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Annual Report 2017/2018 | 110


UWCSEA Dover 1207 Dover Road Singapore 139654 UWCSEA East 1 Tampines Street 73 Singapore 528704 www.uwcsea.edu.sg UWCSEA Dover is registered by the Committee for Private Education (CPE), part of SkillsFuture Singapore (SSG) CPE Registration No. 197000825H | CPE Registration Period 18 July 2017–17 July 2023 | Charity Registration No. 00142 UWCSEA East is registered by the Committee for Private Education (CPE), part of SkillsFuture Singapore (SSG) CPE Registration No. 200801795N | CPE Registration Period 10 March 2017–9 March 2023 | Charity Registration No. 002104 Printed on recycled paper with environmentally friendly inks | MCI (P) 049/03/2018 | 066COM-1819


CONTENTS Message from Anna Lord, Chair of Board of Governors ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2 Introduction from Chris Edwards, Head of College ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������3 UWCSEA guiding statements and governance �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 4 UWCSEA learning programme �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6 Governance and leadership................................................................................................................................................10 UWCSEA governance..........................................................................................................................................................14 Strategic Plan 2018–2023........................................................................................................................................................18 Student achievement............................................................................................................................................................... 24 Academics............................................................................................................................................................................. 28 Activities.................................................................................................................................................................................41 Outdoor education.............................................................................................................................................................46 Personal and social education �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������49 Service.................................................................................................................................................................................... 52 Our community......................................................................................................................................................................... 56 Scholars..................................................................................................................................................................................61 Community feedback......................................................................................................................................................... 63 Business report..........................................................................................................................................................................68 Human Resources................................................................................................................................................................ 70 Admissions............................................................................................................................................................................ 73 Finance................................................................................................................................................................................... 76 Statement of financial position ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������77 Statement of profit and loss and other comprehensive income ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 78 College Advancement..............................................................................................................................................................80 Foundation............................................................................................................................................................................ 82 Statement of financial position ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������84 Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 85 Foundation financial report...............................................................................................................................................86 Alumni relations..................................................................................................................................................................88 Donors 2017/2018..............................................................................................................................................................90 Annual Report 2017/2018 | 1


MESSAGE FROM ANNA LORD CHAIR OF BOARD OF GOVERNORS Each year the UWCSEA annual report tells a story of success and achievement, and this one is no different. I am delighted to introduce another set of information and statistics about the College learning programme and operations for the 2017/2018 year, which serve to provide a transparent account of our community’s work. The primary role of the Board of Governors is to ensure the long-term sustainability of the College, both reputationally and financially. We provide the strategic oversight that ensures the school is well-run, giving a quality experience to students, while at the same time we continually scan the horizon to prepare for the future. The 2017/2018 year was one where we had our eye firmly fixed on the future, and the main expression of this was the development of the UWCSEA five-year strategy. The process of developing the strategy included consultations with stakeholder groups from across the community. With the UWCSEA mission as our compass, Board and management considered the external opportunities and threats that Singapore and the wider world of education present, as well as the internal resources and capabilities that we must harness to respond to various potential realities as they unfold. We generated much discussion as we tested our assumptions, sought relevant data and synthesised perspectives. The outcome was the UWCSEA Strategy 2018-2023, which was approved by the Board of Governors in March 2018. But while the focus of the plan may be on the next five years, it was built with the more long-term picture very much at the forefront. In particular, we were focused on the financial sustainability of the College and our ability to deliver a high quality, mission-driven education to young people well into the future. I am confident that if we fulfill the promise of our five-year strategy, we will be well-placed to bring the College to the next stage of our development in the long-term. Another major preoccupation during the year was compliance. Nowhere was this made more apparent than in our Service programme, where changes to Singapore regulations on fundraising led to a re-examination of our practice. We are immensely proud of the pro-active and positive approach staff had to the project: they took the opportunity to review and revise our internal processes 2 | Annual Report 2017/2018

around fundraising at the College, while protecting the integrity of student learning through the service programme, which is fundamental to who we are. At the same time, they built a deeper understanding of our programme among regulators, and took every chance to emphasise the strength of our Local Service programme, which has a long history in Singapore and contributes so broadly to our host country. But if there was a theme to the 2017/2018 year, it was one of external outreach and partnerships. As an example, in January 2018 the College entered into an agreement with Sky School, which aims to provide education for young refugees and displaced people whose education has been disrupted. UWCSEA educators collaborated with people from across the world and are well on their way to articulating a curriculum that is relevant to the circumstances of people who have had to put their education on hold after they were forcibly displaced as a result of conflict and persecution in their home countries. By harnessing technology, the opportunities for impact are extremely exciting. We also began work on the Impact Study, conducted in partnership with researchers at Harvard Graduate School of Education Project Zero, to examine whether or not the UWC movement has a positive impact on the lives of our students and alumni and on society as a whole. Both these partnerships are fully aligned to our mission and we look forward to building more local and international partnerships that will help us to extend our reach. And finally, this is the last Annual Report where my message as Chair will be accompanied by another fine piece of prose on the opposite page from Chris Edwards, our Head of College. At the end of last year, Chris announced that he will be leaving us after five years in his role. Annual reports are not the place to pay tribute to departing leaders, but it seems appropriate to acknowledge that while Chris was our Head, the College moved closer to the heart of the UWC movement, examined our commitment to our mission and prepared the way for a sustainable future for UWCSEA in Singapore. Thank you, Chris.

Anna Lord


INTRODUCTION FROM CHRIS EDWARDS HEAD OF COLLEGE China is the first superpower to come back. While some city-states and countries were more or less at the top of the game for centuries (Rome) or even millennia (Egypt), they all eventually conceded the crown to others, and none has ever returned to reclaim the prize. Until now. China’s awareness of self famously stretches back millennia but so does its sense of destiny. “Opportunities multiply as they are seized” said Sun Tzu, General and author of The Art of War, and now an extraordinary national patience and stoicism is wedded, paradoxically, to a breathtaking yet pragmatic innovative paradigm that has become, in scale at any rate, the greatest show on earth. My drawing a parallel between what is easily the largest and fastest social and economic change in human history and a school’s Annual Report may seem final confirmation that Heads are peripheral, self-aggrandising pinheads. But as George Gershwin memorably (though inaccurately) wrote: “They all laughed at Christopher Columbus/When he said the world was round”. The fact is, I believe that if the right people can look to the horizon rather than where they have come from, the academic year 2017/2018 will be seen as the start of the second coming of UWC the movement with a recalibrated UWCSEA at the heart of the uprising. 2017/2018 saw both the movement and the College turning over and watering the good earth so that new flowers and, I hope, forests might be planted. At first glance this metaphorical claim will appear so vague as to be meaningless or just plain bogus. After all, much of what you read here looks like last year— and that’s a good thing. The School is operating at full capacity (we remain oversubscribed in changing times); the IB results are very strong (with East and Dover achieving almost identical averages) and our university placements are typically impressive and diverse; you’ll see an amazing number of trips, activities and service projects (probably more than any other school in the world); and sadly, as ever, we can reflect very little of what the Romans would have called our ‘genius lociI’, our protective and defining spirit, because in the end annual reports are not designed to capture that. So yes, a cursory glance will tell you everything is hunky-dory and that if we had shareholders there would be murmurs of quiet satisfaction. But good metaphors should not be vague: they should amplify, not obfuscate truth, and so I go back to cultivation of the existing land.

In 2017/2018, the new College Strategic Plan recognised four areas of focus which support the education of our young in the tradition of Kurt Hahn: Education as a Force; Peace and a Sustainable Future; A United Community; Our Strength and Capacity. These areas are linked to the three pillars of the UWC movement’s new 2018 and Beyond strategy: Seek, Educate, Inspire. While keeping the students at the centre of our thinking, the College plan moves to a much more sustainable paradigm, and this includes significant restructuring of leadership, a new financial model and a long term vision that takes into account land leases and a host of possible future scenarios. It was imperative that we fortified the College so that it would be here for future generations and so that it might also more fully and intimately engage with Singapore. But together with the long-term visioning we must acknowledge the quotidien successes that marked last year, and I would like to focus on one area. Just as we never hear on the news how many aeroplanes landed safely around the world in any given day, so we don’t foreground the work of the support staff who provide the thousands of meals, clean the multitude of rooms, answer the endless calls. The impressive numbers and statistics in this publication reflect wonderfully well on students and teachers, but they would not exist but for the support staff. UWCSEA is a very large and complex school, and the fact that so many of our metaphorical aeroplanes do indeed land safely is testament to the dedication of this community within the College. They are too often the unsung heroes of such reports as this. This will be my final introduction to an Annual Report. With the new five year strategy and financial plan in place, and the attendant restructuring set for completion in 2018/2019, it is time to hand this extraordinary College over to new leadership. Going forward it should become still stronger and more resilient, in tandem with a movement that is regenerating purpose and momentum. For the sake of neatness I should really finish with a Chinese proverb about future good fortune, but I hope you’ll forgive me if I turn to a fellow countryman, G.K Chesterton, to help me express what I feel about the privilege of being a part of UWCSEA. He said: “I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.” That just about sums it up.

Chris Edwards Annual Report 2017/2018 | 3


4 | Annual Report 2017/2018


UWCSEA GUIDING STATEMENTS AND GOVERNANCE Annual Report 2017/2018 | 5


UWCSEA LEARNING PROGRAMME UWC MISSION

Because the UW CM

is ION ISS

To make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future

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ion nit

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Pr

Co

ge tic

UWCSEA will be a leader in international education. We will have a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education with an emphasis upon academic achievement, service to others, environmental stewardship, teamwork and leadership.

en

Secure

LEARNING PRINCIPLES ac

UWCSEA AMBITION

hip

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UWCSEA EDUCATIONAL GOAL The UWCSEA goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world.

To educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world

ti o

The UWC movement makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

Ch

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UWCSEA LEARNING PROGRAMME

u c ti v i s m

we h a v e a h o li s t i c l

This diagram explains how the elements of the UWCSEA Learning Programme fit together, with the mission as both the starting point and the goal.

HOLISTIC EDUCATION

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ag

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aw

a re

Re

C o m m u n ic a

t

we

can

IS

SI

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ON

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To make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future

f u l fi l o u r M

6 | Annual Report 2017/2018

s

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llab o r a ti v e

S e lf- m

UWCSEA PROFILE

develop q u a l itie sa n

Cr iti c Commi tm e

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learners multipl eo ing pp giv r o Cre nke


LEARNING PRINCIPLES Learning is a life-long process in which the learner engages with and reflects upon information and experiences to construct new or modify existing understanding as well as develop and apply qualities and skills. We know learning is effective when: • learners construct new understanding by activating prior knowledge and experiences Therefore, it is important that new learning is connected to what the learner has previously experienced or understood. • learners use timely and goal directed feedback Therefore, ongoing assessment should be regular and structured in a manner that allows for specific feedback to guide the learner in constructing meaning. • learners collaborate Therefore, learners must have opportunities to interact with others in a variety of situations and groupings. • learners are challenged Therefore, learners need to be challenged in developmentally appropriate ways. • learners feel secure and supported Therefore, learners need a safe and respectful learning environment. • learners construct meaning by seeing patterns and making connections Therefore, learning needs to be organised around core concepts. • learners actively process and reflect Therefore, time is required for learners to practise, reflect and consolidate learning. • learners apply metacognitive skills Therefore, learners should develop an awareness of their own thinking processes to develop intellectual habits. • learners understand the purpose of the learning Therefore, learning should occur in context with clear connections to real world. • learners have ownership of their learning Therefore, opportunities for self-directed learning are needed to sustain and motivate learning.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 7


UWCSEA PROFILE Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Our community achieves this goal by developing knowledge and understanding, qualities and skills through the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service.

QUALITIES

SKILLS

Commitment to care

Critical thinker

Initiate actions and make a commitment to shaping a better world. Related concepts: stewardship, caring, empathy, compassion, open-minded, service, sustainability

Reason in an informed and fair-minded manner. Related concepts: inquiry, questioning, connection, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, problem solving

Principled

Creative

Act with integrity and respect for self and the dignity of others. Related concepts: integrity, honesty, responsibility, respect, fairness

Imagine and generate new possibilities or alternatives. Related concepts: originality, imagination, curiosity, adaptability, connection, innovation, improvisation, risk-taking

Resilient Anticipate, persevere and confront challenge. Related concepts: optimism, confidence, courage, diligence, perseverance Self-aware Develop intellectual, physical, spiritual and emotional well-being. Related concepts: self-discipline, selfesteem, self-confidence, reflection, balance, contentment

Collaborative Participate collaboratively in diverse settings. Related concepts: cooperation, participation, leadership, flexibility, adaptability, responsibility, trust Communicator Communicate effectively according to audience and purpose. Related concepts: communication, interpretation, perspective, intent Self-manager Take responsibility for directing one’s learning. Related concepts: metacognition, independence, diligence, organisation, responsibility

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Annual Report 2017/2018 | 9


GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP UWC MOVEMENT UWC South East Asia is a member of the UWC movement, which was founded in 1962 by Kurt Hahn, the German educationalist. UWC South East Asia was the second member of the UWC movement, opened by Lee Kuan Yew as Singapore International School in 1971. Since then, UWCSEA has expanded to become a K–12 school of more than 5,500 students, making it the largest UWC in the movement, and one of only four that take students before the IB Diploma in Grade 11.

UWC SOUTH EAST ASIA

UWC ADRIATIC

Dover Campus, Singapore

East Campus, Singapore

Duino, Italy

Opened in

Opened in

Opened in

1971

2008

1982

Student population

Student population

Student population

3,000

2,557

182

Age group

Age group

Age group

4–18

4–18

16–19

UWC ATLANTIC COLLEGE

UWC CHANGSHU CHINA

UWC COSTA RICA

Vale of Glamorgan, United Kingdom

Changshu, Jiangsu Province, China

San José, Costa Rica

Opened in

Opened in

Opened in

1962

2015

2006

Student population

Student population

Student population

350

443

175

Age group

Age group

Age group

15–19

15–18

16–19

UWC DILIJAN

UWC ISAK JAPAN

LI PO CHUN UWC

Dilijan, Armenia

Karuizawa, Japan

New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, China

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Opened in

Opened in

Opened in

2014

2014

1992

Student population

Student population

Student population

219

175

256

Age group

Age group

Age group

16–18

15–19

16–18


There are now 17 schools and colleges in the movement. The schools and colleges are supported by a network of National Committees, made up of volunteers in 15 countries worldwide, who help to find and select many of the Grade 11 and 12 scholars in the colleges around the world. Below is some information on the schools and colleges in the UWC movement.

UWC MAASTRICHT

UWC MAHINDRA

UWC IN MOSTAR

Maastricht, Netherlands

Pune, Maharashtra, India

Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Opened in

Opened in

Opened in

2009

1997

2006

Student population

Student population

Student population

915

240

200

Age group

Age group

Age group

4–18

16–18

16–19

PEARSON COLLEGE UWC

UWC RED CROSS NORDIC

UWC ROBERT BOSCH COLLEGE

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Flekke, Norway

Freiburg, Germany

Opened in

Opened in

Opened in

1974

1995

2014

Student population

Student population

Student population

200

205

200

Age group

Age group

Age group

16–19

16–20

16–19

UWC THAILAND

UWC-USA

WATERFORD KAMHLABA UWC

Phuket, Thailand

Montezuma, New Mexico, USA

Mbabane, Eswatini

Opened in

Opened in

Opened in

2008

1982

1963

Student population

Student population

Student population

460

235

600

Age group

Age group

Age group

2–18

17–19

11–20 Annual Report 2017/2018 | 11


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STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENTS DURING 2017/2018 In October 2017, stakeholders from across the UWC movement—Heads and Chairs from the schools and colleges, National Committee members, UWC Council and the International Board—came together to give final input to the UWC Strategy 2018 and Beyond before it was officially approved by the UWC International Board. The overarching aim is to increase the impact of the UWC Movement’s mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. It extends UWC’s ambition from providing transformative educational experiences for students to becoming a global voice for how values- and diversity-based education can build peace and sustainability. Jens Waltermann, Executive Director of UWC International wrote: “Values and deep encounters with diversity which encourage students to reach across national and social divides are crucial if eduation is to impart a bias for good, for understanding and reconciliation and if it is to inspire selfless leadership. That was Kurt Hahn’s goal—and the new UWC Strategy translates his vision into our programme for the next decade.” “Seek, educate, inspire!”—these words frame UWC’s three focus areas. The first area ‘Seek’ focuses on UWC’s unique National Committee system, which enables UWC to select students in over 155 countries and territories worldwide. While the majority of UWCSEA’s students come in through a direct entry system, similar criteria to that used by National Committees are used to select our older students, involving them in immersion days and working with our current students to help identify those individuals who will best benefit from, and contribute to, the UWCSEA community. This area of the strategy is aimed at strengthening the selection system so that we identify students of promise and potential who would not otherwise have found UWC. The second area ‘Educate’ focuses on the learning experiences students have while they are at a UWC, most particularly how the community commitment to the mission can be incorporated into their learning programme. For the UWC movement, this is focused on delivering excellence through our staff and teaching practice and ensuring an environment where students are trusted but also supported. This area also focuses on developing short courses so that more people can access a UWC education, even if they do not attend one of the schools and colleges. The third area ‘Inspire’ expands on the idea that UWC is more than an education, but rather is about fostering active and engaged communities that have positive impacts on the world around them. The Movement is also seeking to build strategic partnerships with mission-aligned individuals and organisations so that UWC becomes one of the most respected voices in intercultural and diversity education, while advancing the mission and values.

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UWCSEA GOVERNANCE INTRODUCTION UWCSEA is committed to the highest standards of corporate governance. The UWCSEA Board of Governors recognises good governance as critical in supporting the school in achieving its mission and educational goal. Good governance begins with the Board of Governors and requires that they set the tone for the organisation. The Board of Governors is one of the principal bodies with the fiduciary obligation to ensure that the College acts to further its stated objectives, and that the College has appropriate systems in place to properly account for and safeguard the funds and assets of the College. The Board of Governors works closely with the management and stakeholders of the College to shape the vision, chart the major directions, and develop programmes and initiatives to produce a strong and enduring impact for the College in Singapore and beyond.

UWCSEA BOARD OF GOVERNORS The UWCSEA Board of Governors comprises 19 members. The Board includes respected business/industry leaders, academics, educators, entrepreneurs, and professionals.

SIZE, COMMITTEES, MEETINGS AND REVIEWS The maximum number of Governors is 21. The Board has six committees: • Education and Talent, which sets and oversees education and talent management strategies • Finance and Infrastructure, which oversees the College’s finances and its physical and digital infrastructure • Governance, which is responsible for nominations and governance matters

• Audit and Risk, which oversees audit and risk matters • Engagement, which is responsible for improving the engagement and outreach of the College locally and globally, including the UWCSEA Foundation • Committee of Chairs, which functions as a coordinating and management committee among the Chairs of the Board and Committees

Governors periodically re-evaluate the committee structure to ensure it is effective, strategic and forward-looking. The Board meets four times each year. Each Governor is usually a member of one committee, which also meets four times per year. The Board carries out formal Board effectiveness reviews, both externally every five years and internally every two years.

COMPOSITION The Board consists of three groups of Governors: • Ad Personam Governors – The majority of Governors are appointed by the Board itself through a rigorous selection process. Many Ad Personam Governors are parents of current students of the College. To ensure the Board benefits from independent thinking, there are also several non-parent Governors.

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• Ex Officio Governor – The Head of College (Chris Edwards) • Interested Party Governors – These are elected directly by their constituencies and include two parent-elects and two teacher-elects, one each from the Dover and East campuses.


GOVERNOR SELECTION AND INDUCTION The Board recruits Ad Personam Governors through a robust process that responds to clearly defined skill requirements for the Board. Candidates are first co-opted as Advisers to Board committees. New Ad Personam Governors are usually only selected from that pool of Advisers who have served on a Committee. Appointments are based on an assessment of the following factors: • professional skills and fit with Board requirements

• impact on Board diversity

• role models for UWC values and culture

• leadership potential

• demonstrated ability to contribute to a Board

• positive impact on Government relations

• past contributions to UWC/service institutions There is a comprehensive induction programme for all Advisers and Governors that includes information about the College and the Board, an induction session with the Board Secretary, and meetings with the Chair of the Board and other Governors.

TERM LIMITS, REVIEWS, RECRUITMENT AND INDUCTION Governors serve a maximum of two three-year terms. Only the Chair may serve an additional term of three years. The College and the Board holds its Governors and Advisers to a high standard and regularly evaluates each against the following criteria: The Governor: • is prepared for meetings

• has made meaningful contributions to key decisions

• listens to and challenges others, when appropriate, while maintaining an atmosphere of respect

• attends most meetings and is highly attentive when present • contributes overall

• contributes and participates in a manner consistent with UWCSEA values

WHISTLE BLOWING

OTHER POLICIES ON CORPORATE AND INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOUR

The College has a Whistle Blowing policy through which members of the UWCSEA community may, in confidence, raise concerns about possible wrongdoing or improprieties in financial or other matters within the organisation. The Board thoroughly and appropriately investigates matters brought to its attention through the policy and takes appropriate follow-up action.

The Board is also subject to, or will adhere to, the College’s policies on corporate and individual behaviour, including the Board of Governors Guidelines, Confidentiality Policy, Harassment Policy, Staff Safeguarding Code of Conduct, and the Equal Opportunities, Access and Disabilities Policy.

CHECKLIST CONFLICT OF INTEREST The College has a Conflict of Interest policy, which requires Board and staff members to disclose conflict of interests in the performance of their duties. In the case of the Board, the policy requires Governors and Advisers to report potential conflicts to the Governance Committee, which may impose remedies specific to the situation.

In addition to the application of good governance practices as a corporate entity, the Board of Governors has adopted best practices in key areas of governance that are closely aligned to the principles enunciated in the Code of Governance for Charities and Institutions of a Public Character (the “Code”). In line with the disclosure requirement by the Charity Council that all IPCs are required to disclose the extent of their compliance with the Code, UWCSEA’s Governance Evaluation Checklist can be found at the Charity Portal website www.charities.gov.sg. Annual Report 2017/2018 | 15


UWCSEA/UWCSEA-EAST/UWCSEA FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBERS (as at August 2018) Anna Lord Chair Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

Subodh Chanrai

Davy Lau

Ad Personam Governor Engagement Committee

Ad Personam Governor Governance Committee

Benjamin Hill Detenber

Julianne Martin

Ad Personam Governor Education and Talent Committee

Interested Party Governor – Parent Representative Engagement Committee

Priti Devi Chair of Engagement Committee Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

Alexander Krefft Chair of Governance Committee Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

Andrew McCarthy Christopher Edwards Ex-Officio Governor Head of College

Surinder Kathpalia

Margarita Encarnacion

Chair of Audit and Risk Committee Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

Interested Party Governor – Parent Representative Education and Talent Committee

David Maxwell

Vivek Kalra

Chair of Education and Talent Committee Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

Chair of Finance and Infrastructure Committee Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

Nicholas Chan

Will Kennedy-Cooke

Ad Personam Governor Governance Committee

Ad Personam Governor Committee of Chairs

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Interested Party Governor – Common Room Finance and Infrastructure Committee

Michelle Sassoon Ad Personam Governor Engagement Committee

Doris Sohmen-Pao Ad Personam Governor Engagement Committee

Kenneth Stirrat Interested Party Governor – Common Room Audit and Risk Committee


UWCSEA/UWCSEA-EAST/UWCSEA FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBERS (as at August 2018) Anna Lord, Chair

Davy Lau

Priti Devi

Alexander Krefft

Doris Sohmen-Pao*

Subodh Chanrai

Andrew McCarthy

Julianne Martin

Surinder Kathpalia

Benjamin Detenber

Kim Teo

Vivek Kalra

Chris Edwards

Margarita Encarnacion

Heinrich Jessen

David Maxwell

Nicholas Chan

Pamela Kelly Wetzell

*not member of Foundation Board

INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS: THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LIMITED (as at August 2018) Andrew Budden

Derek Lau

UWCSEA BOARD ADVISERS (as at August 2018) Philip Motteram

Sajjad Akhtar

Robert Harayda

Steve Okun

Sumitra Pasupathy

WT Cheah

AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE

ENGAGEMENT COMMITTEE

GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Surinder Kathpalia, Chair

Priti Devi, Chair

Alexander Krefft, Chair

Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards

Heather Carmichael

Doris Sohmen-Pao

Davy Lau

Sajjad Akhtar (Adviser)

Julianne Martin

Nicholas Chan

WT Cheah (Adviser)

Subodh Chanrai

Surinder Kathpalia

Steve Okun (Adviser)

Heinrich Jessen

COMMITTEES (as at August 2018)

EDUCATION AND TALENT COMMITTEE

Pamela Kelly Wetzell

David Maxwell, Chair

FINANCE AND INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE

Chris Edwards

Vivek Kalra, Chair

COMMITTEE OF CHAIRS

Benjamin Detenber

Chris Edwards

Anna Lord, Chair

Margarita Encarnacion

Andrew McCarthy

Alexander Krefft

Heather Carmichael

Robert Harayda (Adviser)

David Maxwell

Sumitra Pasupathy (Adviser)

Philip Motteram (Adviser)

Priti Devi Surinder Kathpalia Vivek Kalra Andy Budden

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 17


18 | Annual Report 2017/2018


STRATEGIC PLAN 2018–2023 Annual Report 2017/2018 | 19


INTRODUCTION During the 2017/2018 year, the College embarked on a strategic planning exercise, a collaborative process involving multiple College stakeholders. The result was the UWCSEA Strategy 2018-2023, which was approved by the Board of Governors in March 2018 and shared with the wider community in April 2018. The College guiding statements, which include the mission, educational goal, ambition and values served as compass points in the process. The planning honoured multiple perspectives while seeking reliable evidence and data to inform decision making. A small group of leaders formed the Steering Committee and engaged large numbers of people in some depth, with different constituencies being brought together for discussion and insight in a transparent process. We had input (often repeated, iterative input) from educational and operations leadership, governors, staff and parents, with students becoming involved at the project planning stage. The process provided for scaffolded generative discussion with such questions as: ‘What are our assumptions? What information do we need here? What might be alternatives? What should we
stop doing?’ The Strategy should be like a river, adapting to obstacles and change and is structured so it can endure from year to year, even as some elements within may change. The Strategy begins with a Strategic Vision, a description of what the plan is intended to achieve over the next five years, followed by four Areas of Focus. These Areas of Focus each include a summary of the intended outcome for the focus area, along with strategies that will help to realise these outcomes. The ten strategies are the strands that guide planning and decision making for campuses, schools and operational areas at the College. During Term 3, each campus, school and operational area took the Areas of Focus and strategies and made annual or multi-year plans for the various projects that will bring these strategies to life. The Board of Governors will oversee progress through a report on an Area of Focus at each of the four meetings during the year, while the senior leadership teams monitor the detailed projects. The following is an outline of the UWCSEA Strategy 2018-2023.

20 | Annual Report 2017/2018


STRATEGIC VISION UWCSEA students will be equipped with the skills and qualities to become compassionate, engaged global citizens who seek to make positive differences towards peace and a sustainable future. To achieve this, a diverse, united and caring College community will focus creatively on student learning through a dynamic, holistic programme that supports individuals, their well-being and their readiness for an uncertain future. Effective operational practices will provide for the College’s long-term future in Singapore.

PEACE AND A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

EDUCATION AS A FORCE

UWCSEA STRATEGY

A UNITED COMMUNITY

AREAS OF FOCUS

OUR STRENGTH AND CAPACITY

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 21


PEACE AND A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

EDUCATION AS A FORCE

EDUCATION AS A FORCE

PEACE AND A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

At UWCSEA, we educate our students to impact on individuals and society in accordance with the UWC mission. Through a holistic Learning Programme, students develop the skills and qualities (which meld to form the UWCSEA profile) to fulfil their potential and become life-long learners and ethical agents for change.

Our community is strengthened by diversity and united in common purpose. On local, national and global platforms, we will seek to engage with and impact positively on individuals and communities who hold similar, disparate and diverse ideas.

We understand educational excellence to be manifested by student learning across all five elements of our Learning Programme. This spirit of excellence, balanced with a serious commitment to wellbeing, will help inspire our community to rich experiences and high achievement. Our innovation will align with our values. We will take scalable, safeto-fail approaches to probe and test the boundaries of our strategies and practices. Within the contexts of Singapore and our Learning Programme, we will seek to be inclusive and diverse, in accordance with our definitions of these concepts, and we will recognise the importance of intercultural competence. Strategy E1: Extending Excellence Strategy E2: Deliberate Innovation Strategy E3: Diversity and Inclusion Accountable Learning Leadership Team reporting through UWCSEA Board Education and Talent Committee

22 | Annual Report 2017/2018

All members of our community should understand Peace to include concepts such as justice, equality and human rights and to be more than the absence of conflict. Our Learning Programme will help seed and nurture these concepts. We aspire to promote Peace in all of its contexts—for the individual, our communities and our global societies. We will embed structures to support learning for Peace and its systematic implementation across the College, and develop meaningful links with like-minded organisations that are in pursuit of the same goals. Sustainability as a systemic response means aligning ourselves to the UN Sustainable Development Goals to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all within the means of nature. We will engage with these challenges by deepening our intellectual and moral capacities, and building our collective wisdom. We will develop our curriculum to ensure that sustainability is woven into all five elements of our learning programme from K–12. We will also develop our community’s capability in systems thinking. Strategy P1: Working for Peace Strategy P2: Sustainability as a Systemic Response Accountable Learning Leadership Team reporting through UWCSEA Board Education and Talent Committee


A UNITED COMMUNITY OUR STRENGTH AND CAPACITY

A UNITED COMMUNITY

OUR STRENGTH AND CAPACITY

A strong College community, based on shared values, is fundamental to our success. Our community members will demonstrate respectful attention to diverse needs and perspectives, and compassionate engagement with others.

UWCSEA puts people, not systems, first. Our plan for sustainable growth will be transparent and support our community, while reflecting and responding to current realities and future possibilities. We will guarantee the financial security of the College while balancing present and future educational, environmental and organisational needs.

We seek to promote the educational significance of UWC residential life and will seek to harmonise the best of the day and residential experiences. We will strengthen relationships with one another, between campuses and with those outside our immediate community of students, staff and parents. We will build strategic relationships that extend our reach and deepen our impact. We will intensify the focus of the UWCSEA Foundation, enhance Alumni engagement, and continue to dedicate an agreed percentage of our annual turnover to scholarships. Our fundamental responsibility to our community members is to keep them safe, well and secure at all times and in all situations. We will continue to develop robust safeguarding practices, and empower our community to identify and respond to safeguarding situations. We will implement policies, practices and programmes to support staff and student wellness and safeguard everyone in our community. Strategy C1: Strengthening our Community Strategy C2: Keeping People Safe and Well Accountable Head of College with members of senior leadership teams (LLT, DLT, ELT and OLT) through UWCSEA Board Governance and Engagement Committees

In order to retain education as our focus, we recognise the necessity of humane, sustainable and effective systems. We will develop operational systems that set a positive, datainformed culture around rigorous practices, adhering to all external regulatory requirements. In adapting to any changes, we will support our community and protect the College’s ethos and values. We will establish decision-making processes and leadership structures that enhance operational effectiveness while retaining flexibility to adapt to changing circumstances. Strategy S1: Ensuring Long-term Financial Sustainability Strategy S2: Embedding Effective Systems Strategy S3: Establishing Effective Decision-Making Structures Accountable Head of College with members of senior leadership teams (LLT, DLT, ELT and OLT) through UWCSEA Board Governance, Finance and Infrastructure, and Audit and Risk Committees

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 23


24 | Annual Report 2017/2018


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Annual Report 2017/2018 | 25


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The learning programme at UWCSEA consists of five interlinking elements: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service. These elements combine to provide our students with a values-based education that develops them as individuals and as members of a global society. Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Through the learning programme, students develop disciplinary knowledge, skills and understandings alongside the skills and qualities of the UWCSEA Learner Profile. All five elements of the programme complement each other to create a whole that is greater than the sum of the parts. This is a carefully planned and purposeful process, where students develop understanding in disciplinary and interdisciplinary ways. For example, students gain deep disciplinary understanding in our academic programme, which may be applied in outdoor education or service when students encounter and grapple with real world situations. The skills and qualities identified in the UWCSEA profile are embedded in all five elements of the programme.

THE UWCSEA CURRICULUM Our educational goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. We achieve this through our UWCSEAdesigned K–12 curriculum which encompasses all five elements of our holistic learning programme—academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service.

CONCEPT-BASED CURRICULUM EXPLAINED Our concept-based curriculum organises learning around the development of transferable ideas, which may be disciplinary or interdisciplinary. Knowledge and skill acquisition is vital, but not the end goal in a concept-based curriculum. Using their knowledge and skill learning, students construct and express conceptual understandings, which transfer to new contexts. This allows our students to apply critical thought in any situation, now or in the future. How the K–12 model works We articulated the curriculum by working backwards from the needs of our graduating students. Understanding our students’ destination, we developed ageappropriate conceptual understandings from K1–12 in each learning area. Standards (K–12): Significant concepts from each learning area, articulated into ‘conceptual statements’. These apply to all grade levels, ensuring that the concepts are revisited in developmentally appropriate ways as students transition from grade to grade. Conceptual Understandings (grade-specific): Under each Standard are Conceptual Understandings, which are conceptual statements written for specific developmental stages. This allows students to access the broader concepts in the standard, while simultaneously developing an understanding of concepts appropriate to the grade-level. Benchmarks (grade-specific): Attached to each Conceptual Understanding, these describe what a student should know or be able to do at each stage. Qualities and Skills: We have identified the qualities and skills needed by our community to help to fulfil our mission. Students are given multiple, age-appropriate opportunities to develop these qualities and skills in each of the five elements of the learning programme.

26 | Annual Report 2017/2018


ACADEMICS EXAMPLE: SCIENCE–ENERGY AND ITS TRANSFORMATION All students work towards a Standard related to energy and its transformation. Conceptual Understandings in each grade outline what students should understand at each stage—in early Primary School this consists of Conceptual Understandings around light and sound energy. By Middle School the Conceptual Understandings widen, asking students to understand electrical and thermal energy. In the High School students in the IBDP are asked to investigate, within their chosen area of science, concepts in depth, such as electricity, magnetism, wave phenomena and nuclear energy.

GRADE 1

GRADE 7

GRADE 11

Standard Energy comes in different forms which can be transformed from one to another, the total amount of energy remaining constant in the universe. Conceptual Understanding

Conceptual Understanding

Conceptual Understanding

Substances and surfaces can reflect, refract or absorb light, changing its pathway.

The transfer of heat energy occurs through conduction, convection and radiation.

For simplified modelling purposes the Earth can be treated as a black-body radiator and the atmosphere treated as a grey-body.

Benchmark example

Benchmark example

Benchmark example

Investigate how substances and surfaces reflect, refract and absorb light.

Explain how heat can be transferred through conduction, convection and radiation.

Explain black-body radiation.

Sample learning engagement: ‘light labs’ allow students to tinker with myriad objects (mirrors, transparent blocks, cellophane, torches and prisms) to make observations, develop testable questions and engage in scientific experimentation. Teachers ask questions to provoke further investigation and support learning.

Sample learning engagement: a variety of ‘real world’ activities encourage students to investigate heat transfer concepts of conduction, convection and radiation. They collaborate on a group investigation, engage in scientific discourse and conduct workshops to teach their topic to their peers.

Sample learning engagement: IB Physics students explore solar radiation and the concept of black-body radiation. Using an online simulation to take measurements and extrapolate the relationship between temperature and peak emissivity, students acquire specialised concepts and make connections across contexts including those pertaining to sustainability.

Qualities and Skills In these sample learning engagements students develop the following qualities and skills:

Critical thinker

Creative

Communicator

Critical thinker

Collaborative

Communicator

Self-manager

Commitment to care

Critical thinker

Creative

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 27


LEARNING PROGRAMME: ACADEMICS The academic learning programme is a rigorous programme that allows students to experience the challenge of intellectual pursuit and the joy of scholarly engagement. They gain a deep understanding of individual disciplines, while investigating the connections between these disciplines and how to solve complex problems using different approaches.

28 | Annual Report 2017/2018

UWCSEA students follow a UWCSEA-designed curriculum, based on standards, essential understandings and benchmarks from K1 to Grade 8. Students in Grades 9 and 10 followed the (I)GCSE programme, with students entering in Grade 10 following a Foundation IB (FIB) programme. Grade 11 and 12 students follow the IB Diploma programme.


IB DIPLOMA RESULTS In May/June 2018, 572 UWCSEA students took the IB Diploma exams. A full breakdown of their achievement by College and by each campus can be seen in the following pages.

COLLEGE Students

Average IB Diploma Score

572

36.2 29.8 UWCSEA

Pass rate

Worldwide

Percentage receiving 40+ points

97.9% UWCSEA

78.2%

27.6%

Worldwide

UWCSEA

Percentage receiving bilingual diploma

24.0%

7.7%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

22.7% Worldwide

IB Diploma score comparison 43–45 40–42

8.2% 2.1%

Number of candidates

UWCSEA Worldwide UWCSEA percent average average passed percent passed diploma score

Worldwide average diploma score

2018

572 (Dover: 318 | East: 254)

97.9

78.2

36.2

29.8

2017

572 (Dover: 325 | East: 247)

98.4

78.4

36.7

29.9

2016

500 (Dover: 328 | East: 172)

99.0

79.3

36.4

30.0

2015

498 (Dover: 322 | East: 176)

98.4

80.8

36.2

30.2

2014

465 (Dover: 323 | East: 142)

99.8

79.4

36.8

30.0

2013

317

99.4

79.0

36.4

29.9

2012

311

99.7

78.5

35.8

29.8

2011

300

100

77.9

36.9

29.7

2010

295

98.9

78.1

36.0

29.5

2009

286

97.6

78.7

35.7

29.5

19.4% 5.6% 38.8%

35–39

18.1% 24.3% 26.6%

30–34 7.3%

24–29 <24

Year

29.9% 1.9% 17.7%

UWCSEA

Worldwide

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 29


DOVER CAMPUS

318

Complete IB course listing for the Class of 2018 English is UWCSEA’s medium of instruction and courses are offered at both Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL) unless otherwise noted.

IB Diploma students

1.

Pass rate

97.8%

78.2%

UWCSEA Dover

Worldwide

Average IB Diploma score

Taught

English; Hindi (SL); Japanese; Korean

School Supported SelfTaught (SL)

Belarusian; Filipino; Georgian; Indonesian; Khmer; Modern Greek; Portuguese; Romanian; Russian; Slovene; Swahili; Swedish; Thai; Vietnamese

Language A: Language and Literature

Chinese; Dutch; English; French; German; Spanish

2. Language B or ab initio

36.1 29.8 UWCSEA Dover

Language A: Literature

3. Individuals and Societies Business and Management; Economics; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Geography; Global Politics; History; Philosophy; Psychology

Worldwide

4. Experimental Sciences

Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Design Technology; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Physics; Sports Exercise and Health Science

5. Mathematics

Further Mathematics (HL); Mathematical Studies (SL); Mathematics (HL); Mathematics (SL)

6. The Arts

Dance (HL); Film (HL); Music; Theatre; Visual Arts

IB Diploma score comparison 43–45 40–42

7.5% 2.1% 19.5% 5.6% 38.1%

35–39

18.1% 25.2% 26.6%

30–34 7.9%

24–29 <24

Chinese B - Mandarin (SL), English B (HL); French B; French ab initio; German B; Spanish B; Spanish ab initio

29.9%

ACT and SAT scores 109 members of the Class of 2018 took the ACT and 94 took the latest version of the SAT. All scores, including those from non-native English speakers, are included.

1.9% 17.7%

UWCSEA Dover

20.4%

Range of middle 50% Worldwide

ACT SAT Reading and Writing SAT Mathematics

UWCSEA Dover students received a bilingual diploma

30 | Annual Report 2017/2018

SAT Composite

Mean

25 28.5 32 610 660 650

690 715

780 1260

1365

1450


Environ. Systems and Societies SL

Group 3

82 127 127 40

English HL English A: A: Literature Literature SL English A: Literature SL French A: Language and Literature SL

4.72 5.03 5.03 5.33

5.72 5.78 5.78 5.82

40 40 40 11

4.96 5.08 5.08 4.70

Business HL Business Management Management SL Business Management SL Economics HL

4.70 4.89 4.89 5.13

5.64 5.92 5.92 5.88

39 13 13 100

4.70 5.13 4.97 4.15 4.70 4.15 5.234.97

5.88 5.80 5.80

100 41 41 40

Group Group 4 4

Biology HL Biology SL Biology SL Chemistry HL Chemistry HL Chemistry SL Chemistry Science SL Computer HL Computer HL Computer Science Science SL Computer Science SL Physics HL Physics HL Physics SL Physics SL Sports Exercise Science HL Sports Science FurtherExercise Mathematics HLHL Further Mathematics Mathematical StudiesHL SL

6.07 5.80 5.80 5.82

5.12 5.02 4.55 5.02 4.554.94 4.94 4.71 4.71 4.69 4.69 4.36 4.36 4.35 4.35 4.22 4.22 4.46 3.994.46 3.99 4.27 4.27 3.79 3.79

5.30 5.82 5.30

6.25 5.55 6.25 5.55 5.78 5.78 5.61 5.61 5.85

4.21 4.85 4.21 4.75 4.26 4.75

Mathematics SL Film HL Film HL HL Theatre

4.26 4.46 4.464.88

14 14 14 52 52 11 11 10

5.70 5.67 5.67 5.85

23 27 27 13

5.85 5.73 5.73 5.29

13 102 102 31

5.30 5.305.67 5.325.67 5.32 5.06 5.06

6.30 6.30

6.15

Group 1 Group 4

58 18 18 83 83 40 40 72 72 23

156 16 16 34

10

5.30 6.25 5.55

4.69

8 No. of candidates 58

4.36 Psychology SL Chinese A: Language and Literature SL 5.25 5.82 5.78 5.61 4.35 Biology HL English A: Language and Literature HL 5.85 4.98 5.85 4.22 Biology SL English A: Language and Literature SL 5.63 5.10 5.325.72 4.46 Chemistry HL English A: Literature HL 4.72 5.70 3.99 Chemistry SL English A: Literature SL 5.78 5.03 5.67 4.27 Computer Science HL 5.82 French A: Language and Literature SL 5.33 3.79 Computer Science SL 6.11 Chinese B: Mandarin SL 5.93 5.85 4.65 Physics HL English B HL 5.75 5.736.13 5.29 4.06 Physics SL 5.33 French ab initio SL 4.93 4.88 4.95 Sports Exercise Science HL 6.57 French B HL 5.18 4.85 Further Mathematics HL 5.72 6.30 French B SL 5.01 5.30 4.21 4.96 Mathematical Studies SL 5.52 Spanish ab initio SL 5.67 4.75 Mathematics HL 5.73 Spanish B SL 5.08 5.32 4.26 Mathematics SL 5.64 Business Management HL 4.70 4.464.89 5.06 Film HL 5.92 Business Management SL 6.15 4.88 Theatre HL 5.88 5.13 Economics HL 5.48 4.48 Visual Arts HL 5.80 4.70 Economics SL

Philosophy SL

4.71

Psychology HL

4.69

Psychology SL

4.36

Biology HL

4.35

Biology SL

Chemistry SL

18 8 83 82 40 127 72 40 23 40 27 11 13 80 102 30 31 10 8 7 10 54 64 43 100 45 156 39 16 13 34 100 23 41

5.85

Theatre HL

27

31 8 6.30

4.85

100

5.67

4.75

10 64

5.30

4.21

13 102

5.29 4.95 4.88

Mathematics HL

Film HL

5.67 5.73

4.65

Further Mathematics HL

Mathematics SL

72 23

5.85

4.06

40

5.70

3.79

Sports Exercise Science HL

Mathematical Studies SL

83

5.32

4.27

Physics HL Physics SL

18

5.78

3.99

8 58

5.61

4.46

Computer Science HL Computer Science SL

6.25 5.55

4.22

Chemistry HL

31 8 8 10 10 64 64 100 100 156

11

5.82

4.71 UWCSEA Dover

14

40 4.97 4.15 Environ. Systems and Societies SL * Average scores are listed for subjects with seven or more candidates. Subjects with fewer 37 5.97 5.23 Geography HL candidates were: Chinese A: Literature HL; Dutch A: Language and Literature HL and SL; French 14 4.82and Literature5.86 Geography SLLiterature HL; German A: Language A: Language and HL and SL; Hindi A: Literature SL; Japanese A: Literature HL and SL; Korean A: Literature Literature14 SL 6.07 5.12 HL and SL; Self-taught Global Politics HL (Belarusian; Filipino; Georgian; Indonesian; Khmer; Modern Greek; Portuguese; Romanian; Russian; 5.80 5.02A: Language HistorySwahili; Asia andSwedish; OceaniaThai; HL Vietnamese); Spanish Slovenian; and Literature HL and52 SL; German B HL 11 and 5.82 HL; Sports Exercise 4.55 HL; Design Technology History SL and SL; Spanish B HL; Global Politics Health Science SL; Dance HL; Visual Art SL; Music HL; Music Group Performance SL; Theatre SL 10 5.30 4.94 Philosophy HL

10 8 8 58

5.32 5.85 5.325.70

4.65 4.06 4.65 5.29 4.06 4.95 4.88 4.95 4.88 4.85

Mathematical Studies SL Mathematics HL Mathematics HL Mathematics SL

40 37 37 14

Group 4

Group Group 3 3

Geography SL HL Global Politics Global Politics HLOceania HL History Asia and

Psychology HL Psychology SL Psychology Biology HL SL

5.97 5.97 5.86 5.86 6.07

4.825.23 4.825.12

Philosophy HL Philosophy SL Philosophy SL Psychology HL

Group Group 5 5

43 45 45 39

5.52 5.73 5.73 5.64

Spanish Spanish ab B SLinitio SL Spanish SL BusinessBManagement HL

History History Asia SL and Oceania HL History SL HL Philosophy

6oup 6

547 54 43

Group 2

30 10 107

Group 5

5.33 6.13 4.93 5.75 4.93 6.57 5.18 5.33 6.57 5.18 5.72 5.01 5.72 5.01 5.52 4.96

Group 6

11 80 80 30

Group 5

Group Group 2 2

French HL French B B SL French B SL Spanish ab initio SL

Environ. Systems Geography HL and Societies SL Geography HL Geography SL

4.94

14 52

5.80

5.02 4.55

37

Group 3

5.33 5.93 5.82 6.11 5.93 6.11 6.13 5.75

French ChineseA:B:Language Mandarinand SL Literature SL Chinese B: Mandarin SL English B HL English B HL French ab initio SL French ab initio SL French B HL

8 8 82

oup 6

Group Group 1 1

English HL English A: A: Language Language and and Literature Literature SL English A: A: Literature Language and English HL Literature SL

5.82 5.25 5.85 4.98 5.82 5.25 5.85 4.98 5.63 5.10 5.63 5.72 4.725.10

Economics HL Economics SL Economics SL Environ. Systems and Societies SL

Philosophy SL Worldwide Psychology HL

6.07

5.12

Global Politics HL

Philosophy HL No. of candidates No. of candidates

5.86

4.82

Geography SL

History Asia and Oceania HL

Worldwide UWCSEA Dover Worldwide UWCSEA Dover Chinese A: Language and Literature SL Chinese Languageand andLiterature LiteratureHL SL English A:A:Language

5.97

5.23

Geography HL

IBDP average score by subject*

40

4.97

4.15

History SL

41

5.80

4.70

Economics SL

156 | 31 Annual Report 2017/2018 5.32

4.26 4.46 4.88

16

5.06 6.15

34


EAST CAMPUS

254

Complete IB course listing for the Class of 2018 English is UWCSEA’s medium of instruction and courses are offered at both Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL) unless otherwise noted.

IB Diploma students

1.

Pass rate

98.0%

78.2%

UWCSEA East

Worldwide

Average IB Diploma score

Language A: Literature Taught

Chinese; English; Hindi (SL); Japanese; Korean (SL); Russian; Spanish

School Supported SelfTaught (SL)

Albanian; Danish; Dutch; Dzongka; Estonian; Filipino; French; German; Indonesian; Italian; Khmer; Laotian; Portuguese; Serbian; Swedish; Thai

Language A: Language and Literature

English

2. Language B or ab initio

36.2 29.8 UWCSEA East

3. Individuals and Societies Economics; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Geography; History; Psychology

Worldwide

4. Experimental Sciences

Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Design Technology; Environmental Systems and Societies (SL); Physics

5. Mathematics

Further Mathematics (HL); Mathematical Studies (SL); Mathematics

6. The Arts

Dance; Film; Music; Theatre; Visual Arts

IB Diploma score comparison 43–45 40–42

9.1% 2.1% 19.3% 5.6% 39.8%

35–39

18.1% 23.2% 26.6%

30–34 24–29 <24

Chinese B; English B (HL); French B; French ab initio (SL); Mandarin ab initio (SL); Spanish B; Spanish ab initio (SL)

6.7% 29.9%

ACT and SAT scores 84 members of the Class of 2018 took the ACT and 71 took the SAT. All scores, including those from non-native English speakers, are included.

2.0% 17.7%

UWCSEA East

28.3%

Range of middle 50% Worldwide

ACT

25

SAT Reading and Writing SAT Mathematics UWCSEA East students received a bilingual diploma

32 | Annual Report 2017/2018

SAT Composite

Mean

28.2 32 590 640 620

680 680

750 1210

1320

1410


5.39

Spanish B HL

5.23

Group Group 3 3

Geography HL Geography SL Geography SL History Asia and Oceania HL History History Asia SL and Oceania HL History SL HL Psychology Psychology HL Psychology SL Psychology Biology HL SL

Group Group 4 4

Biology HL Biology SL Biology SL Chemistry HL Chemistry HL Chemistry SL Chemistry SL Computer Science HL Computer HL Computer Science Science SL Computer Science SL Design Technology HL

roup Group 6 6

Group Group 5 5

Design Technology HL Physics HL Physics HL Physics SL Physics SL Mathematical Studies SL Mathematical Studies SL Mathematics HL Mathematics HL Mathematics SL Mathematics SL Film HL Film MusicHL HL Music HLHL Theatre Theatre HL Theatre SL

Group 3

6.29 6.00 6.00 5.71

5.71 4.96 5.48 5.41 4.965.39 5.41 5.39 5.08 5.08 5.13

5.916.30 5.91 6.13

4.70 5.13 4.15 4.70 4.94 4.15 5.234.94 4.825.23 4.82 5.02

4.35 4.22 4.22 4.46

3.994.46 3.99 4.27

3.79 4.27 3.79 4.48

4.48 4.65 4.06 4.65

4.06 4.21 4.21 4.75 4.26 4.75 4.26 4.46 4.46 4.62

4.62 4.88 4.88 4.28

6.13

5.81 5.816.14

397 407

40 103 103 40 40 16 16 43

60 10 10 32

6.10

32 18 18 18

5.06 5.67 5.67 5.68

5.20 5.91 5.20 6.26 6.26 5.22 6.57 6.57 6.67

15 66 66 65

65 122 122 19 19 9 9 21 21 6

Group 4Group 1

3.79 4.48 4.06

Music HL ab initio SL Mandarin Theatre Spanish HL ab initio SL

Group 5

4.26

4.75 4.93

60 39 10 62

5.736.10

5.06 5.94 5.06 6.11

6.54

5.67 5.37 4.64 5.68 6.31

4.65

Mathematics French B HL SL Film HLB SL French

Theatre Spanish SL B HL Visual Arts HL Spanish B SL

5.03

4.27

4.21

5.00 5.93 5.84 5.755.585.94

6.50 6.50

6.29 4.46 5.01 6.26 6.00 4.62 5.485.22 5.71 4.88 4.96

4.28

6.57

5.41

6.67 6.57 5.80 6.30

5.39

4.48 5.08

18 11 736 15 38 66 18 65 13

5.91 6.15

5.18 5.20

32 13 186

1227 19 29 97 21 39 67 15 40

Economics HL 103 5.13 5.91 * Average scores are listed for subjects with six or more candidates. Subjects with fewer candidates Economics SL 40 4.70 6.13 were: Chinese A: Literature HL; German A: Literature SL; Italian A: Literature SL; Japanese A: Environ. Systems and Societies SL 16 4.15 4.94 Literature HL and SL; Self-taught Literature SL (Albanian; Dutch; Dzongkha; Estonian; Filipino; French; Hungarian; Indonesian; Khmer; Lao; Portuguese; Serbian; Swedish; Thai); Spanish A: Geography HL 43 5.23 5.81 Literature HL and SL; ITGS HL; Design Technology SL; Further Mathematics HL; Dance HL; Film SL; Geography 7 4.82 6.14 Music SL; VisualSLArts SL History Asia and Oceania HL 29 5.02 5.90

4.55

History SL

4.69

Psychology HL Psychology SL

4.36

Biology HL

4.35

Biology SL Chemistry SL

Design Technology HL

Mathematical Studies SL

Film HL Music HL

23 60

5.67

10

6.10

32

5.06

3.79

18

5.06 4.48 4.65

4.06

5.67

18

5.68

73

5.00

4.21

15 5.58

4.75 4.26 4.62 4.88 4.28

66

5.91

65

5.20

4.46

Theatre HL Theatre SL

12 91

5.09

4.27

Mathematics HL Mathematics SL

71

3.99

Physics HL Physics SL

6

5.69 5.92

4.46

Computer Science HL Computer Science SL

5.67

5.46

4.22

Chemistry HL

18 73 73 15

5.00 5.68 5.00 5.58 5.58 5.91

Computer Science SLSL Korean A: Literature Design Technology HLSL Russian A: Literature

3.99

Mathematical English B HL Studies SL Mathematics HLSL French ab initio

91 23 23 60

5.09 5.67 5.676.10

Chemistry SL English A: Literature SL Computer Science Hindi A: Literature HL SL

Physics ChineseHL B: Mandarin HL Physics ChineseSL B: Mandarin SL

71 12 12 91

5.465.92 5.095.46

5.22

297 397

29 6 6 71

5.67 5.69 5.69 5.92

5.06 5.06 5.06

137 297

437 297

6.14 5.90 5.90 5.67

4.555.02 4.55 4.69

4.69 4.36 4.36 4.35

6.57 6.57 6.30

38 18 18 13

128 91 28 23 104

5.92 5.52 5.75 4.35 4.98 5.46 6.04 Biology SLLanguage and Literature SL 4.22 English A: 5.10 5.09 5.71 Chemistry HL 4.46 5.67 English A: Literature HL 4.72 5.79

Group 2

5.18 5.01 5.015.48

Spanish initio SL Spanish ab B HL Spanish B HL Spanish B SL

Economics SL Environ. Systems and Societies SL Environ. Systems Geography HL and Societies SL

5.94 6.15 6.15 6.29

11 6 6 38

5.69

4.69

Group 6

4.93 4.93 5.18

5.75

13 6 6 11

6 No. of candidates 71

Group 3

Group Group 2 2

6.50 5.936.31 5.84 6.50 5.93 5.84 5.75 5.94

French B SL Mandarin ab initio SL Mandarin initio Spanish ababinitio SLSL

Spanish B SLHL Economics Economics HL Economics SL

6.50

39 62 62 13

Group 4

Russian Chinese A: B: Literature Mandarin SL HL Chinese B: HL Chinese B: Mandarin Mandarin SL

French initio SL French ab B HL French B B SL HL French

6.54 6.54 6.50

5.94 6.11 6.11 5.37 4.64 5.37 4.64 6.31

Hindi A:A:Literature Korean LiteratureSLSL Korean A: Russian A:Literature LiteratureSL SL

Chinese Mandarin SL English BB:HL English B HL French ab initio SL

5.79 5.73 5.945.73

5.03

28 104 104 39

5.716.04 5.71 5.79

Group 5

English HL English A: A: Literature Literature SL English A: Literature SL Hindi A: Literature SL

4.725.10 4.72 5.03

8 8 28

5.75 5.75 6.04

5.67

4.36

Psychology SL Chinese A: Literature SL Biology HL English A: Language and Literature HL

Group 6

Group Group 1 1

English HL English A: A: Language Language and and Literature Literature SL English A: Language and Literature SL English A: Literature HL

5.52 4.98 5.52 4.98 5.10

29

5.90

4.55 UWCSEA East

7

6.14

5.02

History Asia and Oceania HL

43

5.81

4.82

Geography SL History SL Worldwide Psychology HL

16

4.94

Geography HL

No. of candidates No. of candidates

40

6.13

4.15

Environ. Systems and Societies SL

7 40 103

5.91

4.70

Economics SL

Worldwide UWCSEA East Worldwide UWCSEA East Chinese A: Literature SL Chinese Literatureand SL Literature HL English A:A:Language

6.30

5.13

Economics HL

IBDP average score by subject*

6.57

5.08

Spanish B SL

122

6.26 19 Annual Report 2017/2018 5.22 9 | 33 6.57 6.67

21 6


DESTINATIONS OF CLASS OF 2018

UNIVERSITY DESTINATIONS

COLLEGE

Below is a list of universities that UWCSEA students were accepted to between 2016 and 2018. Gap Year 10%

31% USA

National Service 8%

Trinity College, Dublin

Australian National University

University College Cork

Bond University

Other 1% Asia/Middle East 4% Canada 6.5%

Deakin University

Europe 7% Australia 7.5%

AUSTRALIA

25% UK

University College Dublin

Monash College

JAPAN

Monash University

Doshisha University

National Institute of Dramatic Art

Keio University

University of Melbourne

Keio University Mita

University of New South Wales

Okayama University

University of Queensland

Sophia University

University of Sydney

Temple University Japan Tokyo University of Science

DOVER CAMPUS Gap Year 8%

37% USA

Brock University

McGill University

Asia 5%

McMaster University

Europe 6% 27% UK

EAST CAMPUS 25% USA

MIDDLE EAST NYU Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Northwestern University in Qatar

Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University

NETHERLANDS

Quest University Canada

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam

Simon Fraser University

Erasmus University College

University of Alberta

Fontys Hogescholen

University of British Columbia

Hanzehogeschool Groningen

University of Toronto

Hogeschool van Amsterdam

University of Waterloo

Hotelschool The Hague

Western University

Leiden University College The Hague

York University

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Technische Universiteit Delft

Gap Year 12% Asia/Middle East 3% Canada 7%

HONG KONG

Technische Universiteit Eindhoven

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Tilburg University

SCAD Hong Kong

Universiteit Twente

University of Hong Kong

Universiteit van Amsterdam

Universiteit Leiden

University College Utrecht

Europe 8%

34 | Annual Report 2017/2018

Waseda University School of International Liberal Studies

Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Australia 3%

Australia 12%

Acadia University

Concordia University

Other 2%

National Service 10%

Waseda University

Carleton University

National Service 6%

Canada 6%

CANADA

23% UK

IRELAND National University of Ireland, Cork

PHILIPPINES

National University of Ireland, Galway

Ateneo de Manila University

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

University of the Philippines Diliman


REST OF ASIA

Norwich University of the Arts

University of Stirling

Oxford Brookes University

University of Surrey

Queen Mary, University of London

University of the Arts London

Queen’s University Belfast

University of the West of England, Bristol

École hôtelière de Lausanne

Regent’s University London

University of Warwick

ETH Zurich

Royal Holloway, University of London

University of Westminster

Royal Veterinary College

University of Winchester

REST OF EUROPE

Les Roches International School of Hotel Management

University of York

ESSEC Business School (France)

University of Fribourg

School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

University of St. Gallen

Solent University, Southampton

UNITED STATES

International Medical University (Malaysia) NYU Shanghai (China) PSG Institute of Medical Science & Research (India)

Sciences Po - Columbia University (France)

Instituto Europeo di Design - Madrid Campus

SWITZERLAND

St George’s, University of London

Universita Bocconi (Italy)

THAILAND

University of Freiburg (Germany)

Chulalongkorn University

Vienna University of Economics (Austria)

King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Thonburi

SINGAPORE James Cook University Singapore LASALLE College of the Arts Nanyang Technological University National University of Singapore S P Jain School of Global Management Singapore Management University

Architectural Association School of Architecture

University of Birmingham

Bath Spa University Brunel University London Canterbury Christ Church University

Singapore University of Technology and Design

City University of London Durham University

Yale-NUS College

Edinburgh Napier University Goldsmiths, University of London

SOUTH AFRICA

Guildford School of Acting

Stellenbosch University

Heriot-Watt University

SOUTH KOREA

Imperial College London

Seoul National University Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology Hongik University

SPAIN IE University – Segovia

University for the Creative Arts at Farnham University of Aberdeen

Singapore University of Social Sciences

Sogang University

University College London

UNITED KINGDOM

Cardiff University

Yonsei University

The London School of Economics and Political Science

Hull York Medical School King’s College London Kingston College Lancaster University Leeds College of Art Loughborough University Manchester Metropolitan University MetFilm School, London Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts Newcastle University

University of Bath University of Brighton University of Bristol University of Cambridge University of Central Lancashire University of Dundee University of East Anglia University of Edinburgh University of Essex University of Exeter University of Glasgow University of Hull University of Kent University of Leeds University of Leicester University of Manchester University of Nottingham University of Oxford University of Plymouth University of Reading University of Sheffield University of Southampton University of St Andrews

American University Babson College Bard College Barnard College Baylor University Bennington College Bentley University Berklee College of Music Boston College Boston University Bowdoin College Brandeis University Brigham Young University Brown University Bryant University Bucknell University California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Carleton College Carnegie Mellon University Chapman University Claremont McKenna College Clark University Colby College College of the Atlantic College of William & Mary Colorado College Colorado State University Columbia University Cornell University Annual Report 2017/2018 | 35


Creighton University

Oxford College of Emory University

The New School

University of Texas at Austin

Dartmouth College

Pennsylvania State University

University of Virginia

Davidson College

Pepperdine University

The New School, Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts

Drexel University

Pitzer College

University of Wisconsin, Madison

Duke University

Pomona College

The New School, Parsons School of Design

Earlham College

Pratt Institute

Emory University

Princeton University

Fordham University

Purdue University

Franklin & Marshall College

Rhode Island School of Design

Georgetown University

Rice University

Georgia Institute of Technology

Ringling College of Art and Design

Harvard University

San Diego State University

Harvey Mudd College

Santa Clara University

Haverford College

Sarah Lawrence College

Indiana University at Bloomington

Savannah College of Art and Design

Ithaca College

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Johns Hopkins University

School of Visual Arts

Lake Forest College

Scripps College

Lehigh University

Skidmore College

Lewis & Clark College

Smith College

Loyola Marymount University

St. Francis College

Luther College

St. Lawrence University

Macalester College

St. Olaf College

Manhattan School of Music

Stanford University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Suffolk University

Methodist University

Swarthmore College

Middlebury College

Syracuse University

New York Institute of Technology

Texas Christian University

New York University

The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina

Northeastern University Northwestern University Occidental College

36 | Annual Report 2017/2018

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art The George Washington University

Trinity College Tufts University University of Arizona University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Riverside University of California, San Diego University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Cruz University of Chicago University of Colorado Boulder University of Florida University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign University of Maryland, College Park University of Miami University of Michigan University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Notre Dame University of Oklahoma University of Pennsylvania University of Rochester University of San Diego University of San Francisco University of Southern California

University of Washington Vanderbilt University Wartburg College Wellesley College Wheaton College Massachussetts Williams College Worcester Polytechnic Institute Yale University


(I)GCSE JUNE 2018 IN NUMBERS In June 2018, students on both campuses completed the (I)GCSE exams. Results of the exams from both campuses are below. In previous years, UWCSEA results were compared with the Independent Schools Council (ISC) published averages, a group of UK independent schools that were seen as the closest possible comparison to UWCSEA. However, during the 2016/2017 school year, the ISC moved to a new way of assessing and reporting on GCSE exams: away from the A*–F model and towards a number system that has more in common with the IB Diploma assessment process. As most of the UWCSEA courses are (I)GCSE rather than GCSE exams (most particularly English, Mathematics and Science) and these are still reported in the A*–F format, we lost a valid worldwide comparison. It is therefore not possible to show a valid comparison with previous years, so results for 2017/2018 are shown below in isolation.

DOVER CAMPUS

EAST CAMPUS

301

204

Students

6.08

Average (out of a possible seven in each subject)

%A*– A 73% %A*– C 99% %A*– E 100%

Students

5.92

Average (out of a possible seven in each subject)

%A*– A 69% %A*– C 97% %A*– E 100%

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 37


38 | Annual Report 2017/2018


THE ARTS IN THE ACADEMIC CURRICULUM Much of the artistic pursuit at the College takes place through the activities element of the learning programme. However, the emphasis on music, drama, dance, film and visual arts in the Academic programme ensures that students who are strongly interested in this area can participate deeply in the artistic process. For further information on the Arts, please see the Activities section of this report.

DRAMA As usual, the Drama and Theatre departments on both campuses supported and extended student learning through a series of performance opportunities, workshops, collaborations across departments and Artist in Residence programmes. The enhancement of the Drama programme through these experiences allows students to broaden and deepen their understanding of the professional world of theatre and drama through their engagement with industry specialists.

DOVER CAMPUS

EAST CAMPUS

• Grade 12 Collaborative Project Performances

• IB Theatre trip to the National Institute of Dramatic Arts, Sydney (Australia)

• Jennifer Hartley, Theatre Versus Oppression - Theatre of the Oppressed Workshops with Grade 11 and 12 students, culminating in a Forum Theatre session with domestic workers from H.O.M.E who have survived abuse • Residential weekend intensive workshops in Physical Theatre, Butoh and Suzuki workshops with Mark Hill for Grade 11 and 12 students • Commedia dell’Arte workshop with Marco Luly for Grade 11 and 12 students

• Grade 12 IBDP Theatre Collaborative Project Performances showcase • Grade 12 IBDP Theatre Solo Performances showcase • Grade 11 IBDP Theatre production, Everyman by Carol Ann Duffy • GCSE Drama Examination Performance showcase • Zen Zen Zo (New Zealand), Artist-in-Residence

• IB Theatre Showcase production, Naturally Absurd

• Frantic Assembly (UK), Artist-in-Residence

• GCSE Drama Group Performance Exams (Grade 10)

• Shane Anthony, Artist-in-Residence

• GCSE Drama Devised Performance Exams (Grade 9)

• Middle School NIDA trip

• FIB Drama Showcase

• Debbie Kidd and Louise Clark, Artist-in-Residence

• High School Dance platform

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 39


MUSIC The Music programmes on both campuses continued to challenge students to a high participation and performance level. On Dover, the annual OPUS concert, featuring over 400 students, gave students in Middle and High Schools the opportunity to perform in this iconic venue, including a finale given by the combined choirs, vocal soloist and the Chamber Players which feature music from Georges Bizet’s opera ‘Carmen’. The Finale and Encore concerts, at the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music provided further opportunities for performance at professional venues, while the various ensembles continued to perform at concerts on campus throughout the year. In July 2018, 22 students from the Dover String Programme formed an orchestra to compete in the prestigious Summa Cum Laude International Youth Festival and Competition held in the Golden Hall of the Vienna Musikverein. The festival included 1,500 musicians from 16 countries. Our young musicians competed against older and more experienced conservatoire orchestras, and before an internationally renowned jury, to obtain ‘5th Place with Excellent Success’ in the String Orchestra category. The students also gave a concert in the church at Probstdorf, to raise money for German language lessons for refugees from Afghanistan who are integrating into the local community. On East, the Head of Music continued to be part of the review team writing the new IB Diploma music curriculum. In High School, seven of the sixth graduating class of 2018 went on to study performance and the arts at university level, while 15 of the 23 students taking music at (I)GCSE received A*/A. In Middle School and High School, the focus on implementing the articulated curriculum in music and connecting it further to other aspects of the learning programme continued. There continued to be several developments with music in the service programme, with the ongoing relationships with Epic Arts including workshops, rehearsals and collaborative performances as well as a visit of the music team to Kampot to service the recording studio and work with students. The music department also supported fundraising and awareness-raising for the Focus Africa GC. In Singapore (Local) Service, music students worked with patients with alzheimer’s at APEX Harmony Lodge and provided drum therapy sessions on campus to adults with intellectual disability.

VISUAL ARTS The Visual Arts programme continues to stimulate students to a level of creativity and artistry that is unusual in schools. Visual art students at UWCSEA get exceptionally high results in their IBDP exams and there are UWCSEA Art alumni at every top Art school in Europe and the USA, including those with the most challenging entry requirements. 40 | Annual Report 2017/2018


LEARNING PROGRAMME: ACTIVITIES The College offers an extensive Activities programme from K1 onwards. The programme aims to complement the academic curriculum by providing a broad and balanced range of ‘real life’ vehicles beyond the ‘classroom’ for students to learn and apply the qualities and skills of UWCSEA’s learner profile. Choice is a key principle of the programme and students are encouraged to pursue their passions and in particular to select activities where they can work positively with others towards achieving collective goals. Often a starting point for developing lifelong interests, the programme aids students to develop their personal identity and is one of the key reasons why students feel such a part of UWCSEA’s vibrant community. Students at Dover and East are vital to the building and the leadership of the activities programmes. Councils in JS, MS and HS are responsible for giving a student voice in what activities are offered and from Sports Councils to College Publications and Academic Societies, UWCSEA students take important leadership roles. Some statistical highlights of the Activities programme can be seen below.

2,829

2,408

Dover students involved in activities

East students involved in activities

PARTICIPATION The chart below shows the average number of activities that students in each grade take throughout the year. It indicates that students in all grades are taking full advantage of the offerings from the Activities programme.

8

9

10

Activities at Dover Campus 9

8

6

K1

8 5

K2

G1

G2

G3

Activities at East Campus

G4

G5

5

G6

5

G7

4

G8

5

4

5

4

9 8

7

8

8 6

5

5

5

3

G9 G10 FIB G11 G12

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

5

4

4

5 3

G9 G10 FIB G11 G12

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 41


SPORTS AND WELLNESS Dover and East campuses offer wide ranging Representative Sports Programmes which are supported by Non-Representative Sports and Fitness and Wellness activities. Sport is an integral part of school life at UWCSEA. Our goal is to involve, excite and motivate our students in physical activity. We offer a vibrant, exciting programme of competitive and non-competitive sporting activities to encourage maximum participation, individual aspiration, team achievement and personal excellence. Our local conference, ACSIS (Athletic Conference of Singapore International Schools), is the Premier Sports Conference in Singapore, which includes 39 international schools. SEASAC (South East Asia Student Activities Conference) is the College’s overseas international conference. There are 16 school members and schools participate across 14 sports, MUN and an Arts Festival. In 2017/2018, once again Dover and East had the highest participation rates at ACSIS level of any schools in Singapore. The campuses also hosted a whole series of sports events and travelled extensively to overseas sporting events. 50% of the sports programmes at UWCSEA are non-competitive or fitness and wellness activities. Through a very broad range of physical activities, students at UWCSEA are given the opportunity to pursue their sporting passions and talents in order to develop their physical sporting capabilities and to further their personal lifelong fitness, health and wellness.

DEVELOPMENTS IN THE ACTIVITIES PROGRAMME ON EAST CAMPUS During the 2017/2018 year, the Activities team on East Campus went through a process of reorganising the offering as follows: • Arts and Performance: Activities that promote visual, auditory and movement expression. Originality, collaboration and perseverance are important skills. • Mind Matters: These activities require students to inquire, question and make connections. Mind Matters focuses on problem solving, analysis and evaluation in a variety of different settings. • Create and Innovate: These activities encourage students to unleash curiosity, generate new possibilities and alternative ideas. Students are encouraged to be original, adaptable and to improvise whether working with engines, food or robotics. • Wellness for Life: These activities will develop an understanding of the relationship between a healthy body and a healthy mind. The value of self discipline, awareness and confidence are important aspects as you invest in your body and mind. • Learn and Lead: Communicate and lead through collaboration in diverse settings. You will assume shared responsibility and resolve issues whilst working with others. Flexibility, adaptability and cooperation will be required to develop trust and influence as a leader. • Dragon Sports: Representative sports promote confidence, resilience and determination throughout a wide variety of competitive sports on offer. Commitment, dedication and sportsmanship are essential components of sport. This reorganisation allowed students to think about their participation in the Activities programme in terms of the activity itself, and the skills and qualities it will help them to develop.

42 | Annual Report 2017/2018


ive Sport entat so s e ffe r p re Re cro

e College ss th

Vo l

Softball

oys )

by ( b

Rug

Ne

tb

all

(gi

rls )

le

yb

e be ris eF ld at fie nd tim Ul ck a irls) a Tr ch (g Tou is Tenn g Swimmin

int on Bask etba ll Climbing Cricket (boys) try coun l s s o Cr bal t o s Fo tic s a y mn cke y o G H

da

dm

Sailing

Ba

al

l

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 43


355 1,227 students taking instrumental exams

students participating in the Instrumental Teaching Programme across the College

THE ARTS DOVER ENSEMBLES

EAST ENSEMBLES

Chamber Players

High School Symphony Orchestra

Senior Strings

Sonos (the choir)

Symphonic Band

Sonos Boys (male voices)

Jazz Band

Bersama (the specialist choir)

HS Percussion Ensemble

Pamberi All Stars

Cantabile

Chimanga Marimba

Singers

Chiongotere Mbira

Concert Strings

High School Jazz Band

The Band

High School Jazz Combos

Brass Band

Middle School Symphony Orchestra

MS Woodwind Ensemble

East Vocal Project and Singers

Intermediate Jazz Band

Karibu Marimba Express

Camerata

Karibu Marimba Moja

MS Percussion Ensemble

Middle School Jazz Band

Arioso

Caribe Samba Band

Intermediate Band

Rock School

Intermediate Strings

Kutandara Marimba Ensembles

Beginner Band

Strings United

Recorder Ensemble

Band Together

Grade 5 Choir

Ukulele Grooves

Junior Singers

Xylophone Ensemble

Prelude Strings

Grade 2 Choir

Ukulele Club

Global Voices EPIC Samba PS Music Ambassadors Chamber Ensembles

INSTRUMENTAL TEACHING PROGRAMME – INSTRUMENTS OFFERED Woodwind – recorder, flute, clarinet, saxophone, oboe, bassoon; Brass – trumpet, cornet, horn, tenor horn, baritone, trombone, tuba, euphonium; Strings – violin, viola, cello, double bass; Percussion (including drumkit); Voice; Guitar – Classical, Electric and Acoustic; Bass guitar; Ukulele; Mbira; North Indian Harmonium, Tabla and Vocals; Piano – Classical, Popular and Jazz; Chinese Guzheng 44 | Annual Report 2017/2018


MS AND HS DANCE AND DRAMA PRODUCTIONS DOVER CAMPUS Title

Number of students

The Short Form (student directed)

60 students

UN Night

350 students; profits to Theatre Versus Oppression

IB Theatre Showcase Production

28 students

On the Razzle (Grade 9 and 10)

30 students

Treasure Island (Grade 8)

35 students

Theatresports

25 students

AFTERLIFE - Student Dance Show

50 students

Amadeus (Grade 9 and FIB)

18 students

The Madness of George III (Grade 6 and 7)

30 students

Pool No Water (Grade 11)

10 students

The Importance of Being Earnest (Grade 11 student directed production)

15 students

EAST CAMPUS Title

Number of students

CultuRama

250 students

Candide a new version by Mark Ravenhill

40 students

The Odyssey by Hattie Naylor

60 students

Emil and the Detectives (Middle School Scripted Production)

46 students

Exhibition (Middle School Drama Devising Group)

40 students

Middle School Drama Club

15 students

Yerma by Federico Garcia Lorca

8 students

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 45


LEARNING PROGRAMME: OUTDOOR EDUCATION The Outdoor Education programme is a powerful part of the UWCSEA experience, providing students from Grade 1 to Grade 12 with opportunities to develop their independence, teamwork and resilience. During 2017/2018 the outdoor education programme gave experiential learning opportunities to all students from Grade 1 to Grade 9. Students in

Grade 10 had the opportunity to choose an expedition, while students in Grade 11 participated in Project Week. There were some specific challenges in 2017/2018, including the cancellatino of the Dover Grade 5 trip to Bali as a result of the volcanic activity on the island.

STUDENT HOURS SPENT OVERSEAS

STAFF/PARENT HOURS SPENT OVERSEAS

OPTIONAL TRIPS

400,848

32,305

Middle School Enrichment trips

Dover student hours

Dover staff/parent hours

New Zealand Adventure

Vietnam Service and Curriculum Trip

Skiing and snowboarding in Verbier

Spain Cultural Immersion Tour

Learn to Ski in Japan

France Cultural Immersion Tour

Tabitha History Housebuilding

China Cultural Immersion Tour

High School Adventure trips

285,096

31,101

East student hours

East staff/parent hours

Biodiversity and Research programme, Borneo

Japan Spring Cherry Blossoms

China Climb

Mountain Biking, Outback Australia

Horse Riding Expedition, Outback Australia

Outer Island Sea Kayaking, Malaysia

Japan Autumn Colours Treck

Tall Ship Sailing, Leeuwin, Australia

Maldives Whale Shark Research programme

Ladakh Expedition

Canoe, Trek, Cave the Outback, Australia Paddle Nepal Sichuan/Tibetan Culture Trek

163,176

21,305

Dover and East student hours on combined trips

Dover and East staff/parent hours on combined trips

849,120 84,711 College student hours

46 | Annual Report 2017/2018

College staff/parent hours

Bhutan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Adventures in a mystical land Himalayan Rafting Adventure

Langkawi Adventurous Journey

Mount Kenya Climb Mongolia Amazing Adventures Bowron Lakes Canoe, Canada European Alps South Wales Adventure

Hong Kong Trecking Japan Mountain Winter Snowshoe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Shiga Nowaza

6,170

39

times a student participated in an overseas trip

cross-campus trips


COMPULSORY EXPEDITIONS

K1-2

Weekly outdoor experiences on campus

G1

Overnight stay in their classroom

G2

Overnight camp at Singapore Zoo

G3

Three-day forest adventure in Gunung Ledang, Malaysia

G4

Four-day trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G5

Five-day adventure camp in Gopeng, Malaysia

G6

Five-day trip to Tioman Island in Malaysia

G7

Five-day sea kayaking trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G8

Eleven-day trip to Chiang Mai in Thailand

G9

Students join at least one of over 20 expeditions from trekking in Nepal, Japan, Wales, Ladakh or France to tall ship sailing in Malaysia or Australia

FIB

Seven-day trip to Nan in Thailand (Dover) Six-day trip to Tioman Island in Malaysia (East)

G11

Project Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;independently planned trips by small groups of students Annual Report 2017/2018 | 47


er

of countries

ed

31

v t isi

Num b

COUNTRIES VISITED THROUGH THE OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAMME

Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United Kingdom, United States, Vietnam

48 | Annual Report 2017/2018


LEARNING PROGRAMME: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL EDUCATION The Personal and Social Education (PSE) programme helps to ensure that students feel secure and valued, as well as encouraged in their learning, growth and social development. Through the programme students explore how they are connecting to their learning, friends, family, technology and the outside world. Self-confidence and self-esteem are built through all aspects of the learning programme, and their interactions at the College contribute to a student’s personal and social education. Making PSE a unique strand within the programme ensures that time is dedicated to this important part of the student experience, but student welfare also includes safeguarding, learning support, counselling, university advising as well as the work of the tutor/mentor, Heads of Grade and Vice Principals in supporting socio-emotional needs of students. All members of staff have a responsibility for the well-being of students. The learning support and counselling teams are central and they work closely with teachers to ensure that students are supported both within and outside of the classroom. During the 2017/2018 year, the rationale and standards for the PSE curriculum from K1 to Grade 12 were implemented further with students. Broadly, the content can be classified into three overarching concepts: individual well-being; relationships and community (interpersonal) well-being; and student ability to engage with global issues (global wellbeing). These concepts are revisited each year in a spiral structure, increasing the understanding and skills of students at age-appropriate developmental levels. An increased focus on child protection continued with all staff taking training in identifying and responding to child protection concerns.

PSE IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS In Dover High School there was a focus on collaboration, with students more involved in determining the curriculum planning activities and managing aspects of delivering the programme. At the same time, mentors shared best practice and strategies to elicit meaningful discussions as a consolidation of the Personal and Social Philosophy (PSP) and Philosophy for Children (P4C) training. The team also took steps to articulate and include age-appropriate safeguarding education in the High School PSE programme. On East Campus, there was an ongoing focus on PSE curriculum and lesson refinement in each grade, with the significant development in Grade 12. Aware that this grade is a more challenging year than others, the leadership team sought ways to give extra attention to resiliency and self-management skills which would allow students to meet the challenges and better set them up for what lies ahead after graduation. A group lead by the High School Head of PSE looked at this and has developed a 40 minutes a week programme for Grade 11. The aim is to pro-actively prepare for an intense year, and support students in matters such as selfawareness, self-talk, peer support, deeper study and time-management skills.

PSE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOLS In Dover Middle School PSE was delivered across subject areas, daily Advisory sessions and weekly Life Skills lessons. In Advisory, Circle Solutions continued to be at the core of the PSE delivery in an inclusive and safe environment . Circle Solutions is a philosophy for healthy relationships and a pedagogy for teaching them. In Circle activities the focus was on building relationships through inclusion, respect and quality. Students attended a weekly Life Skills lesson which focused on specific skills to encourage a healthy lifestyle, build positive emotions, promote growth mindset and practice mindfulness. An audit of the Safe Practices Online curriculum culminated in a more relevant and dynamic programme which was reinforced in a series of practical workshops for parents including ‘Growing up Digital’ and ‘Demystifying Social Media’. Increasing student awareness of Safeguarding practices and expectations was a priority of the Middle School and explicit units were developed to ensure this was embedded in the Life Skills curriculum.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 49


50 | Annual Report 2017/2018


On East Campus the PSE programme is delivered through Mentor Time, Middle School Expeditions and Life Skills. During 2017/2018, Middle School PSE saw the further incorporation of Mindfulness into the curriculum. Grade 7 teachers benefited from professional learning around Mindfulness. In addition, the teams began exploring the piloting of a House System in the Middle School to encourage community building and student voice began. The House structure will allow for specific activities focusing on academics, performance and sport. An ongoing focus on digital citizenship included workshops with parents so that they can support students in this critical area.

PSE IN THE INFANT AND JUNIOR SCHOOLS During 2017/2018, Dover Junior School focused on the development and implementation of the five expectations that sit alongside the UWCSEA profile. These expectations aim to help children develop the qualities of a UWC student in an age appropriate and accessible way. The 5 Expectations are used across classrooms to frame the general classroom agreements and guide Circle Solutions lessons as well as restorative conversations. Circle Solutions remains an important part of the PSE programme in Junior School. Circles follow a predictable routine that allows students to identify and share their strengths and develop strategies to manage different social situations. In the Infant School, teachers began to explore and implement ideas and strategies from the Responsive Classroom approach, which aligns with the UWCSEA Learner Profile. This framework helps to promote safe, joyful, and engaging classroom and school communities. The emphasis is on helping students develop their academic, social, and emotional skills in a learning environment that is developmentally responsive to their strengths and needs. Teachers also focused on the first six weeks of school as a distinct and critical time for establishing classroom expectations and practices. This period has four overarching goals: creating a climate of warmth, inclusion and safety; teaching classroom routines and behaviour expectations; helping students get to know each other and care for the classroom and school environment; and establishing expectations for academic work. On East Campus in the Primary School there was further examination of the role of Mindfulness. The PSE mentors reviewed vertical alignments within specific standards and conceptual understanding in the PSE curriculum. Teachers also looked at commonality of morning meetings routines and content and how to ensure that the messages in assemblies supported the work teachers were doing in class.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 51


LEARNING PROGRAMME: SERVICE The UWCSEA Service programme empowers students to become aware, able and active contributors to the community, whether on campus, locally in Singapore or internationally with a project in a developing country. Service is at the heart of our mission, and service activities are a vital part of the learning programme. UWCSEA believes in the transformative nature of the experience of serving others and in the responsibility we have to one another and the planet. The Service programme fosters empathy and helps students to recognise that part of being human is seeking opportunities to put yourself aside in the service of others. We do service at UWCSEA so that students can actively contribute to resolving social and environmental problems, both locally and globally. We want our students to deepen their understanding of why these problems exist but also to realise that everyone can play a part in shaping a better world. We expect our students to be compassionate and responsible. Service allows students to put these values into action while also offering them an experiential learning opportunity that is rewarding in terms of personal growth. UWCSEA is recognised as a model of how dedicated and regular service cultivates an ongoing commitment in students to meaningful action in their community and beyond. The value of the Service programme to the organisations and people our students interact with can be measured in many ways. But the greatest impact is on our students, as they put their ideals and values into action and grow as compassionate people and active agents of change.

FUNDRAISING FOR SERVICE Money raised by students through the UWCSEA Service programme (All money raised at the College is independently audited annually.)

$827,136

$402,095

Dover

East

BREAKDOWN OF COLLEGE FUNDRAISING FOR SERVICE

Global Concerns $1,229,231

$12,098 Initiative for Peace

$379,788 SEALinks

52 | Annual Report 2017/2018

$1,229,231

Total


Annual Report 2017/2018 | 53


54 | Annual Report 2017/2018


STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENTS IN 2017/2018 During the 2017/2018 year, the College began a significant review of the fundraising aspect of the Service programme in view of Singapore regulations regarding fundraising and cash collection. This resulted in adaptations to the Global Concerns programme in particular, while the focused remained on continuing to deliver positive learning outcomes for students. At the same time the College began building even closer links with Singapore partners who work with students through the Local Singapore Service programme. Through the Singapore Service programme, students take action to address systemic issues that are of particular concern for Singapore, such as income inequality and its attendant educational imbalance and the challenges of an ageing population. This deepens their understanding of Singapore and they build ongoing relationships with the Singapore community that enrich the lives of all. UWCSEA was registered with the National Council of Social Service (NCSS) in 1970. More than 40 years later in May 2012 our then Head of Local Service, Cathy Elliott, accepted a special award from former President Tony Tan in recognition of the contribution UWCSEA students have made to the Movement for Intellectually Disabled in Singapore (MINDS) over a 40-year partnership. According to the NCSS, 64% of volunteers volunteer as a ‘one-off’ event. At UWCSEA, older students volunteer at least once a week for a year and our Service programme is founded on long-term, sustainable and mutually beneficial partnerships. Our older students commit to at least one year of service, and will often continue with the partnership the following year. Teachers and service leaders will lead the same service for years, building close friendships with their counterpart in the partner organisation and with the beneficiaries themselves. The UWCSEA K-12 Service Learning Programme Standard 3 states that “by taking informed, purposeful action, individuals and groups can act as changemakers, contributing to the sustainable development of local and global communities.” The action taken by students varies but it is always founded on a deep understanding of the issues and of the people. Feedback from the partner and reflection and adjustment throughout the partnership ensure that the relationship is reciprocal.

SERVICE BY THE NUMBERS

53

service partners in Singapore

63,000

volunteer hours given to our Singapore partners

1.5

average number of hours volunteered weekly by students and service leaders

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 55


56 | Annual Report 2017/2018


OUR COMMUNITY Annual Report 2017/2018 | 57


OUR COMMUNITY The UWC South East Asia community is a vibrant, truly international group of individuals, united in a common purpose. This section of the report provides some statistics and information about our community.

ENROLMENT 2017/2018

LANGUAGES

TRANSITION

58

6.2%

DOVER CAMPUS Students: 3,000 268

88

88

K1

K2

112

134

155

178

201

289 296

332 320 270

222

languages spoken at Dover Campus

students leaving Dover Campus

47 G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

EAST CAMPUS Students: 2,557

88 K1

112

132

160 156

177 178

200 198 202

222

252 255 201

58

24 K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

languages spoken at East Campus

7.8%

students leaving East Campus

COLLEGE TOTAL Students: 5,557

584 575

466

491

518 471

422 355 294

379

69

311

244 176

languages spoken across the College

200

71 K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

58 | Annual Report 2017/2018

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

6.9% leavers across the College


NATIONALITY SPREAD 15.4% India Others 28.2% (76 nationalities)

86

14.7% UK China 2.8% nationalities in Netherlands 2.9% Dover Campus France 3.5% 8.9% USA Korea 4.1% Japan 5.0% 7.6% Australia Singapore 6.9%

22.8% India

Others 23.1% (65 nationalities)

75

13.9% UK France 2.3% nationalities in Korea 2.8% East Campus Canada 3.1% China 4.0% 9.1% USA Japan 4.0% 9.0% Australia Singapore 5.9%

18.8% India

Others 24.0% (90 nationalities)

Canada 2.8% France 2.9% China 3.4% Korea 3.5%

100

14.3% UK

nationalities in the College

Japan 4.5% Singapore 6.5%

9.0% USA 8.2% Australia Annual Report 2017/2018 | 59


76

28

Nationalities

Languages spoken

BOARDERS Kurt Hahn, the founder of the United World College movement, believed the experience of boarding with other young people from around the world should be at the heart of UWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s philosophy. In 2017/2018, the residential communities on Dover and East Campuses were home to 342 boarders with 76 nationalities, who live together and are nurtured in a challenging but safe environment. College

Dover Campus

178

Dover Campus

342

boarders across the College

East Campus 136

106

61

30%

52

11 6 5 G8

32

34

19

18

13 G9

60 | Annual Report 2017/2018

75 54

16

23 8 15

G10 IGCSE

G10 FIB

G11

G12

boarders who are scholars

164

East Campus


SCHOLARS In 2017/2018, the UWCSEA scholarship programme supported 102 scholars from 57 countries. Some scholars are selected by the College directly, but many are selected through their country National Committees. The National Committees is a network of volunteers, who operate in 156 countries worldwide. The UWC national committee system selects more than 1,000 students each year from within their countries and territories to attend UWC schools, colleges and programmes. They organise camps, a range of activities and formal interviews to establish studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; commitment to UWC values and potential to thrive throughout the UWC experience. In some cases, they also raise funds for scholarships for students. Many of the UWCSEA scholars have entered the College through this system. Other UWCSEA scholars come through the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s direct entry process. While scholarship students must have the academic ability to meet the demands of the UWCSEA programme, they are also selected on the basis of their potential to have a positive impact on the local and global community. The College community benefits tremendously from the presence of scholarship students. The diversity of background, culture, socioeconomic status and life experience they bring enriches the everyday life of students, teachers and parents.

54

Dover Campus

102

scholars across the College

48

East Campus

42.2% Asia

Middle East 1.0% Oceania 3.9%

Africa 14.7%

Nationalities of scholars by continent 22.5% Europe

tr un

ies represen t

57

by scholars ed

mber of c Nu o

Americas 15.7%

Albania, Belarus, Belize, Bhutan, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Colombia, Chile, China, Denmark, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guyana, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Myanmar, Namibia, Nigeria, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Taiwan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Vietnam Annual Report 2017/2018 | 61


FINANCIAL SUPPORT: SCHOLAR PROGRAMME Funding for scholarships is generated through school fees, the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP), corporations, foundations, National Committees, parent donations and alumni donations. A total of S$7.96 million was given to scholars on both campuses during the 2017/2018 school year.

DOVER CAMPUS 71.8% UWCSEA school fees

19.5% Corporate/major donors

percentage contribution to the scholarship funding 4.0% UWCSEA Fund 2.1% Parents 1.8% UNP 0.5% National Committees 0.3% Alumni

$4.22 million

total financial support

EAST CAMPUS 68.1% UWCSEA school fees 18.1% Corporate/major donors

percentage contribution to the scholarship funding 5.4% Parents 4.6% UWCSEA Fund 3.8% National Committees

$3.74 million 62 | Annual Report 2017/2018

total financial support


COMMUNITY FEEDBACK In 2011/2012, the College embarked on a process of trying to better understand the students, staff and parent experience. Part of this process was an extensive annual survey. As well as asking detailed questions about all aspects of their experience, community members were asked to say how likely they were to recommend the College to friends and family. This recommendation measure is used to understand advocacy levels in communities and businesses, with a view to identifying areas for improvement. Participants are asked how likely they are to recommend an organisation on a scale of 0–10. Those who score a 9 or a 10 are considered advocates for the organisation; those who score a 7 or an 8 are considered neutral; and those who score between 0 and 6 are considered detractors.* The Net Promoter Score is devised by subtracting the number of detractors from the number of advocates (neutrals are ignored). Organisations can score anywhere from -100% (all detractors) to +100% (all advocates). NPS are often averaging quite low. Fred Reichheld, in his calculation of 400 companies across 28 industries back in 2003 (Harvard Business Review article “The One Number You Need to Grow”), found that the median Net Promoter score was just 16. According to The Temkin Group report The Economics of Net Promoter, “compared to detractors, promoters are almost six times as likely

to forgive, are more than five times as likely to repurchase, and are more than twice as likely as detractors to actually recommend a company.” As a school, UWC South East Asia does not have the same opportunity for measuring the impact of loyalty in terms of repurchasing, switching to another brand and economic impact. Indeed, the complexity of the decision around whether or not to move your child means that detractors are more likely to stay at the school, despite low levels of satisfaction. During analysis of the UWCSEA surveys, the main focus is on the comments made and the ideas submitted for improvement. In addition, while many organisations will focus on moving neutral 8’s into advocating 9’s, the College focus is on those students, parents and staff who are scoring at the low end of the scale. In a place of learning, it is vital to understand why a student, parent or staff member is having a negative experience, and take steps to improve their situation. The analysis and discussion of the survey is extensive, and a series of action points are put in place each year to respond to the particular points raised. Results of the survey are communicated with parents through emails and forums. Below are some of the highlight results of the 2017/2018 parent survey. * For further information and details of the research that went into devising this scale please see The Ultimate Questions 2.0 by Fred Reichheld, with Rob Markey,

PARENT SURVEY PARTICIPATION The survey was distributed to 7,224 email addresses on 16 May 2018 with 2,662 parents completing the survey, of which 2,551 were valid responses. This represents 36.8% of the distribution list, in line with the previous year’s return rate of 36.7%. It should be noted that 2016/2017 rate was a drop on the previous year’s of 45.2%.

The spread of responses between campuses and school sections, along with the number of students represented is outlined in the table below. It should be noted that if both parents from a family completed the survey, some students may be represented twice.

Campus

No. of parents giving No. of Infant School feedback children represented

No. of Junior School children represented

No. of Middle School No. of High School children represented children represented

Maximum no. of children represented

Dover

1,360

203

446

557

720

1,926

East

1,173

241

440

405

564

1,650

Both

18

2

7

4

16

29

Total

2,551

446

893

966

1,300

3,605

The 2017/2018 survey, as well as asking the usual questions about the student experience at the College, also asked for parent view on communicating learning. There was also a change from asking about satisfaction with the 5 elements of the learning programme, to asking about impact on overall learning of each element. The survey focused on quantitative data, with only a few text entry questions, making it faster for participants to complete. Annual Report 2017/2018 | 63


RESULTS The overall NPS score for the College from parents was 43.1%, a high advocacy score that speaks to the commitment to the College among the parent body. However, the trajectory in the last three years is downwards, with a drop from 50% in 2015/2016 to 45% in 2016/2017. There was a small difference in score between campuses, with Dover Campus scoring 41.9% and East Campus scoring 44.8%. The graphs below show the distribution of responses to the question â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how likely are you to recommend UWCSEA to your friends and family?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; on each campus.

41.9% overall NPS for Dover Campus from parents

COLLEGE No. of parents giving feedback = 2,551 10 9

23.9%

8

23.6%

7

5 4

4.5% 3.3% 0.8%

3

0.7%

2

0.4%

1

0.3%

0

0.3%

DOVER CAMPUS No. of parents giving feedback = 1,360 10

28.0%

9

24.2%

8

23.3%

7

13.8%

6

4

overall NPS for East Campus from parents

12.8%

6

5

44.8%

29.5%

4.9% 3.3% 0.7%

3

0.7%

2

0.6%

1

0.3%

0

0.2%

EAST CAMPUS No. of parents giving feedback = 1,173 10

31.2%

9

23.3%

8

23.8%

7

11.5%

6 5

64 | Annual Report 2017/2018

4.1% 3.3%

4

1.0%

3

0.8%

2

0.3%

1

0.3%

0

0.4%


IMPACT ON STUDENT LEARNING OF ELEMENTS OF THE PROGRAMME Parents were asked about their perceived impact of each element of the programme on their child’s learning. In previous years, respondents were asked about their levels of satisfaction with the elements of the programme. This year, the change in question was designed to help educators understand parents’ perception of the programme with regard to how it impacts on their child’s overall learning, a more relevant question than pure satisfaction. The change in question appears to have resulted in a ‘levelling out’ of the 5 elements. The difference between the mean of the highest- and lowestscoring elements last year when the question related to satisfaction was 0.8, while the difference this year was 0.3. The positioning also changed, with parents recording the lowest level of satisfaction with the academic element last year, while they perceive it as having one of the higher levels of impact on their child’s overall learning. Perhaps the most important insight from this section of the survey is that by and large, parents value each of the five elements equally when they think of how it impacts on their child’s learning. This is encouraging in terms of the community’s belief in the importance of a holistic education for our students. How strong is the impact of Academics on your child’s learning?

How strong is the impact of Activities on your child’s learning?

10

10

10.4%

9

9

20.6%

8

32.0%

7

8

9.0%

5

5.6%

4

1.6%

4

3

1.5%

3

0.9%

2

2

31.9% 19.4%

6

9.5%

5

20.4%

7

17.4%

6

11.0%

4.3% 1.9% 1.2% 0.5%

1

0.4%

1 0%

0

0.2%

0

0.5%

How strong is the impact of Outdoor Education on your child’s learning?

How strong is the impact of Personal and Social Education on your child’s learning?

10

10

12.2%

9

21.9%

8

29.7%

7

17.5%

6

9.4%

5

4.9%

8.2%

9

17.6%

8

29.2%

7

22.3%

6

10.5%

5

6.6%

4

1.5%

4

3

1.4%

3

1.4%

2.6%

2

0.9%

2

0.7%

1

0.3%

1

0.3%

0

0.5%

0

0.4%

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 65


How strong is the impact of Service on your child’s learning? 10

13.0%

9

19.9%

8

27.1%

7

17.8%

6

10.3%

5 4 3 2

6.6% 2.3% 1.6% 0.9%

1

0.2%

0

0.4%

TEACHING In previous years we asked parents to share their view of the quality of the teaching their children received each year, on a scale of 0-10. This year, we changed the question to look at specific outcomes that we know impact on a child’s learning, asking parents to indicate whether the statement applied to all, most, some or none of their child’s teachers. The first statement looked at a safe and secure environment; the second on relationships between students and teachers; and the third on what parents perceive the level of learning was from teachers. The results are below. Nearly 90% of parents believe that most or all teachers create a safe and secure environment for learning. 82% of them believe that most or all teachers build positive relationships with their students. 77% believe that their children learned a lot this year from most or all of their teachers. All of the teachers

My child(ren)’s teachers create a safe and secure environment for learning 43.9% 45.8% 9.9% 0.3%

My child(ren)’s teachers build positive relationships with them 27.5% 54.4% 17.9% 0.2%

My child(ren) learned a lot from their teachers this year 27.7%

Most of the teachers

49.1%

Some of the teachers None of the teachers

66 | Annual Report 2017/2018

22.7% 0.5%


SPECIAL SECTION This year, the educational leadership were interested in parent perception of how the College communicates their child’s learning and progress. The issue of assessment and reporting is an ongoing conversation at senior educational leadership level and this question was designed to help them to understand and measure current views as a baseline for any improvements they can make. Parental responses to the quantitative question in the area of communication of learning are outlined below.

Communication of my child’s learning is simple and accessible 30% 48% 9% 10% 3%

Communication of my child’s learning is consistent between grades and school sections

Strongly agree

24% 43%

Somewhat agree 16%

Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree

13% 3%

Strongly disagree I know who to speak to if I have questions about my child’s learning or well-being 55% 33% 6% 4% 2%

I feel welcomed when I approach the School with questions about my child’s learning or well-being 53% 31% 8% 4% 3%

I feel welcomed when I approach the School about any aspect of operations 44% 33% 15% 5% 3%

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 67


68 | Annual Report 2017/2018


BUSINESS REPORT Annual Report 2017/2018 | 69


BUSINESS REPORT The College has significant business operations and this section of the report provides an overview of Human Resources, Admissions and Finance for the 2017/2018 school year.

HUMAN RESOURCES UWCSEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S vision is to be a leader in international education, with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education. The recruitment and retention of excellent teachers remains central to this vision. The below provides some statistics about the teaching and administrative and support staff at UWCSEA.

496

82

full-time teaching staff at the College

496

part-time teaching staff at the College

Dover Campus student teacher ratio

admin/support staff at the College

East Campus student teacher ratio

10.2 students

1 teacher

10.4 students

1 teacher

RECRUITMENT

201

posts advertised

Please note that this number represents the total number of posts advertised for both teaching and admin/support staff positions.

70 | Annual Report 2017/2018

59% Female

7,159 applications received

41% Male

36

average number of applications per vacancy


TRANSITION

TENURE

UWCSEA enjoys an extremely stable teaching environment, with a low transition rate of teachers every year.

316

45

teachers at Dover Campus

Part-time teachers

39

271

37

years at Dover Campus

24

5.9

Full-time teachers

262 Part-time teachers

8.9

leavers at Dover Campus

teachers at East Campus

225

leavers at East Campus

years at East Campus

Full-time teachers Please note that East Campus opened in 2008, while Dover Campus has been open since 1971.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 71


FULL-TIME TEACHING STAFF NATIONALITY SPREAD 47.2% UK Others 9.3% (23 nationalities)

32

Spain 2.2% Ireland 2.2% China 3.3% Singapore 4.5%

STAFF BREAKDOWN Foundation 0.8% Boarding support 2.3% Management 3.7% Admin/support staff 14.2%

Dover Campus

nationalities

New Zealand 6.2%

9% Australia

31.2% Educational support staff

47.8% Academic staff (full-time and part-time)

8.7% USA

Canada 7.3%

FULL-TIME ADMIN/SUPPORT STAFF NATIONALITY SPREAD 72.8% Singapore

Others 5.7% (22 nationalities) Sri Lanka 0.8% China 0.8% USA 0.8% Australia 1.4% India 2.6% UK 3.2% Philippines 3.6% Malaysia 8.3%

72 | Annual Report 2017/2018

31

Boarding support 0.9% Foundation 1.1% Management 2.9% Admin/support staff 10.8%

East Campus

nationalities 29.7% Educational support staff

54.7% Academic staff (full-time and part-time)


ADMISSIONS The Admissions Department is responsible for all aspects of the admission of students to the College. During 2017/2018, the Admissions Department continued to administer a large amount of applications for entry to the College. While Kindergarten to Grade 8 applications follow the usual format of an online application and supporting documents, with interviews and in-person assessments where necessary, admission to High School involves an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;immersion dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for applicants. This day of activities and assessments gives prospective students and their families a

better insight into what a UWCSEA education entails and the mission and values of the UWC movement. The series of group activities and discussions provide applicants with an opportunity to demonstrate their skills and qualities and how they would fit with the mission-aligned education at the College. In addition, current students work with potential students in group discussions and forums on relevant topics and give the Admissions Department the voice of current students during the selection process.

Dover Campus applications for each available place

2,692 -1%

East Campus applications for each available place

applications for August 2018 entry

change in number of applications across College

3 applications

0%

change in number of applications to Dover Campus

1 place

2.8 applications

10%

change in number of applications to East Campus

1 place

-10%

change in number of dual applications across College

The 2017/2018 application cycle saw a significant drop in the number of applicants for both campuses (dual applications). This was a result of a deliberate effort on the part of the Admissions team to encourage families to choose one campus or the other. The overall number of applications was down by 14. However, this general number hides fluctuations at grade level, where on Dover we saw an increase in applications to Infant and Middle Schools, and a decrease in Junior School applications, with High School applications remaining steady. On East, there was an increase in applications in Infant, Junior and Middle Schools, but a decrease in High School applications. The College continues to attract an average of nearly three applications for every available space and opened with a full roll in August 2018.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 73


APPLICATIONS AND OUTCOMES DOVER CAMPUS The table below shows the number of Dover Campus applications processed for entry in August 2018. Number of Dover Campus applications processed during 2017/2018 Dover entry August 2018

K1

K2*

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

233

6

141

82

109

105

106

127

100

132

130

95

172

1538

Of which duals accounted for

51

0

33

27

29

32

22

39

36

38

92

61

106

566

Number of places available

88

6

29

27

27

35

34

37

56

39

31

42

54

505

Total number of applications for each space available

2.6

1.0

4.9

3.0

4.0

3.0

3.1

3.4

1.8

3.4

4.2

2.3

3.2

3.0

Dover only applications for each space available

2.1

1.0

3.7

2.0

3.0

2.1

2.5

2.4

1.1

2.4

1.2

0.8

1.2

1.9

Total applications processed for entry

* K2 applications are by invitation only

The table below shows the outcome of processed Dover Campus applications. Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications Dover entry August 2018

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted (excluding transfers from East)

88

6

29

27

27

35

34

37

56

39

31

42

54

505

Ineligible including duals

7

0

17

8

18

24

17

8

15

17

33

20

41

225

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

81

0

65

22

37

31

33

54

15

39

13

1

13

404

Accepted other campus

29

0

8

9

12

0

5

9

4

12

28

18

31

165

Withdrawn/declined opt out

28

0

22

16

15

15

17

19

10

25

25

14

33

239

The table below shows the outcome of processed Dover Campus applications by percentage. Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications by percentage Dover entry August 2018

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted

38% 100% 21%

33%

25%

33%

32%

29%

56%

30%

24%

44%

31%

33%

Ineligible including duals

3%

0%

12%

10%

17%

23%

16%

6%

15%

13%

25%

21%

24%

15%

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

35%

0%

46%

27%

34%

30%

31%

43%

15%

30%

10%

1%

8%

26%

Accepted other campus

12%

0%

6%

11%

11%

0%

5%

7%

4%

9%

22%

19%

18%

11%

Withdrawn/declined opt out

12%

0%

16%

20%

14%

14%

16%

15%

10%

19%

19%

15%

19%

16%

6.2%

leavers on Dover Campus

74 | Annual Report 2017/2018

3.69 years

average length of stay of leavers on Dover Campus

5.86 years

maximum average length of stay possible on Dover Campus


EAST CAMPUS The table below shows the number of East Campus applications processed for entry in August 2018. Number of East Campus applications processed during 2017/2018 East entry August 2018

K1

K2*

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Total applications processed for entry

130

68

93

62

64

77

57

87

66

106

125

71

148

1154

Of which duals accounted for

51

0

33

27

29

32

22

39

36

38

92

61

106

566

Number of places available

88

29

28

30

10

35

14

32

12

16

43

23

56

416

Total number of applications for each space available

1.5

2.3

3.3

2.1

6.4

2.2

4.1

2.7

5.5

6.6

2.9

3.1

2.6

2.8

East only applications for each space available

0.9

2.3

2.1

1.2

3.5

1.3

2.5

1.5

2.5

4.3

0.8

0.4

0.8

1.4

* K2 applications are by invitation only

The table below shows the outcome of processed East Campus applications. Outcome of processed East Campus applications East entry August 2018

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted (excluding transfers from Dover)

88

29

28

30

10

35

14

32

12

16

43

23

56

416

Ineligible including duals

7

7

10

12

10

14

14

6

12

10

35

16

40

193

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

22

18

50

2

30

15

16

42

20

42

6

1

10

274

Accepted other campus

3

0

1

7

6

4

4

3

17

20

20

20

14

119

Withdrawn/declined opt out

10

14

4

11

8

9

9

4

5

18

21

11

28

152

The table below shows the outcome of processed East Campus applications by percentage. Outcome of processed East Campus applications by percentage East entry August 2018

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted

68%

43%

30%

48%

16%

45%

25%

37%

18%

15%

34%

32%

38%

36%

Ineligible including duals

5%

10%

11%

19%

16%

18%

25%

7%

18%

9%

28%

23%

27%

17%

Eligible but disappointed/declined opt in

17%

26%

54%

3%

47%

19%

28%

48%

30%

40%

5%

1%

7%

24%

Accepted other campus

2%

0%

1%

11%

9%

5%

7%

3%

26%

19%

16%

28%

9%

10%

Withdrawn/declined opt out

8%

21%

4%

18%

13%

12%

16%

5%

8%

17%

17%

15%

19%

13%

7.8%

leavers on East Campus

3.64 years

average length of stay of leavers on East Campus

5.56 years

maximum average length of stay possible on East Campus

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 75


FINANCE UWC South East Asia operates three separate financial entities: Dover Campus, East Campus and the UWCSEA Foundation. This section of the report outlines the financial data for the 2017/2018 school year for both campuses. Financial information for the Foundation can be found in the College Advancement section of this report. The College is a registered charity in Singapore and as such is a non-profit organisation.

DOVER CAMPUS

Maintenance and operations 5%

Other contributions 2% Boarding fees 3%

66% Salaries and benefits

Educational resources and other expenses* 15%

Development levy 10%

Income Sundries and other fees 11%

Expenditure

Depreciation 14%

Tuition fees 74% *includes boarding expenses, central administration, educational resources and finance and marketing costs

EAST CAMPUS

69% Salaries and benefits

Depreciation 3%

Other contributions 2% Boarding fees 4%

Maintenance and operations 6%

Sundries and other fees 8%

Expenditure

Income Development levy 10% Educational resources and other expenses** 22% Tuition fees 76%

** includes boarding expenses, central administration, educational resources, finance and marketing costs, operating lease expenses and property tax

76 | Annual Report 2017/2018


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION DOVER CAMPUS

EAST CAMPUS

As of 31 July 2018

As of 31 July 2018 2018

2017

2018

2017

$

$

$

$

ASSETS

ASSETS

Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Club membership

Non-current assets 133,667,984

145,342,372

205,000

133,667,984

145,547,372

Current assets Trade and other receivables Prepayments Cash and cash equivalents

Total assets

Retained earnings Total funds

9,859,353

9,955,200

Trade and other receivables

2,534,723

2,484,574

12,394,076

12,439,774

11,956,288

12,250,512

344,329

532,432

Current assets 4,382,338

4,007,779

232,893

306,565

35,907,268

19,245,408

40,522,499

23,559,752

174,190,483

169,107,124

FUNDS Development fund

Property, plant and equipment

Trade and other receivables Prepayments Cash and cash equivalents

Total assets

76,903,663

99,499,878

89,343,437

53,690,648

55,314,893

Development fund

6,408,109

5,392,126

51,111,190

44,764,876

Retained earnings

44,548,589

38,758,547

104,801,838

100,079,769

Total funds

50,956,698

44,150,673

LIABILITIES

Non-current liabilities

Current liabilities –

1,600,000

Current liabilities Loan and borrowings

11,600,000

16,240,000

Trade and other payables

12,072,679

10,885,050

Deferred income

64,120,719

87,105,802

FUNDS

LIABILITIES Loan and borrowings

74,805,185

45,715,966

40,302,305

69,388,645

67,427,355

Total liabilities

69,388,645

69,027,355

TOTAL FUNDS AND LIABILITIES

174,190,483

169,107,124

Trade and other payables

10,317,086

9,236,570

Deferred income

38,188,824

35,918,924

37,270

37,270

Total liabilities

48,543,180

45,192,764

TOTAL FUNDS AND LIABILITIES

99,499,878

89,343,437

Tuition fee deposits

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 77


STATEMENT OF PROFIT AND LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME DOVER CAMPUS Year ended 31 July 2018 Unrestricted operating fund

Development fund

Total

2018

2017

2018

2017

2018

2017

$

$

$

$

$

$

Revenue

94,768,131

92,057,999

11,521,056

11,897,602

106,289,187

103,955,601

Other operating income

12,770,367

13,814,321

12,770,367

13,814,321

(73,874,717)

(74,324,039)

(73,874,717)

(74,324,039)

(2,827,697)

(4,716,409)

(13,029,222)

(11,849,253)

(15,856,919)

(16,565,662)

(24,500,693)

(22,204,430)

(16,083)

(24,516,776)

(22,204,430)

6,335,391

4,627,442

(1,524,249)

48,349

4,811,142

4,675,791

194,577

429,687

194,577

429,687

(183,654)

(99,996)

(459,281)

(283,650)

(459,281)

10,923

429,687

(99,996)

(459,281)

(89,073)

(29,594)

6,346,314

5,057,129

(1,624,245)

(410,932)

4,722,069

4,646,197

6,346,314

5,057,129

(1,624,245)

(410,932)

4,722,069

4,646,197

Staff costs Depreciation of property, plant and equipment Other operating expenses Results from operating activities Finance income Finance costs Net finance income/(costs) Profit/(loss) before tax Tax expense Profit/(loss) for the year, representing total comprehensive income for the year

78 | Annual Report 2017/2018


EAST CAMPUS Year ended 31 July 2018 Unrestricted operating fund

Revenue Other income Staff costs Depreciation of property, plant and equipment Operating lease expense Other operating expenses Profit before tax Tax expense Profit for the year, representing total comprehensive income for the year

Development fund

Total

2018

2017

2018

2017

2018

2017

$

$

$

$

$

$

79,988,480

77,442,619

9,707,055

9,309,763

89,695,535

86,752,382

8,153,442

9,225,107

8,153,442

9,225,107

(60,930,563)

(59,928,760)

(60,930,563)

(59,928,760)

(2,828,723)

(3,192,936)

(72,340)

(11,398)

(2,901,063)

(3,204,334)

(8,550,774)

(8,550,773)

(8,550,774)

(8,550,773)

(18,592,594)

(16,896,383)

(67,958)

(95,900)

(18,660,552)

(16,992,283)

5,790,042

6,649,647

1,015,983

651,692

6,806,025

7,301,339

5,790,042

6,649,647

1,015,983

651,692

6,806,025

7,301,339

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 79


80 | Annual Report 2017/2018


COLLEGE ADVANCEMENT Annual Report 2017/2018 | 81


COLLEGE ADVANCEMENT The Department of College Advancement comprises the UWCSEA foundation, which is the fundraising arm of the College, and Alumni Relations, which helps the College to stay connected to former students, staff and families.

FOUNDATION The Foundation is dedicated to enriching the unique UWCSEA learning experience and bringing the College closer to achieving its mission: making education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. Responsible for advancing the philanthropic aims of the College, the donations support activities and initiatives that help bridge the gap between UWCSEA being a great international school and being a truly great United World College. Since its inception in 2008, the Foundation has enlisted the support of the UWCSEA community to focus on four key pillars of activity: scholarships, sustainable development, teaching and learning, and endowment. It is the collective generosity of donors, through gifts large and small, that has helped the Foundation to raise nearly $27 million since 2008.

TOTAL GIFTS AND DONORS $6million

2,000

$5,653,261 $5,337,707 1,661

$5million

1,500

$4million

$3,234,669 $3million

$2million

$2,567,423 1,117

1,000

$1,553,617 964

$1million

715 0

2013/2014

646 2014/2015

Total donations 82 | Annual Report 2017/2018

2015/2016

2016/2017

Donors

2017/2018

400


DONOR RECOGNITION SOCIETIES Since inception, the UWCSEA Foundation has coordinated nearly S$27million in new gifts and pledges. 100% of donations support the continued development of the College and the UWC movement. Membership of our donor recognition societies for 2017/2018 has increased, as follows: 1971 Society recognises those who have made cumulative lifetime gifts in five giving levels from S$10,000 to in excess of S$1,000,000.

5

New

23 members

175

Members renewed/

Benefactor’s Circle – $100,000–$499,999

giving level

37

Members

50 maintained

members

Globe Giving Club is an annual giving society that recognises gifts of S$1,000 or more made during the financial year.

Chairman’s Circle – $1,000,000 and above Patron’s Circle – $500,000–$999,999

102 upgraded to a new

members

220

8

108

17

10

members

Fellow’s Circle – $50,000–$99,999 Member’s Circle – $10,000–$49,999

Kurt Hahn Society recognises those who have indicated they intend to leave a legacy to the College as part of a planned bequest.

Scholarships - Uniting people, nations and cultures

• Urban Gardening and Edible Garden projects.

• 21 scholarships to UWCSEA in 2018/2019 from countries including Argentina, Burkina Faso, India, Myanmar and Uganda.

• Biomimicry and Biodiversity Conservation and Education projects.

• Four additional UWC refugee scholarships for students from South Sudan, Sri Lanka and Palestine. • Four scholars at Waterford Kamhlaba UWC of Southern Africa and UWC Mahindra supported through the Staff Scholarship Fund • A Gap Year Programme supporting nine scholars in Belarus, Bhutan, Chile, Guatemala, Mexico and Nepal.

• Eco-Design and Technology for Marine Conservation programmes. Teaching and Learning - Exceptional learning experiences • Experiential Artist-in-Residence programmes and an inspiring Student Speaker Series, designed and led by students. • Longitudinal study into the impact of the UWC experience, carried out by the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

• Flight support for scholars and their families during holidays and graduation.

• A Chinese Culture and History Programme that connects students with Chinese language, heritage and art.

• Extracurricular activities for scholars through the Scholarship Enrichment Fund.

• Pioneering IDEAS Hub at Dover, inspiring creativity and innovation.

Sustainable Development - Creating a sustainable future

Endowment - Supporting the long-term future of UWCSEA.

• Solar for Dover and Solar for East programmes: student-led initiatives to install solar panels on both campuses.

• Endowment support for scholarship enrichment activities, Artist in Residence, and Teaching and Learning programmes.

• Dover Green Heart and East Campus Greening Programmes.

• An endowed scholarship at UWCSEA driven by Charles Ormiston, former Board Chair of UWCSEA, by cycling across America.

• Campus-wide composting projects that turn waste into resources.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 83


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD As of 31 July 2018

2018

2017

$

$

ASSETS Non-current assets Available-for-sale investments

9,510,433

7,928,336

Total non-current assets

9,510,433

7,928,336

655,892

560,598

Current assets Other receivables Prepayment

23,468

17,267

Cash and cash equivalents

4,104,516

5,619,229

Total current assets

4,783,876

6,197,094

14,294,309

14,125,430

12,980,294

12,748,142

52,951

52,951

Total assets

FUNDS Restricted funds Operating fund â&#x20AC;&#x201C; accumulated surplus Fair value reserve

1,055,579

772,957

14,088,824

13,574,050

Other payables

205,485

551,380

Total liabilities

205,485

551,380

14,294,309

14,125,430

Total funds

LIABILITIES Current liabilities

TOTAL FUNDS AND LIABILITIES

84 | Annual Report 2017/2018


STATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD Year ended 31 July 2018 Restricted funds

2018

Operating fund

Endowment fund

Scholarship fund

Sustainable Development fund

$

$

$

$

Excellence in Teaching and Learning fund

Staff professional development fund

General fund

Total funds

$

$

$

$

Income Donation income

222,069

1,588,202

352,757

628,387

443,254

3,234,669

Other income

1,207,571

1,207,571

Total incoming resources

1,207,571

222,069

1,588,202

352,757

628,387

443,254

4,442,240

Audit fees

(10,000)

(10,000)

Staff costs

(1,006,894)

– (1,006,894)

(190,677)

(190,677)

(230,033)

(1,849,409)

(145,837)

(728,773)

(48,465)

(3,002,517)

(1,207,571)

(230,033)

(1,849,409)

(145,837)

(728,773)

(48,465) (4,210,088)

Surplus/(deficit) for the year

(7,964)

(261,207)

206,920

100,386

394,789

232,152

Other comprehensive income Items that may be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss

282,622

282,622

274,658

(261,207)

206,920

100,386

394,789

514,774

Expenditure

Other operating expenses Donation expenses Total resources expended

Net change in fair value of available-for-sale financial assets Total comprehensive income for the year

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 85


FOUNDATION FINANCIAL REPORT TOTAL DONATIONS IN 2017/2018

$3,234,669

OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 2017/2018

Total donations

College gift (for operating expenses) $1,120,350

Operating income

Excellence in Teaching and Learning fund $222,069

$6,136 Bank interest

Scholarship programme $1,588,202

General fund $443,254

Staff cost (aided by the College) $932,138

Operating expenditures

Sustainable Development fund $352,757

Other expenses $179,084

$15,264 Audit fees

Endowment $222,069

ENDOWMENT FUND

Available-forsale investments $9,510,433

$9,738,126 Total endowment $227,693 Cash at bank

86 | Annual Report 2017/2018


Annual Report 2017/2018 | 87


ALUMNI RELATIONS The goal of the UWCSEA alumni programme is to connect and engage our wide and varied network of alumni around the world with the College and with each other, to encourage life-long connections and mutually beneficial relationships. A valuable resource to the College, UWCSEA alumni are invited to get involved and give back in many ways. Achievements this year included: • The annual Alumni Careers Week during which alumni share information about their career and industry with current students at both UWCSEA campuses, saw 17 alumni Skyping in at least once each, from 10 different countries around the world. • The twice-yearly sessions run by the University Advising Centre at which young alumni are invited to share information about their universities with current students, saw over 60 alumni taking part. • A number of alumni came in to the College to share their expertise with students at the IDEAS Hub and in the classroom, including but not limited to, an alumnus who works to detect and prevent blast fishing who led an underwater ROV building workshop, an AI subject expert who led a workshop and discussion on the basics of AI, an alumnus in the High Tech industry who led a Tech and Design for Social Good activity teaching students how to design effective solutions for individuals with mobility issues, an artist who spoke to current senior art students and an environmental filmmaker who spoke to junior students about his rescue and rehabilitation of sun bears. • This year saw a record-breaking number of almost 400 alumni come back to the College from 31 countries to celebrate their milestone anniversary at

Reunion 2018, during which over 100 attended a discussion about UWCSEA and the movement led by the Head of College, and at least one from each class year group participated in a panel to discuss UWC values with the Grade 6 student group. • For the first year, a combined Dover and East Campus Young Alumni event was held in London UK, which was attended by 234 young alumni from the classes of 2014–2018. • An alumni panel has been introduced to discuss UWC values at global alumni events. • For the tenth year, the inspirational Dover graduation guest speaker was a member of the UWCSEA alumni community. • Over 500 notable alumni have now been documented in a database which will be made available to staff as a resource. • The new UWCSEA ad campaign launched in 2017/2018 features 30 alumni who continue to espouse the UWC values in their lives. All alumni asked to be involved have been more than happy to help to promote the College. • The 15th issue of the alumni magazine, One°North was published, featuring an alumni couple whose endowed scholarship gift to the College has thus far enabled five promising young students to attend UWCSEA, along with eight other inspiring alumni stories.

13,032

62%

contactable alumni

140

c at e d

Countrie si

hich alumni e lo ar

nw

88 | Annual Report 2017/2018

133 alumni who visited the College Alumni Relations office and toured the campus


9,518

$393,242

1,562

alumni members of UWCSEA alumni digital platform

Alumni Giving 2017/2018

alumni members of the UWC Hub

1,214

1,858

Twitter

LinkedIn

53%

8,683

88

new names

729

5,611

Facebook

Social media followers

7

Annual Milestone Reunion 2018 attendees who participated in Reunion Class Giving (Classes of ’73, ’78, ’83, ’88, ’93, ’98, ’08)

7

university mentors

253

members of the Student Alumni Council

alumni on the 2017/2018 Board of Governors

universities represented by alumni mentors

785

15

28

attendees at alumni events

alumni events

members of the 1971 Society Annual Report 2017/2018 | 89


DONORS 2017/2018 1971 SOCIETY Named in honour of the year the College was opened by the then Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, the 1971 Society recognises those who have made cumulative lifetime gifts in five giving levels from S$10,000 to in excess of S$1,000,000.

SOCIETY MEMBERS UWCSEA would like to thank the following 131 members for their generous and continued support: CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE ($1,000,000 and above)

Nang Lang Kham ’07

Scholae Mundi

Nang Kham Noung ’09

Julianne and Jeremy Martin

Takeda Pharmaceuticals (Asia Pacific) Pte Ltd

Lizanne ’83 and Robert A. Milton ’78

Nang Mo Hom ’14

Anna Mezhentseva

Åsa and Magnus Böcker

Lee Hysan Foundation

A grateful UWCSEA Family

Saga Tree Capital

Ben Morgan

Gale and Shelby Davis

In Honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr. Rajadurai

Anonymous gift

Ne Aung and Khin Moe Nyunt

Ricardo and Petra Portabella MAC3

Leon Le Mercier ’94

PATRONS ($500,000 and $999,999)

Van Oord Dredging and Marine Contractors

Kewalram Chanrai Group Trafigura Pte Ltd. Andy and Mei Budden UWC Denmark National Committee Bataua Scholarship Fund Dauren Yerdebay The Sassoon Family Foundation

KMG International N.V. Ravi and Sumati Raheja Sanjay and Ravina Kirpalani UWC National Committee of Germany Fredrik Fosse ’03 Maxim and Altynay Telemtayev UWC Changsu China

Anonymous gift

UWCSEA East Parents’ Association

BENEFACTORS ($100,000 and $499,999)

Ormiston Family

S and V Foundation Capital International Inc. Suhardiman Hartono MacFadden Family Kirtida and Bharat Mekani Mara McAdams and David Hand Shiv and Urvashi Khemka Gary Basil Scholarship Fund AT Capital Pte Ltd Mary Ann Tsao Robinson SK-NIS Mayank Singhal of PI Industries Ltd Sonia Nayaham and Hari Kumar In Memory of Sarojini Viswalingam Reza and Imelda Sasmito Safavi 90 | Annual Report 2017/2018

UWC Spain National Committee Anonymous gifts made by 6 donors FELLOWS ($50,000 and $99,999) Prince of Wales Trust Dato Abdul Rahman Abdul Shariff and Datin Dr. Mona Abdul Rahman Family Harrold Manzoni Family Lester and Christine Gray UWCSEA Dover Parents’ Association UWC China National Committee Shripriya Mahesh Ramanan and Ramanan Raghavendran BHP Billiton Yun Dai Family Nitin and Amie Gulabani

MEMBERS ($10,000 and $49,999) Iain and Tejas Ewing Jean de Pourtales Craig Flood ’78 Kush Handa ’78 Haeyong Jung Kishore Mahbubani John Shang ’78 Mr and Mrs Zain C. Willoughby ’78 Julian and Buff Whiteley Tord ’86 and Kimberly Stallvik Satish and Anita Shankar Gay Chee Cheong Mark Koczanowski and Vicky Binns Bindiya and Raj Mishra Dale Fisher ’78 Vinod Sahgal Peter ’83 and Tine Jessen Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan Kennedy-Cooke Family David and Sonja Chong James Dalziel and Nancy Fairburn Viren and Ruchee Desai Arvind and Niharika Tiku Ashwin Ranganathan and Claire Ngo Kandisaputro and Juliet Chris and Fleur Thomas Mr and Mrs G. S. Ramesh

Soofian ’90 and Fatima Zuberi Jacques Mainguy ’79 Mr and Mrs Sohmen-Pao Ross and Florence Jennings Ko Ko Gyi and Moe Moe Alex Dong Seng Chee and Audrey Ho Ravi and Lakshmi Raju Rigel Technology (S) Pte Ltd Lau Family Mr and Mrs Yaw Chee Ming Wang Piau Voon and Lam Li Min Tek and Angeline Heng Dominic and Tania Pemberton KC Hew Mr and Mrs Shinichi and Emi Tonomura Varun Kodthivada and Tara Gupta Hideshi and Mana Tokoi Jerome and Stephanie David Sheng Zhang and Donna Tang Rob and Jeanette Gilby Prashant and Claudia Kedia Liu Tsu Kun Nisha and Rajesh Raman Newman Family Srinivas Venkatraman Abad Merritt Family Declan and Chisa O’Sullivan Takeda Family


Dave and Sue Shepherd

Stirrat Family

Geetha Muthiah

Haroon Family

Mikhail Nikolaev

Julie Ann Kohn and Dan Swift and Family

Magnier Family

Miran Salgado ’79

Ronald Chong ’78

Lan Jian

Jina Chung’s parents

Petersik Family

Nicholas Chan

Richard and Zainab Slovenski

Mario and Francesca Salvatori

Jonathan and Corinne Carter

Paul Cummins ’78

Hamanaka Family

Sung and Fumi Lee Family

Carmichael Family

Bhargava Family

Bovornrudee Poonsornsiri

Aya Takeda and Joseph Chia

Masuhr Family

Mikayla Menkes ’17

Derek and Katherine Chang

Holt Family

Aya and Yukihiro Nomura

John Menkes

Moreau Family

Beckmann Family

Chris Edwards

Utsav Ratti ’96

McLaughlin Family

Buchan and Malee Love

Julie and Albert Ovidi

Mark Reinecke ’86

Jeremy and Janet Snoad

Serena Tan

Anonymous gifts made by 12 donors

KURT HAHN SOCIETY Named after the founder of the UWC movement, the Kurt Hahn Society recognises those who intend to leave a legacy to the College as part of a planned bequest.

SOCIETY MEMBERS Tui Britton ’98

Iain and Tejas Ewing

Julian Whiteley

Andy and Mei Budden

Dave and Sue Shepherd

Five anonymous members

ANNUAL GIVING 1971 SOCIETY ANNUAL GIVING Recognising those extremely generous supporters of the 1971 Society who have made gifts of S$10,000 or more during the financial year. A grateful UWCSEA Family

Sanjay and Ravina Kirpalani

Bovornrudee Poonsornsiri

Takeda Family

Gary Basil Scholarship Fund

Leon Le Mercier ’94

Ravi and Sumati Raheja

Serena Tang

Bataua Scholarship Fund

Lee Hysan Foundation

Mary Ann Tsao Robinson

Beckmann Family

Sung and Fumi Lee Family

In Honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr. Rajadurai Shripriya Mahesh Ramanan and Ramanan Raghavendran

UWC Spain National Committee

Jina Chung’s parents

Liu Tsu Kun

Yun Dai Family

Buchan and Malee Love

Gale and Shelby Davis

MAC3

Fredrik Fosse ’03

Julianne and Jeremy Martin

Lester and Christine Gray

Mara McAdams and David Hand

Hamanaka Family

Anna Mezhentseva

Holt Family

Sonia Nayaham and Hari Kumar

Peter ’83 and Tine Jessen

Petersik Family

Reza and Imelda Sasmito Safavi Saga Tree Capital Mario and Francesca Salvatori The Sassoon Family Foundation Scholae Mundi

UWC National Committee of Germany UWCSEA East Parents’ Association Van Oord Dredging and Marine Contractors In Memory of Sarojini Viswalingam Dauren Yerdebay Anonymous gifts made by 7 donors

Aya Takeda and Joseph Chia Annual Report 2017/2018 | 91


GLOBE GIVING CLUB These generous supporters are part of an annual giving society that recognises gifts of S$1,000 or more made during the financial year. Abad Merritt Family

Antoine and Isabelle Decitre

Ijaz Kato and Shukura Babirye

Brian Ó Maoileoin and Kate Drudy

Dara Akbarian and Michelle Hertz

Viren and Ruchee Desai

Neil Keating

Berna Okten

Salvatore Albani

Destandau Family

Prashant and Claudia Kedia

Lyndsey Oliver

Alchin Family

Priti Devi and Tarun Kataria

Kennedy-Cooke Family

Ormiston Family

Harry and Louise Alverson

Hao Ding and Zhang Yi

Chandru and Sunita Kewal Ramani

Yumiko Oshima

Hemant and Rachna AMIN

Eduard R. und Maike Dörrenberg

Zayn Khan

Julie and Albert Ovidi

Anand and Pavithra

Alex Dong and Cecily Guo

Robert and Sylvia Kong

Pai Family

Annika and Ayush

Ojas ’91 and Ruchi Doshi

Pant Family

Pengwei Bao

DSG Partners Asia

Vyacheslav Kormiltsev and Maria Rzhevskaya

Battenfeld

Rick Duijm and Shirley Koffijberg

Alexander Krefft ’93

Mijung Park and Youngseo Lee

Florian and Verena Becker

Daire and Tamara Dunne

Johannes Lagerwij and Mona Zoet

Sean Hyunwook Park, Jenny Jungsook Ahn

Mark Bedingham

Chris Edwards

Eugene Lai

Catherine Parkin

Bellens Family

Jean and Natasha Eichaker

Adam and Linsey Lawrence

Parr Family

The Beri Family

Ellerbaek Family

Martin Lechner

Ping Ping

Victoria Berman

Encarnacion Family

Masaki and Naoko Lee

Jason and Lisa Plamondon

Bhargava Family

In memory of Kay Everett ’91

Xian Yu Li and Jun Michelle Fang

Subarna and Mohan Prabhakar

Simon Bignell and Andrea McDonald

Adam and Taeko Farthing

Liang Chuxin

Leena Prakash

The Bilan-Cooper Family

Victoria Ferris

Dr and Mrs Lim Ka Liang

George and Claire Psillides

Andrea and Manuela Billè

Rachel Freeman

Kristina and Rebecka Livingston

Raghavan Family

Sandra Binny

Thales Gabay

Lord Family

Nisha and Rajesh Raman

Bray-Bridgewater Family

Mark Gabriel ’93

Bolor and Pierre Lorinet

Reitmaier Family

Zoe Brittain

The Ghirardello Family

Louis Dreyfus Company

Zain, Yasser and Zarah Rizvi

Bryant Family

Kareem Gomersall

Luo Chuan

Maxime Roulin

Carmichael Family

Pippa Haley

Magnier Family

Nety and Abhishek Sahai

Jonathan and Corinne Carter

Kush Handa ’78

Kishore Mahbubani

Kenji Sakurai

Lara Chal and Family

Nicola and Bob Harayda

Laksh Maheshwary

Miran Salgado ’79

Elisa Chan

Ralph and Bettina Haupter

Jacques Mainguy ’79

Malini Samai

Derek and Katherine Chang

Douglas and Moemi Heskamp

Vandana and Sumit Malik

Anand Sanghi

Subodh and Shaila Chanrai

Jensen Hjorth

David and Fei-Ying Marshall

Renaldo Santosa ’08

Angela Chew (Class of 2000)

Seng Chee and Audrey Ho

Masuhr Family

Teruhide Sato

Margaret Chhoa-Howard

Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan

McLaughlin Family

Paul Scott

Jason Choo

Hu Huan

Manoj Mishra

Jarrod Seah

Lisa Chow

Edna Irani and children

The Mohantys

Vidhi Shah

Clark Family

Iswahyudi

Monteith Adams Family

Shankar Family

CMO bucket list supporters

Damien and Sharon Jacotine

Ben Morgan

The Sharrys

Sinéad Collins and Gary Toner

Guoqing Jiang and Haiyan Xu

Morgans Family

Dave and Sue Shepherd

Kevin and Emma Crombie

Il Yong Jung ’02

Mikael MÖrn ’92

Kyoko and Toko Shimizu

Michelle ’88 and Ken Crouse

Seho Jung and Seokyoung Nam

Scott Murray

Mike and Eya Sicat

Paul Cummins ’78

Kaneda Family

Indrani and Priyanka Murugason

Richard and Zainab Slovenski

Michael Czerny and Donna Lee

Han Seung Kang and Mee Jee Jung

Mikhail Nikolaev Sr.

The Snoad Family

Dahiya Family

Josephine Kang

Dr. Akiko Nomura

Hendrik J. Soewatdy ’00

Barry and Leah Daniels

Family Kankaanpää-Monney

Gen and Tomoko Nonaka

Mr and Mrs Sohmen-Pao

92 | Annual Report 2017/2018

Amee Parikh

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.


Moses, Sarah, Evelyn and Eleanor Song

Sameer and Geetika Taneja

Alain and Laurence Vandenborre

Zain ’78 and Anastasia Willoughby

Stirrat Family

Altynay Telemtayeva

Gurpreet and Rupinder Vohra

Wu Haiyan

Lindsay Strickland

Graeme and Ying Temple

Roxanne Walker

Xu Qiwen

Gregory Stuppler and Carys Owen

Arvind and Niharika Tiku

Mark and Sandy Wang

Lijun Yang

Ann Syauta ’92

Timm and Almud

Peggy Wang

You Jee Won and Ji Jung Ah

Kina and Kiho Takahashi

Tokuda Family

Nick and Nikki Weber

Sheng Zhang and Donna Tang

Maria Takimoto

Tonich Family

Brenda Whately and Stan Wagner

Xingying Zhou

Akshat Dheeraj Talreja

Yining and Duncan van Bergen

Laura Whiteley

Zhu Wenqing and Fang Weidong

Itsuko and Kotaro Tamura

Judyta Van Heukelem

Amara and Arosha Wijemuni

Anonymous gifts made by 18 donors

K1 Infant School - Class of 2017/2018

Brian and Fay Alesi

Mark and Sue Bradshaw

Peter Cho and Hayoung Cho

Class of K1SLm

Fiona Alexander ’87

Ananya Skye Brandon

Chong Su-San ’82

K2 Infant School - Class of 2017/2018

Alp and Tomoko

The Chong Family

Class K2AVs 2018

Rebecca Alsagoff

Andrew, Donna, George, Alfie and Tilly Brereton

Teachers, Children and Parents of K2JSi, UWCSEA Dover

Coleen Angove

Erik Brodersen

Samantha Chua ’14

Anjna

David Brown ’97

Varun and Tanaya Chugh

G1 Infant School - Class of 2017/2018

Gina and Will Anstee

Rachel Brown

Sunny Chyun ’97

Class of G1ATu

Apell

Family Brownlee

Adam Clark ’07

Class of G1 PTh, 2017/2018

Naoko Arai ’82

Liliane A Brunner Halbach

Raymund Co

The Araki Family

Marc Buchli

Karen Cole

Arriyan and Rishaan

Chuan Ian Campbell ’84

Gilles Collong

Arvind and Jita

M and B Campbells

Linda Cook

Sibel Ascioglu Hayran

Coco and Sasha Canale

Corrigan Family

Rebecca, Max and Lexie Ashby

Kathy Cao Lystad

Ted Cowan and Belinda Robinson

Billy, Fai, Poe Auer

Courtney Carlson and Tony Lee

Jackie Cragg

Avci Family

David Chan ’92

CWM

Paul Baird

Nicholas Chan

Bonnie and Andrew da Roza

Rebecca Baker

Chang Rong-Zer

Dahan Family

Nikhilesh Balaji

Xin and Dianna Chang

Batbayar Damdinsuren

The Bali Family

Anushka Chaudhuri

Jordan Davies

Bill Ballenden

Radhika Chavali

Yumi Davis ’97

Partha Banerjee ’97

Xinwei Che

Natalie de Boursac ’07

Haider Baray

Clifford and Stephanie Cheah

Rajeev and Alexandra De Mello

Danielle Barratt ’87

Chee Boon Leong and Rachel Phoon

Joao Silva de Souza

Ruth Beattie

Chen Jie and Pan Weiying

Tommy Dean ’07

Ian Bellhouse and Eleanor Great

Chen Rong Rong

Emma Defechereux

Nitin Bhanot

Naiqian Chen

Kobita Desai

Urmi Bharne ’99

Patrick YH Chen

Benjamin Detenber

Gaurav and Smriti Bhushan

Richard Chen

Ahna Dewan ’92

Birte Christ

Diana Chee

Vishal Dhawan

Nicolas ’98 and Rachel Blewitt

Timothy Cheung and Sue-Ann Yong

Nikki Dinh

Ben Bowden

Elaine Chew

Djaja and Limardo Clan

Boxö Fishingmen

Chia Yoke Chee

Robert and Edna Dompeling

Denise Boynton ’97

The Chiampo Family

Caroline Doo

UWCSEA FUND SUPPORTERS

The Class of 2CTh 2017/2018, Cinders Thomas Class of 3DWn 2017/2018 Ms Jessica Kelly and Class of 3JKe 2017/2018 Class of 4JMs 4LWh Class of 2017/2018 Class of 4SZi Grade 5 Junior School - Class of 2017/2018 Grade 5 2017/2018 (JSu, JSm, KTl, MBo, SKa, SLc, PAr, FSt) Grade 6 Middle School Class of 2017/2018 Class of 6ALo Grade 9 Mentor Groups Grade 10 Mentor Groups Grade 12 Mentor Groups Grade 12 East Class Gift Soeren Addicks Adrija Sanjeev Agarwal Shradha Agarwal Neetu and Rohit Aggarwal Tengku Nong Fatimah Sultan Hj Ahmad Shah ’82

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.

Chu Pei Hwa

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 93


Jerome Dubois ’97

Amit Gulati

Anupam Jindel

Andrew Lee and Yida Lee

Louis Dutilh ’97

Sophia Gunkel ’08

Ming Jing

Doyun and Yuchan Lee

Gayathri Dwaraknath

Piyush and Priya Gupta

Cathy Jones

Sam and Poni Leong

Susan Edwards and John McAuliffe

Kantesh V Guttal

Anisha Joshi

Karen Letchmanan

The Ellard Family

James and Maria Hackett

Yuan Ju

Ernest Chun Man Leung

Emes Family

Gyuah Han

Kinjal Kaji

Kate Lewis and Doug Wills

The Ohio Esguerras

The Hannigan Family

Anitha Kamath

David Lewnes

Mahmoud and Karin Esmaeili

Hina Haris

Marc-Andre Kamel

Li Yiheng (Andy)

Talitha and Reuben Evans

Haroon Family

Ananya, Rohan, Jemy and Kannan 2018

Linda Li Sung Sang

Ewington Family

Irene Hartono ’92

Erik Karlström ’92

Khantey Lim ’19

Michelle Faherty

Thomas Harvey ’77

Karan Kaul UWCSEA ’98

Lim Kam Su ’82

Farhani

Dirk Heerding ’80

Katsunori Kawaguchi

The Lima Salvo Family

Soeren Ferre and Julyana Irawan

Simon Henry

Janet Keating

Amber and Elijah Liu

Don and Purni Ferrin

Shuichi Hidaka

Peter and Natalie Kennedy

Liu Guolin and Wenpu Zhang

Kyra and Leah Finkelstein

Diya and Jai Himatsinghani

Monica Kesuma ’82

Qing Liu

Johanna Fishbein

Adrienne Hintz ’81

Derek Keswakaroon

Yixuan LIU

Sarah Fisher

Liese Ho ’87

Olivia Kay Khaing Kha ’07

Russel and Tina Lok

Christian Foo

Mihoko Eto Hobberstad

Zara and Zubin Khanna

Kate Lonsdale ’97

Graham and Kahin Francis

Anne Hoecker

Sohana and Nafees Khundker

Charlie Lory

Tomohiro Fujita

Richard and Birgit Holland ’97

Divya Kirti ’06

Anna Lowndes

Tomonari Furukawa

The Holt Family

Yohei Kitano

Xuan Lu

Mansi Gandhi

Tony Hopwood

Effie Knights

Ellie Luckcock

Apollo, Tara and Scott Garson Flower

Juliet Hornsby

Max Kohler

Gina LUENGAS

Shikha and Ab Gaur,3IVa

Ian Hortin

Manish and Aditi Kohli

Matt Lulu

Aaron Gay ’91

Jerry Huang

Anita Kollarne Minko

Xiaolu Lyu

Geeta and Ramanathan

Alex Hunte and Nadia Larsson

Frank and Monika Kotschenreuther

Kaiyen Ma, Sijun Ma and Shanyi Ma

Lucas and Rania Ghai

Cameron Hunter

Anika Astrid and Ava Kowald-Linsley

Paul MacCullum ’84

Sarah French Gibbons ’92

Shena Hussain

Marc Kremer

Anne MacFadden

Jason and Katrina Glassick

Wataru Ishikuro

Rajesh Kumar

Samantha Mak ’07

Robert and Vanessa Glennie

Tamako Ito ’97

Vivek Kumar

Masami Makino

Liyah and Asiya Gokal

Iversen Family

Jae Jeong Kwak

Airlangga Manansang ’97

Goldberg

Iyer-Vohra Family

Kwan Liyi

Rajesh and Rujuta Manghani

Vivek Gomber ’97

Stephane and Gaelle Jacqmin

Hanli Mangun and Jisun Park

Georgina Gonzalez

Abheeshu Jain

Drummond, Alice, Claire and Alexander Kwiatkowski

Goshawk Family

Charu Jain

Koen Laan

Donation in Memorium of Mr. Wellington Manullang

Govil Family

Shruti Jain

Anushka and Sanjana Lahiri

Tor Marshall

David Gowdey and Kathryn Gray

Inda Malini Jamil

Trillion Lai ’07

Nicholas Martin

Gray Family

Javier Meza Robayo

Yufang Lai

Sittichai Matanachai

Brian and Ethel Green

Jawa Family

George and Suzie Laing

Reina Mathieson

Jason, Stefanie, Annabelle, Vanessa, Alexis Green - 2 generations of UWC

Jelfs Family

Ranjan Lath

Micky and Sandeep Mathur

Philip Jemielita ’74

Kimberly Latham and Jeff Bullwinkel

Tsuyoshi and Mariko Matsubara

Carl Jenkins

Su-In and Vinson Lau

Elizabeth Matsumoto

Kenneth Jeyaretnam ’77

Nicholas Laveris

Sue Matthews

Jiang Family

The Layards

David and Kim Maxwell

Jiawen

Sylvie Ledig

Maya and Trisha

Grignani Family Andrea Groth The Grundlingh Family Ishina Gujral 94 | Annual Report 2017/2018

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.


McAdoo Family

Han Nguyen and Boris Forey

Anne Redfern (Pelling) ’77

Roberto Sirtori ’92

Chris McCann ’92

Minh-Tam and Jessica Nguyen

Rinck Family

Erwin Sjamsudin

McCarthy Family

Karen Norris

Joe and Nikki Rivera

Edgar Sjoberg

Wade McDonough ’92

Nyunt Sein

Erin Robinson

Fintan and Toshiko Smyth

Gareth Mcilroy and Hyeon Jung Kim

Carol Oakley ’77

Aksel Roejkjaer

Sonal

Catherine McKinley ’89

Ichha Oberoi

Lyn Rosmarin

Qihong Song

Melvil Meddour-Steiger

Michiko Ohya

Sid Roy

Rina Song

Caroline and Robert Meek

Steve and Paige Okun

Tanya Rustogi

Stampfer Family

Nirali Mehta

The Olivan’s for Mikael Mörn

Oliver Rydstrom

Monica Stanciu

Kirtida and Bharat Mekani

Rae Omar

Siti Aminah Sabtu

India Steger

Philip Meschke ’07

Ong Chaw Yin

Herry Salim’s Family

Stephens Family

Michaelis Family

Ong Family

Jason Sambanju ’92

Francesca Stevens

Milland Family

Neil and Shauna O’Reilly

Michelangelo and Lourdes Samson

Su Yu Kuang

Min Jungi

Dan and Libby Orr

Joseph Santiago ’89

Sunir and Shailja

Minford Family

Yumiko Oshima

Tidaporn Santimanawong

Chandra Suny ’82

Arjun Mishra ’07

Vipart Pakartikom ’85

Petrus Santoso ’82

K C Suresh

Yuki Mitsuyasu ’01

Laurent Palacio

Kavi and Tejas Sarna

Hendra Sutandinata ’82

Vanessa Mittman

Robert Palmer

Listi Sasmito ’87

Marjie Sweeney

Miyakoshi Family

Pang Juxiang

Mark Schiet ’82

Pattama T.

Anne-Maj Moern

Kanaiya Parekh

The Schwender Family

Carola Tagliabue

Kamal Uddin Mohammad and Shirin Begum

Junyoung Park

Scott

Larrie MF Tan

Steinar Mollan ’98

Anne-Marie Parnell

The Scotts

Tan Hsin Ci

Mongeon Family

Paterson Sustainability

Oliver and Mayuko Seddon

Zac and Ryan Tan

Moreau Family (Manu ’18 and Thys ’21)

Chiayu Peng

Nancy and Mat Segal

Oranuj Tantimedh ’81

Kunihito Morimura

Harvey Perkins ’77

Cyanthi Seneviratne

Bhupender and Nivedita Tanwar

The Morley Family

Raj Pherwani

Seo Family

Arnav Tapadia

Motteram Family

The Pinnegar Family

Gary and Mel Seston

Tavleen ’17

Stephen and Karin Motteram

Family Pluijmers

Bharti Amul Shah

Louise Taylor ’87

Elias Moubayed ’82

Ashis, Alpa and Yash Poddar

Reshna Shah

Teagle Family

K.K Mukherjee

Saju Youseph Ponnissery

Tianlan Shao

Siong Swee Tee

David and Karen Mulvenna

Pooja

Varini Sharma ’07

Kemal Temenggung ’07

Vicky Mulvey-Mackay ’87

Prasanna

Shashvin

Suzanne Teo

Zachary and Alexander Myerscough

Aristides and Dominique Protonotarios

Timothy SHEU ’05

Parveen Thakral ’97

Patrick Myhrman ’92

Quentin and Lohan

Mamiko Shigemasa ’99

Ashima Thomas ’97

Selma Nadarajah ’97

R Kalyanaraman

Shilin Family

Amit Kumar Tibrewal

Tapash Nag

Divya Raghavan ’07

Shim Shang Doe

Jocelyne Tjandra ’99

Rustom Nagarwalla ’82

Santosh Raghavan

Kay Shin

Meenakshi Tomar

Nancy

Tengku Rahimah ’84

Jota ’95 and Claudia Shohtoku

Nazliza Tomari

Dhevin Nandyala

Mallika Ramdas

Radhika Shukla

Tonello Family

Bhavna Narayanan

Sora Ramnebro

Bhagwan Singh

Tony and Nikki

Aadya Navandar

Shivendra Rana ’07

Shishir and Nidhi Singh

Cecilia Torterola

Nayantara

Sripriya Ranganathan

Mayank Singhal ’92

Agota Toth

Puneesh and Chandni Nayar

Antonio Rappa and Angelique Chan

Aaryan Sinha

Alexandra and Dominique Touchaud

Winston and Heshani Nesfield

Upwan Ratti ’97

Kavita Sinha

Laurence Tournerie

Chris Newman

The Raver-Wong Family

Lauren Sipelis

Tran-Harvey

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 95


Chantal Travers

Basant Vigarniya

Wickmann Family

Farhana Yaakob

Siddhant Trivedi ’09

Mit Vithalani ’07

John M Widder

Wayne and Helen Yang

Troutman Family

Von der Luehe Family

Franciska Wihardja ’92

Jon Ye

Masayasu Tsuda

Lodewijk Vriens ’11

Anisha Wilmink

Shawn Yeo

Shoken and Ayumi Tsurumaru

Alice and Laurent Vuibert

Oliver Wilson

Carolyn and David Yong

Yoshiyuki Tsutsui

Sota and Kiyomi Wakabayashi

Marko S. Winedt ’16

Mark Zagrodnik ’82

Yu Ming Tung ’82

Lorna Walker

Bettina Wipf ’81

Norman Zeng

Adam and Angela Turner

The Wallner Family

Christian Wipf ’77

Christoph Zenker ’82

Jay Tuseth and Tabitha Manresa

Tina and David Walton

Mr Wolfie

ZHAI Xiaoyu and Family

Ueki Family

Eileen Wang Jiongtong

Aizsa Wong

Liandong Zhang

Tisella Umar ’16

Wang Yaoyao

The Woods Family

Zhang Ling

Family van Noord

Pongdanai Wangthamrongwit ’06

Jun Wu

Zhang Xiaohong

Kristen and Suvir Varma

Genevieve Waters

Wu and Wang

Zihan Zhang

Venkatesh

Darryl Wee ’87

Ariane Wyss ’90

Allison and Scott Ziemer

Joke Verhaart

Tarin Wenger

Lin Xia and Ning Zhang

Anonymous gifts made by 115 donors

Nicholas Verrill

David Wibisono ’82

Peng Xu

Alchin Family

Nicola Coles

Johanna Fishbein

Leigh Jenner

Caroline Araneta

Lucia Cordani

Daniel Forster

Maria-Pilar Jimenez

Adrian Armstrong

Mireille Couture

Helen Gamble

Sian Johns

Naida Arrindell

Kevin and Emma Crombie

Ronald Gillies

Ijaz Kato and Shukura Babirye

Paul Baird

Joanne Cuthbert

Marie-Anne Glavan

Neil Keating

Karen Balthazaar

Julie Dale

Velia Goberna

James Kirrane

Natalie Bane

Lorena Daly Ferreira

Deborah Gordon

Louie Barnett

Barry and Leah Daniels

Alexandra Graham

Drummond, Alice, Claire and Alexander Kwiatkowski

Erin Belliveau

Christopher Davies

Pippa Haley

Sarah La Caze

Victoria Berman

Tim Davies

Richard Hannah

Catherine Lane

Simon Bignell and Andrea McDonald

Nicholas Dawling

Luke Haugen

Adam and Linsey Lawrence

Sandra Binny

Linda De Flavis

Jane Healey

Helen Leeming

Peter Blythe

Simon Dean

Simon Henry

Kate Levy

Mark and Sue Bradshaw

Andrew Denney

Steven Hickey

Kate Lewis and Doug Wills

Bray-Bridgewater Family

Gavin Dinsdale

Adrian Hill

Michael Little

John Bush

Nicola Dinsdale

Lisa Hill

Alison Lloyd

Catherine Butler

Nora Donohue

Victoria Hill

Eric Lyman

Bronwyn Bye

Duff Douglas

Gordon Hirons

Martin Lyon

Andrew Carter

Gillian Duncan

Jensen Hjorth

Maggie Ma

Jonathan and Corinne Carter

Tony Dura Canales

Tony Hopwood

Jennifer MacSwain

Carlos Cazorla Garcia

Susan Edwards and John McAuliffe

Cameron Hunter

Nadine Mains

Christine Chaboyer

Gemma Elford Dawson

Caitlin Hutchinson

Irene Malone

Catherine Cheffins

Jacqueline Evanko

Rachel Ingram

Carla Marschall

Elaine Chew

Andrea Felker and Chris Haigh

Liam Isaac

Tor Marshall

Margaret Chhoa-Howard

Victoria Ferris

Jaeisma Jamil

Julie Martens

Kim Hoon Chia

Andrew Fielding

Veronica Jansen

Jonathan Mayhew

Viki Cole

Lesley Finley

Robert Jefferiss

Rebecca Maynard

UWCSEA STAFF SCHOLARSHIP FUND

96 | Annual Report 2017/2018

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.


McCarthy Family

Debra Pollard

Martin Spreckley

John Waters

Paula McKillop

Hugh Pollard

David Starzynski

Michael Watson

Joseph McWilliams

Stephen Potter

Jill Stephenson

Carl Waugh

Frankie Meehan

George and Claire Psillides

Lindsay Strickland

Helen Webster

Catherine Mellor

Trina Putt

Martin Suarez

Pamela Kelly Wetzell

Kristin Mikulka

Louisa Radford

Adam Taylor

Brenda Whately and Stan Wagner

Luke Milburn

Aarti Rai

Visalatchi Thangaveloo

David White

Minford Family

Mallika Ramdas

Poonam Thapar

Olivia White

Sarah Mollitt

Sora Ramnebro

Cinders Thomas

Alice Whitehead

Ben Morgan

Patrick Renouf

Miles Tranter

Laura Whiteley

Scott Murray

Gareth Richards

Nicole Tripp

John M Widder

Mary Newbigin

Stephen Rowcliffe

Geoffrey Tsang

Paul Williams

Claire O’Farrell

Rebecca Sandford

Ian Tymms

Anisha Wilmink

Lyndsey Oliver

Johannes Schellekens

Manoj Varghese

Melanie Wilson

Brian Ó Maoileoin and Kate Drudy

Lynda Scott

Kate Vaughan

Wittig Family

Dan and Libby Orr

Gary and Mel Seston

Sabine Veron

Mr Wolfie

Kirstie Parker

Sathia Bhama Sethu Madhavan

Roxanne Walker

Katherine Wood

Catherine Parkin

Dave and Sue Shepherd

William Walker

Diana Yacou

Parr Family

Jennifer Smith

Joanne Wallace

Fang Yang

Urvashi Patel

Danielle Solk

Soula Walters

Johann Zobrist

Imogen Piccirilli

Moses, Sarah, Evelyn and Eleanor Song

Timothy Walters

Anonymous gifts made by 8 donors

Michele Pirson

Sara Jane Soutar

Andrew Ware

Veer Abrol ’18

Aida Baimenova ’18

Jayasree Chakravarty ’18

Naman Dugar ’18

Kartikeya Agarwal ’18

Dina Baimenova ’18

Kathryn Chan ’18

Courtney Duncan ’18

Pallav Agarwal ’18

Aiym Bakytbaikyzy ’18

Anisha Chandrasekar ’18

Emee Marjorie Dy ’18

Lior Agmoni ’18

Siddhartha Bali ’18

Krit Chatikavanij ’18

Ingowari Sarah Erenyanate ’18

Ridhima Agrawal ’18

Kevin Bao ’18

Nadja Na-Ya Chong ’18

Maria Fernanda Farias Briseno ’18

Farzin Ahmed ’18

Alexander Barbier ’18

Seok Hyun Chung ’18

Martina Fausto ’18

Arman Alluri ’18

Sophia Barkham ’18

Philip Comrie-Smith ’18

Alexandra Francis ’18

Ines Amathieux ’18

Joshua Beacroft ’18

Emmett Coughlan ’18

Joaquin Gaite ’18

Farhan Ameen ’18

Melchior Beneton ’18

Lauren Crosbie-Walsh ’18

Daria Alessandra Galli Zugaro ’18

Lilliana Ammann ’18

Dhea Bengardi ’18

Sara Currie ’18

Vartika Garg ’18

Vitoria Andrade Carnier ’18

Rahil Bharat Ram ’18

Iyaan Dabu ’18

Risako Gen ’18

Aida Appaz ’18

Ansh Bhargava ’18

Tara Dahy ’18

Ella Glanville ’18

Aevar Arnason ’18

Shruti Bhargava ’18

Ivan Davies ’18

Lela Gomersall ’18

Anjolie Arora ’18

Tatia Bolkvadze ’18

Sarah Davies ’18

Aida Gueye ’18

Sahil Arora ’18

Satayu Boontaveekit ’18

Connor Delahunty ’18

Patrick Gullery ’18

Alagu Ashwin Muthiah ’18

Anthea Bordier ’18

Riccardo Di Mauro ’18

Trisha Guttal ’18

Hui Li Yen Askvik ’18

Kenza Brouwer ’18

Rahul Dias ’18

Chivas Harlie ’18

Azhara Assanova ’18

Isabelle Bull ’18

Ananya Diddapur ’18

Antonia Harrold ’18

Andre Auch ’18

Coralie Bultel ’18

Max Docking ’18

Mahnoor Hasan ’18

Advik Ayya ’18

Zarina Bux ’18

Tosca Dori ’18

Madeleine Hoang ’18

Sean Bagary ’18

Carl Anthony Castueras ’18

John Joseph Doyle IV ’18

Sean Hoet ’18

GRADUATE GIVING (CLASS OF 2018)

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 97


Yeji Hong ’18

Jung Whan Eddie Lee ’18

Shubh Nanda ’18

Varun Shetty ’18

Annie Huang ’18

Sz Ying Lee ’18

Riya Narayan ’18

Kyoko Shimizu ’18

Nikola Hughes ’18

Sten Leinasaar ’18

Dhruv Narayanan ’18

Meera Shoaib ’18

Alina Idrissova ’18

Dylan Leupi ’18

Hattie Nelligan ’18

Eve Singer ’18

Nikita Ignatev ’18

Masud Tyree Lewis ’18

Tahlia Nesfield ’18

Devika Singh ’18

Miyu Inoue ’18

Jiayi Li ’18

Nana Kwame Nyarko-Ansong ’18

Sidhant Singh ’18

Gauthier Jacqmin ’18

Rebecka Lichtenecker ’18

Maxine Ocampo ’18

Udayveer Singh ’18

Aditya Andre Jagtap ’18

Xin-Yi Lin ’18

Sam O’Donohoe ’18

Arinjay Singhai ’18

Mahpara Jahan ’18

Chenyu Liu ’18

Devaditya Ojha ’18

Tarini Sinha ’18

Nikhil Jain ’18

Zoe Lo ’18

Yuko Okumura ’18

Isha Sipahimalani ’18

Jun Hyeok Jang ’18

Novia Long ’18

Juan Palacios Rodas ’18

Lydia Small ’18

Hyae In Jee ’18

Siao Si Looi ’18

Hristina Panajoti ’18

William Smith ’18

Victoria Smoerum Vang Jensen ’18

David Lundevall ’18

Tanisha Pande ’18

Rebecca Helen Snoad ’18

Alison Jeon ’18

Radu Lungu ’18

Michael Paredes ’18

Chanreaksmey (Mey) So ’18

Lea Jessen ’18

Caroline Lye ’18

Dhruv Patel ’18

Elika Somani ’18

Elliot Jessop ’18

Honami Maeo ’18

Sharole Tatiana Pineda Pardo ’18

Vignesh Srivathsan ’18

Siming Ji ’18

Lisa Magnusson Biel ’18

Maria Plessia ’18

Uday Sudhakar ’18

Jasmine Johnson ’18

Anya Magotra ’18

Matthieu Pool ’18

Witold Sulima-Horbatowski ’18

Sresta Kandikattu ’18

Ishita Mahajan ’18

Petra Portabella ’18

Dillon Tallentire ’18

Devika Karmakar ’18

Violet Majendie ’18

Samay Prakash ’18

Ellie Tam ’18

Samiksha Kattera ’18

Naviya Makhija ’18

Annika Prinz ’18

Ken Meng Tan ’18

Freya Kelly ’18

Anta Male ’18

David Protonotarios ’18

Nikhil Tan ’18

Sebastian Kendrick ’18

Daniyal Manekia ’18

Huzaifa Raghav ’18

Terrence Tan ’18

Mrunal Khadke ’18

Muskaan Matwankar ’18

Muhammad Raka Rahmatullah ’18

Zi Jin Tan ’18

Vania Khoe Yu Wei ’18

Isobel Maxwell ’18

Ashika Rajesh ’18

Georgina Taylor ’18

Caroline Kim ’18

Zoe McAdoo ’18

Akshara Rajeshkannan ’18

Samuel Taylor ’18

Julia Hae Jin Kim ’18

Paula Medina Agromayor ’18

Ela Rautner ’18

Sreylin Touch ’18

Kyung Sang Kim ’18

Anushree Mehta ’18

Prahalad Ravi ’18

Lauren Traas ’18

Yu Rae Kim ’18

Jay Mistry ’18

Rohit Ravi ’18

Savannah Trafford ’18

Patricia Kinsumbya ’18

Annika Moeller-Chandiramani ’18

Lorenzo Remmerswaal ’18

Daiki Tsumagari ’18

Andrew Kiplagat Kipkoech ’18

Mehak Monga ’18

Flademir Luis Ribeiro Mendes Mota ’18

Sandra Tu ’18

Anna-Marie Kohn ’18

Gyu Rie Moon ’18

Noa Rosenfeld ’18

Kirsten Corinne Tumaru ’18

Tintie Ahmed Kone ’18

Young Min Moon ’18

Corin Runacres ’18

Rosemary Tymms ’18

Eva Konig ’18

Navya More ’18

Idhika Sahi ’18

Kanhav Uppal ’18

Alisha Konnoth ’18

Manu Moreau ’18

Karil Salim ’18

Maximiliaan Van Es ’18

Kochakorn Krachaiwong ’18

Eleonore Morin ’18

Raffaela Santosa ’18

Marie Van Hove ’18

Aditya Krishna ’18

Emma Motteram ’18

Muskan Sapra ’18

Jonah Floran Van Sluijs ’18

Akshata Kuvelkar ’18

Muhammad Anaqi Muhamad Afendi ’18

Luca Sassi Arobba ’18

Sonia Varma ’18

Jasmine Kwok ’18

Ainur Mukhamejanova ’18

Anna Marie Saviano ’18

Zaal Vasania ’18

Katherine Lai ’18

Sayantan Mukhuti ’18

Fernando Sepulveda ’18

Pumaeth Veeratanapanich ’18

Zoe Lambert ’18

Sudeekshna Muralidharan ’18

Muhammad Shah ’18

Jessica Verhoeven ’18

Julia Lamers ’18

Yurie Muramatsu ’18

Tianlan Shao ’18

Lennart Von Der Luehe ’18

Paul Le Helloco ’18

Sigapi Muthiah ’18

Marta Shcharbakova ’18

Chadwick Wang ’18

Sol Gye Leader-Cole ’18

Erica Myat ’18

Anna Mae Sheehan ’18

Kaho Watanabe ’18

Adeline Lee ’18

Abhinav Nair ’18

Yesha Sheth ’18

Alexander Watt ’18

98 | Annual Report 2017/2018

Names appear in alphabetical order, as per requested recognition name.


Marcus Went ’18

Chuwen Xiao ’18

Sue Ann Yong ’18

Aizhan Zhomartkyzy ’18

Lara Weyns ’18

Yu Xiao ’18

Jessica Yu ’18

Martin Zieler ’18

Muditha Wijemuni ’18

Yung Yung Sylvia Yang ’18

Yelim Yu ’18

Alva Zinser ’18

Cassandra Wong ’18

Xuan Yee ’18

Ruining Yuan ’18

Anonymous gifts made by 45 donors

Manuel Wuest ’18

Bexultan Yeraly ’18

Wei Zhang ’18

CLASS OF 1978

Milika Nederlof ’83

Kiri Harkess ’93

Lee Balmforth ’08

Liz Ager ’78

Joselina Paredes ’83

Markus Heiliö ’93

Louise Beck ’08

Lesley Anton ’78

Petra van Boetzelaer ’83

HyeJun ’93

Marie-Liesse Capelle ’08

Matthew Bucknall ’78

Von der Luehe Family

Alexander Krefft ’93

Sophia Gunkel ’08

Greg Caccavale ’78

Bill Wilson ’83

Tony Miller ’93

Natasha Howitt ’08

Ronald Chong ’78

Jeanne Zilch ’83

Sitas Prasertmanukitch ’93

Muaz Jema ’08

William Chong Meng Wan ’78

Anonymous gifts made by 5 donors

Steffanie Riess ’93

Avnee Jetley ’08

CLASS OF 1988

Sandra Shakespeare (Schmidkunz) ’93

Sophie Malmros ’08

Margarita Tantra ’93

Ira Martopullo ’08

Aphichai Techanitisawad ’93

Ed Meade ’08

Stuart Thomson ’93

Shusuke Morioka ’08

Simon Collins ’88

Anonymous gifts made by 7 donors

Simon Neal ’08

Jody Conibear Tangredi ’88

CLASS OF 1998

Vernon Neo ’08

Michelle ’88 and Ken Crouse

Nicolas ’98 and Rachel Blewitt

Sarah Deplagne ’88

Ken Bogaert ’98

Sandie (Alexandra) Hanke ’88

Tui Britton ’98

Drew Hulton-Smith ’88

Permada Darmono ’98

Miwa Ishii ’88

Paola Del Fabbro ’98

Deepak Kaul ’88

Tejas Ewing ’98

Sacha Lien ’88

Alex Halbherr ’98

Tanya Luthra ’88

Oliver Houchin ’98

Yumi Matsushita ’88

Elizabeth Hutton ’98

Caroline Nath ’88

Karan Kaul UWCSEA ’98

Parr Family

Mantazh Khanna ’98

Anonymous gifts made by 6 donors

Nachi Periakaruppan ’88

Mori Madenokoji ’98

OTHER YEARS

Samantha Rice (Wilde) ’88

Aulia Masna ’98

Heather Ager ’80

Mark Sarre ’88

Steinar Mollan ’98

Kate Gudgeon ’75

Rachel Smith ’88

Asha Stabback ’98

Anonymous gift

Peter van Veen ’88

Nicola Timmins ’98

CLASS OF 1983

Wong Chen ’88

Vera Tomatis ’98

Kaitlin Ayres ’83

Anonymous gifts made by 8 donors

Sumi Vishnu ’98

David Birks ’83

CLASS OF 1993

Jacob Young ’98

REUNION GIVING

Charles Culley ’78 Paul Cummins ’78 Lian Fey Foong ’78 Karen Giambalvo ’78 In Memory of Gösta Kush Handa ’78 Danica Holtes ’78 Jacqueline Kayser ’78 Yuki Konii ’78 Ee Wey Lim ’78 Alexandra Lutton ’78 Prakash Patel ’78 Eleanor Reid-Meyer ’78 Mario Rosario ’78 In Memory of Rajiv Sachdev ’78 Andrew Smith ’78 Eric P. Suan, M.D. ’78 Bruce and Jackie Walker Patrick Widjaja ’78 Zain ’78 and Anastasia Willoughby Joanne K Wood ’78 Anonymous gifts made by 11 donors

Edwina ’83 Irene ’83 Peter ’83 and Tine Jessen Lewis Marks ’83 Debbie Miller ’83 Indrani and Priyanka Murugason

Adnan Ahmed ’88 Analia Roxana Blanco ’88 Peter Breuer ’88

Roswatinee Abdullah ’93

Anonymous gifts made by 16 donors

Gaurab Banerji ’93

CLASS OF 2008

Thijs Bonsma ’93

Anurag Arora ’08

Katie (Wood) Elcombe ’93

Saskia Baer ’08

Mark Gabriel ’93

Danish Bajaj ’08

Okkie Nikijuluw ’08 Adyuta Amarendra Pramudya ’08 Ana Lucia Robleda ’08 Renaldo Santosa ’08 Riccardo Stilli ’08 Madison Tilbrook ’08 Alex van Hasselt ’08 Gustav Wessman ’08 Aswin Widjaya ’08 Evelyn Z. ’08

Annual Report 2017/2018 | 99


FOUNDATION PARENT AMBASSADOR PROGRAMME AMBASSADORS Alison Sanders Ana Carrera Anchal Attal Anna Bryant Anna Layard Archana Tapadia Bettina Haupter Camilla Wallner Caroline McLaughlin Carys Owen Charlotte Peters Clare Kiersey Colleen Reid Cyanthi Katugaha Seneviratne Debbie Grignani Dhara Shah Farida Montanus Francesca Gasparrini Gayathri Ramaswami Geraldine Gibb Harish Kelath Harry (Hakuei) Kosato Hema Shantigram Hina Adeel Inderjeet Thareja Itu Gupta Jackie Cragg Jacyl Ware

Jenifer Raver

Nathalie De Spiegeleire

Julianne Martin

Navleen Kohli

Karin Esmaeili

Neha Patel

Kate Ansbro Laya

Neeti Govil

Katarina Radosavljevic

Nimisha Pandey

Kathryn Zastera

Prity Tibrewal

Kavita Satwalekar

Rachna Amin

Kelley Morrow

Rita Joseph

Kiran Karunakaran

Ruchee Desai

Lakshmi Raju

Rupinder Kaur

Laura Dahan

Rusan Bicuri Yazicioglu

Laurence Clements

Sabine Hein

Laxmi (Mala) Kamath

Saima Ahmed

Leena Prakash

Saloni Bajaj Singh

Lesley Olejnik-McBride

Sarimah Bonehill

Libby Orr

Seema Sutradhar

Lisa Poon

Shikha Sarkar

Lyndall Menon

Shirley Kan

Malavika Shanker

Stefanie Green

Mark Newman

Stephanie Monteith

Marcela Tellez-Glover

Suparna Kapoor

Marchien Vuijk

Suvidha Balasubramanian

Margaret Kim

Suzannah Ritch

Maria Carvalho

Tanya Watts

Margo Encarnacion

Victoria Great

Melita Gerber

Vinni (Vineet) Sethi

Michelle Hertz

Yamini Bawa

Micky Mathur

Yashoda Kukean

Miwa Otsuka

Yohanna Kurniady

FORMER AMBASSADORS (2017/2018) Anne-Valerie Ohlsson Asema Ahmed Carolyn Wang Yong Chandni Kapoor Edna Irani-Fey Gao Wei Geetha Muthiah Juhee Shah Katrina Glassick Lauren Sipelis Liliane Brunner-Halbach Manvi Chandak Mehvish Maniar Melinda Jacoby-Hogg Michelle Lawlor Miyoung Ha Nancy Segal Noelle Lew Priya Sengupta Rajani Thomas Rebecca Risby-Jones Sara Kahafi Vandy (Vandana) Agarwal

GIFTS IN KIND Through the significant contributions of individuals, businesses and corporations, the Foundation has been able to provide even greater support to the College in achieving its vision of becoming a leader in international education. Annanya Agarwal ’10 and Agarwal Family

Iain and Caroline McLaughlin

Nang Mo Hom ’14

Mayank Singhal ’92

Fredrik Fosse ’03

Kirtida and Bharat Mekani

Charlotte Peters

Prab Thakral ’95

Sean Ghazi ’87

Nang Lang Kham ’07

RadioQuip Communications

Deborah Widjaja ’02

Lateral Plains

Nang Kham Noung ’09

The Sassoon Family Foundation

100 | Annual Report 2017/2018


Annual Report 2017/2018 | 101


102 | Annual Report 2017/2018

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UWCSEA 2017/2018 Annual Report  

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