université de Montréal Carabins 26-23 to win the 51st Vanier Cup in Quebec City Nov. 28. The turnaround of the lackluster UBC Thunderbirds culminated with the program’s fourth Vanier Cup, its first since 1997. “This group of guys was not even picked to make the playoffs in Canada West this year,” said head coach Blake Nill following the game. “What they have done is one of the most amazing things I’ve seen. This team has stood up to

3

Number of Vancouver Canucks who each set career highs the same 2001-02 season on the West Coast Express: Brendan Morrison had 25 goals and 71 points, and Todd Bertuzzi had 46 goals and 97 points.

the best the country can offer and they have come out in front every time.” The site of the Vanier Cup, Stade Telus — Universite Laval, had not been good to Nill over the years. As the head coach of the Calgary Dinos, he twice lost the Vanier Cup in the Quebec City suburb to the Rouge et Or. But signs — if you care to believe in such things — were there from the start. In a pre-season game, UBC defeated Laval on their home field in a feat neither UBC nor Nill had ever accomplished. With the win, Nill improves his Vanier Cup record to 3-5. He becomes the first coach to reach the national CIS championship with three different teams (St. Mary’s, Calgary and now UBC) and the first coach to win with different programs (St. Mary’s and now UBC). But before the T-Birds could wrap up the Cup, they almost lost it and had to earn it back. In another sign — if you

believe in such things — the Carabins won the 50th Vanier Cup over McMaster by blocking a go-ahead field goal in the dying minutes. A similar fate almost played out against UBC when, the game tied at 23 late in the fourth quarter, the T-Birds mishandled the snap on a field goal attempt and turned over the ball on the Carabins’ 35 yard line with less than two minutes remaining in the game. Montreal’s would-be winning drive was interrupted by North Van’s A.J. Blackwell when he intercepted the ball at the half-line. The intended Montreal receiver missed the pass but redirected the ball, tipping it for Blackwell to make the play with 70 seconds left on the clock. T-Birds quarterback Michael O’Connor put the ball in the hands of veteran fifthyear running back Brandon Deschamps, and UBC landed 11 yards from the end zone after the Carabins were called offside. Third-year kicker Quinn

van Gylswyk hadn’t missed from within 40 yards this season — take it as a sign — and during the game he’d already put UBC on the board from 42, 33 and 43 yards. The clock showing one second, van Gylswyk kicked the winner through the uprights. He thanked his teammates for setting him up for the “easiest chip shot.” “Honestly, we thought we’d be a 3-5 team,” he told the Sportsnet broadcast crew before the Cup presentation. “We didn’t think much was possible.” A 2-6 team in 2014, UBC won eight straight to finish the 2015 season 11-2 as Vanier Cup champions. The T-Birds started the national final convincingly and led 16-0 against a defence that allowed an average 13.6 points all year. UBC racked up a string of first downs and scored on their first two drives, grabbing a 6-0 lead off the foot of van Gylswyk. Nearing the close of the first quarter, Dylan Chap-

delaine picked off a pass inside Montreal’s half and the T-Birds took less than 90 seconds to capitalize. Quarterback and Vanier Cup MVP O’Connor hit Marcus Davis, a secondyear running back from Victoria’s Mt. Douglas secondary, for a six-yard major. Van Gylswyk was good for a third time, and UBC enjoyed a 16-0 lead. The Carabins answered in the second quarter, taking four swift plays to score a 12-yard touchdown in double coverage for their first points of the game. After the half, they held momentum and whittled into UBC’s lead. The T-Birds lined up for a 10-yard field goal but instead pulled the kick and tried to run a fake touchdown pass, an aggressive choice that almost sunk them down the stretch. Van Gylswyk called what followed “devastating,” and Nill labelled the play call “a mistake.” The fake wasn’t convincing, and the Carabins sacked holder Trevor

Casey for a seven-yard loss then drove 92 yards in seven plays for a field goal that put them six-points behind the T-Birds. Deschamps, who ran for 79 yards for UBC, gave his side a 23-10 lead on a 44-yard rush. The Carabins cut into that advantage with back-to-back field goals followed by a dagger of a touchdown. Montreal pivot Cousineau led an 88-yard drive and from six yards, hit his receiver for the touchdown and took a share of the lead with 3:55 to play. The teams deadlocked at 23, all that followed was some of the most dramatic football in Vanier Cup history. Both defences forced punts, then UBC gained 42 yards only to mishandle the snap on the shouldacoulda-been winning field goal. Looking to complete the comeback, the Carabins turned over the ball to Blackwell. UBC scored. The Vanier Cup returned to Vancouver. @MHStewart

: Unstoppable force of a commuter train

107

The number of points by the third forward on that fabled line, Markus Naslund. With 48 goals and 56 assists in 01-02, he later earned the 2003 Lester B. Pearson Award as the NHL players’ choice as the most outstanding player.

7

The day (Monday, Dec. 7) the West Coast Express reunites at Rogers Arena for a ceremonial puck drop before the Canucks host the Buffalo Sabres.

JERSEY OF THE WEEK The Vancouver Stormtroopers bring the force to Pacific Coliseum Friday. Wearing official Star Wars swag, the Giants you love will dress as the rebel force you love to loath at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4 against the Kootenay Ice. Watch for the emperor himself, Darth Vader. The official Lucasfilm lookalike jerseys will be available to purchase through an auction, and proceeds from the game will benefit the Shriners of BC and Yukon as well as the Shriners Hospitals for Children. The Giants are 23 points behind the first-place Kelowna Rockets with six wins, 16 losses, two OT losses and two shootout losses.


A46

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Sports & Recreation FOOTBALL BC CHAMPIONSHIP

Versatility a weapon for Vancouver College Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

Saturday’s showdown for the provincial crown has been a year in the making. Maybe it’s been three years in the making. It has definitely been in the works since Halloween. The Vancouver College Fighting Irish play Victoria’s Mt. Douglas Rams for the AAA football provincial title Saturday night at B.C. Place. The Rams will appear in a record fifth-straight championship final since 2011. In 2010, the Fighting Irish won the crown and two year later, lost to the Rams as they picked up their second of three consecutive championships. (In 2014, the Rams lost to South Delta.) On Oct. 31 this year, the undefeated Irish handed their Western Conference rivals their only loss of the season in a 20-0 rout at O’Hagan Field. Naturally, it’s a win coach Todd Bernett

hopes to repeat. They will definitely learn from it. “They challenge you with overall team speed,” he said. “That goes defensively also. They are very quick on D and have enough size that they are not going to be pushed around.” And one more thing. “They have the provincial player of the year, Gavin Cobb. He, on any given moment, is the best player on the field,” said Bernett. In Cobb, the Rams have a utility knife they can slot in at quarterback and wide receiver. The five-foot-10 senior also plays defensive back and QB for Team B.C. “It’s very interesting to have a rematch from when we played on Halloween,” said Bernett. “There was the sense on that day that it could happen. We knew after we beat them that we were going to end up on opposite sides of the bracket. So I’m not

Fighting Irish wide receiver Regan Oey (No. 83) wraps up the ball in a 28-12 semi-final win over the New West Hyacks Nov. 28 at B.C. Place. Vancouver scored each quarter, and Oey caught six passes for a team-high 63 yards. PHOTO CHUNG CHOW

surprised that it’s come down to us.” Vancouver College defeated cross-town

rival Notre Dame in the quarter-final Nov. 21 and followed that by eliminating the New West Hyacks

Nov. 28. Both games were at B.C. Place. Versatility and commitment to practice characterize this College team, said Bernett, adding there is no single “go-to guy.” Instead, there are five or six players to carry the ball and another five or six to receive it in the air. Averaging 28 points over 12 games this season, the Fighting Irish accumulated 2,427 rushing yards and another 2,287 passing. Eight players scored three or more touchdowns, with Michael Le leading them all with eight on the ground for 714 yards and receiver Rhysen John combining with quarterback Jacob Samuels for five majors and 984 total yards. “There is chemistry between the boys themselves and they’re also just a joyful group,” said Bernett. “They love the game and there is good harmony between the player and the coaches as well. They retain info and

they play well on game day because they put in the time at practice.” Bernett said his side has prepared for this game since their season ended in 2014 with a 5420 quarter-final loss to St. Thomas More. “Everything we’ve done the entire year has been building up to prepare us to play well at this moment. We are healthy, we need to have another week of focused practice because I’m confident we will [be ready]. The best thing we’ve done this year is practise well every single day. This team does the right thing by taking a day by day approach. They don’t look too far ahead and don’t forget to put in the work and prepare.” Three years, one year, two months all whittles down to a week and then the big day. The AAA B.C. Championship is 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5 at B.C. Place. @MHStewart

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2015 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A47

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CONSTRUCTION SITE in your NEIGHBORHOOD Req: Carpenters, Helpers, Labourers, CSO’s/OFA’s, TCP’s, Cleaners $12/Hr

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F/T IN -home caregiver is req for a family of 3. Min wage Ferdilynpre@yahoo.ca

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DAILY OR WEEKLY PAY Apply 9AM to 2PM at 118-713 Columbia St. New West 604-522-4900

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One Call Does It All

604-630-3300

Currently seeking REGISTERED CARE AIDES in Metro Vancouver areas a

Requirements: a

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CANADA BENEFIT GROUP Do you or someone you know suffer from a disability? Get up to $40,000 from the Canadian Government. Toll-free 1-888-511-2250 or www.canadabenefit.ca/ free-assessment

CRIMINAL RECORD? Canadian Record Suspension (Criminal pardon) seals record. American waiver allows legal entry. Why risk employment, business, travel, licensing, deportation, peace of mind? Free consultation: 1-800-347-2540

INFORMATION WANTED

LOST *#+)% ',"'$!+# ($&-' 4+"230! ,$// ), ,.-1/# (*)%)&' '#/,(%&,'#%1 537)")$)"2(!-."40*6+. &)(%& +$",, ! '*&# )'%$ (#!&&# *!&'" '#/,(%&,'#%1 537)")$)"2(!-."40*6+.

WITNESS WANTED TO ACCIDENT

Anyone who witnessed an accident on November 7th, 2015 at 6:45 pm on or around the intersection of Manitoba Street and SW Marine Drive, Vancouver British Columbia. Please call: Shawn Sidhu at (778) 835-2540.

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A vehicle will be an asset BC Care Aide Registered Two Step TB Test within the last 12 months is required Clean Criminal Record with vulnerable sector check Valid First Aid and CPR If interested please e-mail your resume to: greatpeoplework@bayshore.ca

RESIDENT CARE ATTENDANTS Now Hiring FLAG PERSONS & LANE CLOSURE TECHS .

• Must have reliable vehicle • Must be certified & exp’d • Union Wage & Benefits .

VALLEY TRAFFIC SYSTEMS Apply in person 9770-199A St, Langley Fax or Email resume: 604-513-3661 darlene@valleytraffic.ca

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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES POWELL RIVER & REGION Transition House Society has a job posting for a Stopping the Violence Counselor, closing on December 30, 2015. Contact: chamberj@telus.net

CAREER TRAINING HUGE DEMAND for Medical Transcriptionists! CanScribe is Canada’s top Medical Transcription training school. Learn from home and work from home. Call today! 1.800.466.1535. www.canscribe.com info@canscribe.com

Go to vancourier.com and Click on classifieds

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DOMESTIC HELP WANTED Retired Couple req. in home/ live out f/t Care Taker. flexible days off, Van Area. superspowerjewell@gmail.com

TRUTH IN EMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING Glacier Media Group makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the: Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711 Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email: inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

required immediately in Vancouver, Burnaby and on the North Shore. Good verbal and written English skills required; BCDL an asset. Send a detailed résumé with cover letter to: Fax: 604-987-4027 or email: HR@ShyloNursing.ca a

THE BC LIQUOR DISTRIBUTION BRANCH The BC Liquor Distribution Branch is seeking janitorial companies with commercial cleaning experience to bid on one or more of the 29 stores in the Vancouver, North Vancouver and West Vancouver area. If you qualify go to: http://www.bcbid.gov.bc.ca and search under Liquor Distribution Branch for Janitorial Services for the Vancouver, North Vancouver and West Vancouver area Bid number: ITQ2015-12-14

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PLACE YOUR BIRTHDAY ANNOUNCEMENTS 24/7

• • • • •

Closing date & Time: December 14, 2015 before 2pm PST.

TRADES HELP $"'&;&"'&"5 (9*%57#&")

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OFFICE/CLERICAL

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required 35 hours/week, Monday - Thursday (8-6), in Vancouver. No experience necessary. We will train the right candidate. You will be responsible to rent and show units to people, answer telephones, light office and ground maintenance. Walking, Standing, Sitting is required. You must be able to read, write, and speak clear and fluent English. Please apply if you fill these requirements. Must have phone and basic computer skills. We are looking to fill this position immediately.

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Temporary Full Time Storage Facility Clerk

Please apply by: Fax: 604-255-9333 Attention: KR email: info@blackwoodapparel.com

Place ads online @

@

classifieds.vancourier.com


A48

THE VANCOUVER COURIER THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2015

SUDOKU

@

MARKETPLACE BUILDING SUPPLIES

ANTIQUES

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FOR SALE - MISC

FREE

WANTED Old Books Wanted also: Photos Postcards, Letters, Paintings. no text books or encyclopedia. I pay cash. 604-737-0530

STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS UP TO 60% OFF! 30x40, 40x60, 50x80, 60x100, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call: 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Hudson’s Bay Blanket, king size, wool, striped, from the Bay. Never used. $250. Call (604)253-7801

place ads online @

FREE - Single “Carol” hospital bed with gel mattress. You pick up from Kerrisdale area. 604-266-6082.

STEEL BUILDING SALE “Really Big Sale - Year End Clear Out!” 21X22 $5,190 25X24 $5,988 27X28 $7,498 30X32 $8,646 35X34 $11,844 42X54 $16,386. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 www.pioneersteel.ca

classifieds. vancourier.com

classifieds.vancourier.com • classifieds.vancourier.com

Christmas Corner Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

PUZZLE ANSWERS ON SEPARATE PAGE

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HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR

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Sat. Dec. 5th 10am - 4pm

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Kensington Community Centre 5175 Dumfries St. Vancouver

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(Near 33rd & Knight St) 604-718-6201

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Handcrafted Items! Door Prizes & Food! Free Admission & Free Parking!

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SPECIAL

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WAREHOUSE X’MAS GIFT SALE Puzzle Tree Antiques & Fine Arts Unit 161 -628 E. Kent Ave. S. Vancouver BC

.902 %;=43 *?4=,4

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Saturdays: Dec 5th & Dec 12th 11am-4:00pm

5$0( 9<< #(&,'1*' 01/. 41"

( 2 days only )

Inquiries:778-859-4442

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Capiz candle holders & stands, X’mas angel ornaments, driftwood stackable table..... Collector’s tin toys, Art Deco clocks and vases mid Century reconditioned chairs and much more......

ACROSS

1. Characters in one inch of tape 4. In a hold 9. Jewish mystic 14. A way to souse 15. A small sharp knife 16. Frogs, toads, tree toads 17. Brew 18. Rowdy carouser 20. Poetries 22. __ salts, remedy 23. Expect eagerly 24. Obstructing the view of something 28. Denotes three

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29. Expression of uncertainty 30. Greek portico 31. Bureau 33. Electric battery 37. Vapor density 38. Radioactivity unit 39. Strive to equal or match 41. Cologne 42. Carrier’s invention 43. Highest in degree or quality 44. Female horses 46. Serbian 49. Publicity 50. Actress Lupino 51. Supporting structures

55. Jobs 58. Indian founder of Sikhism 59. Capital of Zimbabwe 60. Woman of charm and good looks 64. Order 65. Draft animal in desert regions 66. Unaccented syllable verse 67. Fail to keep pace 68. Sheath or shirtwaist 69. Moss stalks 70. __ Lilly, drug company

19. Imitate 21. Gentlemen 24. Dawn 25. A citizen of Chile 26. Bright stars ljw afs{dp qrgbd kmw uycerhrnx bger{grs 32. Diacritical mark 34. Correspondences 35. Indicates position 36. Small cup 40. 12th Greek letter 41. Capable of being eliminated

45. 12th Jewish month 47. Rechristen 48. In a way, imputes 52. Hydroxyls + 2C 53. Follows sigma 54. Vegetable shrubs 56. South African village 57. Monetary unit of D.R. Congo 59. First Chinese dynasty 60. Divides evenly into (Math) 61. Household god (Roman) 62. Pakistani rupee 63. American time

Christmas Craft & Bake Sale

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Sat., Dec. 5th 1-4 pm Columbus Residence

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704 W. 69th Ave., at Ash St, Vancouver

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PETS

DOWN 1. Exclamation of praise lw lvv odnzgs izto{t gzcofg (alt. sp.) 3. Repeated 4. Hungers 5. School of Business, UCB 6. Bobby __, NHL champ 7. Lease 8. More parched 9. Medieval merchant guild 10. Negative ions 11. Top 12. One of the Gershwins 13. Dekalitre

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PET SERVICES

22nd Annual Women’s Winter Faire

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Sat/Sun December 19/20, 11am- 5pm 3102 Main Street (Heritage Hall)

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$3-$5 door donation supports Syrian Refugees See Vendors at: www.soundsandfuries. com/faire A Sounds & Furies Production

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Promote your Craft Fairs, Christmas Events ❄ and Services ❄ We’re are offering a

ALL SMALL BREED PUPS Local, Non-Shedding and Vet Checked. 604-590-3727 www.puppiesfishcritters.com

CATS & KITTENS FOR ADOPTION ! 604-724-7652

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25% discount on Christmas Corner ads

Call 604-444-3000 and book today.


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2015 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

BUSINESS SERVICES

RENTALS

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

APARTMENTS/CONDOS FOR RENT

FRANCHISES

&)00'/*,%) /(,!!$! #)-/ + ,",0.#)!./

DO YOU HAVE 10 HRS/WK to turn into $1500/mth using your PC and phone? Free info: www.BossFree123.com

+*+* 2,'% *&%( "#,/$,. !1/0-$#,)

* %54", $"@-,>5-"+ &5"@6.-34 #;;>5,A@-,:

GET Free Vending Machines. Can earn $100,000.00 + per year. All Cash-Locations provided. Protected Territories. Interest free Financing. Full details, call 1-866-668-6629 or www.TCVEND.COM

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MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get the online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit:CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

/7080B081100 9 -@2>!6>?45"++<686>)

WORK AT HOME!! $570/weekly, assembling CHRISTMAS decorations + great money with our free mailer program + free home typing program. PT/FT Experience Unnecessary Genuine! www.AvailableHelpWanted.com

REAL ESTATE

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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES PROPERTY INVESTORS CLUB Now join for FREE. Call for information. 604-836-6098

KING ALBERT COURT

AMBER ROCHESTER

Borrowers Wanted. Start saving hundreds of dollars today! We can easily approve you by phone. 1st, 2nd or 3rd mortgage money is available right now. Rates start at Prime. Equity counts. We don’t rely on credit, age or income. CALL ANYTIME 1-800-639-2274 or 604-430-1498 Apply online at www.capitaldirect.ca NEED a Loan? Own Property? Have Bad Credit? We can help! Call toll free 1-866-405-1228 www. firstandsecondmortgages.ca

1300 King Albert, Coquitlam

545 Rochester Ave, Coquitlam

LOANS

.

.

(near Coq/Bby border)

office: cell:

604-813-8789

**SWEDISH MASSAGE** 604-739-3998 Relieve Road Rage

Condos and Pretty Homes too! Check us out! www.webuyhomesbc.com ( 604 ) 626-9647

CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE NO RISK program. Stop Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us Now. We can Help! 1-888-356-5248

401 Westview St, Coquitlam .

Large Units. Near Lougheed Mall, all Transportation, & SFU, Colleges. near Coq/Bby border.

604-727-5178

cell:

TRAVEL

.

SAVE 30% on our Greenland and Wild Labrador Voyage until December 18, 2015. See Labrador as it was meant to be seen - By Sea - Aboard the comfortable Ocean Endeavour. No extra charge for singles! Quote Community Newspapers! Call Toll Free: 1-800-363-7566 or visit: www.adventurecanada.com. (TICO # 04001400).

ARBOUR GREENE

552 Dansey Ave, Coquitlam .

Extra large 2 BR’s. Close to Lougheed Mall, Transit, SFU & Colleges. (near Coq/Bby border) .

Call 604-327-1178

office: 604-939-4903 cell: 778-229-1358

info@langaragardens.com Managed by Peterson Residential Property Management Inc.

CALYPSO COURT

.

ROYAL CRESCENT ESTATES

1030 - 5th Ave, New Westminster

22588 Royal Cres Ave, Maple Ridge

Near Transit & Skytrain, Douglas College & more. Well maintained building.

%(!" &('&"( %(!" )($#%( $!"& '#%

.

.

.

Call for info/viewing

604-813-8789

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Large Units. Close to Golden Ears Bridge, shopping & more. GREAT RIVER VIEW!

office: cell:

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604-463-0857 604-375-1768

.

COTTONWOOD PLAZA

GENTLEMEN! Attractive, discreet European lady is available for company. 604-451-0175

555 Cottonwood Ave, Coquitlam .

Large Units, some with 2nd Bathrooms or Den. On bus routes, close to SFU & Lougheed Mall.

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

..

office:

604-936-1225

SKYLINE TOWERS 102-120 Agnes St, New West .

Hi-Rise Apartment with River View & Indoor Pool. 1 BR & 2 BR Available. Rent includes heat & hot water. Remodeled Building and Common area. Gated underground parking available. References required.

CALL 604 525-2122

BAYSIDE PROPERTY SERVICES

GARDEN VILLA

1010 6th Ave. New West. Suites Available. Beautiful atrium with fountain. By shops, college & transit. Pets negotiable. Ref req. CALL 604 715-7764 BAYSIDE PROPERTY SERVICES

VILLA MARGARETA

320-9th St, New West Suites Available. All suites have balconies, Undergrd. parking avail. Refs. req. Small Pet OK. CALL 604-715-7764

BAYSIDE PROPERTY SERVICES .

JUNIPER COURT

415 Westview Street, Coquitlam .

Close to Lougheed Mall, all transit connections, skytrain & schools; SFU, BCIT, Colleges. ..

office:

604-939-8905

TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT

@

CHAMPLAIN HTS 2 BR t/h, carport, family orient, n/p. $1210. Av now. 604-781-9650

place ads online @

classifieds.vancourier.com

A LIC’D. Electrician #30582 Rewiring & reno, appliance/ plumbing, rotor rooter 778998-9026, 604-255-9026 All Electrical, Lic #105654 res/comm, renos, panel chgs Low Cost 604-374-0062 LIC. ELECTRICIAN bf#37309 Commercial &

EUROPEAN DETAILED Service Cleaning www.puma-cleaning.ca Sophia 604-805-3376

residential renos & small jobs. 778-322-0934

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call. Lic#89402. Fast same day service. Insured. Guar’d. We love small jobs. 604-568-1899

CONCRETE

Coastal Concrete .

• Placing & Finishing •Forming •Site Prep •Concrete Removal •Re & Re •Excavation Reinforcing 37 years exp • Free Est. coastalconcrete.ca

Call Mario 604-253-0049

LANGARA GARDENS

#101 - 621 W. 57th Ave, Van Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Rental Apartments & Townhouses. Heat, hot water & lrg storage locker included. Many units have in-suite laundry and lrg patios/balconies with gorgeous views. Tasteful gardens, swim pools, hot tub, gym, laundry, gated parking, plus shops & services. Near Oakridge Ctrl, Canada Line stations, Langara College, Churchill High School & more. Sorry no pets. www.langaragardens.com

#1 A-CERTIFIED Licensed Electrician, Res/Comm New or old wiring. Reasonable rates. Lic #22774 604-879-9394

EXCAVATING

.

.

moneyprovider.com

ENVIRO MAID - Insured and Bonded. Residential. Exc refs. Free est. $25/hr. 604685-1344 enviromaid.net

ELECTRICAL

Rick (604) 202-5184

604-937-7343 778-863-9980

AMBER (W)

$500 loans and more No credit checks 1-877-776-1660 Apply at

A.S.B.A ENTERPRISE. Comm/ Res. Free Est. $25/hr incls supplies. Insured. 604-723-0162

CONCRETE SPECIALIST Sidewalk, Driveway, Patio Exposed Aggregate, Remove & Replacing Reasonable Rates. 35 yrs experience For free est.

.

LOCAL HOOKUPS BROWSE4FREE 1-888628-6790 or #7878 Mobile

Damaged Houses! Older Houses!

..

Call Linda

PERSONALS

******************* FIND Your Favourite CALL NOW 1-866-732-0070 1-888-544-0199 18+

CLEANING

Close to Lougheed Mall, all transportation, SFU, BCIT, Colleges & more.

.

HOT LOCAL CHAT 1-877290-0553 Mobile: #5015 *******************

Santa’s Chimney Services Sweeping, Repairs, Re-build. WETT Cert., 778-340-0324

GREAT LOCATION;

Close to Lougheed Mall, Transportation, & SFU, Colleges.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

LARGE FUND

BY OWNER REVENUE Houses on land value, avail Vancouver starting from $899 & up. Info call 604-836-6098

RECREATIONAL PROPERTY .

.

.

HIP OR KNEE Replacement? Arthritic Conditions/COPD? Restrictions in Walking/ Dressing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. For assistance! 1-844-453-5372.

CHIMNEY SERVICES

UID%:YJ EI',B@ M;ASSRSTV0MASZAPAN5TVS5MO&RT %$ 9S?R)M;ASSRSTV0MASZAPAN5TVS5MO&RT E$ K.=O3KQO.L43 +,M8 UASA<VN ?RN 'V5A97M

HOME SERVICES

HOUSES FOR SALE

* WE BUY HOMES *

A49

#1 Backhoes & Excavators Trenchless Waterlines Bobcats & Dump Truck & All Material Deliveries

Drainage, Video Inspection, Landscaping, Stump/Rock/Cement/Oil Tank & Demos, Paving, Pool/Dirt Removal, Paver Stones, Jackhammer, Water/Sewer, Line/Sumps, Slinger Avail, Concrete Cutting, Hand Excavating, Basements Made Dry Claudio Backhoe Services

604-341-4446

•All Concrete Work

MASONRY AND REPAIRS •Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys •Fireplaces •Pavers •Drain Tiles

GEORGE • 778-998-3689

Get MORE

LIVING ROOM Find it in the Real Estate Section.

L & L CONCRETE, All types: Stamped, Repairs, Pressure washing, seal. 778-882-0098

($-+/363+, 5 %# '36$ '$)03%$: 5 !($* &" ()&3,&7$ 5 )' *&%1"3// 5

classifieds.vancourier.com

9.852#!54..#

DRAINAGE DRAIN Tiles, Sewer, Water,

Video Inspection, Jack Hammering, Hand Excavating, Concrete Cutting, WET BSMT MADE DRY

Tobias 24/7

604.782.4322

DRYWALL Drywall Repairs, Lath-Plaster, Painting Texture Ceilings Boarding & Taping All Repairs include ~ FREE Paint over. Best Prices.

604-715-1587

FLOORING Hardwood Floor Refinishing Repairs & Staining Installation Free Estimates Century Hardwood Floors 604-376-7224

www.centuryhardwood.com

ANYTHING IN WOOD Hardwood floors, installs, refinishing. Non-toxic finishes. 604-782-8275 A to Z CERAMIC TILES Installation, Repairs, Free Est. 604 444-4715, 604 805-4319

To advertise online:

classifieds. vancourier.com

West Coast Cedar Installations New, Repaired or Rebuilt Fences & Decks 604-435-5755 or 604-788-6458

$'!%" #&(&

84957 > 84;2687 -1%- 7+=!'+/"33& 7@.# :=/.

$?)(0<%(*),<

Golden Hardwood & Laminate & Tiles. Prof install, refinishing, sanding & repairs. 778-858-7263

cont. on next page

TODAY'S PUZZLE ANSWERS


A50

THE VANCOUVER COURIER THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2015

HOME SERVICES GUTTERS

LAWN & GARDEN

6/)) 5,'#*-,&

A.S.U. Enterprises

*Gutter Cleaning *Window Cleaning *Power Washing *Free Estimates *Owner/operator Terry 604-376-7383

Ken’s Power Washing Plus WINTER SPECIALS ! Gutter & window cleaning ! Power washing ! WCB, Insured, Free est. Call Ken 604-716-7468

5$07 8$1 57.34"7 +"-'2 %.!/ *$&% (-#,/01)

!:34 &24/21 !:54 (=2:9+,51 ()2:;-.73 66 &24123 #3,9)9/ $7>)9/66*25:0+9; *23:.)79 #5.;+;1 6 '.00253 %);2 '23.)=)<)9/ %:=; 6$9=+;1 ",88)1(/5+30<:3"2;7?:= %+1/03 %2:0 (=2:9+,5 ".88+3/ "2<9,:) !%(( "$#'&)#($

%(!+2405 ,10$%* ###(+-)&).#-'/(!" -00! * #0) *,' +++/#%$.$0+%"&/(*

@

place ads online @

AUTOMOTIVE

.64) 0%84+*: "%&#!6# #*0&%6!6# ':%*65,2 ':%*65,2.

)$%*+# &+"% , '+#)(%!

classifieds. vancourier.com

HANDYPERSON

AaronR Construction Repairs & Renos, general contracting. Insured, WCB, Licensed.

604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com

$'!%" #&(&

84957 > 84;2687 -1%- 7+=!'+/"33& 7@.# :=/.

$?)(0<%(*),<

OIL TANK REMOVAL

",($-&($." QK8M S3C1?KI + >;I + S3=1CC38R3R + 68EHL3R + S3KE18K/I3 SK<3E '*!%)/!%#')*

'!(*# *"$-.+*-%$& !-),

: '0, %#). &6+<3#, : $<9. 8<+;,067 1052 805- !-,#17 : *,1#-7 4#09 " "! ('%#$'#& 96#7<)#!,6 9#567 : (/86,,6)5 964696)867 82= 8=66 9<;537;6< :744

*&&) .,#!-..!-/-, +($$) .,#!-",!'%",'0+#!% *'/- ,#(' /#!)' "$&.

!%'' "$#&

Need help with your Home Renovation?

1-75/1153193

)'( ; $,::< !6.,0%& !('$ %# &!")(

Ny Ton Gardening

Yard Clean Up, Hedge/Bush Trim, Pruning. 604-782-5288 • SD ENTERPRISES • •Landscaping •Lawn Care •Gardening •Pruning •Clean-up •Top Soil •CEDAR FENCING Call Terry • 604-726-1931

TREES, HEDGES, SHRUBS Pruning, shaping, removal, fruits, topiary. Wolfgang, 778-848-7404 WILDWOOD LANDSCAPING Comm/Strata/Res, Exp, Hedge Trimming & Removal, Lawn Restoration, Free Est. 604-893-5745

MASONRY

Find it in the Classifieds! PAINTING/ WALLPAPER

D&M PAINTING

PLUMBING QUALITY PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL • 35 Years Experience • 24/7 Service • $40 per hour Call 604-518-5413

Certified Plumber & Gas Fitter

* Reno’s & Repairs 24 hrs/day * Furnaces * Boilers * Hot Water Heating * Reasonable Rates * Hot Water Tanks

RENOS & HOME IMPROVEMENT FERREIRA

RUBBISH REMOVAL

*"+)/ '.!& "(#$-+%,!"#

HOME IMPROVEMENTS All interior and Exterior Renovations and Additons Renovation Contractor Licensed and Insured Free Estimates “Satisfaction Guaranteed”

NORM 604-841-1855

ROOFING

1 %;<< "+E8B/+ $;6? #+938:< 7 '<+:6C@0 :A *))3E-:4<+ #:A+D 1 (33?+- *003B6A9+6AD 1 ":9+C&:5 "+E8B/+ 1 >2 =:E- (B6 !E;/? 1 #+DB-+6AB:< 7 '399+E/B:< ;E @<D9 :73 D83B<4C .-+"-&#' +- "%#& $ *,%! ()).

YOUR WAY

Always Reddy Rubbish Removal

A-1 Contracting & Roofing Re-Roofing & Repair. Concrete Tile, Paint & Seal & Maint. WCB. 25% Discount. Call Jag at:

778-892-1530

85/-.5

6523-718 5490

OY\ZV\Z[ NXRW]ZU L PMT QYSSZU

0 7JA:BUV 0 52>0 728 50;9/10 0 6<: 32:0; 42=? 0 9B2OJ2PU 4FUWD OJ 5U2N 9U@UW@OGJ

0.,21/320.1-

3 Licensed Plumbers 66 years of exp. 604-830-6617 www.oceansidemechanical.com

$'!%" #&(&

84957 > 84;2687 -1%- 7+=!'+/"33& 7@.# :=/.

$?)(0<%(*),< AMBLESIDE ROOFING

Reroofs & Repairs, BBB A+ insured/WCB 778-288-8357 Your Leak Repair Experts

• Respectful • Reliable & • Responsible. All Rubbish, Junk & Recycling needs. Res/Com. Affordable rates

604-724-3832

*"3./1*4!3"2'!,0

"961- 03+3

$=!& 5&:*#52 5&@=-*/#=@2 #@2/*""*/#=@2 'EGB 7H.),C ".)BG)BDC 'EGB 5.643C (EGDBDC %H+A+G3BBDC #G>HABDC

8F91?;?1<I0I '+#),%+#*!##(*"&!#$*!%

AAA All types repairs, tiling, painting, plumbing, electrical, more. David 604-862-7537

D2C<E>;<+C)> MOVING

*%%96'*(!& ?91"<$ eeeMk``OLbkh[aZOfaLKhgMgOZ

+@BA#.

%.28 Nc Hc _c J j Nd lOY lLqg\K R]gaYKab i na[]kh[a i N IO H QaY %.)) &,=;8/=)A3)5;2. ';,-275= naK]baYI]k[iWOZZaLg]k[io]kYOK

RpWXR j RpPT VSmlXPWU

C4@>B:D>@0@4

HANDYMAN Reno, kitchen, bath, plumbing, countertop, floors, paint, etc. Mic, 604-725-3127

HEATING ACTUAL HEATING LTD

No Heat? BBB

604-874-4808

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING Across the street, across the world Real Professionals. Reas. Rates. Best in every way! 604-721-4555

1(/)C)=+ A "F)@ /3BF!. $F);/ )=;CD (C76/F5!C/ $F/@)9@ G9!C)B0 4!)=B, 53 1"-6!5/ #)$,+ 7(4 ,% 2(*'+.$.0& *DE 9D !>79B 79F &!@)=!B/ 'C77F)=+ A %!)5 #/F6);/D,

&#+ )$%# )%-%( --'#%!!#!%-' &"+*$$)*(),)

JACK’S RUBBISH & RECYCLING Fast & Friendly! Best Price Guaranteed! 604-266-4444

ACTUAL PLUMBING LTD

BBB, Visa/Mcard/Amex

!($%%&'$#(" &;;5+*04498+%0)!9"%/994 (94#,+$;8"/;) '/;)9 6.1+21.+:73.

RENOS & HOME IMPROVEMENT

2006 Mercedes C230 V6 $9999 2012 Mazda5 +7Pass $11,888 2006 LEXUS LS430 Top Model Auto Depot 604-727-3111

Canam Roofing 778-881-1417 Res. roofing, new, re-roofing & repairs. Peace of mind warranty. www.canamroofing.ca

Roofing, soffits, siding, hardy board, windows, doors, patios. Great rates, quality pays

2007 Veracruz V6 AWD SUV $9999 2011 M-Benz GLK 4Matic $22,800 2000 Lexus RX300 108km $ 9999 Auto Depot 604-727-3111

604-358-7597

TCP MOVING 1 to 3 men from $40.Lic & Ins local & storage. Ca & US long distance 604-505-1386 604-505-9166

Find the Key to your New Home • BUY • SELL • RENT

604.630.3300

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

GL Roofing, & Repairs. New roof, clean gutters $80. 604240-5362. info@glroofing.ca MCR Mastercraft Roofing Right the 1st time! Repairs, reroofing, garage, decks. Hart 322-5517

84957 > 84;2687 -1%- 7+=!'+/"33& 7@.# :=/.

WIJ XLYN[[JY

.,- !)) ("#' $*%!/+& -'*.(& !.%)(#*$ "'$$'& /+$' 0&'' 1%$.,+$' &#!'"##'$##% DISPOSAL BINS starting at $219 plus dump fees. Call Disposal King 604-306-8599

$?)(0<%(*),< ,<64/. #$,+&% 04=27,4= '+!)-#+! /(".&*(/ :1;8/31: -925

JACK’S RUBBISH REMOVAL Household Junk Specialist! Fast, Friendly & cheap. Call 604-266-4444

, 20-'$-'/ , !+(*$%-*0+ , 2+#).-'/ , 1-+-'/ , "!%&('$%# "0%&($-'/

*(#) .,&%"-!%'"'. *'#) ",!%&"&-( +'##) "$-%&-&" # )&!! !%$('"$!% # +(##) .,&%"$.%'.'"

TREE SERVICES TREE SERVICES

7 "1):;;+8 7 *,1+0)01+ $930;6'45. (;/4:8 7 *,1+0)01+ #90,0)28 7 !0)-, '45.0)2 7 *,1+0)01+ &4)50)2 7 *13; %9348

3(++ !'&)0/&+' %#('!$&'$%""

###*2/&),",$+(1/.-,%$+(*-,0

Get MORE

Bath, Kitchen, Basement & More Grade A+, Licensed & Insured RenoRite.com, 604-365-7271 CONCRETE FORMING, framing & siding crews available. 604-218-3064 D & M Renovations. Flooring, tiling, finishing. Fully Insured. Top quality, quick work, 604-724-3832

FERREIRA HOME IMPROVEMENTS All interior and Exterior Renovations and Additons Renovation Contractor Licensed and Insured Free Estimates “Satisfaction Guaranteed”

NORM 604-841-1855

XLYN[ LNY T WYVLH YJ]\UNG

*+$' (#! +%% ")'&*%)$

OKSRPQKRMQKK JQI RMIPKN OL

M

#1 FREE Scrap Vehicle Removal

Ask about $500 Credit!!!

$$ PAID for Some 604.683.2200

RUBBISH REMOVAL Reasonable rates - Free est. Pat 604-224-2112 anytime

ABBA MOVERS bsmt clean 1-5 ton Lic, senior disc, 1 man $35, 2 men from $45/hr, 24/7, 26 yrs 604-506-7576 ABE MOVING & Delivery & Rubbish Removal $30/HR per Person• 24/7. 604-999-6020

2004 Kia Rio Winters Inc $3950. 2002 Suzuki Aerio Hatch $3950. 2003 Sunfire sedan auto $2650. Auto Depot 604-727-3111

10% Off with this Ad. For all your plumbing, heat & reno needs. Lic Gas Fitter, Aman. 778-895-2005

$'!%" #&(&

PATIOS

2002 VW Jetta 1.8T GLS $4850 2003 VW Golf Hatch GL $4850 2002 Volvo S-60 Sedan $4850 Auto Depot 604-727-3111

604-874-4808

SAVE ON GAS FITTING & HOT WATER TANKS. Plumber /Gas fitter. Quality work. Free Estimates. Same day service, Insured BBB 604-987-7473

DJ Painting, Int/Ext. Com /Res. Drywall repair. Free est. Fully insured. 604-417-5917, 604-258-7300

MASTER BRUSHES PAINTING. Top Quality Paint & Workmanship. 25 yrs exp. 3 coats, & repairs for $200 ea room. BEST PAINTER IN TOWN! 778-545-0098, 604-377-5423

1999 Toyota Corolla LE $2950 1997 Volvo Wagon 850 $2950 1996 Volvo 850 Sedan $2950 Auto Depot 604-727-3111

Johnson• 778-999-2803

? F77@D -7F 2<::8 < ;7!BD !=0 ;7C79F

&*"$%#: 4 "!$%(=$#' 30;3 "?78B?6-,,5 "A./ @76.

SPORTS & IMPORTS

.

.

Interior / Exterior Specialist Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free estimate

JEEP OWNERS. Holiday Sale Starts Now!! Parts, Accessories for JEEPS from 1942 to 2016. Huge Discounts. Easy Gift Shopping, Buy Canadian. www.gemini-sales.com Phone 604-294-4214.

=E?>;;E>6A35 .'!$',

604-591-2499

Plumbing & Renovations Full Kitchen & Baths Trenchless Waterlines H/W tanks. Plugged Drains “Old Home Specialist” STEVE • 604-830-8555

AUTO MISCELLANEOUS

LIVING ROOM Find it in the Rental Section

To advertise call

604.630-3300

Keep your trees pruned to be safe in upcoming windstorms. 60 ft Bucket Trucks 604-787-5915 604-291-7778 treeworksvancouver.ca 10% discount with this ad WILDWOOD TREE Services, Res/Comm/Strata, Free Estimate. Call 604-893-5745

CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

From the City to the Valley

604-630-3300

ADVERTISING POLICIES

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and wil ingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort wil be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes wil be made in the next available issue. The Vancouver Courier wil be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration. For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!


T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A51


A52

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, DE C E M B E R 3 , 2 0 1 5

Natural

Your Original

B.C. Grown

Organic

Organic

Certified Organic Outside or Inside Red Bulk Round Roasts Beets

Whole Chickens

4

Food Store

2

5

$ 98 $ 19 $ 99 /lb 10.98/kg

/lb 4.83/kg

/lb 13.21/kg

We carry a Huge Selection of Organic Products GRASS FED

Sirloin Tip Roasts

6

ORGANIC

MAPLE HILL’S

Frozen Turkeys

4

Cornish Hens

4

MAPLE HILL’S

ANGUS

Roasting Chickens

2

Prime Rib Roasts

9

$ 99

$ 53

$ 53

$ 99

NON-MEDICATED

FROM THE DELI

CALIFORNIA GROWN

MEXICO GROWN

MEXICO GROWN

Certified Organic

Certified Organic

Long English Cucumbers

/lb 15.41/kg

Bone-In Pork Butt Roasts

3

$ 99

/lb 8.80/kg

COSTA RICA GROWN

Pineapples

3

$ 99 each

/lb 9.99/kg

Lyoner Sausage

1

$ 29 /100 g

MEXICO GROWN

Certified Organic

Avocados

3

$ 99 3 pk bag

/lb 9.99/kg

Lemons

Romaine Lettuce

$ 89

$ 79

JOHN GREEK

JOHN GREEK

4

2lb bag

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

7

$ 99 500ml

2

each

3

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

8 am-9 pm •

/lb 22.00/kg

2 for 3

$ 00

DR. BRONNER’S

Balsamic Vinegar

Magic Soaps Assorted

$ 99

$

250ml

14

99 plus tax 944ml

ORGANIC

NON-ORGANIC

Cane Sugar

Semi Sweet Chocolate Chips

3

$ 49 1595 Kingsway • 604-872-3019 • www.famousfoods.ca

$ 98

/lb 6.59/kg

1kg

Sale Dates: Thursday, December 3rd - Wednesday, December 9th, 2015.

4

$ 49 455g

Vancouver Courier December 3 2015  

Digital Edition

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