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CONTENTS Letter from Charles Ormiston, Chair of the Board of Governors �������������������������������������������2 Letter from Chris Edwards, Head of College................................................................................5 UWCSEA guiding statements and learning programme...........................................................7 UWCSEA governance and leadership.......................................................................................... 11 Board of Governors...................................................................................................................12 Student achievement.....................................................................................................................15 Academics...................................................................................................................................16 Activities......................................................................................................................................31 Outdoor education..................................................................................................................34 Personal and social education............................................................................................... 37 Service.........................................................................................................................................40 Our community.............................................................................................................................. 45 Scholars .....................................................................................................................................48 Community feedback.............................................................................................................. 50 Business report............................................................................................................................... 55 Human Resources..................................................................................................................... 55 Admissions................................................................................................................................. 58 Finance.........................................................................................................................................61 Statement of financial position............................................................................................. 62 Statement of comprehensive income..................................................................................64 College Advancement................................................................................................................... 67 Foundation................................................................................................................................. 67 Foundation financial report....................................................................................................68 Statement of financial position............................................................................................. 70 Statement of comprehensive income...................................................................................71 Alumni relations....................................................................................................................... 73 Donors 2014/2015................................................................................................................... 75 1


LETTER FROM CHARLES ORMISTON CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 2015/2016 marks the end of my second term as Chair of the UWCSEA Board of Governors, so this introduction to the 2014/2015 Annual Report will be my last. I’d like, therefore, to use this letter to highlight some of the major achievements of the Board of Governors in the last six years, and to provide some reflection on the rationale for several of the decisions, perhaps to serve as a guidepost to future generations of leadership at the school. But first, why do we have an Annual Report? Why do we reveal so much unvarnished data about all aspects of our school, including student achievement in the learning programme, feedback from our community, details of our financial health and all aspects of our administration? The answer is that our annual report reflects our commitment to transparency about our achievements and our shortcomings, so that we have no alternative but to improve. The annual report shines a bright light on the workings of the Board of Governors and the school leadership in a way that allows any stakeholder to raise concerns or provide ideas for improvement. It is a clear demonstration of our desire to be a global leader in international education, and allows other schools to benchmark themselves against us. We are not a leader unless others follow. When I joined the Board of Governors in 2007, the school had spent three years under the guidance of Kishore Mahbubani as Chair of the Board of Governors and Julian Whiteley as Head of College. I quickly discovered three characteristics of the school that I didn’t expect: 2

• The UWC Mission is at the very heart of everything UWCSEA does. During my subsequent time on the Board, I repeatedly observed that decisions were guided by an idealistic commitment to that vision, as opposed to ‘pragmatic’ alternatives. The Board of Governors sees itself as accountable to the mission and responds accordingly. • The Board of Governors has a very constructive and collaborative working relationship with the leadership and staff. This positive working relationship continues today and is so important in schools, where less positive interactions between Boards and staff can have a destructive effect on culture and operations. • Finally—and this was perhaps the most unexpected finding of all— UWCSEA was resting on its laurels. All institutions need an inspirational mission, ambitious goals and a culture of growth and development for employees, so that the institution stays focused on what matters. It was clear to the Board and the school’s leaders that UWCSEA, while continuing to provide a very good education for students, was losing its ambition and not acting like a leader: it played a secondary role in UWC International affairs, it was not open to expansion, it had fewer scholars than almost every other UWC, it was not accredited by an external agency, it was no longer a driving force within the IB or in other curriculum initiatives, it was falling behind in innovation and technology, the physical plant was deteriorating and there had been no investment in sustainability.

In short, the Board was governing a great school, with a great Mission, falling short of its full potential. The month I joined the Board the Singapore government asked UWCSEA to build a second campus. While there was much discussion about how to respond to this request, there were three factors that compelled us to act. Firstly, the Singapore Government had been highly supportive of UWCSEA, providing us with land at reasonable rents, supporting a tremendous number of work and student permits, working closely with us on matters involving civil works, security and so on. They had a genuine need for more high quality capacity in the international school sector, and we were in a position to respond. Secondly, the Board believed strongly that the school needed to step up to more ambitious goals in keeping with a desire to be a leader in international education. Third, and perhaps most importantly, we believed in the Mission of UWCSEA and the quality of the education we were providing. The greater scale would allow us to have a positive impact on more children and scholars, to have more resources to develop and pursue innovative programs, and to have more financial stability. The development of East Campus began almost immediately and three years later I was asked by the Board to assume the Chairmanship. I was tremendously honoured and excited about the opportunity. Looking back on the six years since then, I am amazed by how much has been achieved by the school and the community. It is hard to summarise the efforts of so many in a short letter, but I will highlight a few of the achievements that I believe have


been most significant in furthering the College and our Mission. 1. The East Campus is a success, and has had the additional benefit of strengthening the Dover campus—a commitment the Administration and Board made to the parents of Dover students at the time of the announcement. If there is any evidence of successful collaboration between a school and its Board, it is in the conceptualisation and execution of the second campus at UWCSEA. By any measure—academic performance, satisfaction of the students, teachers and parents, hitting cost and revenue targets by opening both the temporary and permanent campuses on time and on budget, the architectural awards the school has received for sustainability and usability, the addition of 42 additional scholars, not to mention the nearly 2,500 additional students who now receive a UWC education— the East Campus is a source of tremendous pride to everyone associated with it. The cost of the second campus—over $250 million— has been properly financed and the costs of operations are well below competitive benchmarks. 2. We have underwritten one of the most comprehensive reviews of curriculum in the field of international education. The goal of the Curriculum Articulation project is to develop a logically sequenced K1 to Grade 12 curriculum that is firmly derived from the UWC mission and appropriate for UWCSEA and the Singapore context. Students are already benefitting from a more seamless experience,

developing age-appropriate knowledge, skills and understanding in each area of the learning programme from K1 to IB Diploma. We are excited by and proud of the efforts of our educational staff, supported by our Board Education Committee. The UWC movement, which helped to develop the IB Diploma, is once again at the forefront of curriculum design. 3. We have completed a major building programme at Dover. Over a 6 year period we have added approximately 20% to the physical capacity of the Dover campus without adding students. This has added significantly to the functionality of the environment and our ability to educate the students to a global standard. The campus has already achieved Greenmark Platinum award and the overall power consumption is lower, despite the increase in size—a remarkable move towards our sustainability goal. In addition, not a single building has suffered from the quality and construction problems that were common features of facilities built in the past. The Facilities committee of the Board played a major role in this expansion, working closely with school leadership. 4. Our balance sheet is healthy; our costs are low. We carry sufficient cash and liquid assets on the balance sheet to fund one term’s expenditure—about 12 times the levels of 12 years ago. We do not borrow from our reserves for mortgage obligations. All pension obligations are fully funded and reserved, with most paid out every two years. Our tuition costs, while

higher than 6 years ago, have fallen from the second most expensive school in Singapore in 2008/2009 to seventh in 2014/2015. Under the leadership of the Finance Committee, the school is financially secure and sustainable in the long term. 5. The UWCSEA Foundation is a success, with room to grow. It is now hard to believe that 10 years ago UWCSEA had raised only $200,000 in its history or that we only had contact details for about 15% of the graduates at the school. With this as a starting point, I’d like to point to the efforts of David Chong (who provided tremendous pro bono support for getting IPC status with the government), Kishore Mahbubani (who served as the first Chair of the Foundation) and Declan MacFadden (who has served as the second Chair), along with the team at the College, for what they achieved. We now have a far-reaching and active alumni programme and a successful gifts programme that has raised SG$12.4 million in gifts and pledges since 2008. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, we have increased the number of scholars at the College from 55 to 102, supported many environmental initiatives and provided significant support for professional development and excellence in teaching and learning. Members of our community have contributed not only financially, but with their time and expertise, to help make the College better—we are fortunate indeed to have such a committed community. 3


6. Over the last three years, the Governance Committee has systematically reviewed the governance of the Board. Most Board Governors now spend two years on 1-2 committees before joining the full Board. This allows them to familiarise themselves with the operations of the Board and to demonstrate an ability to contribute effectively to its operations. We have added an Education Committee and an Engagement Committee. We have carefully separated the role of the Governance committee Chair from the Chair of the Board: now, the Governance Committee drives the process for who is brought onto the Board (with input from the Chair of the Board) while the Chair of the Board decides the leadership within the Board (with input from the Governance Committee). Every Board Governor is rigorously assessed at the end of their first term to ensure they merit a second term. Key skills that are required to fulfil the agenda of the Board are considered heavily as we seek to attract great candidates to the Board. All these efforts have established the Board as a highfunctioning professional group of volunteers who are accountable to the College guiding statements and can effectively guide and support the school leadership. 7. We have tackled a range of topics in support of the administration—with an approach of how the Board can support the College in becoming a global leader in a particular area, as opposed to how the Board thinks the College should do it. Key areas included technology in education 4

(the iLearn programme); child protection; language learning at UWCSEA; outdoor education; and sustainability in education. 8. We have changed the admissions policy of the school from one based on date of application to an annual application cycle with selection criteria that take a holistic view of the applicant. Our goal is to ensure that every family joining the College is committed to our Mission, and that every child joining can benefit from the programme we offer. Equally, we need our community to reflect the diversity that is so central to our mission. This policy is already paying enormous benefits to the school. I have real admiration for the Admissions Department and the commitment and energy they have displayed in implementing the new policies. 9. We have successfully managed a Head of College transition through an inclusive process that included Board Governors, faculty and staff. We believe the process we undertook for the Head of College selection was appropriately inclusive and confidential—the community has a right to engagement but the candidates also have a right to have their privacy protected. We were heartened by the vast number of high quality candidates who expressed genuine interest in the position. Our choice of Chris Edwards as our new Head of College is a response to our ongoing commitment to being a leader in international education, and we are excited about the future of the College under his leadership.

There is still work to be done—there always will be. As I write, there are deep and important conversations taking place about integration with Singapore, innovation and entrepreneurship at the College, how we measure the impact of our education, how we understand the issue of diversity, and how we respond to an increasingly competitive environment and the changing needs of our current community. I will have to leave it to my successor and the Board and school leadership to continue those conversations and determine the next agenda. What I do hope is that the annual report—and the commitment to transparency on our performance against the goals that we set ourselves— is maintained. UWCSEA is a great institution, one of the highest performing non-profits I am aware of in the world. I am proud and grateful for the opportunity to play a role in its development over the last six years. All of us who volunteer on the Board of Governors are stewards of this great institution for just a short time; UWCSEA will continue long after our time in the leadership of the school is finished. The only reward we should expect for ourselves is the deep satisfaction of knowing that we have left the school in the strongest position possible to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world.

Charles Ormiston


LETTER FROM CHRIS EDWARDS HEAD OF COLLEGE Annual reports are strange things. They reflect on a year that, in the life of a school at least, is a distant memory, and while they mark changes and achievements during that year, they don’t allow for the momentous happenings that are taking place as we write our introductions. One such happening is the end of Charles Ormiston’s second term as Chair of the Board of Governors. In theory, reflections on the 2015/2016 year’s most significant change don’t belong in this report. But as I look back on last year it would be wrong not to acknowledge that I wish I had enjoyed more time working with Charles. Charles has sacrificed much for UWCSEA: to be Chair is to give, give and give again: you can’t even clothe yourself in your own biases, prejudices and gripes while you are expending so much energy. Impartial, generous, honest even when it hurts, Charles has led with a blend of compassion and precision such as I have seldom seen. Under Charles’ leadership things changed at the College: quickly, significantly and for the better. Next time you are on East campus, look around you. Without Charles, none of it would be there. Our governing body, our drive to transparency, our will to engage: they too owe their genesis to his will, intelligence and passion for the College. Every Chair will eventually become a historical figure in UWCSEA’s annals. But few will be historic. Charles will. The UWCSEA community thanks and salutes him. And so to 2014/2015. As he states in his introduction, the annual report is in part a manifestation of Charles and the Board’s commitment to transparency.

And they are right. A school should tell it straight. And if we are to go by the raw numbers (the ‘straight talk’), the UWCSEA community should engage in vigorous self congratulation. Another wonderful year of service, activity, and outdoor education; an inspiring set of public examination results; super net promoter scores from parents on both campuses; much needed new facilities on Dover. We could continue listing until the Report was filled and the Amazon felled. It would be easy, then, to say “It’s been a stellar year” and fall silent. However, when it comes to understanding a school’s quintessence, statistics can be far more dangerous than opinion or even rumour, and the tempering of raw numbers with measured critique is vital if we are to honour value above price. So, as one heartily congratulates students, staff and parents for the scale and success of what is recorded here, let’s ponder for a moment on what is not. And as we ponder, let’s acknowledge that the landscape for international education in Singapore has witnessed tectonic shifts in the last eighteen months whose effects will resonate for many years. Where once UWCSEA sat proud as a large single campus school with an effective monopoly on holistic, experiential education, it now finds that the lone and level sands of its former landscape have become undulating dunes of change. We cannot be a stagnant colossus gazing imperiously over its domain: we must be as dynamic, as fluid, as nimble as circumstances demand. So, when we consider what the annual report does not cover, we must revisit internal structures and steer this

aircraft carrier as if it were a frigate, constantly reviewing our curriculum and our pedagogy to ensure we are truly understanding front line 21st century tertiary education and desirable workplace skill sets. Our educational offer must be transferable and recognisable: in an international school, many students are not loyal veterans of K through to 12, hence it is imperative we introduce International School Assessment tests for our students. We need a College wide, unambiguous position on sustainability and a crystalline understanding as to what we mean by optimum diversity (instead of an inarticulate notion that more might somehow be done). Creative centres need to be up and running on both campuses so our offer better reflects the dynamic of the world beyond our walls. And yet, we we must exercise discipline by not falling into line with fads, paying homage to this year’s buzz-words and running in fear of pie charts. As Margaret Atwood said: “Ignoring isn’t the same as ignorance: you have to work at it.” A good year, then? No, an amazing one. A joyous, eventful, intense and invigorating time of invention. Those who seek starts, middles and ends in all they do might want to seek elsewhere, but I’ll take my mantra for the year from the Bhagavad Gita: “Curving back within myself I create again and again.”

Chris Edwards

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6


UWCSEA GUIDING STATEMENTS AND LEARNING PROGRAMME UWC MISSION

Because the UW CM To make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future

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To make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future

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This diagram explains how the elements of the UWCSEA Learning Programme fit together, with the mission as both the starting point and the goal.

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UWCSEA LEARNING PROGRAMME

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UWCSEA will be a leader in international education. We will have a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education with an emphasis upon academic achievement, service to others, environmental stewardship, teamwork and leadership.

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UWCSEA AMBITION

To educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world

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UWCSEA EDUCATIONAL GOAL The UWCSEA goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world.

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The UWC movement makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

f u l fi l o u r M

7


LEARNING PRINCIPLES Learning is a life-long process in which the learner engages with and reflects upon information and experiences to construct new or modify existing understanding as well as develop and apply qualities and skills. We know learning is effective when: • learners construct new understanding by activating prior knowledge and experiences Therefore, it is important that new learning is connected to what the learner has previously experienced or understood. • learners use timely and goal directed feedback Therefore, ongoing assessment should be regular and structured in a manner that allows for specific feedback to guide the learner in constructing meaning. • learners collaborate Therefore, learners must have opportunities to interact with others in a variety of situations and groupings. • learners are challenged Therefore, learners need to be challenged in developmentally appropriate ways.

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• learners feel secure and supported Therefore, learners need a safe and respectful learning environment. • learners construct meaning by seeing patterns and making connections Therefore, learning needs to be organised around core concepts. • learners actively process and reflect Therefore, time is required for learners to practise, reflect and consolidate learning. • learners apply metacognitive skills Therefore, learners should develop an awareness of their own thinking processes to develop intellectual habits. • learners understand the purpose of the learning Therefore, learning should occur in context with clear connections to real world. • learners have ownership of their learning Therefore, opportunities for selfdirected learning are needed to sustain and motivate learning.


UWCSEA PROFILE Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Our community achieves this goal by developing knowledge and understanding, qualities and skills through the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service.

QUALITIES

SKILLS

Commitment to care

Critical thinker

Initiate actions and make a commitment to shaping a better world. Related concepts: stewardship, caring, empathy, compassion, open-minded, service, sustainability

Reason in an informed and fair-minded manner. Related concepts: inquiry, questioning, connection, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, problem solving

Principled

Creative

Act with integrity and respect for self and the dignity of others. Related concepts: integrity, honesty, responsibility, respect, fairness

Imagine and generate new possibilities or alternatives. Related concepts: originality, imagination, curiosity, adaptability, connection, innovation, improvisation, risk-taking

Resilient Anticipate, persevere and confront challenge. Related concepts: optimism, confidence, courage, diligence, perseverance Self-aware Develop intellectual, physical, spiritual and emotional well-being. Related concepts: self-discipline, selfesteem, self-confidence, reflection, balance, contentment

Collaborative Participate collaboratively in diverse settings. Related concepts: cooperation, participation, leadership, flexibility, adaptability, responsibility, trust Communicator Communicate effectively according to audience and purpose. Related concepts: communication, interpretation, perspective, intent Self-manager Take responsibility for directing one’s learning. Related concepts: metacognition, independence, diligence, organisation, responsibility

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GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP UWC MOVEMENT

movement, opened by Lee Kuan Yew as Singapore International School in 1971. Since then, UWCSEA has expanded to become a K-12 school of more than 5,500 students, making it the largest UWC in the movement, and one of only three who take students before the IB Diploma in Grade 11.

UWC South East Asia is a member of the UWC movement, which was founded in 1962 by Kurt Hahn, the great German educationalist. UWC South East Asia was the second member of the UWC

The UWC movement now has 15 schools and colleges, and is supported by a network of National Committees, made up of volunteers in more than 145 countries worldwide, who help to find and select many of the Grade 11 and 12 scholars in the colleges around the world.

UWCSEA uses the Hobo-Dyer Projection for our maps which, as a cylindrical equal area projection, more accurately reflects the relative size of the continents.

A breakdown of the other schools and colleges can be seen in the table below School

Country

Age

Number of students 2014/2015

UWC Adriatic

Italy

16–19

190

UWC Atlantic

United Kingdom

16–19

350

UWC Costa Rica

Costa Rica

16–19

160

UWC Changshu

China

16–19

520

UWC Dilijan

Armenia

16–18

190

Li Po Chun UWC

Hong Kong SAR, China

16–19

255

UWC Maastricht

Netherlands

2–18

850

UWC Mahindra

India

16–19

240

UWC in Mostar

Bosnia and Herzegovina

16–19

150

Pearson College UWC

Canada

16–19

200

UWC Red Cross Nordic

Norway

16–19

200

UWC Robert Bosch College

Germany

16–19

200

UWC South East Asia

Singapore

4–19

5525

UWC-USA

New Mexico, USA

16–19

200

Waterford Kamhlaba UWC

Swaziland

11–20

600 11


BOARD OF GOVERNORS UWCSEA is a non-profit organisation. Its legal status is as a public company limited by guarantee, registered with the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA). UWCSEA is also a registered charity with the Commissioner of Charities, and a foreign system school, registered

made up of both elected and selected (co-opted) members. In addition to the Management Committee, which is comprised of the Board Chair and the Chairs of all Board committees, there are six Board committees: Audit, Education, Engagement, Facilities, Finance and Governance.

with the Ministry of Education and the Council for Private Education. As a member of the UWC movement, UWCSEA is overseen by the UWC International Board. UWCSEA benefits from a highly experienced Board of Governors,

UWCSEA BOARD OF GOVERNORS 2014/2015 Charles Ormiston (Chair)

Vivek Kalra (Chair, Finance Committee)

Dale Fisher

Chris Edwards

David Maxwell (Chair, Audit Committee)

Alexander Krefft (Chair, Governance Committee)

Michelle Sassoon

Ho Seng Chee (retired 3 October 2014)

Thierry Brezac

Alexandra De Mello

Miles Beasley (retired 30 January 2015)

Anna Lord (Chair, Engagement Committee)

Nicholas Chan

Katherine Davies

Elaine Teale (retired 31 July 2015)

Will KennedyCooke (Chair, Facilities Committee)

Davy Lau

Kenneth Stirrat

Doris SohmenPao (Chair, Education Committee)

Co-opted members Surinder Kathpalia Shelly Maneth 12

Benjamin Detenber Heather Yang Carmichael

S C Chiew Subodh Chanrai


ENGAGEMENT COMMITTEE

EDUCATION COMMITTEE

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

Anna Lord (Chair) Michelle Sassoon Chris Edwards Benjamin Detenber Subodh Chanrai Sinead Collins

Doris Sohmen-Pao (Chair) Dale Fisher Alexandra De Mello Chris Edwards Benjamin Detenber Heather Yang Carmichael Frazer Cairns James Dalziel

Charles Ormiston (Chair) David Maxwell Doris Sohmen-Pao Anna Lord Will Kennedy-Cooke Vivek Kalra Alexander Krefft

FACILITIES COMMITTEE Will Kennedy-Cooke (Chair) David Maxwell Thierry Brezac Chris Edwards Frazer Cairns Simon Thomas

AUDIT COMMITTEE David Maxwell (Chair) Kenneth Stirrat Surinder Kathpalia Shelly Maneth

GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE Alexander Krefft (Chair) Nicholas Chan Ho Seng Chee Davy Lau Elaine Teale Chris Edwards Surinder Kathpalia Chegne How Poon

FINANCE COMMITTEE Vivek Kalra (Chair) Anna Lord Katherine Davies Chris Edwards S C Chiew Chegne How Poon Cecilia Teo

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The learning programme at UWCSEA consists of five interlinking elements: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service. These elements combine to provide our students with a values-based education that develops them as individuals and as members of a global society. Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Through the learning programme, students develop the knowledge and understanding, and skills and qualities, that will help them to fulfil this goal. Each of the five elements of the programme complements each other to create a whole that is greater than the sum of the parts. This is a carefully planned and purposeful process, where outdoor education is connected to subject areas in the academic curriculum, the Personal and Social Education programme support students in the Activities programme, students can use the Service programme to address social questions identified in their academic learning, and so on. The skills and qualities identified in the UWCSEA profile are embedded in all five elements of the programme. This section of the Annual report is an overview of the main highlights of the 2014/2015 year in each of the five elements.

THE STRUCTURE OF THE UWCSEA ACADEMIC CURRICULUM The curriculum is concept-based. As a result, each curriculum area (or discipline) has standards, which are written as single statements that include the key concepts for that area. These standards run from K1 to Grade 12.

Each standard has essential understandings, which are developmentally appropriate statements of understanding, also expressed in concepts, that describe what a student should understand at each stage of their development. They build naturally in complexity from K1 to Grade 12. Benchmarks are attached to each essential understanding. The

benchmarks describe what a student should know, understand or be able to do at each stage of their learning as the student works toward the deeper understanding that is outlined in the essential understanding. These benchmarks are what our teachers assess to ensure that students are reaching the essential understandings and are working towards the standards.

Below is an example of a standard in English, and the essential understandings and benchmarks for that standard in Grades 1, 7 and the IB Diploma Programme. K1-Grade 12 Standard: Writing expresses selfhood, creativity and intellect in a medium shaped by audience and purpose. Grade 1

Grade 7

Grade 11 and 12 (IB Diploma)

Essential understanding: We create real or imagined experiences when writing stories by using characters and setting.

Essential understanding: All parts of a text work together to shape meaning.

Essential understanding: Writers manipulate structure to convey meaning effectively.

Benchmark: Develop the story through character, focusing on specific actions.

Benchmark: Write narratives, using time and plot deliberately in order to influence mood and focus attention on the important moments in a story.

Benchmark: Sequence and sustain structure to strengthen and develop the logic and persuasive impact of a claim. 15


LEARNING PROGRAMME: ACADEMICS The academic learning programme allows students to experience the challenge of intellectual pursuit and the joy of scholarly engagement. They gain a deep understanding of individual disciplines, while investigating the connections between these disciplines and how to solve complex problems using different approaches. Learning goals for individual subject areas

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build logically through each grade so that students grow in knowledge and understanding and are prepared for the next academic challenge. In 2014/2015, UWCSEA students followed a UWCSEA-designed curriculum, based on standards, essential understandings and benchmarks defined through our

curriculum articulation project, from K1 to Grade 8 (see previous page for more details). Students in Grades 9 and 10 followed the (I)GCSE programme, with students entering in Grade 10 following a Foundation IB (FIB) programme. Grade 11 and 12 students took the IB Diploma programme.


IB DIPLOMA RESULTS In May/June 2015, 498 UWCSEA students took the IB Diploma exams. A full breakdown of their achievement by College and by each campus can be seen in the following pages.

COLLEGE Average IB Diploma Score

Students

498

36.2

30.1

UWCSEA

Worldwide

Percentage receiving 40+ points

Pass rate

98.4%

79.3%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

26.5%

6.4%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

Percentage receiving bilingual diploma

26.1% UWCSEA

28.2% Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 40–45

26.5% 6.8% 42.0%

35–39

<24

Number of candidates

Percent passed

Worldwide average percent passed

UWCSEA average diploma score

Wordwide average diploma score

2015

498*

98.4

79.0

36.2

29.9

2014

465**

99.8

79.3

36.8

30.1

2013

317

99.4

79.1

36.4

29.9

2012

311

99.7

78.5

35.8

29.8

2011

300

100

77.9

36.9

28.8

2010

295

98.9

78.1

36.0

29.5

18.1% 23.4% 28.3%

30–34

24–29

Year

7.8% 31.6% 0.2% 15.2% UWCSEA

*322 students on Dover and 176 on East | ** 323 students on Dover and 142 on East

Worldwide 17


DOVER Complete IB course listing for the Class of 2015

Pass rate

Courses are offered at either Higher or Standard Level unless noted below.

99.4%

79.3%

UWCSEA Dover

1.

Language A: Literature Taught

English; French; Hindi (SL); Indonesian; Japanese; Korean; Chinese

School Supported SelfTaught (SL)

Afrikaans; Bosnian; Czech; Danish; Hebrew; Hungarian; Khmer; Kinyarwanda; Lao; Norwegian; Portuguese; Serbian; Siswati; Swahili; Swedish; Thai; Vietnamese

Language A: Language and Literature

Dutch; English; German; Chinese; Spanish

Worldwide

Average IB Diploma Score

36.7

30.1

UWCSEA Dover

2. Language B or ab initio

English B (HL); French B; French ab initio; German B; Mandarin B; Mandarin ab initio; Spanish B; Spanish ab initio

3. Individuals and Societies

Business and Management; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Economics; Geography; History; Information Technology in a Global Society; Philosophy; Psychology; Science, Technology and Society (SL)

4. Experimental Sciences

Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Design Technology; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Physics; Science, Technology and Society (SL); Sports, Exercise and Health Science (SL)

5. Mathematics

Further Mathematics (HL); Mathematics; Mathematical Studies (SL)

6. The Arts

Film (SL); Music; Theatre Arts; Visual Arts

Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 40–45

26.2% 6.8% 44.8%

35–39

18.1% 22.1% 28.3%

30–34

25–29

7.1% 31.6%

<25 0%

15.2%

UWCSEA Dover

SAT and ACT scores Worldwide

23.9% UWCSEA Dover students received a bilingual diploma

18

189 members of the Class of 2015 took the SAT and 57 took the ACT. All scores, including those from non-native English speakers, are included. Range of middle 50% SAT Critical Reading

560

630

700

620

SAT Mathematics SAT Writing ACT

Mean

590 25

27.8

31

682 652

760 720


IBDP average score by subject

Group 1

Worldwide

UWCSEA Dover

English A: Language and Literature HL

57

English A: Language and Literature SL

103

English A: Literature HL

75

English A: Literature SL

58

Chinese A: Language and Literature SL

10

German A: Language and Literature SL

5

Japanese A: Literature HL

5

Japanese A: Literature SL

7

Korean A: Literature HL

4

Korean A: Literature SL

Group 4

Group 3

Group 2

English B HL

21 16

French B SL

49

Group 5

6

Chinese B: Mandarin SL

65

Spanish ab initio SL

34

Spanish B SL

50

Business and Management HL

29

Business and Management SL

10

Economics HL

112

Economics SL

35

Environmental Systems and Societies SL

25

Geography HL

33

Geography SL

9

History HL

56

History SL

15

Philosophy HL

20

Psychology HL

89

Psychology SL

25

Science, Technology, and Society SL

23

Biology HL

79

Biology SL

53

Chemistry HL

78

Chemistry SL

34

Computer Science HL

17

Design Technology HL

8

Physics HL

83

Physics SL

24 8

Further Mathematics HL

15

Mathematical Studies SL

70

Mathematics HL

86

Mathematics SL

166

Film HL Music HL

students

9

French B HL Mandarin ab initio SL

322

28

French ab initio SL

Sports, Exercise and Health Science SL

Group 6

No. of candidates

14 7

Theatre HL

33

Visual Arts HL

26 19


EAST Complete IB course listing for the Class of 2015

Pass rate

Courses are offered at either Higher or Standard Level unless noted below.

97.7%

79.3%

UWCSEA East

1.

Worldwide

Language A: Literature Taught

English; Hindi (SL); Japanese; Korean; Spanish

School Supported SelfTaught (SL)

Albanian; Croatian; Dutch; French; German; Indonesian; Khmer; Norwegian; Portuguese; Russian; Thai; Urdu

Language A: Language and Literature

English; Chinese

Average IB Diploma Score

36.1

30.1

UWCSEA East

Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 40–45

3. Individuals and Societies

Economics; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Geography; History; Philosophy (SL); Psychology

4. Experimental Sciences

Biology; Chemistry; Design Technology; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Physics

5. Mathematics

Further Mathematics (HL); Mathematics; Mathematical Studies (SL)

6. The Arts

Music; Theatre; Visual Arts

26.8% 6.8% 36.9%

35–39

18.1% 26.1% 28.3%

30–34

9.7%

25–29

31.6%

<25 0.6%

15.2%

UWCSEA East

SAT and ACT scores Worldwide

30.7% UWCSEA East students received a bilingual diploma 20

2. Language B or ab initio

English B (HL); French B; French ab initio (SL); Chinese B; Chinese ab initio (SL); Spanish B; Spanish ab initio (SL)

94 members of the Class of 2015 took the SAT and 45 took the ACT. All scores, including those from non-native English speakers, are included. Range of middle 50% SAT Critical reading

550

609

SAT Writing ACT

680

600

SAT Mathematics 560 24 26.5

670 624

30

Mean

750 700


IBDP average score by subject

Group 1

Worldwide

UWCSEA East

English A: Language and Literature HL

29

English A: Language and Literature SL

45

English A: Literature HL

29

English A: Literature SL

63

Chinese A - Language and Literature SL

Group 2

Hindi A: Literature SL

Group 3 Group 4 Group 5

4

176 students

13

Japanese A: Literature HL

4

Korean A: Literature SL

4

Chinese B: Mandarin HL

5

Chinese B: Mandarin SL

21

English B HL

10

French ab initio SL

13

French B SL

25

Mandarin ab initio SL

Group 6

No. of candidates

9

Spanish ab initio SL

30

Spanish B SL

19

Economics HL

93

Economics SL

16

Environ. Systems and Societies SL

23

Geography HL

23

Geography SL

5

History HL

30

History SL

5

Psychology HL

41

Psychology SL

19

Biology HL

53

Biology SL

28

Chemistry HL

45

Chemistry SL

19

Design Technology HL

16

Design Technology SL

4

Physics HL

43

Physics SL

11

Mathematical Studies SL

24

Mathematics HL

66

Mathematics SL

86

Music HL

7

Theatre HL

9

Theatre SL

4

Visual Arts HL

18

Visual Arts SL

7 21


DESTINATIONS OF CLASS OF 2015 USA – 38.3%

Gap Year – 5.0% National Service – 10.0% Asia – 4.0% Europe – 4.3%

College

Australia – 5.0% Canada – 10.2%

Gap Year – 4%

USA – 40%

National Service – 10%

USA – 35%

National Service – 7% Gap Year – 10%

Other – 0.6% Australia – 3.7% Europe – 4%

UK – 23.2%

Asia – 3% Dover Campus

East Campus

Australia – 5%

Asia – 4.6%

Europe – 5%

Canada – 7.7% UK – 25.4%

UNIVERSITY ACCEPTANCES Below is a list of universities that UWCSEA students were accepted to between 2013 and 2015. Asia Chulalongkorn University, Thailand Hong Kong University of Science and Technology International Christian University, Japan International Medical University, Malaysia 22

Keio University, Japan Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea National University of Singapore Nihon University, Japan Nirma University, India NYU Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates NYU Shanghai, China Okayama University, Japan Osaka University, Japan Seoul National University, Korea Singapore Management University

Canada – 15%

UK – 20%

Sophia University, Japan The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology Universitas Indonesia University of Hong Kong University of Tokyo, Japan Waseda University, Japan Yale-NUS College, Singapore Yonsei University, South Korea Australia/New Zealand Bond University Monash University


Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology The University of Queensland University of Melbourne University of New South Wales University of Newcastle University of Sydney University of Western Australia Canada Carleton University Concordia University HEC Montreal McGill University McMaster University Simon Fraser University University of British Columbia University of Calgary University of Toronto University of Victoria University of Waterloo Western University York University Central/South America Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Europe Amsterdam University College, Netherlands Delft University of Technology, Netherlands École hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Netherlands IE University, Spain Leiden University, Netherlands Les Roches International School of Hotel Management, Switzerland Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Sciences Po, France The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Denmark Trinity College Dublin, Ireland Università Bocconi, Italy University College Cork, Ireland University College Maastricht, Netherlands

University College Utrecht, Netherlands United Kingdom Anglia Ruskin University Arts University Bournemouth British College of Osteopathic Medicine Brunel University Cardiff University Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design City University Durham University Falmouth University Hull York Medical School Imperial College London Keele University King’s College London Lancaster University London College of Communication London School of Economics Loughborough University Middlesex University Newcastle University Queen Mary, University of London Royal Holloway, University of London School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London St George’s, University of London The Glasgow School of Art The Royal Veterinary College University College London University of Bath University of Birmingham University of Brighton University of Bristol University of Cambridge University of East Anglia University of Edinburgh University of Exeter University of Glasgow University of Hull University of Kent University of Leeds University of Liverpool University of Manchester University of Northumbria University of Nottingham

University of Oxford University of Reading University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of St. Andrews University of Stirling University of Surrey University of Sussex University of the Arts London University of Warwick University of Westminster University of York United States of America American University Amherst College Babson College Bard College Barnard College Bennington College Bentley University Berklee College of Music Boston College Boston University Brandeis University Brown University Bryn Mawr College California College of the Arts, San Francisco Carleton College Carnegie Mellon University Chapman University Claremont McKenna College Colby College Colgate University Colorado College Columbia University Cornell University Dartmouth College Davidson College Drexel University Duke University Earlham College Emerson College Emory University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Grinnell College 23


Harvard University Harvey Mudd College Haverford College Indiana University at Bloomington Johns Hopkins University Johnson & Wales University Kenyon College Lehigh University Lewis & Clark College Loyola Marymount University Luther College Lynn University Macalester College Manchester University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Methodist University Middlebury College New York University North Carolina State University Northeastern University Northwestern University Oberlin College Occidental College Pace University, New York City Parsons The New School for Design Pennsylvania State University Pepperdine University Pitzer College Pomona College Pratt Institute Princeton University Purdue University Rhode Island School of Design Rice University Rockford University Sarah Lawrence College School of the Art Institute of Chicago School of Visual Arts Scripps College Skidmore College Smith College St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College St. Lawrence University St. Olaf College Stanford University Swarthmore College Syracuse University 24

The College of Idaho The George Washington University The New School - Eugene Lang College The University of Texas, Austin Tufts University Union College University of California, Berkeley University of California, Los Angeles University of California, San Diego University of Chicago University of Colorado Boulder University of Florida University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign University of Maryland, College Park University of Michigan University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Notre Dame University of Oklahoma University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Richmond University of Rochester University of San Francisco University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin University of Virginia University of Washington Utah State University Vassar College Washington and Lee University Washington University in St. Louis Wellesley College Wesleyan University Westminster College Wheaton College MA Whitman College Willamette University Williams College Yale University


25


26


(I)GCSE JUNE 2015 IN NUMBERS In June 2015, students on both campuses completed the (I)GCSE exams. Results of the exams from both campuses are below.

Dover Campus %A* UWCSEA %A* ISC†

East Campus 45.1

30.5 %A* ISC†

32.9 74.7

%A*–A UWCSEA

%A*–A UWCSEA

60.8

%A*–A ISC

%A*–A ISC 97.7

%A*–C UWCSEA

%A*–C UWCSEA

90.1

%A*–C ISC

32.9

%A*–C ISC

58.0 60.8 96.3 90.1

ISC = Independent Schools Council

Ten-year comparison This chart shows a comparison between Independent Schools Council (ISC) schools and UWCSEA Dover over a ten year period, from 2006 to 2015. It also shows the East Campus 2013–2015 results. 100

% A*–C DOVER % A*–C EAST % A*–C ISC

80

% A*–A DOVER % A*–A EAST % A*–A ISC

60

% A* DOVER % A* EAST % A* ISC

40

20

2006

2009

2012

2015

27


OTHER ACADEMIC HIGHLIGHTS During 2014/2015, teams of teachers and educational leaders, with the support of the articulation project team, worked collaboratively to develop standards, essential understandings and benchmarks for individual subjects so that learning goals build logically in each grade from K1 to IB Diploma. The teams also devoted time to identifying where the UWCSEA profile (qualities and skills that should be developed in students) can be explicitly planned for through the academic curriculum and other elements of the learning programme. Finally, there was a strong focus on developing the online IT system to underpin planning, teaching, assessing, recording and reporting to parents. This system also supports teachers in collaboratively building units of study for students, and in finding meaningful connections between all 5 elements of the programme in an intentional way. The articulation project has 3 distinct phases, outlined below

PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

During Phase 1, under the leadership of the Articulation Team Leader and with the support of Articulation Team, the rationale, standards, strands, essential understandings, benchmarks and elaborations are developed. Decisions within this phase are led by the Articulation Team Leader with the support of school leaders and teachers from both campuses. By the end of this phase, school leaders and the Articulation Team agree that the curriculum is ready to be piloted. AÂ timeline for the collection of feedback during Phase 2 is established.

During Phase 2, under the leadership of the Curriculum Director on each campus, school leaders manage processes for piloting and collecting feedback on the written curriculum from their teaching teams. The Articulation Team Leader manages the process of analysing the feedback and reaching College consensus on amendments to the written curriculum with the support of and the Articulation Team. By the end of Phase 2, the written curriculum has been piloted on both campuses, amended, and there is consensus that no significant changes are required at this time.

During Phase 3, under the leadership of the Curriculum Director on each campus, school leaders oversee the full implementation of the written curriculum. School leaders continue to oversee the collection of feedback through the unit reflection process to inform future review.

Teacher professional development included a continued focus on integrating technology to improve student learning; assessment; leadership training, particularly for middle leaders; cognitive coaching; and differentiation in the classroom (ensuring all students are being challenged and supported appropriately).

28


THE ARTS IN THE ACADEMIC CURRICULUM Much of the artistic pursuit at the College takes place through the activities element of the learning programme. However, the emphasis on music, drama, dance, film and visual arts in the Academic programme ensures that students who are strongly interested in this area can participate deeply in the artistic process. For further information on the Arts, please see the Activities section of this report.

DRAMA As usual, the drama departments on both campuses supported students through a series of performance opportunities, workshops, collaborations across departments and Artist in Residence programmes.

Dover Campus

East Campus

• Grade 12 Independent Project Performances

• Frantic Assembly Artist-in-Residence High School

• Jennifer Hartley, Theatre Versus Oppression – Theatre of Oppression Workshops with Grade 11 and 12 Theatre students, culminating in a Forum Theatre session with abused domestic helpers from H.O.M.E

• Jennifer Hartley, Theatre Versus Oppression – Artist-in-Residence High School

• Physical Theatre and Butoh workshops with Mark Hill

• Matt Goffrey – Artist-in-Residence Middle School

• High School Dance Platform

• Grade 11 IB Theatre Production ‘The Arabian Nights’

• GCSE Drama Group Performance Exams

• Grade 12 Independent Project Performances

• FIB Showcase

• Grade 10 GCSE Unit 3 productions

29


MUSIC The Music programmes on both campuses continued to challenge students to a high participation and performance level. On Dover, the annual OPUS concert, featuring over 400 students, gave students in Middle and High Schools the opportunity to perform in this iconic venue, while the Finale and Encore concerts, at the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music provided further opportunities for performance at professional venues. The various ensembles continued to perform at concerts on campus throughout the year. A sellout performance of West Side Story brought together the music and drama departments and saw very high standards of music-making and theatre performance from students. On East, the first ever High School music Urinetown was a strong collaboration between the Music and Drama departments. A focus on transition between Grades 5 and 6 and Grades 8 and 9, through the implementation of transitional units, supported continuity of programme for students. In Primary School, the team conducted a full review of all Unit Plans, realigning and writing new units of study, while the introduction of the Grade 3 Strings Programme and the Grade 4 Clarineo Programme provided every student with the opportunity to try out an instrument for 8 weeks. Ten students from the Class of 2015 graduated with Music as a subject in the IB Diploma, a significant increase on 2 from the Class of 2014.

30

Also on East, the music programme continued to be integrated into the Service programme. The music team visited Kampot to support Epic Arts in building, resourcing and developing their recording studio, and delivered workshops to teachers and students at Bali Bridges. Local services Drum Therapy and Music Therapy allowed students to use their musical skills in working with Alzheimer’s patients. Students in Primary and Middle Schools participated in Asian Arts and Culture Week, with a focus on Singapore.

VISUAL ARTS The Visual Arts programme continues to stimulate students to a level of creativity and artistry that is unusual in schools: 44 students took Higher Level Visual Arts for the IB Diploma, scoring an average of 5.8 (worldwide average is 4.85). Several graduates are now attending Rhode Island School of Design, consistently ranked as one of the top three Art schools in the USA, while a record 6 students have gone on to study Architecture. Dover students participated in Art Stage Singapore, the leading Asian art fair, while on East Campus the Artist-in-Residence programme gave students the opportunity to work with professional artists, including Kel Win, Young Artist of the Year in 2014. The purchase of a high-end laser cutter and second kiln further expanded student creativity.


LEARNING PROGRAMME: ACTIVITIES The College offers an extensive Activities programme to students from Grade 2 onwards. The goal of the programme is to provide students with the opportunity to pursue their passions and develop skills and qualities that they can transfers to other areas of their learning. The Activities programme is roughly divided into sports, arts (music, drama, visual art), leadership, clubs and special interests. Some statistical highlights from the 2014/2015 school year can be seen below.

TOTAL NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES Leadership Music ensembles Clubs Sports and fitness

125 80 281 1,028

2,157 94 71 40 438

Enrichment

Visual and performing arts Academic extension

Sports teams

2,909 2,311

Dover students involved in activities

East students involved in activities

31


PARTICIPATION The graph below shows the average number of activities that students in each grade took throughout the year. It indicates that students in all grades are taking full advantage of the offerings from the Activities programme.

9

10

Activities at Dover Campus

8 7

Activities at East Campus

9

8 7

6

9

9

7

5

5

5

7

7

6

6

5 4

4

5

6

5

5

5

3

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

G11

G12

K1

K2

G1

3

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

G11

G12

SPORTS

818

students participating in gymnastics

958

students participating in swimming

REPRESENTATIVE SPORTS OFFERED ON DOVER AND EAST l al ee yb isb lle Fr Vo ate ) tim rls Ul (gi h uc To s i nn g Te min im Sw all b ft So g s) n ili oy Sa (b ) y ls gb gir Ru ll ( ba et N y ke cs i oc H ast n m Gy ll ba ys) o ot Fo t (b y e r ick nt Cr cou s os Cr ing b im ll Cl ba et n sk Ba into dm Ba tics e hl At 32


THE ARTS Dover ensembles Senior Orchestra Symphonic Band Jazz Band HS Percussion Ensemble Cantabile Singers Concert Strings The Band Brass Band MS Woodwind Ensemble Intermediate Jazz Band Camerata MS Percussion Ensemble iPad Ensemble MS Gamelan Arioso Junior Band Beginner Band Recorder Ensemble Grade 5 Choir Junior Singers Grade 2 Singers Junior Strings Singing Playground African Drumming Activity Happy Feet Club Intermediate Band

East ensembles High School Orchestra Sonos Colla Voce Coloratura Pamberi All Stars Chimanga Marimba Chiongotere Mbira Djembefolaw East Community Singers High School Samba Band Middle School Orchestra East Vocal Project and Singers Karibu Marimba Express Middle School Jazz Band Middle School Jazz Combo Middle School Caribe Samba Band Guitar ensemble Kutandara Marimba Ensemble (3) Strings United Band Together Ukulele Grooves Rhythmical Madness Chamber Ensemble Global Voices EPIC Samba Bali Bridges Gamelan (2) PS Music Ambassadors

335 1,058 students taking Associated Board Exams

students participating in the Instrumental Teaching Programme across the College Instruments offered through ITP • Woodwind – recorder, flute, clarinet, saxophone, oboe, bassoon, clarineo • Brass – trumpet, cornet, horn, tenor horn, baritone, trombone, tuba, euphonium • Strings – violin, viola, cello, double bass • Percussion including drumkit • Voice • Guitar – classical, electric, acoustic • Bass guitar • Ukulele • Mbira • North Indian Harmonium, Table and Vocals • Piano – Classical, Popular and Jazz

Drama productions across the College Title

Number of students

Title

Number of students

The Breakfast Club

Student-directed – 12 students

Silence – Student Dance Show

50 students

UN Night

350 students; proceeds to Theatre Versus Oppression

In Ascendance

25 students; student-written and directed

White Rabbit, Red Rabbit

2 students

Village of Idiots

35 students

The Revue

25 students

Hiroshima, Crucible of Light

50 students

The Chrysalids

40 students

The Rock Show

50 students

Urinetown the Musical

50 students

Hurry Up, I’m Dreaming (Middle School Dance Show)

30 students

The Chairs

8 students

Theatre Sports

25 students

Death and the Maiden

8 students

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

40 students; Grade 12 students as Assistant Directors

No Exit

10 students

Alice in Wonderland

70 students 33


LEARNING PROGRAMME: OUTDOOR EDUCATION The Outdoor Education programme is a powerful part of the UWCSEA experience, providing students from Grade 1 to Grade 12 with opportunities to develop their independence, teamwork and resilience. During 2014/2015, the outdoor education programme gave experiential learning opportunities to all students from Grade 1 to Grade 9. Students in Grade 11 participated in Project Week.

OPTIONAL TRIPS Middle School New Zealand Adventure Skiing and Snowboarding in Verbier Tabitha History Housebuilding Vietnam Service and Curriculum Trip South Africa and Swaziland Service and Curriculum Trip Spain Cultural Immersion Tour China Cultural Immersion Tour France Cultural Immersion Tour

STUDENT HOURS SPENT OVERSEAS

STAFF/PARENT HOURS SPENT OVERSEAS

321,072

30,528

Dover students hours

Dover staff/parent hours

234,420

31,344

East students hours

East staff/parent hours

136,104

20,544

Dover and East students hours

Dover and East staff/parent hours

691,416

82,416

College hours

College hours

6,605

287

35

times a student participated in overseas trips

overseas trips run through the College iPal system

cross-campus trips

34

High School Sea Kayaking in Sibu Ladakh, India Langkawi Adventure, Malaysia Eco Dive Sulawesi, Indonesia Leeuwin Tallship, Australia Sichuan/Tibetan Culture Trek, China Trekking, Bhutan Multi-sport, Taiwan Tioman Multi-Activity Adventure Malaysia China Climb Biodiversity Research Programme, Borneo Puteri Mahsuri Expedition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tall Ship Sailing, Malaysia Horse riding, Perth, Western Australia Outback Australia Mountain Biking ex Bangkok, Thailand Bali Green Camp, Indonesia Trekking, Hong Kong Coast to Coast, Bali, Indonesia Trail Cycling in Remote Cambodia Wales Multi Activity Adventure, UK Idaho Whitewater Rafting, USA Chamonix, France New Zealand Winter Adventure


COMPULSORY EXPEDITIONS

G1 Sleepover in the classroom

G2 Trip to Singapore Zoo

G3 Riders Lodge in Malaysia

G4 Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G5 Green Camp, Bali in Indonesia (Dover) Taman Negara in Malaysia (East)

G6 Tioman Island in Malaysia

G7 Sea kayaking trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G8 Chiang Mai in Thailand

G9 The opportunity to join various trips and expeditions from trekking in Nepal to tall ship sailing (listed opposite)

FIB Endau River in Malaysia

G11 Project Week 35


be

r of

countrie s ited

32

vis

Nu m

COUNTRIES VISITED THROUGH THE OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAMME

Australia, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Fiji, France, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Qatar, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United Kingdom, United States of America, Vietnam

STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENTS 2014/2015 By 2014, the Outdoor Forum for South East Asian Schools (OFFSEAS), begun by UWCSEA in 2011, included schools and organisations from around the region and a conference will be hosted by UWCSEA in May 2015. The seven-year longitudinal study, designed to evaluate the outdoor education programme, and better understand the impact of the programme on our students’ overall learning and development while at the College, began in 2014/2015. The study is conducted in conjunction with researchers from Oregon State University (OSU), who are experts in the fields of experiential education and social psychology. It is expected that the study will provide valuable information on how the Outdoor Education programme contributes both to UWCSEA’s educational goal and to the development in students of the skills and qualities outlined in the UWCSEA profile.

NATIONAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (NYAA) The NYAA aims to encourage young people to develop personal qualities of self-reliance, perseverance and a sense of responsibility to themselves and to society. In this way it fits very well with the Outdoor Education element of the learning programme.

74 91

students taking gold award

students taking silver award 36


LEARNING PROGRAMME: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL EDUCATION The Personal and Social Education (PSE) programme helps to ensure that students feel secure and valued, as well as encouraged in their learning, growth and social development. Through the programme students explore how they are connecting to their learning, friends, family, technology and the outside world. Self-confidence and self-esteem are built through all aspects of the learning programme, and their interactions at the College contribute to a student’s personal and social education, but making PSE a unique strand within the programme ensures that time is dedicated to this important part of the student experience. All members of staff have a responsibility for the well-being of students. The learning support and counselling teams are central and they work closely with teachers to ensure that students are supported both within and outside of the classroom. During the 2014/2015 year, the rationale and standards for the PSE curriculum from K1 to Grade 12 were examined, in order to map concepts across a grade and vertically across each school section. Broadly, the content can be classified into three overarching concepts: individual wellbeing; relationships and community (interpersonal) well-being; and student ability to engage with global issues (global well-being). These concepts are revisited each year in a spiral structure, increasing the understanding and skills of students at age-appropriate developmental levels. Dover Campus continues to work with Generation Safe, to ensure robust e-safety practices and policies

are in place. The College has Silver Status within Generation Safe. This focus on digital citizenship as part of the PSE programme ensures that the conversations are not about the technology, but rather are concerned with how students manage themselves in a digital world. The Generation Safe programme focuses on four main aspects of e-safety: Policy; Education; Infrastructure; and Accountability. Staff took part in a two day workshop Citizenship & Resilience in the Digital Age-a Common Sense Approach, led by Robyn Treyvaud from Cyber Safe Kids. A number of staff are now accredited as Digital Citizenship Certified Educators and came away with ideas for how to improved Digital Citizenship lessons in classrooms and across the school. Alongside this work, there was an increasing awareness of the importance of student and staff well-being and resilience, and the complexities of developing these within the UWCSEA community.

PSE IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS The High School on Dover was focused on finalising the rationale, standards and benchmarks for PSE and mapping new units of study for the 2015/2016 school year. To support this significant development, a new Head of PSE was appointed to develop approaches and resources for the new programme. In addition, external speakers were brought in to help launch the programme, including Michael Carr-Gregg and Dan Haessler, who both provided sessions for staff and for parents. The Vice Principals (Pastoral) attended the Positive Schools conference, and the Vice

Principal (Pastoral) for Grades 11 and 12 worked with the Ministry of Defence National Service ACCORD initiative, to support international school communities in understanding more about National Service. On East Campus, teachers and leaders were also focused on ensuring the PSE rationale, standards and benchmarks were turned into a series of units that would support students in their learning. In addition, the campus introduced an enquiry-based approach to learning in Grades 9 and 10, grounded in Philosophy for Children, while the Grade 12 independent living unit adjusted emphasis to deal with issues surrounding sexual violence and consent at university. 37


38


PSE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOLS On Dover, there was a continued emphasis during the 2014/2015 year on community-building in the Middle School. The House System, piloted during 2013/2014, was fully adapted, with all students and staff allocated to one of six Houses, named after another college in the UWC movement: Adriatic, Atlantic, Pearson, Mostar, Nordic and Waterford. The aims of the House System are: • To enhance interactions across Grades 6–8 • To promote house spirit and a sense of camaraderie, which directly promotes Middle School spirit • To provide additional leadership opportunities for students • To promote a supportive spirit amongst different grade levels • To make links to the qualities and skills in the UWCSEA profile • To broaden access/participation to drama, art and sports Building on the previous years success, extra House meetings and the inaugural House Battle of the Bands was introduced. The House Maths Challenge was held again in June, while the Days of Sport were a blaze of colour and excitement as students and staff supported their House with energy and enthusiasm. The Grade 7 Community Day in September gave students the opportunity to spend a whole day exploring themes of personal discovery, personal diversity, community building and community enrichment. Dannielle Miller, a leading expert in adolescent development, worked with Grade 7 and

Grade 8 girls, discussing the challenges of friendship and critically evaluating the messages they receive every day, such as negative stereotyping, sexism, the fixation on being thin and so on. Boys spent their time with Martin Harper, also taking part in a ‘myth-busting for boys’ workshop, as they examined the often unrealistic standards set by society. On East Campus, the PSE programme is delivered through Mentor Time, Middle School Expeditions, Life Skills and Be The Change. During 2014/2015, Heads of Grades were trained in Philosophy for Children in order to further develop students in their critical thinking skills and self-awareness. In Grade 6, Double Mentor time was implemented to provide increased support to students during Primary-Middle School transition, while combined mentor activities with Grade 8 and Grade 9 students supported students in their transition to High School. Dannielle Miller and Martin Harper also visited East Campus to work with students on developing strong self esteem and self identity, while Noriko Anderson visited to support the Sexuality and Relationships unit. An ongoing focus on digital citizenship resulted in a new unit on Responsible Digital Communities for all Middle School students.

PSE IN THE INFANT AND JUNIOR SCHOOLS On Dover, there was further focus on communicating progress in PSE, and working with parents to ensure that links between home and school were strong in this critical area of the learning programme. In Infant

School, the central role of PSE in the development and learning of the College’s youngest students continued to be supported through the You Can Do It programme in K1 and the Bucket Fillers and Bully Busters/Cool Calm Kids programmes. In Junior School, assemblies were conducted in line with the new PSE benchmarks, while circle time and morning meetings provided an effective tool for discussing specific PSE topics, while helping to develop a sense of community within the classroom. Each grade has dedicated PSE units of study and many of the reading and writing workshops drew on elements of the PSE curriculum to create authentic cross curricula links. On East Campus, there was further development of Mindfulness and Philosophy for Children. A group of staff met weekly around Mindfulness and a number followed online training with Mindful Schools, while still more received Level 1 and Level 2 training in Philosophy for Children. Teachers embedded mindfulness tools as a normal part of classroom life, with many Infant classes having ‘breathing buddies’—small toys to watch as they breathe. East Campus also hosted the inaugural Positive Schools Singapore conference. The Positive Schools organisation is based in Australia and runs conferences for schools, focused on mental health and well-being. Working on this project gave students and parents the opportunity to focus on the relationships they form as part of their learning, and to identify that these social factors are the foundation for making the process of education positive and enjoyable.

39


LEARNING PROGRAMME: SERVICE UWC South East Asia has service at the heart of its mission, and service activities are a vital part of the learning programme. There are three levels of service: College; local; and global (incorporating Global Concerns, the Initiative for Peace and Gap Year). Below are some service statistics for the 2014/2015 school year. Number of Global Concerns

90

Dover Campus

199

109

East Campus

Dover and East Campus combined

Number of Local Service partners

54

Dover Campus

82

136

71

112

East Campus

Dover and East Campus combined

Number of College Services

41

Dover Campus

East Campus

Dover and East Campus combined

Money raised by students for the College Service programme

Dover

$826,574

East

+ Total

$465,765

$1,292,339 40


41


BREAKDOWN OF FUNDRAISING FOR SERVICE

$273,774

$927,334

SEALinks

Global Concerns

$5,651

College

Initiative for Peace

$576,814

$198,965 SEALinks

$651

$350,520

$74,810

Global Concerns

SEALinks

$5,000

Dover

Initiative for Peace

Global Concerns

East

Initiative for Peace

DISBURSEMENT

42

u nt Co

te d

through

20

G al Concerns

All money raised at the College is independently audited annually.

or

lob

The money raised by SEALinks, the parent groups who volunteer and fundraise for organisations in need of support in Singapore and overseas, is disbursed directly by them.

ri e s s u pp

Students from the Global Concerns groups disburse money directly to the NGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s they are raising money for. They undertake this task with their supervisor, with the Head of Global Concerns having oversight. Each has their own bank account, so the students know their individual totals.

Brazil, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Thailand, Vietnam, Zambia


PROJECT WEEK

Dover

Every year, Grade 11 students are presented with the challenge to research, plan, organise, and then carry out an independent low budget trip to a place where they can make a difference.

331

East

students participated

177

students participated

14

75

countries visited

groups formed

9

43

countries visited

groups formed

60

organisations helped

39

organisations helped

GAP YEAR PROGRAMME The gap year programme offers students the opportunity to put UWC values into practice in Southeast Asia before going to university. The Class of 2015 were involved in the following projects: Project

Number of students

Chiang Mai BABSEA CLE in Thailand

3

Child Workers in Nepal

2

Gili Eco Trust, Lombok

2

Equitable Cambodia

2

Sustainable Cambodia

1

Bairo Pite Clinic, Dili, Timor-Leste

1

Expeditions

12

Lihuk Panaghiusa, Cebu, Philippines

4

Akshara Foundation, MUWCI, Pune, India Green Shoots, Hoi An, Vietnam Own Project

1 2

10 30

Gap Year projects

students involved 43


66 languages spoken across the College 44

47

languages spoken at Dover Campus

52

languages spoken at East Campus


OUR COMMUNITY The UWC South East Asia community is a vibrant, truly international group of individuals, united in a common purpose. This section of the report provides some statistics and information about our community.

ENROLMENT 2014/2015

TRANSITION

Dover Campus: 2,988 336 325 265

88

88

K1

K2

110

133

156

176

199

284 287 278

5.3%

221

students leaving Dover Campus

42 G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

East Campus: 2,401

110 110

133

156 156

178 179

199 201 197

217 185

182 175

23 K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

10.1% students leaving East Campus

College total: 5,389 466

481

518

504

500

463

420 354 289

378

7.4%

312

243 198 198

leavers across the College

65 K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

45


NATIONALITY SPREAD Others – 23.66% (81 nationalities)

India – 20.08%

91

France – 2.39% Malaysia – 2.67% Canada – 2.71% Korea – 3.66% Japan – 3.84%

USA – 8.85%

Singapore – 7.18%

Australia – 7.68%

Others – 23.76% (71 nationalities)

Malaysia – 2.44% Canada – 2.51% Netherlands – 3.15% Japan – 3.45%

India – 18.14%

81

USA – 8.50%

Australia – 7.33%

Singapore – 8.50%

India – 22.49%

Others – 22.36% (60 nationalities)

Malaysia – 2.96% Canada – 2.96%

UK – 17.97%

nationalities in Dover Campus

Korea – 4.25%

France – 2.58% Korea – 2.92%

UK – 17.28%

nationalities in College

70

nationalities in East Campus

UK – 16.41%

Japan – 4.33% Singapore – 5.62% Australia – 8.12%

46

USA – 9.25%


BOARDERS

27%

boarders who are scholars

182

162

Dover Campus

East Campus

344 College

122

Number of boarders

110

62 51

42 14

33 15

14 2

8 6

G7

G8

College

28

G9

21

60

59

G11

G12

11 18

G10

Dover Campus

10

FIB

East Campus 47


OUR COMMUNITY: SCHOLARS In 2014/2015, the UWCSEA scholarship programme supported 95 scholars from 45 countries. Some scholars are selected by the College directly, but many are selected through their country National Committees. The National Committees is a network of volunteers, who operate in over 145 countries worldwide. The UWC national committee system selects more than 1,000 students each year from within their countries and territories to attend UWC schools, Americas – 16.3%

colleges and programmes. They organise camps, a range of activities and formal interviews to establish students’ commitment to UWC values and potential to thrive throughout the UWC experience. In some cases, they also raise funds for scholarships for students. Many of the UWCSEA scholars have entered the College through this system. While scholarship students must have the academic ability to meet the

demands of the UWCSEA programme, they are also selected on the basis of their potential to have a positive impact on the local and global community. The College community benefits tremendously from the presence of scholarship students. The diversity of background, culture, socioeconomic status and life experience they bring enriches the everyday life of students, teachers and parents.

Asia – 33.7%

Middle East – 1.1% Oceania – 1.1% nationalities of scholars by region

tr un

Europe – 29.3%

ies represen t

45

by scholars ed

mber of c Nu o

Africa – 18.5%

Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Belarus, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Cambodia, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Guatemala, Hungary, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Italy, Laos, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mexico, Myanmar, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Spain, Swaziland, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vietnam, Zimbabwe 48


Number of scholars

59

36

Dover Campus

East Campus

95 College

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: SCHOLAR PROGRAMME Funding for scholarships is generated through school fees (3.3% (Dover) and 3% (East) of tuition fees are dedicated to the scholarship programme), the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP), corporations, National Committees, parent donations and alumni donations. A total of $6.6 million was given to scholars on both campuses during the 2014/2015 school year.

Dover Campus Alumni – 0.12%

Annual Fund – 1.55% Parents – 2.72% UNP – 3.29% National committee – 4.89%

percentage contribution to the scholarship funding Corporation/major donors – 19.61%

East Campus

Annual Fund – 2.83% National committee – 3.1% Corporation/major donors – 4.25%

Parents – 9.77%

UWCSEA Parental – 80.05%

total financial support

3.3% school fees

UWCSEA Parental – 67.82%

percentage contribution to the scholarship funding

$4.18 million

$2.48 million total financial support

3.0% school fees 49


OUR COMMUNITY: COMMUNITY FEEDBACK 8 are considered neutral; and those who score between 0 and 6 are considered detractors.* The Net Promoter Score is devised by subtracting the number of detractors from the number of advocates (neutrals are ignored). Organisations can score anywhere from -100% (all detractors) to +100% (all advocates). In general organisations score somewhere between -10% and +10% (though this varies between industries).

In 2011/2012, the College embarked on a process of trying to better understand the students, staff and parent experience. Part of this process was an extensive annual survey. As well as asking detailed questions about all aspects of their experience, community members were asked to say how likely they were to recommend the College to friends and family. This recommendation measure is used to understand advocacy levels in communities and businesses, with a view to identifying areas for improvement.

During analysis of the UWCSEA surveys, the main focus is on the comments made and the ideas submitted for improvement. In addition, while many organisations will focus on moving neutral 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s into advocating 9â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the College focus is on those students, parents and staff who are scoring at

Participants are asked how likely they are to recommend an organisation on a scale of 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10. Those who score a 9 or a 10 are considered advocates for the organisation; those who score a 7 or an

the low end of the scale. In a place of learning, it is vital to understand why a student, parent or staff member is having a negative experience, and take steps to improve their situation. The analysis and discussion of the survey is extensive, and a series of action points are put in place each year to respond to the particular points raised. Results of the survey are communicated with parents through emails and forums. Below are some of the highlight results of the 2014/2015 parent survey. * For further information and details of the research that went into devising this scale please see The Ultimate Questions 2.0 by Fred Reichheld, with Rob Markey.

PARENT SURVEY Participation The survey was distributed to 6,993 parents on 28 April 2015. 53 emails bounced and 3,123 surveys were submitted, representing 44.6% of the distribution list. The spread of responses between campuses and school sections, along with the number of students represented is outlined in the table below.

Campus

No. of parents giving feedback

No. of Infant School children represented

No. of Junior School children represented

No. of Middle School children represented

No. of High School children represented

Total no. of children represented*

Dover

1,663

248

535

648

936

2,367

East

1,432

291

527

519

663

2,000

Both

28

6

15

14

20

55

Total

3,155

578

1,111

1,135

1,562

4,386

* Please note that if two parents from the same family respond to the survey, then their children are counted twice.

A percentage of the parents who agreed to be contacted were telephoned by a Principal or the Head of Campus before the end of term. In many cases, the focus was on calling those who had a serious concern, or who had an unusual rating in one of the sections (for example was highly satisfied with all elements of the programme but scored very low on one area). Feedback on these calls was coordinated by the Heads of Campus.

50


Results The overall NPS score for the College from parents was 53%, a very high advocacy score that speaks to the level of commitment to the College among the parent body, and represents the highest score since we began tracking in 2011.

The graphs below show the distribution of responses to the question â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how likely are you to recommend UWCSEA to your friends and family?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; overall for the College and on each campus. College 10

37%

9

24%

8

23%

7

53%

overall NPS for College from parents

8%

6

3%

5

3%

4

1%

3

1%

2 0% 1 0% 0 0%

Dover Campus 10

36%

9

24%

8

24%

7

9%

6

4%

5

3%

4

1%

3

1%

2 0% 1 0% 0 0%

East Campus 10

37%

9

25%

8

23%

7

8%

6

3%

5

3%

4

1%

3 0% 2 0% 1 0% 0 0%

51


Submission of ideas

important (i.e., ranked highly), so that efforts are focused on the areas most important to the community.

parents and selected and ranked, according to the other parents view. This process allows the College to understand those ideas that are both popular (i.e., selected often) and

The survey allowed parents to submit their own ideas on how various aspects of the programme could be improved. These ideas are then viewed by other

Satisfaction with elements of the programme Parents were asked to rate their level of satisfaction with various elements of the programme. The graphs below show the distribution of their responses to the questions:

How satisfied are you with the Academic element of the programme?

How satisfied are you with the Activities element of the programme?

10

10

10%

9

22%

8

33%

7

21%

6

24%

8

31%

7

8%

5

13%

9

17%

6

3%

7%

5

4%

4

1%

4

2%

3

1%

3

1%

2

1%

2

1%

1 0%

1 0%

0 0%

0 0%

How satisfied are you with the Outdoor Education element of the programme?

How satisfied are you with the Personal and Social Education element of the programme?

10

10

17%

9

28%

8

31%

7

13%

6

5%

5

3%

9%

9

20%

8

32%

7

19%

6

11%

5

6%

4

1%

4

1%

3

1%

3

1%

2 0%

2

1%

1 0%

1 0%

0 0%

0 0%

52


How satisfied are you with the Service element of the programme?

How satisfied are you with the quality of teaching at the College?

10

10

13%

9

25%

8

32%

7

16%

6

24%

8

32%

7

7%

5

11%

9

19%

6

5%

8%

5

3%

4

1%

4

1%

3

1%

3

1%

2 0%

2 0%

1 0%

1 0%

0 0%

0 0%

How satisfied are you with the educational leadership?

How happy is your child at school?

10

10

13%

9

26%

8

31%

7

17%

6

7%

5

4%

21%

9

33%

8

27%

7

11%

6

4%

5

2%

4

1%

4

3

1%

3 0%

2

1%

2 0%

1%

1 0%

1 0%

0 0%

0 0%

53


54


BUSINESS REPORT The College has significant business operations and this section of the report provides an overview of Human Resources, Admissions and Finance for the 2014/2015 school year.

BUSINESS REPORT: HUMAN RESOURCES UWCSEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision is to be a leader in international education, with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education. The recruitment and retention of excellent teachers remains central to this vision. The information below provides some statistics about the teaching staff at UWCSEA.

481

full-time teaching staff at the College

87

part-time teaching staff at the College

Dover Campus student teacher ratio

10.6 students

1 teacher

10.3 students

1 teacher

East Campus student teacher ratio

60

posts advertised

3,410

applications received

57

average number of applications per vacancy

55


TRANSITION UWCSEA enjoys an extremely stable teaching environment, with a low transition rate of teachers each year.

319

51

teachers at Dover Campus

268

Part-time teachers

Full-time teachers

249 36

teachers at East Campus

213

Part-time teachers

37

leavers at Dover Campus

Full-time teachers

25

leavers at East Campus

TENURE

7.6

years at Dover Campus

2.1

years at East Campus

Please note that East Campus opened in 2008, while Dover Campus has been open since 1971. 56


FULL-TIME TEACHING STAFF NATIONALITY SPREAD Others – 5.3% (14 nationalities) Netherlands – 1% India – 1.5% China – 1.5% Spain – 1.9% Ireland – 2.1% New Zealand – 7.9%

UK – 49.7%

25

nationalities

USA – 7.9% Canada – 8.9%

Australia – 12.3%

STAFF BREAKDOWN Foundation – 0.6% Boarding – 2.5% Management – 3.0% Administrative staff – 13.8%

Dover Campus

Educational support staff – 30.4%

Academic staff – 49.7%

Foundation – 0.9% Boarding – 1% Management – 3.4% Administrative staff – 8.6%

Educational support staff – 31.7%

East Campus

Academic staff – 54.4%

57


BUSINESS REPORT: ADMISSIONS The Admissions Department is responsible for all aspects of the admission of students to the College. During 2014/2015, the Admissions Department continued to administer a large amount of applications for entry to the College. The introduction of FIB and IB Student Forums as part of the admissions experience for older students was part of a drive to ensure that applicants had a better sense of the reality of life at UWCSEA. Current students were able to provide potential students with an insight into UWCSEA experience, by involving them in group discussions and forums on relevant topics. They were also able to provide the Admissions Department with the

voice of current students during the selection process. At the same time the Department moved towards an earlier offer cycle, in an attempt to reduce anxiety and uncertainty for families during the application cycle. This was supported by a review of communication and information flow between the Schools and the Admissions Department, and an even stronger focus on providing a positive experience to potential families, regardless of the outcome of their applications.

2,366

increase in applications at Dover Campus

applications for August 2015 entry

Dover Campus applications for each available place

58

Three years of online application data facilitated improved and more meaningful statistical analysis and monitoring of the Admissions process. Alongside the external audit, this gave the Admissions Department further information to ensure that the Admissions Policy was being applied appropriately.

The English as an Additional Language (EAL) programme was extended into Junior School at Dover, and the

5%

3.7 applications

Admission Department responded with increasing the amount of testing of students in order to identify those who would benefit from the programme.

1 place

9%

increase in applications at East Campus

East Campus applications for each available place

3.0 applications

1 place


The table below shows the number of Dover Campus applications processed for entry in August 2015. Number of Dover Campus applications processed during August 2014/2015 Dover entry August 2015/2016

K1*

K2**

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11 Total

Old policy applications

8

0

7

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

18

New policy applications

226

4

169

122

122

131

128

141

122

123

147

124

137

1696

Total applications processed for entry

234

4

176

122

122

131

128

142

123

123

148

124

137 1714

Of which duals accounted for

70

0

59

39

37

48

49

54

35

59

94

76

100

720

Of which transfers from East accounted for

0

0

4

2

6

0

7

3

0

0

0

0

0

22

Number of places available

88

4

30

24

30

31

23

34

54

41

23

36

43

461

Total number of applications for each space available

2.7

1.0

5.9

5.1

4.1

4.2

5.6

4.2

2.3

3.0

6.4

3.4

3.2

3.7

Dover only applications for each space available

1.9

1.0

3.9

3.5

2.8

2.7

3.4

2.6

1.6

1.6

2.3

1.3

0.9

2.2

* only 87 K1 places were filled as we had a repeater | ** K2 applications are by invitation only

Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications Dover entry August 2015/2016

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11 Total

Accepted (excluding transfers from East)

87

4

26

26

26

33

19

35

57

45

32

40

43

473

Ineligible

9

0

23

14

19

18

12

12

10

15

32

32

49

245

126

0

118

76

64

72

82

86

47

53

73

33

31

861

Transferred to Dover from East

0

0

4

0

6

0

7

3

0

0

0

0

0

20

Accepted other Campus

6

0

0

0

0

3

2

3

0

1

7

4

5

31

Withdrawn/declined opt out

6

0

5

6

7

5

6

3

9

9

4

15

9

84

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications by percentage Dover entry August 2015/2016

K1

K2

G1

G2

G11 Total

Accepted

37% 100% 15% 21% 21% 25% 15% 25% 46% 37% 22% 32% 31% 28%

Ineligible

4%

0%

13%

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

54%

0%

67% 62% 52% 55% 64% 61% 38% 43% 49% 27% 23% 50%

Transferred to Dover from East

0%

0%

2%

0%

5%

0%

5%

2%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

1%

Accepted other Campus

3%

0%

0%

0%

0%

2%

2%

2%

0%

1%

5%

3%

4%

2%

Withdrawn/declined opt out

3%

0%

3%

5%

6%

4%

5%

2%

7%

7%

3%

12%

7%

5%

11%

16% 14%

9%

8%

8%

12% 22% 26% 36% 14%

LEAVERS

5.3%

percentage of leavers on Dover Campus

3.83 years

average length of stay of leavers Dover Campus 59


The table below shows the number of East Campus applications processed for entry in August 2014. Number of East Campus applications processed during August 2014/2015 East entry August 2015/2016

K1

K2*

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11 Total

Old policy applications

0

0

3

0

1

0

0

1

1

1

2

1

1

11

New policy applications

186

10

137

77

80

97

94

102

67

98

141

103

169

1361

Total applications processed for entry

186

10

140

77

81

97

94

103

68

99

143

104

170 1372

Of which duals accounted for

70

0

59

39

37

48

49

54

35

59

94

76

100

720

Of which transfers from Dover accounted for

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number of places available

110

8

35

32

16

32

23

41

11

16

40

34

65

463

Number of applications for each space available

1.7

1.3

4.0

2.4

5.1

3.0

4.1

2.5

6.2

6.2

3.6

3.1

2.6

3.0

East only applications for each space available

1.1

1.3

2.3

1.2

2.8

1.5

2.0

1.2

3.0

2.5

1.2

0.8

1.1

1.4

* K2 applications are by invitation only

Outcome of processed East Campus applications East entry August 2015/2016

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11 Total

Accepted (excluding transfers from Dover)

110

8

35

34

19

34

24

43

17

21

41

38

67

491

Ineligible

6

0

20

5

11

8

7

15

3

13

31

34

59

212

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

64

2

80

32

44

50

57

42

39

56

67

17

35

585

Transferred to East from Dover

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Accepted other Campus

17

0

6

2

8

2

4

5

8

7

11

3

73

Withdrawn/declined opt out

6

0

5

6

7

5

6

3

9

9

4

15

9

84

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

Outcome of processed East Campus applications by percentage East entry August 2015/2016

K1

K2

G1

G2

G11 Total

Accepted

59% 80% 25% 44% 23% 35% 26% 42% 25% 21% 29% 37% 39% 36%

Ineligible

3%

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

34% 20% 57% 42% 54% 52% 61% 41% 57% 57% 47% 16% 21% 43%

Transferred to East from Dover

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Accepted other Campus

9%

0%

4%

3%

10%

2%

0%

4%

7%

8%

5%

11%

2%

5%

Withdrawn/declined opt out

3%

0%

4%

8%

9%

5%

6%

3%

13%

9%

3%

14%

5%

6%

0%

14%

6%

14%

8%

7%

15%

4%

LEAVERS

10.1% 60

percentage of leavers on East Campus

3.23 years

average length of stay of leavers East Campus

13% 22% 33% 35% 15%


BUSINESS REPORT: FINANCE UWC South East Asia operates three separate financial entities: Dover Campus, East Campus and the UWCSEA Foundation. This section of the report outlines the financial data for the 2014/2015 school year for both

campuses. Financial information for the Foundation can be found in the College Advancement section of this report. The College is a registered charity in Singapore and as such is a nonprofit organisation. However, as part

of due diligence, a small surplus is accrued each year that is put into a reserve. This reserve will allow the College to continue operating for six months in the event of closure due to circumstances beyond our control.

Dover Campus Other contributions – 2% Sundries and other fees – 4% Boarding fees – 4% Income

Central admin – 1% Marketing and Communications – 1% Boarding salary and benefits – 1% Boarding exp – 2% Educational resources – 4% Maintenance and operations – 5% Expenditure Administration salary and benefits – 5% Depreciation – 6% Educational support salary and benefits – 10%

Tuition fees – 90%

Teachers salary and benefits – 65%

East Campus

Other contributions – 1% Sundries and other fees – 5% Boarding fees – 5% Income

Central admin – 1% Marketing and Communications – 1% Boarding salary and benefits – 1% Boarding exp – 3% Educational resources – 4% Depreciation – 4% Administration salary and benefits – 5%

Expenditure

Maintenance and operations – 7% Tuition fees – 89%

Educational support salary and benefits – 9%

Teachers salary and benefits – 65%

61


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION DOVER CAMPUS As of 31 July 2015 2015

2014

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

24,724,032

22,409,787

Trade and other receivables

35,198,899

31,819,762

Total current assets

59,922,931

54,229,549

148,723,508

125,747,548

205,000

205,000

Total non-current assets

148,928,508

125,952,548

Total assets

208,851,439

180,182,097

Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Club membership

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Bank borrowings

32,320,000

10,000,000

Trade and other payables

14,743,105

12,817,160

Deferred income

68,554,216

67,306,720

57,741

57,741

115,675,062

90,181,621

57,619,097

55,515,859

Accumulated surplus

35,557,280

34,484,617

Total equity

93,176,377

90,000,476

208,851,439

180,182,097

Tuition fee deposits Total current liabilities

EQUITY Restricted funds: Development funds General funds:

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

62


EAST CAMPUS As of 31 July 2015 2015

2014

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

57,044,125

50,959,785

Trade and other receivables

29,310,559

30,933,226

Total current assets

86,354,684

81,893,011

Property, plant and equipment

6,562,327

5,499,854

Total assets

92,917,011

87,392,865

Non-current asset

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade and other payables Deferred income Tuition fee deposits

7,258,529

5,375,424

57,358,626

53,431,977

37,270

37,270

64,654,425

58,844,671

1,184,277

4,299,480

Accumulated surplus

27,078,309

24,248,714

Total equity

28,262,586

28,548,194

92,917,011

87,392,865

Total current liabilities

EQUITY Restricted funds: Development funds General funds:

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

63


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME DOVER CAMPUS Year ended 31 July 2015 General funds

Revenue Other income Staff cost

Restricted funds

Total

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

$

$

$

$

$

$

85,803,904

83,703,662

10,203,433

10,058,925

96,007,337

93,762,587

2,911,869

2,896,436

2,911,869

2,896,436

(67,481,897)

(64,902,192)

(67,481,897)

(64,902,192)

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

(5,009,711)

(4,979,894)

(7,599,506)

(7,361,100)

(12,609,217)

(12,340,994)

Other operating expenses

(15,151,502)

(14,914,892)

(337,780)

(26,296)

(15,489,282)

(14,941,188)

Profit before income tax

1,072,663

1,803,120

2,266,147

2,671,529

3,338,810

4,474,649

1,072,663

1,803,120

2,266,147

2,671,529

3,338,810

4,474,649

Income tax Profit for the year, representing total comprehensive income for the year

64


EAST CAMPUS Year ended 31 July 2015 General funds

Revenue

Restricted funds

Total

2015

2014

2015

2014

2015

2014

$

$

$

$

$

$

69,473,893

62,853,282

8,737,097

8,119,328

78,210,990

70,972,610

2,031,830

1,485,545

2,031,830

1,485,545

Staff cost

(52,104,176)

(48,037,239)

(52,104,176)

(48,037,239)

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

(3,079,848)

(2,761,280)

(3,079,848)

(2,761,280)

Other income

Operating lease expense

(11,756,400)

(9,405,120)

(11,756,400)

(9,405,120)

Other operating expenses

(13,492,104)

(12,516,160)

(95,900)

(55,941)

(13,588,004)

(12,572,101)

Profit before income tax

2,829,595

1,024,148

(3,115,203)

(1,341,733)

(285,608)

(317,585)

2,829,595

1,024,148

(3,115,203)

(1,341,733)

(285,608)

(317,585)

Income tax Profit for the year, representing total comprehensive income for the year

65


66


COLLEGE ADVANCEMENT The Department of College Advancement comprises the UWCSEA Foundation, which is the fundraising arm of the College, and Alumni Relations, which helps us to stay connected to former students, staff and families.

FOUNDATION The aim of the UWCSEA Foundation is to support the College in its ambition to become a leader in international education. The Foundation was established in 2008 and has since raised in excess of $12.4 million. The Foundation is making a difference in three key areas: 1. Scholarship programme: enhancing diversity where the goal is to provide 135 scholarship places by 2020 2. Environmental Sustainability: supporting the College in its commitment to making environmental stewardship a significant part of every studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education 3. Excellence in Teaching and Learning: contributing to our investment in teachers and enhancing educational programmes to ensure UWCSEA provides an unparalleled learner-focused experience in all five elements of the programme 3,500,000

600

3,000,000

$2,637,519

$2,496,994

$2,775,418 $2,743,673 519

2,500,000 2,000,000

$1,728,387

391

1,500,000 1,000,000

289

286

2010/2011

2011/2012

435

500

Total donations Number of unique adult donors (excluding graduating class donors)

400

300

500,000 0

95

scholars

2012/2013

2013/2014

2014/15

200

45

countries

67


FOUNDATION FINANCIAL REPORT OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 2014/2015

TOTAL DONATIONS IN 2014/2015 Total donations

$2,743,673

College gift (for operating expenses) $120,000

Endowment $519,831

Operating income

Bank interest $761

Other income $110,601

Scholarship programme $1,558,729

Staff cost (aided by the College) $502,130

Others $665,113

Operating expenditures Audit fees $15,516

Other expenses $223,772

ASSETS LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

ENDOWMENT FUND Cash in bank $3,439,882

Current assets $7,846,092

Total endowment

Equity

$7,800,580 68

$5,825,007

Current liability $45,512 Available-for-sale bonds $2,385,125


69


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD As of 31 July 2015 2015

2014

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Other receivables

5,409,667

4,076,850

51,300

37,186

Available-for-sale investments

2,385,125

Total current assets

7,846,092

4,114,036

Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

Held-to-maturity financial asset

1,250,000

Available-for-sale investments

1,648,548

Total non-current assets

2,898,548

7,846,092

7,012,584

45,512

14,622

Total assets

LIABILITY Current liability Other payables

EQUITY Restricted funds: Scholarship fund

1,517,417

1,352,369

Capital fund

59,314

15,487

Programme innovation & initiatives fund

70,250

22,037

Staff professional development fund

5,000

338,918

340,646

5,825,007

5,284,263

7,810,906

7,019,802

(10,326)

(21,840)

1,713,699

1,713,699

Total equity

7,800,580

6,997,962

TOTAL LIABILITY AND EQUITY

7,846,092

7,012,584

General fund Endowment fund Unrestricted funds: Accumulated deficit

70


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD Year ended 31 July 2015 Restricted funds

Unrestricted fund

Endowment fund

Scholarship fund

Capital fund

Programme innovation & initiatives fund

$

$

$

$

$

Staff professional development fund

General fund

Total funds

$

$

$

2015 Income Donation income

519,831

1,558,729

69,314

103,250

62,000

430,549

2,743,673

Other income

761

105,569

120,000

226,330

Total incoming resources

761

625,400

1,558,729

69,314

103,250

62,000

550,549

2,970,003

Expenditure Audit fees

(15,516)

(15,516)

(223,772)

(223,772)

(89,689)

(1,377,620)

(25,487)

(55,037)

(67,000)

(318,296)

(1,933,129)

Total resources expended

(239,288)

(89,689)

(1,377,620)

(25,487)

(55,037)

(67,000)

(318,296)

(2,172,417)

(Deficit) Surplus for the year

(238,527)

535,711

181,109

43,827

48,213

(5,000)

232,253

797,586

5,032

5,032

(238,527)

540,743

181,109

43,827

48,213

(5,000)

232,253

802,718

Other expenses Utilisation of fund during the year

Other comprehensive income Items that may be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss Available-for-sale investments - fair value gain during the year, representing other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax Total comprehensive income for the year

71


72


ALUMNI RELATIONS The UWCSEA alumni community extends around the globe, with alumni currently located in 114 countries worldwide. The Alumni Relations programme was established in 2006 to connect former students to one another and the school.

CONTACTABLE ALUMNI

55%

10,420

members

TOP 20 KNOWN ALUMNI LOCATIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 114 COUNTRIES IN ALL

114

c at e d

Countrie si

hich alumni e lo ar

nw

Top 20 countries (in order): Singapore, United Kingdom, United States of America, Australia, Malaysia, Canada, Netherlands, India, Indonesia, Japan, Germany, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Switzerland, South Korea, Norway, France, Thailand, United Arab Emirates, Italy 73


$430,000 alumni giving 2014/2015

32%

attendees in inaugural Reunion Class Giving programme

10%

donors who are alumni

4

alumni members on Foundation Board of Trustees

15

alumni members of 1971 Society (representing those who have made very significant cumulative financial gifts to UWCSEA)

11

453

13

Student Alumni Council members

volunteer hours given by alumni to current students

reunion events

517

211

1,030

universities represented by alumni mentors

attendees at alumni events

university mentors

74


DONORS 2014/2015 1971 SOCIETY Named in honour of the year the Dover Campus was opened by the then Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, the 1971 Society recognises those who have made accumulative lifetime gifts of $10,000 or more to UWCSEA. Through their generosity, these benefactors are helping the College remain at the forefront of international education.

SOCIETY MEMBERS Chairman’s Circle Lizanne ’83 and Robert A. Milton ’78 Lee Hysan Foundation Patrons Kewalram Chanrai Group Trafigura Pte Ltd. Andy and Mei Budden UWC Denmark National Committee Anonymous gift Benefactors Gale and Shelby Davis S and V Foundation Capital International Inc. Sassoon Family Suhardiman Hartono MacFadden Family Kirtida and Bharat Mekani Mara McAdams and David Hand Shiv and Urvashi Khemka Gary Basil Scholarship Fund Bataua Scholarship Fund AT Capital Pte Ltd Mary Ann Tsao Robinson SK-NIS Anonymous gifts made by two donors Fellows Prince of Wales Trust Dato Abdul Rahman Abdul Shariff and Datin Dr. Mona Abdul Rahman

Family Harrold In honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr. Rajadurai Sanjay and Ravina Kirpalani Manzoni Family Lester and Christine Gray UWCSEA Dover Parents’ Association UWC Spain National Committee UWC National Committee of Germany UWC China National Committee Anonymous gifts made by two donors Members Iain and Tejas Ewing Jean de Pourtales Craig Flood ’78 Kush Handa ’78 Haeyong Jung Kishore Mahbubani Charles and Jenny Ormiston John Shang ’78 Mr and Mrs Zain C. Willoughby ’78 Julian and Buff Whiteley Tord ’86 and Kimberly Stallvik Satish and Anita Shankar Gay Chee Cheong Mark Koczanowski and Vicky Binns Bindiya and Raj Mishra Dale Fisher ’78 Vinod Sahgal Peter ’83 and Tine Jessen Shripriya Mahesh Ramanan and Ramanan Raghavendran Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan Kennedy-Cooke Family David and Sonja Chong James Dalziel and Nancy Fairburn Viren and Ruchee Desai Arvind and Niharika Tiku Ashwin Ranganathan and Claire Ngo Kandisaputro and Juliet Chris and Fleur Thomas Mr and Mrs G. S. Ramesh Takeda Pharmaceuticals (Asia Pacific) Pte Ltd

Åsa and Magnus Böcker Ben Morgan Nitin and Amie Gulabani Ne Aung and Khin Moe Nyunt Soofian ’90 and Fatima Zuberi UWCSEA East Parents’ Association Jacques Mainguy ’79 Mr and Mrs Sohmen-Pao Ross and Florence Jennings Ko Ko Gyi and Moe Moe Alex Dong Seng Chee and Audrey Ho Ravi and Lakshmi Raju BHP Billiton Rigel Technology (S) Pte Ltd Lau Family Fredrik Fosse ‘03 Mr and Mrs Yaw Chee Ming Wang Piau Voon and Lam Li Min Tek and Angeline Heng Anonymous gifts made by four donors

75


KURT HAHN SOCIETY Named after the founder of the UWC movement, the Kurt Hahn Society recognises those who intend to leave a legacy to the College as part of a planned bequest. These gifts will have a lasting impact on the College and provide the donor with the knowledge that their gift will live on well into the future.

SOCIETY MEMBERS Iain and Tejas Ewing Andy and Mei Budden Julian Whiteley Dave and Sue Shepherd Tui Britton ‘98 Two anonymous members

ANNUAL GIVING The financial support of UWCSEA’s parents, alumni and friends through Annual Giving, enables the College to invest in additional transformational projects and initiatives. Through Annual Giving, the College continues to develop a pioneering curriculum, enhance diversity through the scholarship programme and provide first class professional development opportunities.

ANNUAL GIVING 2014/2015 Abad Merritt Family Kevin and Zinnie Aepli Andrew Affleck Punit Agarwal Diana Ah Teck Nicholas and Eleanor Alchin Brian and Fay Alesi Mr Akmal Alhamawi and Mrs Shelly Maneth Sama and Ruhi AMIN Ang Kuan Maan Sandeep and Jyoti Angresh The Angus Family 76

Anjali and Sajith Summie Aoki ‘84 Rahel and Thomas Arm Arriyan Maglin and Arun Kumar Ava and Noa Ayya C A Bagattini Family Yessengali Baimenov and Oxana Baimenova Bali Family K and C Barbier In memory of Samantha Barlian Jaiveer and Naira Bedi Haerul Bengardi ‘87 Vicky Berman and George, Eddie and Jamie Rutteman Chintamani and Mithu Bhagat The Bhargava family Rohini and Sumit Bhasin Ashwin Bhat ‘06 Sujoy Bhawal BHP Billiton Simon Bignell and Andrea McDonald John W.C Birrell Blanc The Blumer Family Michael and Emily Bourdon Family Mark and Sue Bradshaw The Brereton Family Brezac-Massini Family Zoe Brittain Paul Brogden Kim Brumby Bryant Family The Bubb Family Andy and Mei Budden Frazer and Rebecca Cairns Capital International Inc. Margaret and Chris Capodanno Courtney Carlson and Tony Lee Alex and Heather Carmichael Andy, Sarah, Ethan, Toby and Isobel Carter Jonathan Carter Mr. Nicholas KC Chan Derek and Katherine Chang

Binu Chaudhary Chegne How Poon Timothy Cheung and Sue-Ann Yong Chia Sew Kim Chia Yoke Chee Choi Moon Young David and Sonja Chong Chong Yoon Chou YM Chow Chun, Haeann Grant Clark and Linda Davies Amy Clark and Rosie Clark Karen Cockburn Sinead Collins and Gary Toner Ted Cowan and Belinda Robinson Tilson and William Crew Kevin and Emma Crombie Michelle and Ken Crouse Wei Cui and Yun Dai Paul Cummins ‘78 Andrew da Roza Tracy and Matthew Dallimore Permada Darmono ‘98 Kaushik Das Gale and Shelby Davis James Dalziel and Nancy Fairburn Family De Hert Rajeev and Alexandra De Mello Jean-Francois and Patricia d’Estalenx Viren and Ruchee Desai O and S Destandau Benjamin and Jake Detenber, Nikki and Lucy Blue Draper Vishal Dhawan Vinay Dhillon Natasha, Raphael, Hans Diederen and Nadine Bailey Nadja and Cem Dinckol Divesh Ojas ‘91 and Ruchi Doshi John and Mariam Doyle Alex Dong D. R. Dunn Durant Family Chris Edwards Iain and Tejas Ewing Casse Eyears


Dale Fisher ’78 Christian Foo Fredrik Fosse ‘03 Foong Siew Yeng Debbie Fordyce Isabel and Jerome Francis Thales Gabay and Raquel Maia Family Gaier The Garlinghouses, for a better world Lucas Ghai The Ghirardello Family Geraldine Gibb and David Wilson Vikram and Ayesha Goel Keith Goh Aadithya Gowthaman and Arjun Gowthaman Frédéric Grandjean ‘02 Rika Grant Ethel and Brian Green Grundlingh Family Lester and Christine Gray Elaine and Ian Grundy Piyush and Priya Gupta Rohit and Anjali Gupta Ko Ko Gyi and Moe Moe Tek and Angeline Heng Samantha Hague Pippa Haley Kush Handa ‘78 Rolf Harrison and Shareen Khattar Suhardiman Hartono Keisuke, Noriko and Miku Hasegawa Regina and Colm Hayden Haywood family Tek and Angeline Heng Douglas and Moemi Heskamp KC Hew Bev Hewitt ‘74 Lisa and Paul Hewitt Shuichi Hidaka Adrienne Hintz ‘81 Seng Chee and Audrey Ho Fritz and April Horlacher Hu Huan Anderson Huang Ta Lun Huang and Wen Yi Chen Anthonia HUI

Max Hull Kelvin and Wendy Hung Abdul Hamid Ibrahim International SOS (Phils), Inc. Boris Irtuganov and Natalia Irtuganova Inda Malini Jamil Varun and Megha Jain Ross and Florence Jennings Johanna Johnston Family Cathy Jones Geraint Jones Neo Kabuye and Eli Kasule Sholpan Kairgali Vivek Kalra and Gauri Bhaskar Mr V. Kannan and Mrs Usha Kannan Surabhi Kapoor and Rajeev Chawan Tirupathi Karthik and Malini Balakrishnan Lakshmi Kartik and Kartik Ramachandran Kasahara Tarun Kataria and Priti Devi Takashi Kawada Abe Kebede Kennedy-Cooke Family Jamie and Paula Kelly Kewalram Chanrai Group Suresh Kewalramani Jong Han Kim and Hee Myung Han Kim Tae Heon Mark Kingsley Sanjay and Ravina Kirpalani Klemmer Family Phyo Ko Zin Mark Koczanowski and Vicky Binns Varun Kodthivada and Tara Gupta Charlene Koh Julie Kohn and Dan Swift and Family May Kong Pat Kongboonma Robert Kraybill and Durreen Shahnaz Alexander Krefft ‘93 Anke Kubsch Ashutosh and Monica Kumar In Honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr. Rajadurai Wahyu Setya and Marry Lianti Kusumanegara

Sandip Labh Anthony and Christopher Lam Yan Yu Geoff, Rosie, Tom, Sam, Becca and Izzy Lambrou Alexander and Nadya Lapshun Lau Family Lau Hang Boon Nicholas Laveris Julien Le Sourd Lee Hysan Foundation Sam and Poni Leong Leow Kim Kiat Leung Chee Yin Kate Lewis and Doug Wills Cindy Li Xian Yu Li and Jun Michelle Fang Dena Lim Dr and Mrs Lim Ka Liang Edmund Lim Lim Fang Fen Lim Geok Poh Lim Lee Soan Sona Lippmann Michael and Helena Livingston Lock Kim Hock The Logan Family Loh Phui Cheu Loo Kuen Feng Lord Family Grace Lu Theresa Lu Inna Luengas Elisabeth Lystad MacAlpine family MacFadden Family Oisin MacFadden ‘04 Diego Madurga Diez Daniel and Pascale Magnier Jacques Mainguy ’79 Masami Makino Raj and Ruja Manghani Ashwin Manoj Manzoni Family Gabor Marosi and Viktoria Marosi-Marczell David and Fei-Ying Marshall Laurent Martinez and Ioana Hanganu Masabumi and Miki 77


Masuhr Family Sittichai Matanachai Arvind Mathur David and Kim Maxwell Mara McAdams and David Hand Sarah McCarrison and Joe Sergi McCarthy Family Alexander McGregor Paula and Andy McKillop Caroline and Robert Meek Sameera Mehta Kirtida and Bharat Mekani Mahua Menon and Ranodeb Roy Usha Menon Michaelis family Nienke Youya, Ling and Robert Mik The Mikkelsen Family Lizanne ‘83 and Robert A. Milton ‘78 Min Eunhong Minford Family The Greg Mitchell Family Jonathan and Kim Mitchell Shunji and Kyoko Miyakoshi Miyano Haruhiko Kamal Uddin Mohammad and Shirin Begum Marc and Farida Montanus Monique Morley and Anders Mogensen Moreau family Ben Morgan Saptha Muraleedharann Darwin Nasution David Neidel and Joy Natividad Frederik and Heidi Neve Newman Family Suhonto Ngatimin and Calvina Chu Anh Nguyen Minh-Tam and Jessica Nguyen Richard Nies Mikhail NIKOLAEV Sr. Nipun, Jaya and Shivam Henny Nirmalawati Rafferty Noble Harker Jeremy Nugroho and Kaira Nugroho Karen O’Connell Danny and Alison O’Connor Atsushi Ogawa 78

Michiko Ohya Sedef Okman Steven and Paige Okun Brian Ó Maoileoin and Kate Drudy Ong Chaw Yin Charles and Jenny Ormiston Dan and Libby Orr Declan and Chisa O’Sullivan Albert and Julie Ovidi Edward Pank You Mi Park Parr Family Persaud Family Vikas Phadnis Liza,Timothy,Alexandra,Eleanor and Eliza Pinnegar Jason and Lisa Plamondon Mohan and Subarna Prabhakar Amee and Akash Prakash Soracha Prathanrasnikorn ‘11 Prem Prince of Wales Trust Rahel Probst Antonio and Tricia Puno Soazig Purenne Qi Hai Bei Ravi and Lakshmi Raju Santosh Raghavan Arjun Raghavan and Siok Han Tjoa Rajani and Thomas Varun and Ved Rajesh Anand Ramachandran and Priya Sivaramakrishnan Satyanarayan Ramamurthy Mr and Mrs G. S. Ramesh Fiona and Patrick Read Pete Read Rehan Anwer Rigel Technology (S) Pte Ltd Rigg Family Joe and Nikki Rivera Tony Robb ‘86 Frances Roberts Alexander Rodrigues Siti Aminah Bte Sabtu Aarushi and Avni Sachdeva Kenji Sakurai

Mike, Lou and Ally Samson Samy Pauline Santoso Kavi and Tejas Sarna Sassoon Family Lynda Scott Juraeme Seebli Sudeep Sengupta Ser Ah Seoh Damien Servant Gary and Mel Seston Sandeep and Krishma Seth Shaem Shaymentyran Dave and Sue Shepherd Shilin Family Gauri Shukla June Sim Deepak Singh PK Singh Virginia Sipiere ‘74 Richard and Zainab Slovenski S. M. Sofian ‘81 Mr and Mrs Sohmen-Pao Family Spaan Family Spjut Monica Stanciu Daniel and Jessica Steele Stellar-Mont Forbes Pte Ltd Stirrat Family Parizad Sukhani Swina International Pte Ltd Maggie Sy Matt T Cynthia and Richard Tan Gerald Tan Tan Ah Lam Tan Bock Heng Tan Chuan Leong Tan Lee Hong Nobuyoshi Tanaka Bhavna and Kartik Taneja Anna Tay Sok Yong Tay Lay Cheng Tay Wee Lam Linda Teagle ‘78 Shruti Tewari Kaida Tey


Theyasagayam Gregory and Nathalia Thiery Henry Thio and Yoshie Asahara Thio Simon and Cinders Thomas Jason Kok Kiong Toh ‘02 Tokuda Family Laurence Tournerie Trafigura Pte Ltd. The Trevis Family Tsai Shih Hsien Adam and Angela Turner Ueno Kazuhisa UWC Denmark National Committee UWC Spain National Committee UWCSEA Dover Parents’ Association Marc and Fabienne Van de Walle - Hankard Mary Van Der Heijden Julia and Chris van Gend Louis van Oost The van Oost family Hiten and Shernaz Varia Kristen and Suvir Varma Vidya and Saju Mr Girish Vijapur Ravi Vijayaraghavan Aurora Villacellino Jorge Vizcaino ‘87 Gurpreet and Rupinder Vohra Wang Piau Voon and Lam Li Min Eric von der Luehe ‘83 Johan Vooren and Erica Staal Sota and Kiyomi Wakabayashi Lorna Walker The Wallner Family Wan Jiachen ‘15 Hao Wang Wang Wee Seng Wang Xiaolan Wang Yi Yi Brenda Whately Karl Wilcox Kyle, Rory, Dave Wilton and Edwina Rigby Dr Si Thu Win and Dr Hla Han Su Ian, Vangie and James Wood Jun Wu

Wu Shiou Lian Luo Xiaoling and Zeng Jinli Farhana Yaakob Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan Thomas Hao Tian Yang, Class of 2015 Mr and Mrs Yaw Chee Ming Xavier Yip Family Yoshida Pauline Yu Yu Ki Jun Zastera family Christoph Zenker ‘82 Ning Zhang and Xia Lin Sheng Zhang and Donna Tang Wanjun Zhang and Ji Chen Du Zhi Zhao Zhu Wenqing and Fang Weidong Scott and Allison Ziemer The Zilliacus Family Anonymous gifts made by 38 donors

GRADUATE GIVING Since 2008 the graduating Grade 12 students have united in a common effort: to give back to UWCSEA and to leave a lasting legacy for future students at the College. This vibrant student-led programme demonstrates the culture of philanthropy that exists within the student community. Class of 2015 Shefali Agarwal ‘15 Shukri Ahmad Shahizam ‘15 Ahaan Arora ‘15 Lok Hin Au ‘15 Onkham Banyadith ‘15 Hannah Bedford ‘15 Arief Johan Alimin ‘15 Sophie Black ‘15 Matthew Booker ‘15 Zoe Budsworth ‘15 Kelly Chang ‘15 Kim Serey Vuth Chea ‘15

David Chem ‘15 Yi Chen ‘15 Cristobal Cintolesi Carvallo ‘15 Eden Coates ‘15 Caroline Crang ‘15 Rachel Deeley ‘15 Samant Robert Ferrin ‘15 Ricarda Filsinger ‘15 Felicitas Filsinger ‘15 Aaron Francis ‘15 Charlotte Freydefont ‘15 Ker Wei Fung ‘15 Jia En Gan ‘15 James Gledhill ‘15 Diya Gopalan ‘15 Anant Gururaj ‘15 Geovania Guterres Ornai ‘15 Lachlan Guthrie ‘15 Samantha Hartono ‘15 Tyler Harvey ‘15 Nadia Hawila ‘15 Ryo Hayakawa ‘15 Femke Heddema ‘15 Naoki Hidaka ‘15 Yuri Hirama ‘15 May Htet ‘15 Susan Htoo ‘15 Kathryn Huang ‘15 Mathilde Huybens ‘15 Heather Jacombs ‘15 Rachita Jain ‘15 Haram Jang ‘15 Kay Khaing Yu ‘15 Meng Puthyda Keath ‘15 Benedict Kendrick ‘15 Bhavani Khemka ‘15 Junsoo Kim ‘15 Rachel Hyun Jee KIM ‘15 Karan Kochhar ‘15 Sayo Koike ‘15 Emma Koster ‘15 Hye Jin Kwon ‘15 Samuel Lambrou ‘15 Jun Beom Lee ‘15 Khai Xhiang Lim ‘15 Samantha Lo ‘15 Madeleine Mak ‘15 79


Mei Masuyama ‘15 Israel George Mnyitafu ‘15 Simren Nagrath ‘15 Alexis Ocampo ‘15 Ryo Ogawa ‘15 Niamh O’Reilly ‘15 Aidana Orynbassar ‘15 Phavadee Phasavath ‘15 Vannasack Phonesavanh ‘15 Neel Pujari ‘15 Neeti Relan ‘15 Samradha Sanjeev ‘15 Dmitry Sapronov ‘15 Shiori Sato ‘15 Marjorie Segule ‘15 Krishna Shahane ‘15 Naomi Silhavy ‘15 Urvashi Singh ‘15 Pornsiri Sirikul ‘15 Karl-Johan Ingerslev Sørensen ‘15 Vida Steiro ‘15 Anish Suri ‘15 Ethan Swift ‘15 Samuel Tang ‘15 Fiona Tien ‘15 Sophia Isabel Uy ‘15 Armaan Varadaraj ‘15 Shabdita Vatsa ‘15 Gayathri Warrier ‘15 Kazuki Watanabe ‘15 Elizabeth Widder ‘15 Kaung Arkar Win ‘15 Anye Wu ‘15 Thomas Yang ‘15 Zenia Yim ‘15 Tiankai Kevin Yin ‘15 Duzhi Zhao ‘15 Anonymous gifts made by 11 donor

REUNION GIVING UWCSEA milestone anniversary reunions are an occasion for alumni to reconnect with former classmates and staff, revisit Singapore and learn how the College continues to evolve. Reunion celebrations are also a time when anniversary classes can show their appreciation for the education they received and lend their support to help to make the UWCSEA experience at least as unique and meaningful for today’s students as it was for them. This year, more than 34% of the members of the celebrating classes who attended Reunion 2015, participated in the class gift. Class of 1975 Katy Berentsen ‘75 Peter ‘75 and Tania Dyer Kate Gudgeon ‘75 Kim Ivey ‘76 Thomas Reske ‘75 Colin Robertson ‘75 Pat Robinson ‘75 Kathy Somic ‘75 Class of 1980 Kay Brockmueller ‘80 Anthony Cheung Man Chung ‘80 Alison Green ‘80 Heddy Motzfeldt Hedström ‘80 Dirk Heerding ‘80 Annecke B. Jenssen ‘80 Bron Laney ‘80 Lee Cheu Seng ‘80 Rebecca (Becky) Martin ‘80 Karen Rimington ‘80 Nigel Swinnerton ‘80 Michael Taylor ‘80 Class of 1985 Malek Ali ‘85 The Datta Family Yen Mee Lai ‘85 Stephanie Magdalino ‘85

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Stephanie Miller ‘85 Ronald Ong ‘85 Vipart Pakartikom ‘85 Jeroen van der Heijden ‘85 Caroline van Eijk ‘85 Yap Lee Ling ‘85 Class of 1990 Farhan Ahmad ‘90 D.D. Daruvala ‘89 Sandra Farmer ‘90 Ernest Leung ‘90 Vanessa Loong ‘90 Juliette Martin ‘90 Claudia Maschi ‘90 Sanjay Parakh ‘90 Ee Chen Wong ‘90 Gary Yeoh ‘90 Class of 1995 Yasmine Ameen ‘95 Angela Armstrong ‘95 Anshul Arora ‘95 Anirudh Baheti ‘95 Anna-Mae Chin ‘95 Andrew Cunningham ‘95 Mia Davidson McGregor ‘95 Rosah ‘95 and Marcus Dunn Samuel Evers-Swindell ‘95 Salina Froehlich ‘95 Mandy Furstenberg ‘95 Yvette Ingwersen ‘95 Roslan Jaffar ‘95 Kumiko Kaneda ‘95 Angeline Lee ‘95 Jin Kwong Lim ‘95 Biraj Mandavilli Uppal ‘95 Stuart McLelland ‘95 Jacqueline Moccand ‘95 The Mules Family Gareth Saunders ‘95 Jota ‘95 and Claudia Shohtoku Pam Sikkers ‘95 MC Spence ‘95 Sripriya Sundararajan ‘95 Grace Tahir ‘95 Vanessa van der Burgt ‘95


Class of 2005 Dr Ben Au ‘05 and Yeo Jing Wen Anja Frotjold Birkeland ‘05 Mattia De Biasi ‘05 Pavan Jeswani ‘05 Marie Lamy ‘05 Martin Lund ‘05 Jeremy Nunns ‘05 Marian Quek ‘05 Nadia Sofiandi ‘05 Anonymous gifts made by three donors

GIFTS IN KIND

VOLUNTEERS

Through the significant contributions of individuals, businesses and corporations, the Foundation has been able to provide even greater support to the College in achieving its vision of becoming a leader in international education.

UWCSEA is privileged to have a very enthusiastic and active volunteer community across all areas of College life. It is their generous support and commitment to the vision and values of the College that enables us to achieve so much.

Bain & Co. South East Asia Inc. CREATE David Chong & Co. Deutsche Bank AG Singapore EFG Bank ETH Zürich Future Cities Laboratory Lateral Plains Naveen Agarwal Mrs Ruchira Agarwal Sassoon Family SIEMENS

AMBASSADOR PROGRAMME The Ambassador Programme is an opportunity for parents and alumni to engage with the fundraising activities of the UWCSEA Foundation and promote College Advancement. The main role of the Ambassador Programme is to support the philanthropic activities of the College by encouraging awareness of the UWCSEA Foundation and the range of programmes and initiatives that it supports. Jyoti Angresh Samantha Hague Midori Isozaki Anisha Kaul Navranjan Khanna Henrik Mikkelsen Vinitha Mukherjee Mark Newman Jenifer Raver Sanjay Sharma Jenny Windheim Susana Zilliacus

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UWCSEA Annual Report 2014/2015  
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