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CONTENTS Letter from Charles Ormiston, Chair of the Board of Governors �������������������������������������������2 Letter from Chris Edwards, Head of College................................................................................3 UWCSEA guiding statements and learning programme...........................................................5 UWCSEA governance and leadership............................................................................................9 Board of Governors...................................................................................................................10 Organisational structure.......................................................................................................... 11 Student achievement.....................................................................................................................13 Academics...................................................................................................................................14 Activities..................................................................................................................................... 27 Outdoor education..................................................................................................................30 Personal and social education............................................................................................... 33 Service......................................................................................................................................... 36 Our community...............................................................................................................................41 Scholars .....................................................................................................................................44 Community feedback..............................................................................................................46 Business report................................................................................................................................51 Human Resources......................................................................................................................51 Admissions................................................................................................................................. 54 Finance........................................................................................................................................ 56 Statement of financial position............................................................................................. 58 Statement of comprehensive income..................................................................................60 College Advancement................................................................................................................... 63 Foundation................................................................................................................................. 63 Foundation financial report....................................................................................................64 Statement of financial position.............................................................................................66 Statement of comprehensive income.................................................................................. 67 Alumni relations....................................................................................................................... 69 Donors 2013/2014....................................................................................................................71 1


LETTER FROM CHARLES ORMISTON CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS I am pleased to introduce the UWC South East Asia Annual Report, which highlights aspects of the UWCSEA learning programme and operations during the 2013/2014 school year. Our ambition at UWCSEA is to be a leader in international education with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education. As the Board of Governors sets priorities and allocates resources, we constantly come back to the ambition. Identifying those key initiatives that will improve the quality of our students’ education, while furthering our ambition to be a leader in education on the world stage, is our main focus. The role of the administration is to run the school; the role of the Board of Governors is to ensure the school is well run. In addition to the standard compliance and fiduciary roles that a Board must play, we work closely with the school’s management to ensure excellence. Each Board committee has a specific focus, and members leverage this expertise as appropriate to support the school. The 2013/2014 year was a significant one for the Board. Julian Whiteley completed a highly successful nine-year stint as Head of College and we welcomed our new Head of College, Chris Edwards. The selection process and orientation programme for Chris reflected the best of UWCSEA—inclusive of our broader community (with parents, teachers and staff involved in each step of the process), values-based and professional. The Board oversaw significant progress in the following areas in 2013/2014: • A review of school fees. As a result, in 2013/2014 we were the seventh most expensive premium international school in Singapore, which, given the quality of 2

the programme, indicates exceptional return on investment for parents. • Auditing the success of the new admissions policy, which shifted from waitlists to annual applications and set clear goals to increase the diversity and maintain the quality of our student body. • Launched an English as an Additional Language (EAL) pilot programme in Dover Primary School. • Launched construction of the High School building and a solar panel programme on Dover Campus. • Maintained the investment in the curriculum articulation project. • Significant upgrades to our Board governance led by the Governance Committee, touching important topics like Board member nomination and selection, how coopted members are elevated to the full Board, Board member assessment and feedback, Chair assessment and feedback, role of Committee Chairs. Many of these topics were surfaced in the Heidrick & Struggles review of Board Effectiveness, each recommendation from which has now been fully implemented. As we look to the challenges that face us in 2014/2015 the seven most important areas of focus for the Board in the coming year will be: 1. Establishing a new strategic plan for the College that will help us to realise our long term vision and fulfill our ambition, while taking into account market forces 2. Upgrading our policies and procedures regarding child protection and student safety 3. Prioritising and resourcing the key initiatives that will continuously improve the quality of our students’

education, consistent with our “challenging, holistic, values-based” commitment 4. Overseeing the final phase of the Dover Campus Master Plan, including the opening of the new High School building 5. Ensuring the two campus model is a source of strength for the College and that we have unity of purpose within our diversity of practice 6. Adjusting our stakeholder interaction model so that we can engage more members of our community more closely with the College and with the Board of Governors 7. Launching a sixth Board Committee that will focus on the College’s engagement with key stakeholders in the school: the UWCSEA Foundation, the Parents’ Association, the Student Council, the scholar programme, UWC International and the Singapore government and community (among others) I am very grateful to every full and coopted member of the Board of Governors, who volunteer their time and expertise to support the school, and have a real impact on the educational experience of our students. I would also like to thank Chris, James, Frazer, all the teachers and staff, alumni, parents and students, who contribute so much to the school. I hope this report provides you with an insight into another great year at UWCSEA.

Charles Ormiston


LETTER FROM CHRIS EDWARDS HEAD OF COLLEGE “It’s amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” Harry S. Truman’s ubiquitous observation is something of a cliché these days, but I do hope Julian Whiteley shares the sentiment. The face staring out from this page is mine: the year was Julian’s. He finished with grace and generosity. During a typically thorough and self-effacing handover, Julian spoke repeatedly of how he felt humbled by those around him. The College was awash with talent, passion and verve, he said, and often he watched in awe as the bold initiatives of gifted students and staff came to fruition, for the good of themselves and others. From his perspective, part of the job was allowing people to be brilliant. But the fact is Julian took the helm when the sea was far from calm, and he found a way—it seems to me—to steer between two extremes of leadership. One is described with characteristic simplicity by Lao Tzu: “A leader is best when people barely know he exists. When his aim is accomplished, people will say: we did this ourselves.” The other is vigorously iterated by Norman Schwarzkopf: “Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. If you must be without one, be without the strategy.” Well, Julian had the character all right, but the ego was as far away as Lao Tzu would have wished. Under Julian, the ship sailed into deeper, calmer waters, but it needed a firm, quiet authority from the wise figure on the bridge. So, just what did Mr. Whiteley and his crew get up to in his last year? I believe—first and foremost—they were honest. Honest in their adherence to the College mission when it would have been so very easy to steer

a new course, by reducing the offer and falling into line with those schools whose existences are dominated by a corporate educational world of identikit heads, graphs, pie charts and tables. I am thrilled beyond measure to see the breadth of achievement in these pages. And for those who think that service, activities and outdoor education are merely worms eating away at time that is rightfully academe’s, I point to both campuses’ extraordinary IB results as evidence, and then call on the Buddha’s wisdom: “Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of that first candle will not be shortened.” After the heroic build at East, it was Dover’s turn to witness construction on a massive scale. The High School building forced its way on to the skyline as if it were in a time-lapse movie, while around it patient staff and students went about their business in good heart. Indeed, I’ve seldom seen such sense of purpose as I have at UWCSEA. Yes, we’ve got the problems one would expect a big school to have, but goodness me they pale when set against the whirling optimism and drive of governors, alumni, staff and students. May I especially thank the parents, whose contributions to the College of time and expertise were immense last year. Julian’s school had no flag above its door. In July, when I first sat down in the office that was so recently his, one of the first things I did was watch a video of Julian’s opening address to new staff. His quiet pride in the extraordinary diversity of this great College was evident not merely in the words and images he used, but in the smile that never quite left his face throughout the

talk. His was a College where gamelans and cellos, ballet and bhangra, sarongs and saris meshed in vibrant harmonies and created something unique. His students were taking the mission beyond Singapore’s borders: many were taking Gap Years so that they might further help communities in need. “Cambridge,” as one famously said, “can wait a year. This can’t”. Students were given opportunities to think, plan, act and fail. And how crucial that last point is: the College was not a soft focus idyll, with mistakes blurred by hazy rhetoric. Instead, it looked upon failure and disappointment as learning experiences, as valuable as joy and success. Diversity of experience, triumphant or otherwise, mattered. And when Julian spoke to those new staff, he invariably iterated these crucial mantras in the context of Kurt Hahn and the UWC movement. He was intentional. He understood the genesis of UWCSEA and why we act as we do. There were easier schools to run—and easier schools to attend—than Julian’s, but the easy and the obvious were never his style. We are all the stronger for that. And now, having written so effusively about that in which I played no part, I must live up to the past. Thank you Julian for the year—and years—gone. This annual report is testament to a legacy that burns with benevolent ferocity. And that’s no oxymoron: that’s UWCSEA.

Chris Edwards 3


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UWCSEA GUIDING STATEMENTS AND LEARNING PROGRAMME UWC MISSION

Because the UW CM To make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future

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To make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future

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The diagram on the right explains how the elements of the UWCSEA learning programme fit together, with the mission as both the starting point and the goal.

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UWCSEA LEARNING PROGRAMME

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UWCSEA will be a leader in international education. We will have a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education with an emphasis upon academic achievement, service to others, environmental stewardship, teamwork and leadership.

a n d o ur ed

UWCSEA AMBITION

To educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world

Metac og

UWCSEA EDUCATIONAL GOAL The UWCSEA goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world.

is ION ISS

The UWC movement makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

f u l fi l o u r M

5


LEARNING PRINCIPLES Learning is a life-long process in which the learner engages with and reflects upon information and experiences to construct new or modify existing understanding as well as develop and apply skills and qualities We know learning is effective when: • learners construct new understanding by activating prior knowledge and experiences Therefore, it is important that new learning is connected to what the learner has previously experienced or understood. • learners use timely and goal directed feedback Therefore, ongoing assessment should be regular and structured in a manner that allows for specific feedback to guide the learner in constructing meaning. • learners collaborate Therefore, learners must have opportunities to interact with others in a variety of situations and groupings. • learners are challenged Therefore, learners need to be challenged in developmentally appropriate ways.

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• learners feel secure and supported Therefore, learners need a safe and respectful learning environment. • learners construct meaning by seeing patterns and making connections Therefore, learning needs to be organised around core concepts. • learners actively process and reflect Therefore, time is required for learners to practise, reflect and consolidate learning. • learners apply metacognitive skills Therefore, learners should develop an awareness of their own thinking processes to develop intellectual habits. • learners understand the purpose of the learning Therefore, learning should occur in context with clear connections to real world. • learners have ownership of their learning Therefore, opportunities for selfdirected learning are needed to sustain and motivate learning.


UWCSEA PROFILE Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Our community achieves this goal by developing knowledge and understanding, qualities and skills through the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service.

QUALITIES

SKILLS

Commitment to care

Critical thinker

Initiate actions and make a commitment to shaping a better world. Related concepts: stewardship, caring, empathy, compassion, open-minded, service, sustainability

Reason in an informed and fair-minded manner. Related concepts: inquiry, questioning, connection, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, problem solving

Principled

Creative

Act with integrity and respect for self and the dignity of others. Related concepts: integrity, honesty, responsibility, respect, fairness

Imagine and generate new possibilities or alternatives. Related concepts: originality, imagination, curiosity, adaptability, connection, innovation, improvisation, risk-taking

Resilient Anticipate, persevere and confront challenge. Related concepts: optimism, confidence, courage, diligence, perseverance Self-aware Develop intellectual, physical, spiritual and emotional well-being. Related concepts: self-discipline, selfesteem, self-confidence, reflection, balance, contentment

Collaborative Participate collaboratively in diverse settings. Related concepts: cooperation, participation, leadership, flexibility, adaptability, responsibility, trust Communicator Communicate effectively according to audience and purpose. Related concepts: communication, interpretation, perspective, intent Self-manager Take responsibility for directing one’s learning. Related concepts: metacognition, independence, diligence, organisation, responsibility

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GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP UWC MOVEMENT

movement, opened by Lee Kuan Yew as Singapore International School in 1971. Since then, UWCSEA has expanded to become a K-12 school of more than 5,000 students, making it the largest UWC in the movement, and one of only three who take students before the IB Diploma in Grade 11.

UWC South East Asia is a member of the UWC movement, which was founded in 1962 by Kurt Hahn, the great German educationalist. UWC South East Asia was the second member of the UWC

The UWC movement now has 14 schools and colleges, and is supported by the National Committees, a network of volunteers in more than 145 countries worldwide, who help to find and select many of the Grade 11 and 12 scholars in the colleges around the world.

UWC Atlantic College

UWC Maastricht

UWC Red Cross Nordic

UWC Dilijan

Llantwit Major, UK

Maastricht, Netherlands

Flekke, Norway

Dilijan, Armenia

Pearson College UWC Victoria, Canada

UWC Robert Bosch College Freiburg, Germany Li Po Chun UWC Hong Kong SAR, China

UWC-USA Montezuma, New Mexico, USA

UWC Mahindra College Pune, India

UWC Costa Rica Santa Ana, Costa Rica

UWC Adriatic Duino, Italy

UWCSEA uses the Hobo-Dyer Projection for our maps which, as a cylindrical equal area projection, more accurately reflects the relative size of the continents.

UWC South East Asia Singapore

UWC in Mostar Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Waterford Kamhlaba UWC Mbabane, Swaziland

A breakdown of the other schools and colleges can be seen in the table below School

Country

Age

Number of students 2013/2014

UWC Adriatic

Italy

16–19

200 350

UWC Atlantic

United Kingdom

16–19

UWC Costa Rica

Costa Rica

16–19

200

UWC Dilijan

Armenia

16–18

100

Li Po Chun UWC

Hong Kong SAR, China

16–19

250

UWC Maastricht

Netherlands

2–18

525

UWC Mahindra

India

16–19

200

UWC in Mostar

Bosnia and Herzegovina

16–19

154

Pearson College UWC

Canada

16–19

200

UWC Red Cross Nordic

Norway

16–19

200 200

UWC Robert Bosch College

Germany

16–19

UWC South East Asia

Singapore

4–19

5225

UWC-USA

New Mexico

16–19

200

Waterford Kamhlaba UWC

Swaziland

11–20

600 9


BOARD OF GOVERNORS UWCSEA is a non-profit organisation. Our legal status is as a public company limited by guarantee, registered with the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA). UWCSEA is also a registered charity with the Commissioner of Charities,

and a foreign system school, registered with the Ministry of Education and the Council for Private Education. As a member of the UWC movement, UWCSEA is overseen by the UWC International Board.

UWCSEA benefits from a highly experienced Board of Governors, made up of both elected and selected (co-opted) members. There are five Board committees: Audit, Education, Finance, Governance and Management.

UWCSEA BOARD OF GOVERNORS 2013/2014 Charles Ormiston (Chair)

Doris SohmenPao (Chair, Education Committee from 30 January 2014)

Barry Daniels (retired 30 January 2014)

Davy Lau

Driek Desmet (Chair, Education Committee— retired 30 January 2014)

Wayne Yang (Chair, Finance Committee)

Katherine Davies

David Maxwell

Will KennedyCooke (Chair, Facilities Committee)

Miles Beasley

Alexandra De Mello

Elaine Teale

Alexander Krefft (Chair, Governance Committee)

Thierry Brezac

Dale Fisher

Julian Whiteley

Anna Lord (Chair, Audit Committee)

Nicholas Chan

Ho Seng Chee

Co-opted members Lily Fang (retired 20 February 2014) Vivek Kalra 10

Surinder Kathpalia Shelly Maneth

Eric Sandlund (retired 22 May 2014) Nilanjan Sen (retired 20 November 2014)


EDUCATION COMMITTEE

FINANCE COMMITTEE

GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Driek Desmet (Chair to 30 January 2014) Doris Sohmen-Pao (Chair from 30 January 2014) Frazer Cairns James Dalziel Alexandra De Mello Dale Fisher Julian Whiteley

Wayne Yang (Chair) Chegne How Poon Katherine Davies Lily Fang Vivek Kalra Anna Lord Eric Sandlund Nilanjan Sen Cecilia Teo Julian Whiteley

Alexander Krefft (Chair) Nicholas Chan Ho Seng Chee Chegne How Poon Barry Daniels Davy Lau Elaine Teale Julian Whiteley

FACILITIES COMMITTEE Will Kennedy-Cooke (Chair) Miles Beasley Thierry Brezac Frazer Cairns Chegne How Poon David Maxwell Simon Thomas Julian Whiteley

AUDIT COMMITTEE

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE Charles Ormiston (Chair) Driek Desmet Will Kennedy-Cooke Alexander Krefft Doris Sohmen-Pao Wayne Yang

Anna Lord (Chair) Surinder Kathpalia Shelly Maneth

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE The College is a complex organisation, requiring a network of individuals and teams working together to ensure that students have the best possible educational experience each day. The leadership structure is below. UWCSEA Foundation Board

UWCSEA Board of Governors

UWC International Board

Head of College

Director of IT

Director of Admissions

Director of Administration

Director of College Advancement

Head of Dover Campus

Head of East Campus

Director of College Staffing and Development

Director of Facilities and Operations

Director of Communications and Marketing

High School Principal

Primary School Principal

Middle School Principal

High School Principal

Director of Boarding

Deputy Head of Dover Campus

Director of Boarding

Infant School Principal

Junior School Principal

Middle School Principal

Director of Curriculum

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The learning programme at UWCSEA consists of five interlinking elements: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service. These elements combine to provide our students with a values-based education that develops them as individuals and as members of a global society. Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Through the learning

programme, students develop the knowledge and understanding, and skills and qualities, that will help them to fulfill this goal. Each of the five elements of the programme complements each other to create a whole that is greater than the sum of the parts. This is a carefully planned and purposeful process, where outdoor education is connected to subject areas in the academic curriculum, where the Personal and Social Education programme supports

students in the Activities programme, where students can use the Service programme to address social questions identified in their academic learning, and so on. The skills and qualities identified in the UWCSEA profile are embedded in all five elements of the programme. This section of the Annual Report is an overview of the main highlights of the 2013/2014 year in each of the five elements.

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LEARNING PROGRAMME: ACADEMIC The academic learning programme allows students to experience the challenge of intellectual pursuit and the joy of scholarly engagement. They gain a deep understanding of individual disciplines, while investigating the connections between these disciplines and how to solve complex problems using different approaches. Learning

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goals for individual subject areas build logically through each grade so that students grow in knowledge and understanding and are prepared for the next academic challenge. In 2013/2014, UWCSEA students from K1 to Grade 8 followed a UWCSEAdesigned curriculum, based on

standards and benchmarks defined through our curriculum articulation project. Students in Grades 9 and 10 followed the (I)GCSE programme, with students entering in Grade 10 following a UWCSEA-designed Foundation IB (FIB) programme. Grade 11 and 12 students took the IB Diploma programme.


IB DIPLOMA RESULTS In May/June 2014, 465 UWCSEA students took the IB Diploma exams. A full breakdown of their achievement by College and by each campus can be seen in the following pages.

COLLEGE Students

Average IB Diploma Score

465

36.8

30.1

UWCSEA

Worldwide

Percentage receiving 40+ points

Pass rate

99.8%

79%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

27.4%

6.4%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

Percentage receiving bilingual diploma

22.6% UWCSEA

28.2% Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 40–45

28.6% 6.8% 43.2%

35–39

Number of candidates

Percent passed

Worldwide average percent passed

UWCSEA average diploma score

Wordwide average diploma score

2014

465*

99.8

79.3

36.8

30.1

2013

317

99.4

79.1

36.4

29.9

2012

311

99.7

78.5

35.8

29.8

2011

300

100

77.9

36.9

28.8

2010

295

98.9

78.1

36.0

29.5

18.1% 23.7% 28.3%

30–34

25–29

Year

4.3% 31.6%

<25 0.2%

*This number includes the first cohort from East. There were 323 students on Dover and 142 on East.

15.2%

UWCSEA

Worldwide 15


DOVER Complete IB course listing for the Class of 2014

Pass rate

Courses are offered at either Higher or Standard Level unless noted below.

100%

79%

UWCSEA

1.

Language A: Literature Taught

English; French; Hindi (SL); Indonesian; Japanese; Korean; Chinese

School Supported Self-Taught (SL)

Afrikaans; Bosnian; Czech; Danish; Hebrew; Hungarian; Khmer; Kinyarwanda; Lao; Norwegian; Portuguese; Serbian; Siswati; Swahili; Swedish; Thai; Vietnamese

Language A: Language and Literature

Dutch; English; German; Chinese; Spanish

Worldwide

Average IB Diploma Score

37.0

30.1

UWCSEA

2. Language B or ab initio

English B (HL); French B; French ab initio; German B; Mandarin B; Mandarin ab initio; Spanish B; Spanish ab initio

3. Individuals and Societies

Business and Management; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Economics; Geography; History; Information Technology in a Global Society; Philosophy; Psychology; Science, Technology and Society (SL)

4. Experimental Sciences

Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Design Technology; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Physics; Science, Technology and Society (SL); Sports, Exercise and Health Science (SL)

5. Mathematics

Further Mathematics (HL); Mathematics; Mathematical Studies (SL)

6. The Arts

Film (SL); Music; Theatre Arts; Visual Arts

Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 29.4%

40–45

6.8% 42.4%

35–39

18.1% 23.2% 28.3%

30–34

25–29

4.9% 31.6%

<25 0%

15.2%

UWCSEA

SAT scores Worldwide

21.7%

UWCSEA Dover students received a bilingual diploma 16

The SAT was administrated to 197 members of the Class of 2014. All scores, including those from non-native speakers are included. Critical reading

580

620 630

Mathematics Writing

680

600

690

648

Range of middle 50%

770 720

Mean


IBDP average score by subject Worldwide

UWCSEA

No. of candidates

English A: Lang and Literature HL

5.10

6.18

60

English A: Lang and Literature SL

5.19

6.05

128

4.78

English A: Literature HL

5.08

English A: Literature SL

57

5.70

English B HL

4.92

French B SL

4.66

Business and Management HL

6.43 5.59

54

5.55

31

5.94

4.71

Economics SL

5.50 5.25

Geography HL

5.02

History HL

4.57

History SL

4.28

IT in a Global Society HL

5.89

4.70

Psychology HL

4.65

43

5.67

21 5

6.00

3

5.62

81 6.32

5.47 5.47

Science, Technology and Society SL Biology HL

4.32

Biology SL

4.27

101

5.63

43

5.89

4.01

110

6.16

Computer Science HL

4.51

Design Technology HL

4.45

5.57

4.16

10 89

6.03

30

5.67

Sports, Exercise and Health Science SL 4.40

6.38

4.65

Mathematics HL

4.42

Mathematics SL

4.48

Mathematical Studies SL

4.52

6.25

4.38

8 4 97

5.59

137

5.46

90

5.68

4.67

32 14

5.90

4.65

19 19

6.12

4.53

Chemistry HL

Music HL

6

5.33

4.41

Psychology SL

7

5.67 5.40

Philosophy SL

Film HL

37 6.71

4.78

Philosophy HL

38 20

4.67

Geography SL

Further Mathematics HL

116

6.32

4.19

Eviron. Systems and Societies SL

7 42

5.18

Economics HL

Students

16

5.29

5.05

Spanish B SL

10

323

86

6.00

5.31

French B HL

Physics SL

5.84 6.11 5.91

Chinese B: Mandarin SL

Physics HL

63

6.29 5.20

Chinese A HL

Chemistry SL

5.87

6.57

7 19

5.32

Theatre HL

4.78

6.52

21

Visual Arts HL

4.88

6.56

16 17


EAST Complete IB course listing for the Class of 2014

Pass rate

Courses are offered at either Higher or Standard Level unless noted below.

99.3%

79%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

1.

Language A: Literature Taught

English; Hindi (SL); Japanese; Korean; Spanish

School Supported Self-Taught (SL)

Albanian; Croatian; Dutch; French; German; Indonesian; Khmer; Norwegian; Portuguese; Russian; Thai; Urdu

Average IB Diploma Score

36.5

30.1

UWCSEA

Language A: Language and Literature 2. Language B or ab initio

English B (HL); French B; French ab initio (SL); Chinese B; Chinese ab initio (SL); Spanish B; Spanish ab initio (SL)

3. Individuals and Societies

Economics; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Geography; History; Philosophy (SL); Psychology

4. Experimental Sciences

Biology; Chemistry; Design Technology; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Physics

5. Mathematics

Further Mathematics (HL); Mathematics; Mathematical Studies (SL)

6. The Arts

Music; Theatre; Visual Arts

Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 40–45

26.8% 6.8% 45%

35–39

18.1% 24.7% 28.3%

30–34

25–29

2.8% 31.6%

<25 0.7%

15.2%

UWCSEA

SAT scores Worldwide

26.1% UWCSEA East students received a bilingual diploma 18

English; Chinese

The SAT was administrated to 101 members of the Class of 2014. All scores, including those from non-native speakers of English, are included. Critical reading

540

601 610

Mathematics Writing

660

570 Range of middle 50%

653

618

700 670

Mean


IBDP average score by subject Worldwide

UWCSEA

No. of candidates

5.10

English A: Lang and Literature HL

5.18

English A: Lang and Literature SL

5.39

4.78

English A: Literature HL

5.08

English A: Literature SL

26

5.81

54

5.58

26

5.52

23

5.83

Chinese A - Lang and Literature HL

6.50

5.61 5.50

Chinese A - Lang and Literature SL

2

6.20

5

Chinese B - Mandarin HL

6.26 6.22

9

Chinese B - Mandarin SL

6.11

5.58

Spanish ab initio SL

5.08

Spanish B SL

5.05

Environ. Systems and Societies SL 4.19

21

5.71

4.57

Psychology HL

4.65

Psychology SL Biology HL

4.32

Biology SL

4.27

5.78

33

6.05 6.05

19

5.80

41

5.50

24 6.05

5.85

4.45 5.67

4.16

Mathematics HL

4.42

Mathematics SL

4.48

Mathematical Studies SL

4.52 4.38

Theatre HL

4.78

Visual Arts HL

4.88

43 26

6.33

3.72 4.65

7

5.76

4.01

Design Technology HL

3 23

6.11

4.53

Chemistry HL

7 6.33

5.02

History SL

Music HL

5.95

4.67

History HL

Physics SL

66

20

5.25

Geography SL

9

6.00

4.91

Geography HL

7

32 6.56

4.71

Economics SL

13

12

5.91

5.18

Economics HL

16

20

6.14

4.92

French B SL

Physics HL

5.85

5.31

French B HL

Design Technology SL

6.15

5.03

French B ab initio SL

Chemistry SL

6.63

5.70

English B HL

Students

4

5.05

Chinese B ab initio SL

142

9 3

5.42

36

5.36

11

4.95

56

5.14

63

5.30

23 6.00 6.50 6.07

1 10 15 19


DESTINATIONS OF CLASS OF 2014 USA – 42.9%

National Service – 3.7% Gap Year – 7.3% Singapore – 1.7% Rest of Asia – 2.6% Europe – 3.2%

College

Australia – 6.3%

Canada – 10.8% UK – 21.5%

USA – 41%

National Service – 3% Gap Year – 7% Singapore – 1% Rest of Asia – 3% Europe – 3% Australia – 8%

National Service – 4% Gap Year – 8%

Dover Campus

Singapore – 3% Rest of Asia – 3% Europe – 3% Australia – 3%

East Campus

Canada – 9%

Canada – 12%

UK – 20%

UK – 22%

UNIVERSITY ACCEPTANCES Below is a list of universities that UWCSEA students were accepted to between 2012 and 2014. Asia Ewha Woman’s University (Korea) Hamamatsu Univ School of Medicine Hong Kong University of Science and Technology International Christian University (Japan) 20

USA – 47%

International Medical University (Malaysia) Keio University (Japan) Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) LASALLE College of the Arts (Singapore) Manipal University (India) Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) National University of Singapore New York University Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

New York University Shanghai (China) Newcastle University Medicine Malaysia Nihon University (Japan) Seoul National University (Korea) Singapore Institute of Management Singapore Management University Sophia University (Japan) Universitas Indonesia University of Hong Kong University of Tokyo (Japan) Waseda University (Japan)


Yale-NUS College (Singapore) Yonsei University (Korea) Yonsei University-Underwood Australia/New Zealand Australian National University Bond University Monash University Queensland University of Technology Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University of Adelaide University of Auckland University of Melbourne University of New South Wales University of Newcastle University of Sydney University of Tasmania University of Western Australia Canada HEC Montreal McGill University Quest University Canada Simon Fraser University Trent University University of Alberta University of British Columbia University of Saskatchewan University of Toronto University of Victoria York University Europe Amsterdam University College (Netherlands) Delft University of Technology (Netherlands) Design Academy Eindhoven (Netherlands) École hôtelière de Lausanne (Switzerland) Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam (Netherlands) IE University (Spain) Jacobs University (Germany) Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Sciences Po-College Universitaire du Havre (France)

Trinity College Dublin (Ireland) Università Bocconi (Italy) University College Cork (Ireland) University College Maastricht (Netherlands) University College Utrecht (Netherlands) University of Oslo (Norway) United Kingdom Anglia Ruskin University Aston University Bath Spa University Brunel University Cardiff University Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design City University Durham University Glasgow School of Art Goldsmiths, University of London Hult International Business School Imperial College London Keele University King’s College London Kingston University Lancaster University Leeds Metropolitan University London College of Communication London Metropolitan University London School of Economics Loughborough University Middlesex University London Newcastle University Nottingham Trent University Oxford Brookes University Queen Mary, University of London Royal Academy of Dramatic Art Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Royal Holloway, University of London Royal Veterinary College School of Oriental and African Studies Southampton Solent University University College London University of Aberdeen University of Aberystwyth University of Bath University of Birmingham

University of Brighton University of Bristol University of Brunel University of Buckingham University of Cambridge University of Dundee University of East Anglia University of Edinburgh University of Essex University of Exeter University of Glasgow University of Greenwich University of Hull University of Kent University of Leeds University of Liverpool University of Manchester University of Northumbria University of Nottingham University of Oxford University of Plymouth University of Portsmouth University of Reading University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of St Andrews University of Stirling University of Surrey University of Sussex University of the Arts London University of Warwick University of Westminster University of York United States of America Academy of Art University American University Amherst College Art Center College of Design Babson College Bard College Barnard College Bentley University Berklee College of Music Boston College Boston Conservatory Boston University Bowdoin College 21


Brandeis University Brown University Bryant University Bucknell University California College of the Arts Carleton College Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University Claremont McKenna College Colby College Colgate University College of Idaho College of the Atlantic College of the Holy Cross Colorado College Columbia University Connecticut College Cornell University Dartmouth College Davidson College Denison University Drexel University Duke University Earlham College Emerson College Emory University Fashion Institute of Technology Fordham University Franklin & Marshall College George Washington University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Grinnell College Hampshire College Harvard College Harvey Mudd College Haverford College Hofstra University Hood College Johns Hopkins University Kenyon College Lafayette College Lake Forest University Lehigh University Lewis & Clark College Loyola Marymount University Luther College 22

Lynn University Macalester College Marist College Massachusetts College of Art and Design Massachusetts Institute of Technology Methodist University Middlebury College New York University Northeastern University Northwestern University Oberlin College Occidental College Pace University Parsons The New School for Design Pennsylvania State University Pitzer College Pomona College Pratt Institute Princeton University Purdue University Randolph-Macon College Reed College Rhode Island School of Design Rice University Rockford University Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Rutgers University-New Brunswick Saint Louis University Santa Clara University Sarah Lawrence College School of the Art Institute of Chicago School of Visual Arts Scripps College Skidmore College Smith College St Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College, Cambridge St. Lawrence University (NY) St. Olaf College Stanford University Swarthmore College Syracuse University Texas A&M University The George Washington University Trinity College (CT) Tufts University Union College

University at Buffalo (SUNY) University of Arizona University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California, Los Angeles University of California, San Diego University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Cruz University of Chicago University of Cincinnati University of Colorado at Boulder University of Denver University of Florida University of Houston University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign University of Maryland, College Park University of Massachusetts Amherst University of Michigan University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Oklahoma University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Richmond University of Rochester University of San Francisco University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Virginia University of Washington University of Wisconsin, Madison Vassar College Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Washington and Lee University Washington University in St. Louis Wellesley College Wesleyan University Westminster College Wheaton College (MA) Whitman College Willamette University Williams College Yale University


(I)GCSE JUNE 2014 IN NUMBERS In June 2014, students on both campuses completed the (I)GCSE exams. Results of the exams from both campuses are below.

Dover Campus %A* UWCSEA %A* ISC†

East Campus 46.8

%A* UWCSEA 36.4 %A* ISC†

32.7 74.5

%A*–A UWCSEA

%A*–A UWCSEA

60.6

%A*–A ISC

%A*–A ISC 97.6

%A*–C UWCSEA

%A*–C UWCSEA

90.9

%A*–C ISC

32.7

%A*–C ISC

63.2 60.6 96.5 90.9

ISC = Independent Schools Council

Ten-year comparison This chart shows a comparison between Independent Schools Council (ISC) schools and UWCSEA Dover over a ten year period, from 2005 to 2014. It also shows the East Campus 2014 and 2013 results. 100

% A*–C DOVER % A*–C EAST % A*–C ISC

80

% A*–A DOVER % A*–A EAST % A*–A ISC

60

% A* DOVER % A* EAST % A* ISC

40

20

2005

2007

2010

2014

23


OTHER ACADEMIC HIGHLIGHTS OF THE 2013/2014 YEAR The 2013/2014 year was the first year that the Infant and Junior Schools did not follow the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP). The decision to move away from the PYP was a result of the need for more flexibility in the written curriculum and the drive to ensure that student learning was related to the College’s context and directly connected to our mission and values. While students may not have noticed any major change in their experience, the extra flexibility meant that teachers could focus on the implementation of programmes such as the Readers and Writers Workshop throughout K2 to Grade 5 and Investigation Time for the K1 students At the same time, the curriculum articulation project continued to develop standards and benchmarks for individual subjects so that learning goals build logically in each grade from K1 to IB Diploma. Under the leadership of the articulation group, teams of teachers worked collaboratively to build a clear progression in each of the subject disciplines. The teams also devoted time to identifying where the UWCSEA profile (skills and qualities that should be developed in students) can be explicitly planned for through the academic curriculum and other elements of the learning programme. Finally, there was a strong focus on building an online system where teachers can access the articulated curriculum and collaboratively build units of study for students, based on the standards and benchmarks.

24

Teacher professional development included: a continued focus on integrating technology to improve student learning; assessment; leadership training, particularly for middle leaders; cognitive coaching; and differentiation in the classroom (ensuring all students are being challenged and supported appropriately).

THE ARTS IN THE ACADEMIC CURRICULUM DRAMA The drama departments on both campuses supported students through a series of performance opportunities, workshops, collaborations across departments and Artist in Residence programmes, outlined in the table below.

Dover Campus

East Campus

• Grade Independent Project Performances by Grade 12 students

• IBDP production: Medea by Euripides

• Theatre of Oppressed workshops with Dr Jennifer Hartley, Artist in Residence for a week, culminating in a Forum Theatre session with abused domestic helpers from H.O.M.E

• IBDP production: Antigone by Jean Anouilh

• Commedia dell Arte workshops with Marco Luly, Artist in Residence for a week

• IBDP production: Independent project performances—student devised work

• Japanese Suzuki Workshops with Mark Hill, Artist in Residence for a week

• GCSE Grade 10 productions: Contrasts—student devised work

• Grade 11 and 12 Theatre students weekend in Desaru

• Artist in residence: Zeal Theatre

• Future Imperfect Grade 11 and 12 Theatre and Music students

• Artist in residence: Mark Hill

• High School Dance Platform, involving 20 UWCSEA students and 30 students from other schools in Singapore

• Artist in residence: Back Yard Theatre Ensemble

• GCSE Group Performance exams

• Artist in residence: Epic Arts

• Bad Seed: Grade 6, 7 and 8 students, with High School crew

• International Schools Theatre Association Theatre Arts programme Symposium for IBDP Theatre students (host school)

• FIB Arts Showcase

• International Schools Theatre Association MS festival at British School of Beijing


25


MUSIC The Music programmes on both campuses continued to challenges students to a high participation and performance level. A major initiative on Dover was the introduction of the class â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;iPad Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for performance in Middle School Music, continuing to build on the iPad skills established in Grade 5. Each student in a class has their own iPad audio connected to a central mixer controlled by the teacher, enabling the students to perform as an orchestra. As a result of this, the iPad Ensemble was formed and gave their debut performance in the Finale 2014 concert at Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music. A full class set of authentic Peruvian panpipes was added to the Dover collection of World music instruments. Students get hands-on experience in a variety of World instruments including Javanese Gamelan, Brazilian Samba drums and African drumming. The collaborative Arts Showcase brought together IB Music and Theatre students in devising pieces on the theme of Future Imperfect. On East, new initiatives included the establishment of lunchtime ensembles, the creation of music-based Local Services and the development of a coaching system for peer-to-

26

peer learning. As usual, the music department had strong connections to the Service programme and these were enhanced this year through the Epic Arts workshops, rehearsals and collaborative performace; through fundraising for Focus Africa; and through Drum Therapy and Music Therapy (working with Alzheimer patients) in the Local Service programme. In the Primary School, students participated in a Balinese Gamelan and Balinese dance workshop during Asian Arts and Culture Week, while Middle School students represented UWCSEA on the international stage in the Association for Music in Schools Middle School Girls Choir and Middle School Orchestra Festivals. The first graduating class included two Music students.

VISUAL ARTS The Visual Arts programme continues to stimulate students to a level of creativity and artistry that is unusual in schools: 31 students took Higher Level Visual Arts for the IB Diploma, scoring an average of 6.3 (worldwide average is 4.88). Dover students participated in Art Stage Singapore, the leading Asian art fair and both Dover and East students took part in the fourth International Art Exhibition at the Australian High Commission.


LEARNING PROGRAMME: ACTIVITIES The College offers an extensive Activities programme to students from Grade 2 onwards. The goal is to provide students with the opportunity to pursue their passions and develop the skills and qualities that they can transfers to other areas of their learning. The Activities programme is roughly divided into sports, arts (music, drama, visual art), leadership, clubs and special interests. Some statistical highlights from the 2013/2014 school year can be seen here.

TOTAL NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES Leadership Music ensembles Clubs Sports and fitness

51 72 143 160

957 94 66 26 345

Enrichment

Visual and performing arts Academic extension

Sports Teams

2,218 1,627

Dover students involved in activities

East students involved in activities

27


SPORTS

l al ee yb isb lle Fr Vo ate ) tim rls Ul (gi h uc To s i nn g Te min im Sw all b ft So ng ys) ili o Sa (b s) y l gb Gir Ru l ( l ba ) et rls N y gi ke cs ( i oc H ast n m Gy all b ot Fo all ) rb oys oo Fl t (b y e r ick nt Cr cou s os Cr ing b im ll Cl ba et n sk Ba into dm Ba tics e hl At

28

Students participating in gymnastics

Students participating in SEASAC

580 423

927

Students participating in swimming

RANGE OF REPRESENTATIVE SPORTS OFFERED ON DOVER AND EAST


979

THE ARTS List of ensembles Dover Senior Orchestra Symphonic Band Jazz Band High School Percussion Ensemble Cantabile Singers Concert Strings The Band Brass Band Intermediate Jazz Band Camerata Middle School Percussion Ensemble iPad Ensemble Middle School Gamelan Arioso Junior Band Beginner Band Recorder Ensemble Grade 5 Choir Junior Singers Grade 2 Singers Junior Strings Singing Playground African Drumming Activity Happy Feet Club

List of ensembles East Orchesta Choir Vocal Group Pamberi All Stars Cimanga Marimba Chiongotere Mbira Community Choir High School Samba East Vocal Project Choir Concer Band Karibu Marimba Express Middle School Jazz Band Middle School Jazz Combo Middle School String Ensemble Middle School Samba Band Guitar Ensemble Kutandara Marimba Ensemble (x 2) Strings United Junior Band Middle School Band Ukulele Grooves Rhythmical Madness Grade 1 Choir EPIC Samba Bali Bridges Gamelan (x 2)

Students participating in the Instrumental Teaching Programme across the College

Instruments offered through ITP • Woodwind – recorder, flute, clarinet, saxophone, oboe, bassoon • Brass – trumpet, cornet, horn, tenor horn, baritone, trombone, tuba, euphonium • Strings – violin, viola, cello, double bass • Percussion (including drumkit) • Voice • Guitar (classical, electric, acoustic) • Bass guitar • Ukulele • Mbira • Piano – Classical, Popular and Jazz

315

Number of students taking Associated Board Exams

Drama Productions across the College Title

Number of students

Title

Number of students

The 39 Steps

9 (cast), 10 (technical/support)

35 (cast and crew)

UN Night

350 students

High School Student Dance Show

On a Night Like This

15 (cast and crew) Student-directed

A View From the Bridge

10 (Student-directed)

Picasso at the Lapin Agile

10 (Student-directed)

Lysistrata

35 (cast and crew)

The Revue

20

Wind in the Willows

30 (cast), 6 (crew)

Twelfth Night

30

Theatresports

25

Nation

45

An Ideal Husband

40

The Wiz

80

The Voyage (Middle School Dance Show)

35

29


LEARNING PROGRAMME: OUTDOOR EDUCATION The Outdoor Education programme is a powerful part of the UWCSEA experience, providing students from Grade 1 to Grade 12 with opportunities to develop independence, teamwork and resilience. During 2013/2014, the Outdoor Education programme gave experiential learning opportunities to all students from Grade 1 to Grade 9. Students in Grade 11 participated in Project Week.

STUDENT HOURS SPENT OVERSEAS

348,912

315

Number of overseas trips run through the College iPal system

5,843 Number of times a student participated in overseas trips

36

Number of cross-campus trips

131,448 Dover and East students hours

696,360 College hours

G2 Trip to Singapore Zoo

G3 Riders Lodge in Malaysia

G4

G5 Taman Negara in Malaysia

G6 OPTIONAL TRIPS 2013/2014

East students hours

Sleepover in the classroom

Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

Dover students hours

216,000

G1

Middle School New Zealand Adventure South Africa Ski-ing in Verbier High School Annapurna Base Camp China Rock Climbing Discover Korea Diving in Lombok Green Camp Bali Himalayas Trekking Hong Kong Horse Riding Perth Climbing Japanese Alps Trekking and Homestay in Ladakh Langkawi Expedition Language home-stay Tall-ship sailing Mountain Biking Thailand Mount Kinabalu Via Ferrata, Borneo Sea kayaking Malaysia Adventure in Tioman Wales Adventure

Tioman Island in Malaysia

G7 Sea kayaking trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G8 Chiang Mai in Thailand

G9 The opportunity to join various trips and expeditions from trekking in Nepal to tall ship sailing

FIB Northern Thailand

G11 Project Week

30


31


countrie s

30

ited

Nu m

r of

vis

be

Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Qatar, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Vietnam, Wales

STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENTS 2013/2014

NATIONAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (NYAA)

During 2013/2014, the College agreed to participate in a seven-year longitudinal study that will help to evaluate the Outdoor Education programme, and better understand the impact of the programme on our studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; overall learning and development while at the College. The study, to begin during the 2014/2015 school year, will be conducted in conjunction with researchers from Oregon State University (OSU), who are experts in the fields of experiential education and social psychology. As the study asks students to reflect on their own feelings and ideas about themselves, it was also reviewed by the Institutional Review Board of OSU and was subject to an internal review at UWCSEA to ensure the well-being of participants.

The NYAA aims to encourage young people to develop personal qualities of self-reliance, perseverance and a sense of responsibility to themselves and to society. In this way it fits very well with the outdoor education element of UWCSEA learning programme.

32

27 93

Students taking gold award

Students taking silver award


LEARNING PROGRAMME: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL EDUCATION The Personal and Social Education (PSE) programme helps to ensure that students feel secure, valued and encouraged in their learning, growth and social development. Through the programme students explore how they are connecting to their learning, friends, family, technology and the outside world. Self-confidence and self-esteem are built through all aspects of the learning programme, and all their interactions at the College contribute to a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal and social education, but making PSE a unique strand within the programme ensures that time is dedicated to this important part of the student experience. All members of staff have a responsibility for the well-being of students. The learning support and counseling teams are central and they work closely with teachers to ensure that students are supported both within and outside of the classroom. During the 2013/2014 year, the main focus in PSE was the development of a rationale and standards for the PSE curriculum from K1 to Grade 12. Teams of staff, led by the curriculum articulation team, collaborated to define the purpose of the PSE programme and to write standards and benchmarks (learning goals) that build logically from K1 to Grade 12. Broadly, the content can be classified into three overarching concepts: individual well-being; relationships and community (interpersonal) wellbeing; and student ability to engage with global issues (global well-being). These concepts will be used to

build age-appropriate units of study that explore these themes in detail and help students to develop their understanding in this key area. This work will continue in all school sections during the 2014/2015 school year. Dover Campus continues to work with Generation Safe, to ensure robust e-safety practices and policies are in place. Focus is on four main aspects of e-safety: Policy: College policies have been reviewed and improved/developed where appropriate Education: The new PSE standards and benchmarks include Digital Citizenship as a distinct strand K1 to Grade 12. Student contribution and education of staff and parents are under review Infrastructure: UWCSEA meets the requirements regarding infrastructure, roles and responsibilities. The Singapore Personal Data Protection Act 2012 has helped to clarify responsibilities and a college-wide review and audit was held in order to ensure compliance with legal requirements E-safety accountability: The College has a satisfactory rating in this area UWCSEA Dover is currently at Silver Level with Generation Safe; the aim for the upcoming year will be to make the necessary adjustments to progress to Gold Level. Alongside this work, there was an increasing awareness of the importance of student and staff well-being and resilience, and the complexities of developing these within our community.

33


34


PSE IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS In the High School on Dover, there was a strong focus on preparing students for transition to university, gap year, national service or elsewhere. A working party involving PSE team members, counselors, university advisers and Parents’ Association representatives met over terms 2 and 3 to research and prepare a fuller transition programme. This also spawned a connection with a renowned expert in the field, Tina Quick, who will return to the College in 2014/2015. In addition, the PSE team received training on body image issues and eating disorders from the Singapore general hospital’s specialist unit. Finally, a review of the role of the tutor and the purpose of tutor group time led to a student perception survey in February 2014 that provided very valuable feedback and professional learning for tutors. On East Campus, the digital Portfolio, where students consolidate and reflect on their school experience during mentor sessions, expanded from the Middle into High School. This will have additional benefits when it comes to submitting university applications and securing internships, and, in the longer term, may potentially enable leadership teams to identify the extent to which skills and qualities are being addressed across the learning programme. A designated Head of Personal and Social Education within the High School has been appointed to develop a programme through which essential understandings and College wide standards can be delivered, in consultation with the Heads of Grade.

PSE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOLS On Dover, there was a strong emphasis on community-building in the Middle School. A pilot House System was launched to help create smaller communities within the larger Middle School community, and promote interaction among students across grades. Students were selected to be House Captains and House events included Day of Swimming, Day of Athletics and a Mathematics Challenge. In Term 1, the outdoor education trips to Tioman for Grade 6 and to Chiang Mai for Grade 8, allowed the students time away from formal lessons to bond and connect. Since Grade 7 do not have this opportunity until Term 3, the Grade 7 Community Day was established. During the day, expert facilitators from JUMP! Foundation helped students to explore questions around identity, community and belonging, leading to a greater understanding of the diversity and common bonds within their community. Finally, Dannielle Miller, a leading expert in adolescent development, came to work with Grade 7 and 8 girls, while Rob Devine, an expert on ‘Whole Brain Thinking’ worked with the boys. On East Campus, there was a significant focus on communicating progress in PSE, and working with parents to ensure that links between home and school were strong in this critical area of the learning programme. Information sessions and coffee mornings for parents, coupled with ensuring that the PSE standards were connected to expectations in the Outdoor Education programme,

creating a coherent experience for students. A review of homework policy and practices focused on clarity of expectation for students, and helping them to seek balance in their daily lives, thereby increasing their well-being. Finally, the Looking for Learning model of understanding student experience was applied to the PSE programme during 2013/2014.

PSE IN THE INFANT AND JUNIOR SCHOOLS On Dover, the introduction of the FRIENDS for Life programme in the Junior School provided a new structure to help build resilience and selfesteem in students, through a focus on important personal development concepts, such as self-esteem, problem solving, self-expression and building positive relationships with peers and adults. The Infant School continued to develop this critical strand of overall learning through the You Can Do It programme in K1 and the Bucket Fillers and Bully Busters/Cool Calm Kids programmes. On East Campus, there was a focus on philosophy for children and mindfulness as strategies to develop children socially and emotionally. A number of teachers who are trained in both strategies supported other teachers in implementing these during morning meetings and throughout the day. Initial feedback has been positive and students have brought their new practices home, resulting in positive feedback from parents.

35


LEARNING PROGRAMME: SERVICE UWCSEA has service at the heart of its mission, and service activities are a vital part of the learning programme. There are three levels of service: College; Local; and global (incorporating Global Concerns, the Initiative for Peace and Gap Year). Below are some updated statistics for the 2013/2014 school year.

Number of Global Concerns

78

44

Dover Campus

East Campus

122

Dover and East Campus combined

Number of Local Service partners

65

48

Dover Campus

East Campus

54

Dover and East Campus combined

Number of College Services

36

57

Dover Campus

East Campus

93

Dover and East Campus combined

Built in Cambodia

108

151

5

1

Houses

Schools

36

Wells

Toilet block


Dover

East

$1,138,814 + $420,864 Total money raised by students for the College Service programme

$1,559,678

37


BREAKDOWN OF FUNDRAISING FOR SERVICE

$523,331

$12,860

SEALinks

Initiative for Peace

College

$1,023,485 Global Concerns

$457,597

$11,620

SEALinks

Initiative for Peace

$65,734

$1,240

SEALinks

Initiative for Peace

East

Dover

$353,889

$669,596

Global Concerns

Global Concerns

DISBURSEMENT

38

u nt Co

te d

through

20

G al Concerns

The annual statutory audit performed by external auditors at the College, includes monies held by Service programmes as a result of fundraising. This ensures that all disbursements have necessary approvals and adequate internal controls.

or

lob

The money raised by SEALinks, the parent groups who volunteer and fundraise for organisations in need of support in Singapore and overseas, is disbursed directly by the parents.

ri e s s u pp

The GCs disburse money directly to the NGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s they are raising money for. They undertake this task with their supervisor, with the Head of Global Concerns having oversight. Each GC has their own bank account, so the students know their individual totals.

Brazil, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Thailand, Vietnam, Zambia


PROJECT WEEK

Dover

Every year, Grade 11 students are presented with the challenge to research, plan, organise, and then carry out an independent low budget trip to a place where they can make a difference.

326

East

Students participated

176

Students participated

15

85

Countries visited

Groups formed

11

44

Countries visited

Groups formed

58

Organisations helped

40

Organisations helped

GAP YEAR PROGRAMME The Gap Year programme offers students the opportunity to put UWC values into practice in Southeast Asia before going to university. The Class of 2014 were involved in the following projects: Project

Number of students

Chiang Mai BABSEA CLE, Thailand

1

Himalayan Voluntourism, Ladakh

7

Leeuwin, Australia

1

Gili Trawangan, Lombok, Indonesia

3

EC: Phnom Penh, Cambodia

9

Sustainable Cambodia, Pursat

2

Bairo Pite Clinic, Dili, Timor-Leste

1

Tioman Island, Malaysia

2

Expedition assistants

9

Lihuk Panaghiusa, Cebu, Philippines

3

Akshara Foundation, MUWCI

1

Green Shoots, Hoi An, Vietnam

1

Own project

2

13 41

Gap Year projects

Students involved 39


52 Number of languages spoken across the College 40

39

Number of languages spoken at Dover Campus

46

Number of languages spoken at East Campus


OUR COMMUNITY The UWC South East Asia community is a vibrant, truly international group of individuals, united in a common purpose. This section of the report provides some statistics and information about our community.

ENROLMENT 2013/2014

TRANSITION

Dover Campus: 3,009 330 326 266

88

89

110

133

154

178

200

285 293 292

6.3%

222

Students leaving Dover Campus

43 K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

East Campus: 2,271

110 110

133

155 155

177 177

200 198 198 199

182 145 108 24

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

11.1% Students leaving East Campus

College total: 5,280 464 422 355 288

512

483 492

471 400

377

8.4%

309

243 198 199

Leavers across the College

67 K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

41


NATIONALITY SPREAD Others – 22.1% (75 nationalities)

India – 21.3%

85

Netherlands – 2.4% Canada – 2.4% Malaysia – 2.6% Japan – 3.6% Korea – 4.3% Singapore – 6.6%

USA – 9.2% Australia – 7.7%

India – 19.8%

Others – 21.9% (63 nationalities)

73

Malaysia – 2.4% Canada – 2.5% Japan – 3.1% Netherlands – 3.3%

UK – 17.8%

Nationalities in College

UK – 17.6%

Nationalities in Dover Campus

Korea – 5.1% USA – 9.2%

Australia – 7.3%

Singapore – 7.8%

Others – 21.3% (70 nationalities)

France – 2.3% Canada – 2.4% Malaysia – 2.9% Korea – 3.3%

India – 23.4%

Japan – 4.2% Singapore – 4.9% Australia – 8.1%

42

70

Nationalities in East Campus

UK – 18%

USA – 9.2%


BOARDERS

26%

Boarders who are scholars

187

162

Dover Campus

East Campus

349 College

120

Number of boarders

113

59 57

25 8

1 G7 College

31

36 16

14

17

17

G8

G9

23

56

61

G11

G12

7 20

G10

Dover Campus

16

FIB

East Campus 43


OUR COMMUNITY: SCHOLARS In 2013/2014, the UWCSEA scholarship programme supported 92 scholars from 37 countries. Some scholars are selected by the College directly, but many are selected through their country National Committees. The National Committees are a network of volunteers, who operate in over 145 countries worldwide. The committees select more than 1000 students each year from within their countries and territories to attend UWC schools, colleges and programmes. An active Asia – 26.4%

Africa – 23.6%

Middle East – 1.4%

Europe – 22.2%

ies represen t

37

by scholars ed

mber of c Nu o

While scholarship students must have the academic ability to meet the demands of the UWCSEA programme,

they are also selected on the basis of their potential to have a positive impact on the local and global community. The College community benefits tremendously from the presence of scholarship students. The diversity of background, culture, socioeconomic status and life experience they bring enriches the everyday life of students, teachers and parents.

America – 26.4%

Nationalities of scholars by continent

tr un

network of volunteers and staff make up our national committees which organise camps, a range of activities and formal interviews to establish students’ commitment to UWC values and potential to thrive throughout the UWC experience. Many of the UWCSEA scholars have entered the College through this system.

Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Cambodia, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ghana, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Laos, Mauritius, Mexico, Namibia, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Uruguay, Vietnam, Zimbabwe 44


Number of scholars

55

37

Dover Campus

East Campus

92 College

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: SCHOLAR PROGRAMME Funding for scholarships is generated through school fees (3.4% of tuition fees are dedicated to the scholarship programme), the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP), corporations, National Committees, parent donations and alumni donations. A total of $6.2 million was given to scholars on both campuses during the 2013/2014 school year.

Dover Campus Alumni – 0.4% Annual Fund – 1.8% Parents – 3.2% UNP – 3.6% National committee – 11.4% Percentage contribution to the scholarship funding Corporation – 14.6%

East Campus

Parents – 8.2%

Annual Fund – 7.5% National committee – 2.9%

UWCSEA Parental – 81.4%

Total financial support

3.4% School fees

UWCSEA Parental – 65%

Percentage contribution to the scholarship funding

$3.78 million

$2.5 million Total financial support

3.4% School fees 45


OUR COMMUNITY: COMMUNITY FEEDBACK made and the ideas submitted for improvement. In addition, while many organisations will focus on moving neutral 8’s into advocating 9’s, the College focus is on those students, parents and staff who are scoring at the low end of the scale. In a place of learning, it is vital to understand why a student, parent or staff member is having a negative experience, and take steps to improve their situation.

In 2011/2012, the College embarked on a process of trying to better understand the students, staff and parent experience. Part of this process was an extensive annual survey. As well as asking detailed questions about all aspects of their experience, community members were asked to say how likely they were to recommend the College to friends and family. This recommendation measure is used to understand advocacy levels in communities and businesses, with a view to identifying areas for improvement. Participants are asked how likely they are to recommend an organisation on a scale of 0–10. Those who score a 9 or a 10 are considered advocates for the organisation; those who score a 7 or an 8 are considered neutral; and those who score between 0 and 6 are considered detractors.* The Net Promoter Score is devised by subtracting the number of detractors from the number of advocates (neutrals are ignored). Organisations can score anywhere from -100% (all detractors) to +100% (all advocates). In general organisations score somewhere between -10% and +10% (though this varies between industries). During analysis of the UWCSEA surveys, the main focus is on the comments

The analysis and discussion of the survey is extensive, and a series of action points are put in place each year to respond to the particular points raised. Results of the survey are communicated with parents through emails and forums. Below are some of the highlight results of the 2012/2013 parent survey. * For further information and details of the research that went into devising this scale please see The Ultimate Questions 2.0 by Fred Reichheld, with Rob Markey.

PARENT SURVEY 2013/2014 Participation The survey was distributed to 6,305 parents on 14 May 2014. 44 emails bounced and 3,155 surveys were submitted (50.0% of the distribution list), while 2,715 of those were complete (43.0% of distribution list). However, dropout rates happened

most often at the third to last question ‘anything further on administration at the school?’ or after (83.2% of noncompletion surveys). Therefore we can be confident that including all 3,155 surveys in the analysis is valid. The spread of responses between campuses and school sections, along with the number of students represented is outlined in the table below. The 2013/2014 survey differed from previous surveys in that it was built using a different system, and distribution and follow-up was entirely managed internally. This allowed further customisation, based on experience in previous years. One of the major differences was that the survey was considerably shorter, as parents were no longer required to answer the questions for each individual child. While this has resulted in a significantly higher completion rate (55% as compared with 23% in 2012/2013) it does mean that we do not get systematic differentiation in responses based on individual children’s experience. A percentage of the parents who agreed to be contacted were telephoned by a Principal or the Head of Campus before the end of term. In many cases, the focus was on calling those who had a

Campus

No. of parents giving feedback

No. of Infant School children represented

No. of Junior School children represented

No. of Middle School children represented

No. of High School children represented

Overall no. of children represented

Dover

1,812

275

589

660

1,033

2,557

East

1,300

288

499

456

499

1,742

Both

43

15

23

19

30

87

Total

3,155

578

1,111

1,135

1,562

4,386*

* Please note that this may not represent 4386 individual children as both parents from some families may have completed the survey.

46


serious concern, or who had an unusual rating in one of the sections (for example was highly satisfied with all elements of the programme but scored outdoor education low). Feedback on these calls was co-ordinated by the Heads of Campus.

The graphs below show the distribution of responses to the question â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how likely are you to recommend UWCSEA to your friends and family?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;on each campus. College 10 9

7

The survey allowed parents to submit their own ideas on how various aspects of the programme could be improved. These ideas are then viewed by other parents and selected and ranked, according to the other parents view. This process allows the College to understand those ideas that are both popular (ie selected often) and important (ie ranked highly), so that efforts are focused on the areas most important to the community.

6

The overall NPS score for the College from parents was 51%, a very high advocacy score that speaks to the level of commitment to the College among the parent body. Dover and East Campus also each scored 51%, so that advocacy levels among parents are the same on each campus.

760

8

Submission of Ideas

Results

1,104

737 294 119

5

95

4

14

3

14

51%

2 6 1 8 0 4

NPS

Dover Campus 10

639

9

434

8

422

7

168

6 5

73 51

4 10

51%

3 8 2 2 1 4 0 1

NPS

East Campus 10

51%

Overall NPS for College from parents

453

9

317

8

305

7

119

6

43

5

43

4 3 3 6 2 4 1 4 0 3

51% NPS 47


STUDENT SURVEY

The graphs below show the distribution of responses to the question â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how likely are you to recommend UWCSEA to your friends and family?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;on each campus.

Participation The survey was distributed to Middle and High School students in June 2014. 1,338 Dover students completed it, representing 68.4% of distribution, while 942 East students completed it, representing 81.3% of distribution. In total, 2,280 students completed the survey, representing a 73.2% participation rate.

College 10

832

9

579

8

464

7

193

6

80

5

46

4

23

55%

3 10

Results

2 8

The overall NPS score for the students was 55%, again a very high result, that suggests that students are having a positive experience at the College.

1 3 0 6

NPS

Dover Campus 10

532

9

339

8

248

7

55%

Overall NPS for College from students

102

6

48

5

25

4 8

59%

3 3 2 5 1 2 0 2

NPS

East Campus 10

300

9

240

8

216

7

91

6

32

5

21

4

15

3 7 2 3 1 1 0 4

48

49% NPS


STAFF SURVEY Participation 480 teachers and educational staff and 349 support staff completed the staff survey, representing 79.6% of all staff. Participants were asked to identify their role in the College. Responses are outlined below: Participants

No of responses

Teacher

399

Teacher Assistant

61

Centre secretary

27

Educational admin (department)

31

College administration (IT, admissions etc)

97

Educational Leadership (Head of Grade, Principal etc)

81

Admin leadership (Director, Manager etc)

30

Other

103

50% Overall NPS for teaching staff

26% Overall NPS for support staff

Results The NPS result for teaching staff was 50%, again another very high result. The NPS result for support staff was 26%. While still a good result, the difference between that and the result for parents, teachers and students, has resulted in a significant effort to understand better what the employee engagement levels are among support staff. Some initial workshops on positive community-building have identified areas where the College can improve to ensure support staff feel valued and part of the school.

49


50


BUSINESS REPORT The College has significant business operations and this section of the report provides an overview of Human Resources, Admissions and Finance for the 2013/2014 school year.

BUSINESS REPORT: HUMAN RESOURCES UWCSEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S vision is to be a leader in international education, with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education. The recruitment and retention of excellent teachers remains central to this vision. The below provides some statistics about the teaching staff at UWCSEA.

465

Total number of full-time teaching staff in the College

101

Total number of part-time teaching staff in the College

Student teacher ratio

10.6 Students

3,262

Applications received

20

1 Teacher

Average number of applications per vacancy

66

72 45 36 11 2

IBDP examiners

Workshop leaders

Conference presenters

Training conductors

Project consultants

Posts advertised

2

ECIS/CoIS visiting team members

51


TRANSITION UWCSEA enjoys an extremely stable teaching environment, with a low transition rate of teachers each year. The table below shows the numbers of full-time teachers leaving Dover Campus each year since 2005. 265 251 229 202

19

234

233

Total number of teachers

217

211

13

12

2006/07

2007/08

237

14

13

9

12

14

12

Total number of leavers 2005/06

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

There are 200 full-time and 32 part-time teachers at East Campus.

232

Total number of teachers at East Campus

10

Total number of leavers at East Campus

TENURE Dover Campus teaching staff has an average tenure of 7.6 years. Please note that East Campus is not included as the large number of teachers joining would skew the data.

14% 4%

21+ years 52

27%

48%

7%

16–20 years

11–15 years

6–10 years

0–5 years


STAFF NATIONALITY SPREAD Others – 5.2% (15 nationalities) Netherlands – 1% India – 1.4% China – 1.5% Spain – 1.9% Ireland – 2.1% New Zealand – 8.1%

UK – 48.7%

25

Nationalities

USA – 8.3% Canada – 9.3%

Australia – 12.5%

STAFF BREAKDOWN Management – 1.9% Boarding – 2.3%

Administrative staff – 14.3%

Dover Campus

Educational support staff – 25.2%

Academic staff – 56.3%

Management – 0.5% Boarding – 1% Administrative staff – 8.2% East Campus

Educational support staff – 31.8%

Academic staff – 58.5%

53


BUSINESS REPORT: ADMISSIONS The Admissions Department is responsible for all aspects of the admission of students to the College. The tables below show the breakdown by grade of how applications were processed on the Dover Campus during the 2013/2014 year Number of Dover Campus applications processed during August 2013/2014 Dover entry August 2014/2015

K1

K2*

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Old policy applications

76

0

9

3

1

0

0

6

1

1

0

1

2

100

New policy applications

158

5

156

141

116

116

113

147

145

143

104

115

156

1615

Total applications processed for entry

234

5

165

144

117

116

113

153

146

144

104

116

158

1715

Of which duals accounted for

74

1

49

49

34

35

34

44

45

74

64

64

113

680

Of which transfers from East accounted for

0

0

4

11

3

14

7

8

1

1

3

1

3

56

Number of places available

88

5

25

28

28

31

31

28

54

43

30

40

24

455

Number of applications for each space available

2.7

1.0

6.6

5.1

4.2

3.7

3.6

5.5

2.7

3.3

3.5

2.9

6.6

3.8

Dover only applications for each space available

1.8

0.8

4.6

3.4

3.0

2.6

2.5

3.9

1.9

1.6

1.3

1.3

1.9

2.3

* K2 applications are by invitation only and only 4 places were filled, as requested by Infant School

Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications Dover entry August 2014/2015

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted (excluding transfers from East)

88

4

23

27

26

30

30

23

54

42

30

43

30

450

Ineligible

12

0

11

14

8

6

5

19

9

22

17

24

58

205

Eligible but disappointed/ declined opt in

110

1

119

84

70

60

57

93

70

63

38

24

51

840

Transferred to Dover from East

0

0

2

4

3

3

2

6

1

1

2

1

1

26

Withdrawn/declined opt out

24

0

10

15

10

17

19

12

12

16

17

24

18

194

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications by percentage Dover entry August 2014/2015

K1

K2

G1

G2

Accepted

38%

80% 14% 19% 22% 26% 27%

15% 37% 29% 29% 37% 19% 26%

Ineligible

5%

0%

12%

Eligible but disappointed/ declined opt in

47%

20% 72% 58% 60% 52% 50% 61% 48% 44% 37%

21% 32% 49%

Transferred to Dover from East

0%

0%

1%

3%

3%

3%

2%

4%

1%

1%

2%

1%

1%

2%

Withdrawn/declined opt out

10%

0%

6%

10%

9%

15%

17%

8%

8%

11%

16%

21%

11%

11%

7%

10%

7%

5%

4%

6%

15%

LEAVERS

6.3% 54

Percentage of leavers on Dover Campus

3.45 years

Average length of stay of leavers Dover Campus

16%

21%

37%

12%


The tables below show the breakdown by grade of how applications were processed on the East Campus during the 2013/2014 year Number of East Campus applications processed during August 2013/2014 East entry August 2014/2015

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Old policy applications

38

2

3

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

2

49

New policy applications

135

14

101

106

66

102

63

106

81

112

117

79

166

1248

Total applications processed for entry

173

16

104

106

68

102

63

106

81

113

117

80

168 1297

Of which duals accounted for

74

1

49

49

34

35

34

44

45

74

64

64

113

680

Of which transfers from Dover accounted for

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2

Number of places available

111

15

43

39

25

44

18

44

21

34

42

22

67

525

Number of applications for each space available

1.6

1.1

2.4

2.7

2.7

2.3

3.5

2.4

3.9

3.3

2.8

3.6

2.5

2.5

East only applications for each space available

0.9

1.0

1.3

1.5

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.4

1.7

1.1

1.3

0.7

0.8

1.2

Outcome of processed East Campus applications East entry August 2014/2015

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted (excluding transfers from Dover)

111

15

43

41

27

46

18

46

24

34

42

22

72

541

Ineligible

8

0

6

17

4

12

4

6

12

24

25

25

61

204

Eligible but disappointed/ declined opt in

32

0

39

33

29

26

34

44

43

39

32

17

16

384

Transferred to East from Dover

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Withdrawn/declined opt out

22

1

16

15

8

18

7

10

2

16

18

15

19

167

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Outcome of processed East Campus applications by percentage East entry August 2014/2015

K1

K2

G1

G2

Accepted

64%

94% 41% 39% 40% 45% 29% 43% 30% 30% 36% 28% 43% 42%

Ineligible

5%

0%

6%

Eligible but disappointed/ declined opt in

18%

0%

38% 31% 43% 25% 54% 42% 53% 35% 27%

Transferred to East from Dover

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

1%

0%

0%

Withdrawn/declined opt out

13%

6%

15%

14%

12%

18%

11%

9%

2%

14%

15%

19%

11%

13%

16%

6%

12%

6%

6%

15%

21%

21%

31% 36% 16% 21%

10% 30%

LEAVERS

11.1%

Percentage of leavers on East Campus

2.71 years

Average length of stay of leavers East Campus 55


BUSINESS REPORT: FINANCE UWC South East Asia operates three separate financial entities: Dover Campus, East Campus and the UWCSEA Foundation. This section of the report outlines the financial data for the 2013/2014 school year for both

campuses. Financial information for the Foundation can be found in the College Advancement section of this report. The College is a registered charity in Singapore and as such is a nonprofit organisation. However, as part

of due diligence, a small surplus is accrued each year that is put into a reserve. This reserve will allow the College to continue operating for six months in the event of closure due to circumstances beyond our control.

Dover Campus Central admin – 1% Marketing and Communications – 1% Boarding salary and benefits – 1% Boarding exp – 3% Educational resources – 4%

UNP Income scholars – 0.2% Other contributions – 1.1% Sundries and other fees – 4.3% Boarding fees – 4.3% Income

Depreciation – 6%

Expenditure

Administration salary and benefits – 6% Maintenance and operations – 6%

Tuition fees – 90.2%

Educational support salary and benefits – 9%

Teachers salary and benefits – 64%

East Campus

Other contributions – 0.5% Sundries and other fees – 5% Boarding fees – 5.4% Income

Central admin – 0.4% Marketing and Communications – 1% Boarding salary and benefits – 1% Boarding exp – 3% Educational resources – 4% Depreciation – 4% Administration salary and benefits – 4%

Expenditure

Maintenance and operations – 8% Tuition fees – 89.1%

56

Educational support salary and benefits – 10%

Teachers salary and benefits – 65%


57


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION DOVER CAMPUS As of 31 July 2014 2014

2013

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

22,409,787

18,959,558

Trade and other receivables

31,819,762

31,647,956

Total current assets

54,229,549

50,607,514

125,747,548

121,452,828

205,000

205,000

Total non-current assets

125,952,548

121,657,828

Total assets

180,182,097

172,265,342

Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Club membership

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade and other payables Deferred income Tuition fee deposits

12,817,160

11,420,498

67,306,720

65,150,600

57,741

168,417

10,000,000

10,000,000

90,181,621

86,739,515

55,515,859

52,844,329

55,515,859

52,844,329

Accumulated surplus

34,484,617

32,681,498

Total equity

90,000,476

85,525,827

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

180,182,097

172,265,342

Bank borrowings Total current liabilities

EQUITY Restricted funds: Development funds General funds:

58


EAST CAMPUS As of 31 July 2014 2014

2013

$

$

Cash and cash equivalents

50,959,785

43,552,717

Trade and other receivables

30,933,226

35,943,747

Total current assets

81,893,011

79,496,464

5,499,854

4,726,341

87,392,865

84,222,805

ASSETS Current assets

Non-current asset Plant and equipment Total assets

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade and other payables Deferred income Tuition fee deposits

5,375,424

6,367,684

53,431,977

48,952,072

37,270

37,270

58,844,671

55,357,026

4,299,480

5,641,213

Accumulated surplus

24,248,714

23,224,566

Total equity

28,548,194

28,865,779

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

87,392,865

84,222,805

Total current liabilities

EQUITY Restricted funds: Development funds General funds:

59


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME DOVER CAMPUS Year ended 31 July 2013 General funds

Revenue Other income Staff cost

Restricted funds

Total

2014

2013

2014

2013

2014

2013

$

$

$

$

$

$

83,703,662

79,914,739

2,896,436

1,975,770

10,058,925 —

89,571,575

2,896,436

1,975,770

(64,902,192)

(61,369,616)

(64,902,192)

(61,369,616)

(4,979,894)

(4,903,023)

(7,361,100)

(6,755,812)

(12,340,994)

(11,658,835)

Other operating expenses

(14,914,892)

(14,682,235)

(26,296)

(65,426)

(14,941,188)

(14,747,661)

Profit before income tax

1,803,120

935,635

2,671,529

2,835,598

4,474,649

3,771,233

Income tax

Profit for the year,

1,803,120

935,635

60

— 2,671,529

93,762,587

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

representing total comprehensive income for the year

9,656,836

— 2,835,598

— 4,474,649

— 3,771,233


EAST CAMPUS Year ended 31 July 2013 General funds

Revenue Other income Government grant Staff cost Depreciation of plant and equipment Operating lease expense

Restricted funds

Total

2014

2013

2014

2013

2014

2013

$

$

$

$

$

$

62,853,282

50,831,154

1,485,545

1,052,399

8,119,328

7,087,380

70,972,610

57,918,534

1,485,545

1,052,399

5,000,000

(48,037,239)

(38,447,614)

(48,037,239)

(38,447,614)

(2,761,280)

(2,150,881)

(2,761,280)

(2,150,881)

5,000,000

(9,405,120)

(7,053,840)

(9,405,120)

(7,053,840)

Other operating expenses

(12,516,160)

(10,741,033)

(55,941)

(99,438)

(12,572,101)

(10,840,471)

Profit before income tax

1,024,148

5,544,025

(1,341,733)

(65,898)

(317,585)

5,478,127

Income tax Profit for the year,

— 1,024,148

— 5,544,025

— (1,341,733)

— (65,898)

— (317,585)

— 5,478,127

representing total comprehensive income for the year

61


62


COLLEGE ADVANCEMENT The Department of College Advancement comprises the UWCSEA Foundation, which is the fundraising arm of the College, and Alumni Relations, which helps us to stay connected to former students staff and families.

FOUNDATION The aim of the UWCSEA Foundation is to support the College in its ambition to become a leader in international education. The Foundation was set up in 2008 and has raised money for four key areas: • Scholarships programme, where our goal is to provide 135 scholarship places by 2020 • Continued enhancement of our K1 to Grade 12 curriculum • A range of staff professional development opportunities • Projects that improve the school environment, such as the tree planting programme at East Campus and the solar panel programme on Dover Campus.

3000000

$2,637,519

$2,775,418 $2,496,994

2375000

1750000

500000

$1,728,387

92

Scholars

700

600

595 500

444 2010/11

Total donations Total number of unique donors

715

513 1125000

800

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

400

37

Countries

63


FOUNDATION FINANCIAL REPORT OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 2013/2014

TOTAL DONATIONS IN 2013/2014 Total donations

$2,775,418

Bank interest $384

Endowment $468,789

Operating income

Operations $196,424

Scholarships programme $1,522,818

College gift $110,000 Other income $86,040

Staff cost (gifted by the College) $334,993

Annual fund $587,387

Operating expenditures

Audit fees $13,700

Other expenses $172,326

ASSETS LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

ENDOWMENT FUND Held-to-maturity bonds $1,250,000

Current assets $4,114,036

Non current assets $2,898,548

Total endowment

$5,284,263

Current liability $14,622 Equity

$6,997,962 64

Fixed deposit $2,385,715

Available-for-sale bonds $1,648,548


65


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD As of 31 July 2014 2014

2013

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Other receivables Total current assets

4,076,850

3,047,083

37,186

81,352

4,114,036

3,128,435

Non-current assets Plant and equipment

Held-to-maturity financial asset

1,250,000

1,250,000

Available-for-sale investments

1,648,548

1,880,780

Total non-current assets

2,898,548

3,130,780

7,012,584

6,259,215

14,622

10,000

1,352,369

1,096,909

Capital fund

15,487

64,269

Programme innovation & initiatives fund

22,037

24,029

Total assets

LIABILITY Current liability Other payables

EQUITY Restricted funds: Scholarship fund

Staff professional development fund Annual general fund

5,000

340,646

216,051

1,735,539

1,401,258

(21,840)

(32,238)

1,713,699

1,369,020

Endowment fund

5,284,263

4,880,195

Total equity

6,997,962

6,249,215

TOTAL LIABILITY AND EQUITY

7,012,584

6,259,215

Unrestricted funds: Accumulated (deficit) surplus

66


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD Year ended 31 July 2014 Restricted funds

Unrestricted fund

Endowment fund

Scholarship fund

Capital fund

Programme innovation & initiatives fund

$

$

$

$

$

Staff PD fund

General fund

Total funds

$

$

$

2014 Income Donation income

347,151

Other income

110,384

121,638

Total incoming resources

110,384

468,789

1,522,818 — 1,522,818

47,503

37,037

47,503

37,037

5,000 — 5,000

497,847 — 497,847

2,457,356 232,022 2,689,378

Expenditure Audit fees Other expenses

(13,700)

(13,700)

(172,326)

(172,326)

Depreciation

Utilisation of fund during the year

(85,738)

(1,267,358)

(96,285)

(39,029)

(287,213)

(85,738)

(1,267,358)

(96,285)

(39,029)

(287,213) (1,961,649)

255,460

(48,782)

(1,992)

Total resources expended (Deficit) Surplus for the year

(186,026) (75,642)

383,051

5,000

210,634

(1,775,623)

727,729

Other comprehensive income Items that may be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss Available-for-sale investments - fair value gain during the year, representing other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax Total comprehensive income for the year

— (75,642)

21,018 404,069

— 255,460

— (48,782)

— (1,992)

— 5,000

— 210,634

21,018 748,747

67


68


ALUMNI RELATIONS The UWCSEA alumni community extends around the globe, with alumni currently located in 112 countries worldwide. The Alumni Relations programme was established in 2006 to connect former students to one another and the College.

9,764 448

Contactable alumni

Alumni university mentors

TOP 20 KNOWN ALUMNI LOCATIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 112 COUNTRIES IN ALL

112

c at e d

Countrie si

hich alumni e lo ar

nw

Top 20 countries (in order): Singapore, United Kingdom, United States of America, Australia, Malaysia, Netherlands, Canada, India, Indonesia, Japan, Germany, New Zealand, Hong Kong, South Korea, Switzerland, Norway, Thailand, France, China, Italy 69


11

349

20

Student Alumni Council members

Volunteer hours given by alumni to current students

Reunion events

207

4

1,047

Universities represented by mentors

Alumni interns in Alumni Relations office

Attendees at alumni events

70


DONORS 2013/2014 The College is extremely grateful to all the people, who, through financial giving, gifts-in-kind, or volunteering have helped us to provide an exceptional educational experience for our students and, through them, fulfil our mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

Fellows Prince of Wales Trust Dato Abdul Rahman Abdul Shariff and Datin Dr. Mona Abdul Rahman Family Harrold Mary Ann Tsao Robinson Kirtida and Bharat Mekani In honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr. Rajadurai Anonymous gifts made by two donors

KURT HAHN SOCIETY

Members Iain and Tejas Ewing Jean de Pourtales Craig Flood ’78 Lester and Christine Gray Kush Handa ’78 Haeyong Jung Kishore Mahbubani Charles and Jenny Ormiston John Shang ’78 Mr and Mrs Zain C. Willoughby ’78 Julian and Buff Whiteley Sanjay and Ravina Kirpalani Tord and Kimberly Stallvik Satish and Anita Shankar Gay Chee Cheong Mark Koczanowski and Vicky Binns Bindiya and Raj Mishra Dale Fisher ’78 Dr. and Mrs Jean-Francois and Anne Manzoni Shripriya Mahesh Ramanan and Ramanan Raghavendran Vinod Sahgal UWCSEA Dover Parents’ Association Peter and Tine Jessen Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan Kennedy-Cooke Family David and Sonja Chong

Named in honour of the year the Dover Campus was opened by the then Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, the 1971 Society recognises those who have made accumulative lifetime gifts of $10,000 or more to UWCSEA. Through their generosity, these benefactors are helping the College remain at the forefront of international education.

SOCIETY MEMBERS Chairman’s Circle Lizanne ’83 and Robert A. Milton ’78 Lee Hysan Foundation Patrons Kewalram Chanrai Group Trafigura Pte Ltd. Benefactors Shelby Davis Foundation S and V Foundation Capital International Inc. Andy and Mei Budden Sassoon Family Suhardiman Hartono MacFadden Family Anonymous gift

James Dalziel and Nancy Fairburn Viren and Ruchee Desai Arvind and Niharika Tiku Ashwin Ranganathan and Claire Ngo Kandisaputro and Juliet Chris and Fleur Thomas Mr and Mrs G. S. Ramesh Takeda Pharmaceuticals (Asia Pacific) Pte Ltd Åsa and Magnus Böcker Mara McAdams and David Hand Ben Morgan Nitin and Amie Gulabani Ne Aung and Khin Moe Nyunt Soofian and Fatima Zuberi UWCSEA East Parents’ Association Jacques Mainguy ’79 Anonymous gifts made by three donors

71


72


ANNUAL FUND The financial support of UWCSEA’s parents, alumni and friends to the Annual Fund makes all the difference in our efforts to maintain and enhance our pioneering curriculum, enhance diversity through the scholarship programme and provide first class professional development opportunities. All gifts, regardless of size, support the continued development of the UWCSEA educational experience.

ANNUAL FUND 2013/2014 2014 K1LaD Class Abad Merritt Family Zaidi Abbas Idris bin Abdul Rahim Mohamed Jamil bin Abdul Samat Mohit Achanta ’14 Advani Family Riya Agarwal ’14 Mrs Manjul Lata Agrawal Nauman and Fatima Ahmad Syed Hyder and Aamena Ahmad Sehr Ahmed Zahra Fatima Ahmed ’14 Natasha and Ali Alam Nicholas and Eleanor Alchin Fay and Brian Alesi Manisha Alex ’14 Sanjana Alex ’14 Thibault Amestoy ’14 Ruhi AMIN and Sama AMIN Anirudh Anand ’14 Ang Kuen Chuan Janet Ang Sandeep and Jyoti Angresh Anjali and Sajith Naoko Arai ’82 Araiza Family The Arnold Family Arriyan Jonathan and Yvonne Asherson Robert Aspin and Marialine Verdickt

Ayush and Annika Bagattini Family Navaneeth Balaji ’14 Panun Bali Zeya Bao ’14 Aysha Baqir and Shariq Saifuddin Deepok Kumar Baral Sebastien Barbier ’14 Miles Beasley Haerul Bengardi ’87 Kirsty Benham ’14 Rose Benjamin ’14 Kevin Bennett and Kate Horsburgh Libby and Aditya Beri Elisha Beston ’14 Bharath Venkatarao Nikhil Bhardwaj ’14 Anokhi Bhargava ’14 Bhargava Family Neeraj and Shefali Bhargava Geetika Bhasin ’14 Akanksha Bhatia ’14 Jesse and Ayesha Bhattal Simon Bignell and Andrea McDonald Emmanuel Bijaoui ’14 John W.C Birrell Marie Bisbo ’14 Alisha Blakemore ’14 The Blumer Family Åsa and Magnus Böcker Karl Bocker ’14 Alexandre Bouchard ’14 Mark and Sue Bradshaw Bray-Bridgewater Brezac-Massini Family Paul Brogden Kim Brumby Andy and Mei Budden Jamie Lynn Buitelaar ’14 Vibhu Bulusu ’14 Syrie Francesca Byfield Frazer and Rebecca Cairns Simon Camacho ’14 Marie Capdouze ’14 Capital International, Inc. Christopher Capodanno Courtney Carlson and Tony Lee

Jonathan Carter Zoe Carter ’14 Stein Cavelaars ’14 Mahir Chadha ’14 Chan Kit Yue Mary Nicholas Chan Raam Chandrasekharan ’14 Chang Boon Hua Chang Xin (Simba) Derek and Katherine Chang Ho Seung Chang ’14 Nupur Chatterji ’14 Lilyanne Cheah ’14 Boon and Rachel Chee Chegne How Poon Chen Huaidan and Tang Yigang Siyu Chen ’14 Steven Chen Leanne Cheng ’14 Isabel Cheong ’14 Timothy Cheung and Sue-Ann Yong Margaret Chew Chia Sew Kim Chia Yoke Chee Latib Chik Amy Chng Doreen Chng Samual Cho Melissa Chong ’14 William Chong ’78 Choo Boon Chye Ravi Chopra Samantha Chua ’14 Rowena Chuabio Chun Haeann Karen Cockburn Sinéad Collins and Gary Toner Kimlan Cook Giacomo Filippo Corsini ’86 Angelo and Megan Coskinas Ted Cowan and Belinda Robinson Tilson and William Crew Michelle and Ken Crouse Paul Cummins ’78 Jeral D’Souza Andrew da Roza James Dalziel and Nancy Fairburn 73


Jill Danne ’14 Katherine and Ceri Davies Rajeev and Alexandra De Mello Sonia De Mello ’14 Emmanuel Dean ’14 Robin Deelen ’14 Ian Delabie Navtej and Harman Deol Viren and Ruchee Desai Driek Desmet and Preeti Khandelwal Vishal Dhawan Jason Dias ’14 Cem and Nadja Dinckol Juen Wei Ding ’14 Rachel Djuang ’14 Robert and Edna Dompeling Dong Hai Mr and Mrs John J. Doyle III East High School Korean Parents’ Community David Eghan ’14 Elsa and Tanya Natalie Enslow ’14 Mats and Christina Ericson Amira Soraya Faruq ’14 Maya Filmeridis ’14 Dale Fisher ’78 Jasper Flierman ’14 Nicholas Fong ’14 Timothy Fong Deborah D. Fordyce Yalda Foroughmand Arabi ’14 Ritoma Ganguly ’14 Gay Chee Cheong Kathryn Geertsema ’14 Tobias Geoghegan ’14 Ishaan Ghai ’14 Lucas Ghai The Ghirardello Family Geraldine Gibb and David Wilson Jagdev and Sajni Gill Katherine Gledhill ’14 Karin Goh ’14 Harvey and Rosita Goldstein In loving memory of Celine Elizabeth Gonzago Clara Gonzalez-Orejas ’14 74

Alan and Brooks Goodyear Malvika Govil ’14 Rajan and Neeti Govil Ajay and Charu Goyal Denise Graf ’14 Emily Graham ’14 Frédéric Grandjean ’02 Lester and Christine Gray Stephen and Sharlene Grundlingh Kathleen Guan ’14 Nitin and Amie Gulabani Mr J.P. Gupta (1936-2002) Nandini Gupta ’14 Angus Guthrie ’14 Sophie Hackett ’14 Syed Hammad Haider and Atiya Kazi Vanessa Halasan ’14 Pippa Haley Kush Handa ’78 Asad and Farah Haq Family Harrold Ayesha Hasan ’14 Syed Saad and Rabia Hassan Andreas Heck Arjan Heck ’14 Lieve Hendren ’08 Georgia Hendry ’14 Sydney Ann Heschuk ’14 Douglas Heskamp Hew Kuan Cheong Lisa and Paul Hewitt Ellen Heyting Shuichi Hidaka Audrey and Seng Chee Ho Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan F. Horlacher-Hu Anthonia Hui Max Hull Kelvin and Wendy Hung India Hussain ’14 Abdul Hamid bin Ibrahim Nora Igesund Kyrkjeboe ’14 Gulallay Iqbal Marina and Ali Irshad Nael and Amina Islam Ivan Ivanov and Tatyana Todorova Iwatake Katsuji

Shreya Jaggi ’14 Hee Yoon Jang ’14 Lori and Olivier Jankelovics Barend Janssens Dongok Jeon ’01 Tine and J. Peter Jessen Phoebe Jewitt ’14 Johnston Family Cathy Jones Geraint Jones Pearce Jones ’14 Iqbal and Maniza Jumabhoy Il Yong Jung ’02 Kirkha Kaharsyah ’14 Nora Kajamaa ’14 Kaho Kameyama ’14 Kandisaputro and Juliet Hee Jin Kang ’14 Archana Kannan ’14 James Kelly ’14 Kennedy-Cooke Family Devora Khafi ’14 Amberkeen Khan Sonica Khera ’14 Dong Kuk Kim ’14 Kim Jin Sik and Lee Si Youn Min Jee Kim ’14 Friends and family of Nanci and Steve Kim Angela King and Kenny Chong Kingsley Chloe Kippax-Chui ’14 The Kirpalani Family Joep Kleine Staarman Mark Koczanowski and Vicky Binns Julie Kohn and Dan Swift and Family May Yuen Kong Pat Kongboonma Gabriela Gonzalez Koo Robert Kraybill and Durreen Shahnaz Alexander Krefft ’93 Amrith Krushnakumaar ’03 Melinda Kuang Anke Kubsch Ashutosh and Monica Kumar Rajesh Kumar and Swati Kumari Yutaro Kurahashi ’14


Jessica Kusdianto ’14 Hoe Jin Kwon ’14 James M. Lai and Ian M. Lai Lai Ang Tau Yin Lai ’14 Ashok and Garima Lalwani Anthony and Christopher Lam Yan Yu Ines Lamy ’14 Davy Lau Nhi Le ’14 Patrick and Sylvie Ledig Chae Hyun Lee ’14 Katrina Lee ’14 Lee Buyng Yel Lee Suk Hwan Sei Min Lee ’14 Soo Yeon Lee ’14 Caroline Leenders ’14 Julien Leo ’14 Leong Chee Seng Sam and Poni Leong Michael Leuchtenberger ’86 Pericles Lewis and Sheila Hayre Li Ping Mr Li Xian Yu and Mrs Fang Jun Yiran Li ’14 Michael and Linda Li Sung Sang Mr Liang Ke Jian Dr Lim Ka Liang Agnes Lim Fang Fen Lim Kathy Lim Nancy Lim Zi Xin Lim ’14 Eliora Elena Limanjaya David Linder ’14 Sona Lippmann Jade Lisbin ’14 Alina W Liu Daren Lo ’14 Lock Kim Hock Loh Phui Cheu Christine Loo Loo Kuen Feng Sinhchhinh Lor ’14 Lord Family

Grace Lu Inna Luengas Tommy Lund Josua Chad Lutian ’14 MacAlpine family Marianne Yong-Macdonald Declan and Anne MacFadden Mahboob and Samia Mahmood Jacques Mainguy ’79 Masami Makino Raj and Fiza Malhotra Gagan Malik Ashwin Manoj ’14 Paul Marks ’75 David and Fei-Ying Marshall Junaid Marvi and Shahla Siddiqui Masuhr Family David and Kim Maxwell Mara McAdams and David Hand Sarah McCarrison and Joe Sergi Filippo Mecheri ’14 PK Medappa and Monisha Medappa Caroline and Robert Meek Lotte Meijerink ’14 Lukas Ming Menkhoff ’14 The Mikkelsen Family Minford Family Bindiya and Raj Mishra Jonathan and Kim Mitchell Pia Mitchell ’14 Mili Mitra ’14 Daisuke Miura ’14 Miyano Haruhiko Kamal Uddin Mohammad and Shirin Begum Nabila Mohd Hassan ’10 Timothy Mok ’14 Ben Morgan Monique Morley and Anders Mogensen Manvi Motiani ’14 East Middle School Student Council Leadership 2013/2014 Ahmad bin Muet Amukelani Muyanga ’14 Soe Naing and Family Amanina Nakamura ’14 Kyosuke Nambu ’14

Rohit Narang and Shweta Asnani Narang Dr S and C Narayanan Asim and Zainab Naseer Meghna Nayak ’14 Raza Nazar ’14 Ne Aung and Khin Moe Nyunt David Neidel Fred and Heidi Neve Newman Family Jessica Ng ’14 Natalie Ng ’14 Darren Ngatimin ’14 Minh-Tam and Jessica Nguyen Mrs Nguyen Mr and Mrs L. Nippress Terutake and Kazumi Niwa John Nnamchi ’14 Lynn Nor Boreland Dan Novak ’02 André Nurman ’93 Brian Ó Maoileoin and Kate Drudy Anjul and Jaya Oberai Tristan O’Brien ’14 Danny and Alison O’Connor Atsushi Ogawa Junichi and Chikage Ogawa Steven and Paige Okun Onestini Tim Ong Chaw Yin Ong Peng Peng Alto Ono ’14 Mathilde Ooi ’14 Charles and Jenny Ormiston Dan and Libby Orr Outwoods Pte Ltd Albert and Julie Ovidi Nihal Pai ’14 Mallika Parambi ’14 Richa Parande ’14 Amee Parikh Gunou Park ’14 Seoyoung Park ’14 You Mi Park Yui Kyung Park ’14 Parr Family Nikita Patel ’14 75


Rahul Patni ’14 Aanavi Patodia ’14 Ines Petard ’14 Namita and Vikas Phadnis Nee Phua Subarna and Mohan Prabhakar Leena Prakash Halcyon Price ’14 Ishaan Prinz ’14 Antonio and Tricia Puno Dr. Ramkrishna Purohit Abbas and Nadia Rahimtoola Haniyyah Rahman-Shepherd ’14 Ravi and Lakshmi Raju Harsha Ramachandran ’14 Mr and Mrs G S Ramesh Ashwin Ranganathan and Claire Ngo Victoria Ranieri ’14 Akshay Rao ’14 Pranati Rao ’14 Shayaan Rasul ’14 Fiona Read Brigitte Remy-Yee ’06 Joe Rivera Frances Roberts Troels Rømer ’14 Dorine Rootsaert Rabiah Rowther ’14 Neha Roy ’14 Aswin Ruanglerbutr Elly Rumengan Siti Aminah Binte Sabtu Rajesh Sachdeva and Sumita Ambasta Per Sagbakken Swar Sahgal ’14 Malika Saksena ’14 Hikari Sakurai Hikari Sakurai ’14 Yuko and Ken Sakurai Theyasagayam s/o Samivelu Samy Ana Sanchez Chico ’14 William Sandlund ’14 Ananya Sanketh Claire Sassoon ’03 Natalia Sassoon ’14 Victor and Michelle Sassoon ’82 Betty Soh 76

Caroline Sebunya Goran and Cecilia Seifert Joy Sen Gang Bin Seo ’14 Tetsuo Serizawa Gary and Mel Seston Priya Sethuraman ’00 Syed Nadir Shah and Sabiha Sultan Vihang and Vaishali Shah Sophia Shaikh Satish and Anita Shankar Angelia Shao Pamela Sharma ’14 Rohan Sharma ’14 Sima Sharma ’14 Varini Sharma ’07 Dave and Sue Shepherd Hannah Shepherd ’14 Shantanu Shete and Sonali Gupta Sara and Salman Shoaib Jota and Claudia Shohtoku Nompendulo Shongwe ’10 Harmeet Singh and Dipika Bedi Yash Singh ’14 Raivat Singhania ’14 Rohit and Nishta Sipahimalani Richard and Zainab Slovenski Peter and Diana Smit Xander Smit ’14 Smith Smithangura Lotus Soh Mr and Mrs Sohmen-Pao Soo Yook Lin Agneta Spjut and Thomas Spjut Eriksson St John’s School Alumni Tord and Kimberly Stallvik Monica Stanciu Daniel and Jessica Steele Gregor Straehle ’14 Ambrish Sukhani Adam and Vandana Summerly Prasun Surana ’14 Swina International Pte Ltd Anna Sze ’14 Lydia Sze ’14 Pei Lyn Tan ’14

Tan Ah Lam Tan Bock Heng Tan Lee Hong Kartik Taneja Steven Tay Tay Wee Lam Nadinda Ayu Temenggung ’14 Tengku Rahimah ’84 Cecilia Teo Pleun Terpstra ’14 Julien Tham ’14 The Romita Shetty and Nasser Ahmad Foundation, Inc. Vireak They ’14 Henry and Yoshie Asahara Thio Pramote and Nantaka Thirakul Chris and Fleur Thomas Robbie Thomas ’14 Simon and Cinders Thomas Arvind and Niharika Tiku Armand Tiphonnet Cheri Toh David Toh Jason Toh ’02 Diandra Tolton ’14 Michele Toms ’93 Laurence Tournerie Mary Ann Tsao Robinson Annie and Nick Tsinonis Adam and Angela Turner Shalaka Uchil ’14 Sarah Usmani Timothy Uy ’14 Marc and Fabienne Van de Walle-Hankard Aurelie Van Oost ’14 The Van Wensveen-Zahir Family Hanna Varga ’14 Shriya Varghese ’14 Aditi Varshneya ’14 Sharanya Venkatesh ’14 Olivier Verbiest ’14 Herman Viljoen ’14 Gurpreet and Rupinder Vohra Wai Chee Hoong Sota Wakabayashi The Wallner Family


Wang Wee Seng Wang Yi Yi Benjamin Watson ’14 Bruno and Sekar Wauters Brenda Whately Julian and Buff Whiteley Wickmann Family Ashley Widjaja ’14 Moira and Chris Wilkinson Dr Win Si Thu and Dr Su Hla Han Alexandra Wong ’14 Bryce Wong ’14 Sarah Wong ’14 Christopher Worsdale ’14 Tiffany Wu ’14 Wu Shiou Lian Mark and Nicole Wyrill Nikolas Xanthopoulos ’14 Farhana Yaakob Mr and Mrs Wayne Yang Mr and Mrs Yaw Chee Ming Nicole Yaw ’14 Xavier Yip Yu Ki Jun Kalimah Haji Zainuri Luo Xiaoling and Zeng Jinli Zhang Wen Scott and Allison Ziemer Soofian and Fatima Zuberi Anonymous gifts made by 73 donors

GIFTS IN KIND

VOLUNTEERS

Through the significant contributions of individuals, businesses and corporations, the Foundation has been able to provide even greater support to the College in achieving its vision of becoming a leader in international

UWCSEA is privileged to have a very enthusiastic and active volunteer community across all areas of College life. It is their generous support and commitment to the vision and values of the College that enables us to achieve so much.

education. Bain & Co. South East Asia Inc. Charles Ormiston Christine Chen CREATE David Chong & Co. Deutsche Bank AG Singapore Dr. and Mrs Jean-Francois and Anne Manzoni EFG Bank ETH Zürich Future Cities Laboratory Lateral Plains Nand and Jeet Khemka Foundation Mr and Dr Ajay and Dhooleka Raj Mrs Ruchira Agarwal Sassoon Family SIEMENS T.K. Lai Aqua Expeditions Fullerton Hotel

AMBASSADOR PROGRAMME The Ambassador Programme is an opportunity for parents and alumni to engage with the fundraising activities of the UWCSEA Foundation and promote College Advancement. The main role of the Ambassador Programme is to support the philanthropic activities of the College by encouraging awareness of the UWCSEA Foundation, and the range of programmes and initiatives that it supports. Sumita Ambasta Morten Andersen Jyoti Angresh Samantha Hague Midori Isozaki Lori Kaufman Anisha Kaul Navranjan Khanna Nauleen Kohli Ausra Larbey Henrik Mikkelsen Vinitha Mukherjee Mark Newman Dhooleka Raj Jenifer Raver Sanjay Sharma Simon Weston Jenny Windheim Helen Yang Susana Zilliacus

77


066COMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1415 | MCI (P) 087/04/2014

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