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2012-2013 UWC South East asia Annual Report


Contents Letter from Charles Ormiston, Chair of the Board of Governors �������������������������������������������2 Letter from Julian Whiteley, Head of College..............................................................................3 UWCSEA guiding statements and learning programme...........................................................5 UWCSEA governance and leadership............................................................................................9 Board of Governors...................................................................................................................10 Organisational structure.......................................................................................................... 11 Student achievement.....................................................................................................................13 Academic.....................................................................................................................................13 Activities......................................................................................................................................18 Outdoor education...................................................................................................................21 Personal and social education............................................................................................... 22 Service......................................................................................................................................... 23 Our community.............................................................................................................................. 27 Scholars ..................................................................................................................................... 28 Business report................................................................................................................................31 Human Resources......................................................................................................................31 Admissions................................................................................................................................. 32 Finance........................................................................................................................................ 33 Statement of financial position.............................................................................................34 Statement of comprehensive income.................................................................................. 36 College Advancement................................................................................................................... 39 Foundation financial report.................................................................................................... 39 Statement of financial position.............................................................................................40 Statement of comprehensive income...................................................................................41 Alumni relations....................................................................................................................... 42 Donors 2012/2013...................................................................................................................43 1


Letter from Charles Ormiston Chair of the Board of Governors I am pleased to introduce the 2012/2013 UWC South East Asia Annual Report, which provides our community with up-to-date figures related to the College learning programme and operations. Chairing the Board of an ambitious non-profit institution like UWCSEA is highly rewarding but occasionally has its challenges. Performing the role effectively requires balancing the expectations of a range of stakeholders (students, parents, teachers, staff, alumni, UWC International, community leaders, other schools), all of whom have strong beliefs about what is best for the students and the school. Added to this are the challenges that the education sector as a whole is facing: cost pressures after years of tuition increases that are greater than inflation, increased competition in the market and the ongoing need to recruit and develop the best educators and educational leaders. Above all, we must provide the leadership that will ensure the College is giving our students a high-quality educational experience. Our ambition at UWCSEA is to be a leader in international education with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, valuesbased education. As the Board of Governors sets priorities and allocates resources, we constantly come back to this ambition. Identifying those key initiatives that will improve the quality of our students’ education, while furthering our ambition to be a leader in education on the world stage, is an ongoing process. The role of the administration is to run the school; the role of the Board of Governors is to ensure the school 2

is well run. In addition to the standard compliance and fiduciary roles that a Board must play, we work together with the school to ensure that the administration and teaching faculty set ambitious objectives aligned to the vision, seek out global best practices for ideas and benchmarks, and show boldness in action. Each Board committee has a specific focus, and members leverage this expertise as appropriate to support the school. The 2012/2013 year was a significant one for the Board. We successfully recruited a new Head of College to succeed Julian Whiteley in July 2014; completed reviews of language provision, teacher compensation and University Advising; and finished implementing the majority of the recommendations made through the Board appraisal, conducted during 2011/2012 by external consultants. We also began a process of identifying how we as a College can measure ourselves against our stated objectives, so that the Board can verify that UWCSEA is achieving our mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. As we reflect on the 2012/2013 year, we also look to the challenges that face us in 2013/2014 and beyond. Below are the five most important areas of focus for the Board in the coming year: 1. providing a seamless transition for our new Head of College 2. prioritising and resourcing the key initiatives that will continuously improve the quality of our students’ education, consistent with our ‘challenging, holistic, values-based’ commitment; currently, the most

important of these initiatives is the curriculum articulation project 3. overseeing the final phase of the Dover Campus masterplan 4. ensuring the two campus model is a source of strength for the College and that we have unity of purpose within our diversity of practice 5. adjusting our stakeholder interaction model so that we can engage more members of our community more closely with the College I am very grateful to every full and co-opted member of the Board of Governors, who volunteer their time and expertise to support the school, and have a real impact on the educational experience of our students. I would also like to thank Julian, Frazer, James, all the teachers and staff, alumni, parents and students, who contribute so much to the school. Once again, the commitment of the whole community to the mission, educational goal and ambition of the College has resulted in outstanding student achievement and positive institutional development. I hope this update provides you with an insight into another great year at UWCSEA.

Charles Ormiston


Letter from Julian Whiteley Head of College Welcome to the 2012/2013 UWC South East Asia Annual Report, which provides a statistical overview of the many achievements of our students and details of our operations during the 2012/2013 academic year. Kurt Hahn, the founder of the UWC movement, believed that education should be a preparation for life not just for university, and this belief underpins the philosophy of the College. While academics are important in providing the gateway to opportunity, it is the skills and qualities the students develop, coupled with a strong set of values, that will enable them to make a meaningful contribution to society as autonomous human beings ready to face life’s challenges. The education we provide is therefore multifaceted, embracing all five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme. This report provides some examples of the impact of this approach on our students. The 2012/2013 year marked another milestone in the history of the College, as we celebrated 50 years of the UWC movement. There were many studentled activities throughout the year and the community organised a 50th Anniversary Ball, which raised money to fund two scholarships to the College. Providing more students with access to the UWC education seemed a fitting tribute to the mission of the UWC movement. Students participated in an ‘Around the World’ photo competition where they took photos of themselves wearing their UWCSEA uniform at global landmarks. The result was a wonderful selection of photos—that said so much about our international community and symbolised our goal to make the UWC mission relevant all over the world.

Several developments took place in the learning programme during 2012/2013. In September, we announced our decision to move away from the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) in the Infant and Junior Schools. This was to allow us more flexibility and to ensure that our curriculum builds logically from K1 all the way to Grade 12. This was closely aligned to the significant work that took place through the curriculum articulation project, as we completed standards and benchmarks for English, Mathematics and Science. Also in the academic programme, the first group of East Campus students sat (I)GCSE exams, with excellent results that aligned very well with those on Dover. More details of the academic results can be seen in the academic section of this report. Elsewhere in the learning programme, we conducted a languages review, developed a sports policy, reviewed University Advising and, on Dover Campus, made progress on the recommendations from the CIS/WASC team many of which were relevant to the East Campus as well. We also conducted a review of the first year of the iLearn programme, with students, teachers and parents, to understand the impact of this significant programme on student learning. At an institutional level, we began implementing our new admissions policy, focused on increasing diversity in our student body; began the refurbishment of the Humanities Block on Dover Campus; launched a review of our uniform so that we could ensure it was being sourced ethically, in line with our commitment to sustainability; and the Centre for International Education hosted events for teachers, students

and parents, further establishing UWCSEA as a centre for thinking on education in the Southeast Asia region. The 2012/2013 year was significant for me personally as it was the year I announced my departure from UWCSEA after what will be nine years, first as Head of Dover Campus, then, with the opening of East Campus, as Head of College. It has been my ongoing privilege to work here with such supportive parents, talented colleagues and outstanding students. I am immensely proud of all the wonderful things that take place at the College each day, but I have to say that my greatest pride is in our students. I feel very fortunate to work with such exceptional young people, who with their talent and commitment are making a positive difference in the world. In an economically globalised and socially transformed world, young people like ours are needed more than ever. I am honoured to have played a small part in their education and am confident that, with them as our future leaders, we may be able to create a peaceful and more sustainable future. I would like to finish by thanking the many people—students, parents, Board members, staff, alumni and other friends of UWCSEA— who contribute to our school’s success.

Julian Whiteley 3


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UWCSEA Guiding Statements and Learning Programme UWC mission

learning principles

The UWC movement makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

Learning is a life-long process in which the learner engages with and reflects upon information and experiences to construct new or modify existing understanding as well as develop and apply skills and qualities.

UWCSEA educational goal The UWCSEA goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world.

UWCSEA ambition UWCSEA will be a leader in international education. We will have a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education with an emphasis upon academic achievement, service to others, environmental stewardship, teamwork and leadership.

We know learning is effective when: • learners feel secure and supported Therefore, learners need a positive and respectful learning environment in which it is safe to succeed or to make mistakes and try again. • learners understand the purpose of the learning Therefore, goals should be explicit and learning should occur in context with connections to the world beyond UWCSEA. • learners construct new understanding by building upon prior knowledge Therefore, it is important that new learning is connected to what the learner has previously experienced or understood. • learners listen, talk and interact with others Therefore, learners must have a range of opportunities to engage with others in a variety of situations.

• learners construct meaning by making connections between knowledge and concepts Therefore, learning experiences need to be organised around core concepts. • learners are appropriately challenged Therefore, learning opportunities should align with the developmental stage and individual needs of learners. • learners use timely and goal directed feedback Therefore, ongoing assessment should be regular and structured in a manner that allows for specific feedback to guide the learner in constructing meaning. • learners have time for meaningful and deliberate practice Therefore, learners need well considered opportunities to develop and improve skills and understanding. • learners have ownership of their learning Therefore, learners need opportunities for selfdirected learning. • learners think and act upon their learning Therefore, learners need opportunities to develop strategies to plan, monitor, reflect and make adjustments to learning as needed.

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UWCSEA profile

Skills

Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Our community achieves this goal by developing knowledge and understanding, qualities and skills through the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service.

Critical thinker

Qualities Commitment to care Initiate actions and make a commitment to shaping a better world. Related concepts: stewardship, caring, empathy, compassion, open-minded, service, sustainability Principled Act with integrity and respect for self and the dignity of others.

Related concepts: inquiry, questioning, connection, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, problem solving Creative Imagine and generate new possibilities or alternatives. Related concepts: originality, imagination, curiosity, adaptability, connection, innovation, improvisation, risk-taking Collaborative Participate collaboratively in diverse settings. Related concepts: cooperation, participation, leadership, flexibility, adaptability, responsibility, trust Communicator

Related concepts: integrity, honesty, responsibility, respect, fairness

Communicate effectively according to audience and purpose.

Resilient

Related concepts: communication, interpretation, perspective, intent

Anticipate, persevere and confront challenge.

Self-manager

Related concepts: optimism, confidence, courage, diligence, perseverance

Take responsibility for directing one’s learning.

Self-aware

Related concepts: metacognition, independence, diligence, organisation, responsibility

Develop intellectual, physical, spiritual and emotional well-being. Related concepts: self-discipline, self-esteem, self-confidence, reflection, balance, contentment

6

Reason in an informed and fair-minded manner.


UWCSEA Learning Programme This is the story of the UWCSEA learning programme, with the UWC mission both our inspiration and our goal.

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8


Governance and Leadership UWC movement UWC South East Asia is a member of the UWC movement, which was founded by Kurt Hahn in 1962 and has 12 schools and colleges across 5 continents. The other UWCs are significantly smaller than UWC South East Asia, as illustrated in the table below. School

Age

Number of students 2012/2013

UWC Adriatic

16–19

200

UWC Atlantic College

16–19

350

UWC Costa Rica

16–19

200

Li Po Chun UWC of Hong Kong

16–19

250

UWC Maastricht

2–18

525

UWC Mahindra College

16–19

200

UWC in Mostar

16–18

154

Pearson College UWC

16–19

200

Red Cross Nordic UWC

16–19

200

UWC South East Asia

4–19

4,909

UWC-USA

16–19

200

Waterford Kamhlaba UWC

11–20

600

UWC Maastricht Maastricht, Netherlands

UWC Red Cross Nordic Flekke, Norway

Li Po Chun UWC Hong Kong SAR, China

UWC Pearson College Victoria, Canada

UWC Atlantic College Llantwit Major, UK

UWC Mahindra College Pune, India

UWC-USA Montezuma, New Mexico, USA

UWC Costa Rica Santa Ana, Costa Rica

UWC Adriatic Duino, Italy

UWC in Mostar Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

UWC South East Asia Singapore

Waterford Kamhlaba UWC Mbabane, Swaziland

Does this map look different? In keeping with the UWC ethos, we are now using the Hobo-Dyer Projection for our maps which, as a cylindrical equal area projection, more accurately reflects the relative size of the continents. Thanks to the alumnus who brought this to our attention.

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UWCSEA Governance and Leadership UWCSEA is a non-profit organisation. Our legal status is as a public company limited by guarantee, registered with the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA). UWCSEA is also a registered charity with the Commissioner of Charities,

and a foreign system school, registered with the Ministry of Education and the Council for Private Education. As a member of the UWC movement, UWCSEA is overseen by the UWC International Board.

UWCSEA benefits from a highly experienced Board of Governors, made up of both elected and selected (co-opted) members. There are five Board committees: Audit, Education, Finance, Governance and Management.

UWCSEA Board of Governors Charles Ormiston (Chair)

Alexander Krefft (Chair, Governance Committee from 30 January 2013)

Ho Seng Chee

Davy Lau

Driek Desmet (Chair, Education Committee)

Anna Lord (Chair, Audit Committee from 30 January 2013)

Chegne How Poon

David Maxwell

Will KennedyCooke (Chair, Facilities Committee)

Miles Beasley

Barry Daniels

Alexandra De Mello

Wayne Yang (Chair, Finance Committee)

Thierry Brezac

Katherine Davies

Doris SohmenPao

David Chong (Chair, Governance Committee and Audit Committee —retired 30 January 2013)

Nicholas Chan

Dale Fisher

Julian Whiteley

Co-opted members Lily Fang Vivek Kalra 10

Eric Sandlund Nilanjan Sen

Surinder Kathpalia Shelly Maneth


Audit Committee Anna Lord (Chair) Shelly Maneth Surinder Kathpalia David Chong (former Chair, retired 30 January 2013)

Education Committee Driek Desmet (Chair) Alexandra De Mello Doris Sohmen-Pao Dale Fisher Julian Whiteley Frazer Cairns James Dalziel

Facilities Committee Will Kennedy-Cooke (Chair) Thierry Brezac

Governance Committee

David Maxwell Miles Beasley Julian Whiteley Frazer Cairns Simon Thomas Chegne How Poon

Alexander Krefft (Chair from 30 January 2013) Nicholas Chan Ho Seng Chee Davy Lau Barry Daniels Julian Whiteley Chegne How Poon David Chong (former Chair, retired 30 January 2013)

Finance Committee Wayne Yang (Chair) Anna Lord Katherine Davies Julian Whiteley Nilanjan Sen Eric Sandlund Lily Fang Vivek Kalra Cecilia Teo Chegne How Poon

Management Committee Charles Ormiston (Chair) Wayne Yang Alexander Krefft Will Kennedy-Cooke Driek Desmet David Chong

Organisational Structure The College is a complex organisation, requiring a network of individuals and team who work together to ensure that students have the best possible educational experience each day. The leadership structure is below. UWCSEA Foundation Board

UWCSEA Board of Governors

UWC International Board

Head of College

Director of IT

Director of Admissions

Director of Administration

Director of College Advancement

Head of Dover Campus

Head of East Campus

Director of College Staffing and Development

Director of Facilities and Operations

Director of Communications and Marketing

High School Principal

Primary School Principal

Middle School Principal

High School Principal

Director of Boarding

Deputy Head

Director of Boarding

Infant School Principal

Junior School Principal

Middle School Principal

Director of Curriculum

11


317 Students

12


Student Achievement The learning programme at UWCSEA consists of five interlinking elements: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service. This section of the report provides some student achievement data.

Learning Programme: Academic The academic element of the learning programme allows students to experience the challenge of intellectual pursuit and the joy of scholarly engagement. In 2012/2013, UWCSEA students followed the IB PYP in K1 to Grade 5, a UWCSEA-designed curriculum in Grade 6 to 8, and the (I)GCSE programme in Grades 9 and 10, with students entering in Grade 10 following a Foundation IB (FIB) programme. Grade 11 and 12 students took the IB Diploma programme.

IB Diploma Results These graphs show highlights of the IB Diploma results for 2013, including comparisons with worldwide average. UWCSEA average vs. worldwide average

UWCSEA scores for five years

40

50

40 35 30

20 30 10

25

2009

2010 UWCSEA

2011

2012

2013

Worldwide

0

2009

2010

2011

2012

Fewer than 25

30–34

25–29

35–39

2013

40–45

13


(I)GCSE Results In June 2013, students on East Campus completed the (I)GCSE exams for the first time. Results of the exams from both campuses are below.

Ten-year comparison

27%

This chart shows a comparison between Independent Schools Council (ISC) schools and UWCSEA over a ten year period, from 2004 to 2013. It also shows the East 2013 results. 100

% A*–C DOVER % A*–C EAST % A*–C ISC

80

Dover students receiving all A* or A grade in all subjects

% A*–A DOVER % A*–A EAST % A*–A ISC

60

% A* DOVER % A* EAST % A* ISC

40

98.1%

20

2004

Dover percentage of A*–C grades across all subjects 14

2007

2010

2013


Destinations of Class of 2013 The pie chart shows the destinations of the Class of 2013

University Acceptances Below is a list of universities that UWCSEA students were accepted to between 2011 and 2013. Australia Australian National University Bond University Griffith University University of Melbourne Monash University University of New South Wales Queensland University of Technology University of Sydney Canada University of British Columbia McGill University Quest University Simon Fraser University University of Toronto

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology India Manipal University Ireland Trinity College, Dublin Japan International Christian University Keio University University of Tsukuba University of Tokyo Waseda University Korea Ewha Woman’s University Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Seoul National University Yonsei University

Costa Rica Universidad de Ciencias Medicas

Mexico Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

France Paris College of Art Sciences Po-College Universitaire du Havre

Netherlands Amsterdam University College Delft University of Technology Design Academy Eindhoven

Germany Jacobs University Bremen

New Zealand University of Auckland

Hong Kong University of Hong Kong

Norway University of Oslo

Singapore James Cook University LaSalle College of the Arts National University of Singapore Singapore Institute of Management Singapore Management University Spain IE University Switzerland Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne Thailand Chulalongkorn University United Arab Emirates New York University Abu Dhabi United Kingdom University of the Arts, London University of Bath University of Birmingham University of Bristol University of Cambridge Cardiff University Central St Martins College of Art and Design City University London University of Dundee Durham University University of East Anglia University of Edinburgh University of Exeter 15


Goldsmiths College, University of London Hull York Medical School Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine Keele University University of Kent at Canterbury King’s College London Kingston University Lancaster University University of Leeds Leeds Metropolitan University University of Leicester London School of Economics University College London Loughborough University University of Manchester Newcastle University University of Nottingham Oxford University Oxford Brookes University University of Portsmouth Queen Mary, University of London University of Reading Royal Academy of Dramatic Art Royal Agricultural College Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Royal Holloway, University of London School of Oriental and African Studies University of Sheffield University of Southampton Southampton Solent University University of St Andrews University of Surrey University of Warwick University of the West of England University of York United States of America Amherst College Babson College Bard College Barnard College Bentley University Berklee College of Music Boston University Brandeis University Brown University 16

Bryant University Bucknell University University of California (Berkeley, Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz) Carleton College Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University University of Central Arkansas University of Chicago Claremont McKenna College Clark University Colby College Colgate University Colorado College Columbia University University of Connecticut Cornell University Dartmouth College Duke University Earlham College Emory University Franklin & Marshall College George Washington University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Grinnell College Harvard University Harvey Mudd College Hood College University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Indiana University at Bloomington Johns Hopkins University Kenyon College Lafayette College Lehigh University Lewis and Clark College Loyola Marymount University Luther College Macalester College Methodist University University of Michigan Middlebury College New York University Northeastern University Northwestern University

Oberlin College Occidental College University of Oklahoma Parsons The New School of Design Pennsylvania State University University of Pennsylvania Pomona College Pratt Institute Princeton University Reed College Rhode Island School of Design Rice University University of Richmond Ringling College of Art and Design University of Rochester Rutgers, State University of New Jersey Saint Louis University San Francisco Art Institute University of San Francisco San Francisco State University Santa Clara University Savannah College of Art and Design School of the Art Institute of Chicago School of Visual Arts Scripps College Skidmore College Smith College University of Southern California St. Mary’s College of Maryland St. Olaf College Stanford University Swarthmore College Syracuse University Texas A&M University The University of Texas, Austin Trinity College Tufts University Union College Vassar College University of Virginia Washington University in St. Louis University of Washington Wellesley College Wesleyan University Williams College University of Wisconsin, Madison Yale University


Arts in the Academic curriculum As usual, the emphasis that UWCSEA places on music, drama, film and visual arts resulted in some significant achievements from students. Below are some highlights. For further information on the Arts at UWCSEA, please see the activities section of this report. Drama performances • Independent project performances – Grade 12 theatre • The Pity of War – IB Theatre (the first introduction of an IB Theatre student performance) • Group performance – Grade 10 • Can You Keep a Secret? – FIB • The Trial – Grade 11 • Sit up and Think – Grade 10 • Short form plays (the first introduction of plays written and directed by students)

Other Developments in the Academic curriculum 2012/2013 During 2012/2013, the College made the decision to move away from the IB PYP in the K1–Grade 5 curriculum. The decision was a result of the need for more flexibility in the written curriculum and the drive to ensure that student learning was related to the College’s context and directly connected to the mission and values. From 2013/2014 academic year, Infant and Junior Schools on both campuses will be following the UWCSEA curriculum. At the same time the curriculum articulation project continued to develop standards and benchmarks for individual subjects so that learning goals build logically in each grade from K1 through to IB Diploma.

Music The numbers of students taking music at (I)GCSE and IB Diploma continues to increase. Visual arts • Showcase of student art in professional gallery • Three students scored 100% in IB Visual Arts exams

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Learning Programme: Activities The College offers an extensive Activities programme to students from Grade 2 onwards. The programme is roughly divided into sports, arts, leadership, clubs and special interests. Some statistical highlights from the 2012/2013 year can be seen below.

4,359

Students involved in activities across the College

Spotlight on East Campus Activities

6 12 38 100 120 Drama

Leadership activities

Music ensembles

Clubs

East Campus Students participating in SEASAC championships:

144 32 10 36 30 20 272

Volleyball, football, cross country, softball, rugby and touch rugby

Tennis and badminton

Golf

Swimming

Model UN

Arts

18

Total students

Sports and fitness activities


• Badminton • Bask et

Gy m ll •

an ge R • o

• Fo

otb a

t

tics Athle all • eyb oll •V

s

•C ng

eld

r • Ea

o sc ros

Tennis • Touch ming • (girl s ) • Tra ck a nd Fi

ricket (boys) • Floorball

im • Sw all ftb So

ry • C u nt

• ng

bal l

•C l i m bi

Sports teams

ered • D

292

r Spo ts o f

ff

It was another exceptional year in sports at UWCSEA. UWCSEA Dover Phoenix again topped the rankings of the best schools in Southeast Asia with eight championship winning teams. UWCSEA East Dragons participated in every SEASAC event in their first year of membership, with the girls winning the SEASAC swimming and Level 3 gymnastics. The College hosted three SEASAC championships in 2012/2013.

• Netball (girls) • R ugb ockey H • y (b ls) r oy i g ( s) •S cs i t s ail i na

ve o

Sports

2,100+

Scheduled sports events across the College

428

Students participating in SEASAC

480

Students participating in gymnastics

976

Students participating in swimming

19


846

700+

Students participating in the Instrumental Teaching Programme across the College

High School students involved in drama activities and production

26

Instruments offered

The Arts List of ensembles Dover: Orchestra Symphonic Band Jazz Band Cantabile High School Percussion Ensemble Singers High School Guitar Ensemble Concert Strings The Band Brass Band Intermediate Percussion Ensemble 20

Intermediate Jazz Band Gamelan Ensemble Camerata Middle School Percussion Enemble Arioso Junior Band Junior Strings Beginner Band Grade 5 Choir Junior Singers Grade 2 Choir Recorder Club Beginner Strings

List of ensembles East: Beginner Band Middle School Jazz Band Grade 2/3 Choir Global Voices Intermediate Band Intermediate String Ensemble Karibu Marimba Express Rhythmic Madness High School Music Technology Pamberi All Stars High School African Ensemble

High School Orchestra High School Band Beginner Strings Middle School Choir Middle School Gamelan Middle School Samba Band High School Samba Band High School Jazz Band High School Choir


Learning Programme: OUTDOOR EDUCATION G1 Sleepover in the classroom

G2 Trip to Singapore Zoo

G3 Riders Lodge in Malaysia

G4 Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G5 Taman Negara in Malaysia

G6 Tioman Island in Malaysia

G7 Sea kayaking trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G8 Chiang Mai in Thailand

G9 The opportunity to join various trips and expeditions

The Outdoor Education programme is a powerful part of the UWCSEA learning programme, providing students from Grade 1 to Grade 12 with opportunities to develop their independence, teamwork and resilience.

500,000+ Student hours spent overseas

List of optional trips 2012/2013 Middle School New Zealand adventure South Africa Ski-ing in Verbier High School Annapurna base camp China rock climbing Discover Korea Diving in Lombok Green camp Bali Himalayas Trekking Hong Kong Horse riding Perth Climbing Japanese Alps Trekking and home-stay in Ladakh Langkawi expedition Language home-stay Tall-ship sailing Mountain biking Thailand Mount Kinabalu via Ferrata, Borneo Sea kayaking Malaysia Adventure in Tioman Wales adventure

National Youth Achievement Award (NYAA) The NYAA aims to encourage young people to develop personal qualities of self-reliance, perseverance and a sense of responsibility to themselves and to society. In this way, it fits very well with the outdoor education element of our learning programme.

NYAA Trips Silver Hong Kong, trekking Pulau Sibu, sea kayaking Thailand, mountain biking Wales, trekking Gold Japan, trekking

34 97

Students taking gold

Students taking silver

G11 Project Week

21


Learning programme: Personal and Social Education The Personal and Social Education (PSE) programme helps to ensure that students feel secure, valued and encouraged in their learning, growth and social development. Through the programme, students explore how they are connecting to their learning, friends, family, technology and the outside world.

In-house speakers

Visiting Speakers

• Simon Beesley, Exam Revision

• Danielle Miller, Navigating Girl World (workshops for students) • Danielle Miller, Wake Up Sleeping Beauty (workshop for teachers) • Fred Toke, Counseling Psychology • Fred Toke, Resilience Training • Fintan O’Regan, No Two Children are the Same • Robert Pereira, Bullying Prevention Parent Workshop • Michael Carr-Cregg, Essential Pieces of Life Advice for Boys • Michael Carr-Cregg, Role of the Charismatic Adult (workshop for teachers) • Michael Carr-Cregg, Supporting the At-Risk Adolescent (workshop for Heads of Grade) • Jack Berckemeyer, Living it, Loving it, Laughing about it (for teachers) • Jack Berckemeyer, Motivating the Adolescent Learner

Middle School Conference, a weekend for students, parents and staff, focused on the various needs of Middle School students. • Jane Pyrgos, Mindfulness • Pushpa Dasari, Positivity • Jane Graham, Sleep • Chris Fensom and Jane Pyrgos, Play, Routines and Healthy Lifestyles for Infants Other developments in PSE across the College: • introduction of ‘You Can Do It’ programme to K1 • Bucket Fillers and Bully Busters/Cool Calm Kids • introduction of weekly lifeskills lessons in Middle School • mapping the PSE programme across Grades 6 to 8, incorporating lifeskills and tutor group sessions • agreement of PSE strands across both campuses • introduction of Grade 8 Action for Happiness positive education unit • Junior School and Middle School Anti-Bullying Month in November • Junior School and Middle School Internet Safety Month in February • review of the PSE programme with the Student Council • introduction of student ambassadors in Middle School to support new and leaving students in transition

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Learning Programme: Service UWC South East Asia has service at the heart of its mission, and service activities are a vital part of the learning programme. There are three levels of service: College, local and global service (incorporating Global Concerns, the Initiative for Peace and the Gap Year.) Below are some updated statistics for the 2012/2013 academic year.

t ported s sup

s

20

C cern

rie

h Global

on

oug hr

Does this map look different? In keeping with the UWC ethos, we are now using the Hobo-Dyer Projection for our maps which, as a cylindrical equal area projection, more accurately reflects the relative size of the continents. Thanks to the alumnus who brought this to our attention.

90 24 46 Global Concerns College service across the College programmes Dover

local service partners

East

$1,168,265 +$380,339 Total money raised by students for Global Concerns

$1,548,604

23

Cou nt


Dover

Project Week

328

Countries visited

15

Groups formed

80

Organisations helped

160

Countries visited

11

Groups formed

36

Organisations helped

East

Students participated

Students participated

It is worth noting that the East Campus had its first Project Week in 2013.

Gap Year Programme The Gap Year programme offers students the opportunity to put UWC values into practice in Southeast Asia before going to university. The class of 2013 were involved in the following projects: Project

Number of students

Chiang Mai BABSEA CLE

5

Lamdon School, Ladakh

7

Leeuwin, Australia

2

Gili Trawangan, Lombok, Indonesia

3

EC: Phnom Penh, Cambodia

12

EC: Kep, Cambodia

1

Tioman Island, Malaysia

1

Expedition

6

Lihuk Panaghiusa, Cebu, Philippines

1

Widhya Asih Foundation, Bali, Indonesia

1

Own project

2

24

66 38


11 41

Gap Year projects

Students involved 25


5.3% Students leaving Dover Campus

11.1% Students leaving East Campus

7.4% Leavers across the College

Language Profile There are 46 languages spoken as a first language across the College, with 64 languages spoken in total.

26

4,909 364 76 Students on both campuses

Boarders

Nationalities


Our Community Enrolment 2012/2013

Nationality Spread

Dover Campus: 2,997

265

87

90

109

133

154

175

199

287

329 325

307

Others – 20% (62 nationalities)

269

221

Malaysia – 2% Netherlands – 3% Canada – 3% Japan – 3%

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

Dover Campus UK – 18%

Korea – 6%

47 K1

India – 20%

G11

G12

Australia – 7%

Singapore – 9% USA – 9%

East Campus: 1,912

109 110

133

154 154

176 175 176 173 168

Others – 20% (55 nationalities)

149 119

Canada – 2% France – 2% Malaysia – 2% Korea – 3%

73 43 K1

K2

G1

India – 22%

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

East Campus UK – 20%

Japan – 4% Singapore – 6% Australia – 8%

USA – 10%

College total: 4,909 438

351 287

374

478

455 426

397 342

325

308

242 196 200

90

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

27


Our Community: Scholars In 2012/2013, the UWCSEA scholarship programme supported 80 scholars from 33 countries.

South America – 11%

Asia – 31%

North and Central America – 13% Nationalities of scholars by continent Europe – 21%

70%

More scholars than three years ago

Africa – 24%

10

Different countries represented by African scholars

Financial Support: Scholar programme Funding for scholarships is generated through school fees (3% of tuition fees are dedicated to the scholarship programme), the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP), corporations, national committees, parent donations and alumni donations. A total of $5.1 million was given to scholars on both campuses during the 2012/2013 academic year.

Annual fund – 2% Alumni – 2% Corporation – 4% National committee – 8% Percentage contribution to scholarship funding Dover Campus

Parents – 9%

Percentage contribution to scholarship funding East Campus

UNP – 10%

Parental contribution – 65% 28

Parental contribution – 88%

National committee – 1% Parents – 11%


Community Feedback In 2011/2012, the College embarked on a process of trying to better understand the student, staff and parent experience. Part of this process was an extensive annual survey. As well as asking detailed questions about all aspects of their experience, community members were asked to say how likely they were to recommend the College to friends and family. This recommendation measure is used to understand advocacy levels in communities and businesses, with a view to identifying areas for improvement. Participants are asked how likely they are to recommend an organization on a scale of 0–10. Those who score a 9 or a 10 are considered advocates for the organization; those who score a 7 or an 8 are considered neutral; and those who score between 0 and 6 are considered detractors*. The Net Promoter Score is devised by subtracting the number of detractors from the number of advocates (neutrals are ignored). Organisations can score anywhere from -100% (all detractors) to +100% (all advocates). In general organisations score somewhere between -10% and +10% (though this varies between industries). During analysis of the UWCSEA surveys, the main focus is on the comments made and the ideas submitted for improvement. In addition, while many organisations will focus on moving neutral 8’s into advocating 9’s, the College focus is on the scores at the low end of the scale. In a place of learning, it is vital to understand why a student, parent or staff member is having a negative experience, and take steps to improve their situation.

The analysis and discussion of the survey is extensive, and a series of action points are put in place each year to respond to the particular points raised. Results of the survey are communicated with parents through emails and forums. *For further information and details of the research that went into devising this scale please see The Ultimate Questions 2.0 by Fred Reichheld, with Rob Markey.

Submission of ideas

academic programme. The College received similar lists about all five areas of the learning programme. • More customised to the needs of individual students. • Differentiated teaching for stronger and weaker students. • Ensure that students have a full understanding of what is taught before moving on. • Occasional take-home worksheets.

The survey allowed parents to submit their own ideas on how various aspects of the programme could be improved. These ideas are then viewed by other parents and selected and ranked, according to the other parents view. This process allows the College to understand those ideas that are both popular (ie selected often) and important (ie ranked highly), so that efforts are focused on the areas most important to the community. As an example, below are the top ten ideas submitted by parents about the

• Take tests home to share with parents. • Higher expectations on achievement levels. • An overview of the class curriculum at the beginning of the school year. • Written term reports with teacher comments, not just effort/attainment levels. • More specific assessments and details of such assessments be shared with parents. • Consistent teaching across classes of the same subject with different teachers.

Overall results The graph below shows the distribution of responses to the question ‘how likely are you to recommend UWCSEA to your friends and family?’ 10

36.47%

9

23.73%

8

18.50%

7

9.28%

6 5

6.54% 3.07%

4

0.85%

3

0.59%

2 0.20%

48.1% Overall NPS for College from parents

1 0.39% 0 0.39%

29


3,065 400

Applications received

Total number of full-time teaching staff in the College

63 83

Posts advertised Total number of part-time teaching staff in the College

Australia – 15%

Canada – 9%

Students teacher ratio New Zealand – 8% USA – 3% Singapore – 3%

10.7 Students

1 Teacher

30

Workshop leaders

Conference presenters

Training conductors

Nationality spread

Other – 17%

72 45 36 11 7

IBDP examiners

UK – 45%

Project consultants

2

ECIS/CoIS visiting team members


Business Report Human Resources: Teaching Staff Transition

Staff Breakdown

UWCSEA enjoys an extremely stable teaching environment, with a low transition rate of teachers each year. The table below shows the numbers of teachers leaving Dover Campus each year since 2005. Please note that East Campus is not included yet as the large number of teachers joining and small number leaving would skew the comparative data.

202

229

217

211

234

233

237

Dover Campus (as of 31 July 2012) Management – 3%

Educational support staff – 28%

251

Total number of teachers

Boarding support staff – 3%

Administrative staff – 14% Academic staff – 52%

19 13

14

12

13

14

12

East Campus (as of 31 July 2012)

9

Management – 1%

Total number of leavers 2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

Tenure

Administrative staff – 10% Academic staff – 53%

Please note that East Campus is not included as the large number of teachers joining would skew the data.

UWCSEA Foundation (as of 31 July 2012)

14%

21+ years

Educational support staff – 35%

Boarding support staff – 1%

Dover Campus teaching staff has an average tenure of 6.5 years.

4%

2012/13

27%

48%

Management – 25%

7%

16–20 years

11–15 years

6–10 years

0–5 years

Administrative staff – 75%

31


Business Report: Admissions The Admissions Department is responsible for all aspects of the admission of students to the College. The tables below show the breakdown by grade of how applications were processed on the Dover Campus during the 2012/2013 year Number of Dover Campus applications processed during August 2012/2013 Dover entry August 2013/2014

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Old policy applications

94

3

21

2

3

3

6

5

2

2

7

1

0

149

New policy applications

143

80

138

130

119

96

114

149

135

111

117

91

156

1579

Total applications processed for entry

237

83

159

132

122

99

120

154

137

113

124

92

156 1728

Number of places available

88

1

26

26

28

35

31

32

55

46

26

42

47

483

Number of applications for each space available

2.7

83.0

6.1

5.1

4.4

2.8

3.9

4.8

2.5

2.5

4.8

2.2

3.3

3.6

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications by percentage K1

K2

G1

Accepted

Dover entry August 2013/2014

37%

1%

16%

19% 20% 33% 22% 18% 38% 41% 19% 46% 30% 27%

Ineligible

5%

4%

8%

14%

Eligible but disappointed

36%

86% 52% 46% 51% 36% 49% 55% 35% 23% 43% 17%

19% 41%

Transferred to Dover from East

0%

0%

3%

2%

4%

3%

2%

0%

0%

Withdrawn

22%

10% 25% 20% 15%

19%

15%

18%

12%

21% 23% 32% 40% 21%

0%

G2

1%

11%

9%

10%

6%

13%

15%

13% 2%

5% 0%

12%

10% 1%

The tables below show the breakdown by grade of how applications were processed on the East Campus during the 2012/2013 year Number of East Campus applications processed during August 2012/2013 East entry August 2013/2014

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Old policy applications

75

12

20

1

4

1

4

5

1

3

6

1

1

134

New policy applications

124

66

138

107

76

97

67

113

102

110

126

81

180

1387

Total applications processed for entry

199

78

158

108

80

98

71

118

103

113

132

82

181

1521

Number of places available

110

4

36

33

23

44

23

43

43

39

50

24

76

548

Number of applications for each space available

1.8

19.5

4.4

3.3

3.5

2.2

3.1

2.7

2.4

2.9

2.6

3.4

2.4

2.8

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Outcome of processed East Campus applications by percentage Dover entry August 2013/2014

K1

K2

G1

G2

Accepted

55%

5%

23% 31% 29% 45% 32% 36% 42% 35% 38% 29% 42% 36%

Ineligible

5%

1%

6%

Eligible but disappointed

6%

9%

7%

21%

83% 42% 40% 53% 23% 51% 36% 34% 31% 24% 27%

9%

33%

Transferred to East from Dover

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Withdrawn

19%

10% 29% 23% 10% 23% 14%

21%

15% 24% 28% 38% 40% 24%

32

0%

6% 0%

9% 0%

8% 0%

3%

7%

10%

11% 0%

10% 0%

0%


Business Report: Finance The College operates three separate financial entities: Dover Campus, East Campus and the UWCSEA Foundation. This section of the update outlines the financial data for the 2012/2013 academic year. Financial information for the Foundation can be found in the College Advancement section of the report.

Central admin – 0.8% Depreciation – 6.0% Boarding exp – 3.2%

Sundries and other fees – 3.5% Other contribution – 1.0% UNP income – 0.2% Boarding fees – 4.0%

Maintenance and operations – 5.4% Marketing and Communications – 0.6% Educational resources – 4.1%

Dover Campus income

Administration salary and benefits – 6.0% Boarding salary and benefits – 1.3%

Dover Campus expenditure

Educational support salary and benefits– 9.2%

Tuition fees – 91.3%

Teachers salary and benefits – 63.4%

Central admin – 0.3% Depreciation – 4.2% Boarding exp – 2.1%

Other contribution – 0.1% Sundries and other fees – 6.4%

Maintenance and operations – 8.8%

Boarding fees – 4.6%

Marketing and Communications – 0.4% Educational resources – 5.1%

East Campus income

Administration salary and benefits – 4.9%

East Campus expenditure

Boarding salary and benefits – 0.8% Educational support salary and benefits – 10.4%

Tuition fees – 88.9%

Teachers salary and benefits – 63.0%

33


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION Dover Campus As of 31 July 2013 2013

2012

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

18,959,558

15,553,960

Trade and other receivables

31,647,956

27,942,744

Total current assets

50,607,514

43,496,704

121,452,828

118,060,786

205,000

205,000

Total non-current assets

121,657,828

118,265,786

Total assets

172,265,342

161,762,490

Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Club membership

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade and other payables

11,420,498

11,797,005

Deferred income

65,150,600

63,181,435

Tuition fee deposits

168,417

29,456

Bank borrowings

10,000,000

5,000,000

Total current liabilities

86,739,515

80,007,896

Equity Restricted funds: Building funds Development funds

—

115,503

52,844,329

50,008,732

52,844,329

50,124,235

Accumulated surplus

32,681,498

31,630,359

Total equity

85,525,827

81,754,594

172,265,342

161,762,490

General funds:

Total liabilities and equity

34


East Campus As of 31 July 2013 2013

2012

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

43,552,717

37,827,867

Trade and other receivables

35,943,747

27,518,164

Total current assets

79,496,464

65,346,031

4,726,341

3,340,917

84,222,805

68,686,948

Non-current asset Plant and equipment Total assets

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade and other payables Deferred income Tuition fee deposits

6,367,684

4,956,176

48,952,072

40,265,225

37,270

77,895

55,357,026

45,299,296

5,641,213

5,707,111

Accumulated surplus

23,224,566

17,680,541

Total equity

28,865,779

23,387,652

Total liabilities and equity

84,222,805

68,686,948

Total current liabilities

Equity Restricted funds: Development funds General funds:

35


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Dover Campus Year ended 31 July 2013 General funds

Revenue

Restricted funds

Total

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

$

$

$

$

$

$

79,914,739

72,876,978

1,975,770

5,767,619

Staff cost

(61,369,616)

(59,624,638)

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

(4,903,023)

(4,232,247)

(6,755,812)

(5,156,480)

(11,658,835)

(9,388,727)

Other operating expenses

(14,682,235)

(14,703,202)

(65,426)

(84,611)

(14,747,661)

(14,787,813)

Profit before income tax

935,635

84,510

2,835,598

3,998,702

3,771,233

4,083,212

Other income

Income tax Profit for the year, representing total comprehensive income for the year

36

— 935,635

— 84,510

9,656,836 — —

— 2,835,598

9,239,793 — —

— 3,998,702

89,571,575

82,116,771

1,975,770

5,767,619

(61,369,616) (59,624,638)

— 3,771,233

— 4,083,212


East Campus Year ended 31 July 2013 General funds

Revenue Other income Government grant Staff cost Depreciation of plant and equipment Management and facility fee Operating lease expense

Restricted funds

Total

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

$

$

$

$

$

$

50,831,154

35,315,710

1,052,399

1,170,845

7,087,380 —

5,856,374 —

57,918,534

41,172,084

1,052,399

1,170,845

5,000,000

3,872,652

5,000,000

3,872,652

(38,447,614)

(25,887,589)

(38,447,614)

(25,887,589)

(2,150,881)

(1,535,971)

(2,150,881)

(1,535,971)

(1,400,000)

(7,053,840)

(4,702,560)

(7,053,840)

(4,702,560)

(10,741,033)

(9,033,693)

(99,438)

(3,500)

(10,840,471)

(9,037,193)

Profit before income tax

5,544,025

2,501,954

(65,898)

1,150,314

5,478,127

3,652,268

Profit for the year,

— 5,544,025

(1,400,000)

Other operating expenses

Income tax

— 2,501,954

— (65,898)

— 1,150,314

— 5,478,127

— 3,652,268

representing total comprehensive income for the year

37


38


College Advancement and Alumni Relations, which helps us to stay connected to former students, staff and families.

The College Advancement Department comprises the UWCSEA Foundation, the fundraising function at the College

For full details of the College Advancement Department, please see the Annual Report 2011/2012.

Foundation Financial report Total donations in 2012/2013 Total donations

Operating income and expenditure 2012/2013

$2,496,994

Other income $75,208

Endowment $599,596

Operating income Bank interest $326

Scholarships programme $1,388,346

Operations $163,434

College gift $87,900

Other expenses $157,788

Audit fees $11,289

Annual fund $345,618

Operating expenditure

Staff cost (Gifted by the College) $310,615

Assets Liabilities and Equity

Endowment Fund Available-for-sale bonds $1,880,780

Current assets $3,128,435

Total endowment

Current liability $10,000 Non current assets $3,130,780

Fixed deposit $1,749,415

$4,880,195

Equity

$6,249,215

Held-to-maturity bonds $1,250,000

39


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD As of 31 July 2013 2013

2012

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Other receivables Total current assets

3,047,083

3,068,447

81,352

22,088

3,128,435

3,090,535

Non-current assets Plant and equipment

Held-to-maturity financial asset

1,250,000

250,000

Available-for-sale investments

1,880,780

1,875,705

Total non-current assets

3,130,780

2,125,705

Total assets

6,259,215

5,216,240

10,000

77,934

1,096,909

508,504

LIABILITY Current liability Other payables

Equity Restricted funds: Scholarship fund Capital fund

64,269

31,615

Outreach initiatives fund

24,029

13,390

Staff professional development fund

Annual general fund

216,051

200,160

93,000

1,401,258

846,669

(32,238)

(26,595)

1,369,020

820,074

Endowment fund

4,880,195

4,318,232

Total equity

6,249,215

5,138,306

Total liability and equity

6,259,215

5,216,240

Unrestricted funds: Accumulated (deficit) surplus

40


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD Year ended 31 July 2013 Restricted funds Unrestricted fund

Endowment fund

Scholarship fund

Capital fund

Educational innovation fund

Staff PD fund

General fund

Total funds

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

2013 Income Donation income

478,744

Other income

88,226

120,852

Total incoming resources

88,226

599,596

1,388,346 — 1,388,346

65,269

15,090

65,269

15,090

265,259 — 265,259

2,212,708 209,078 2,421,786

Expenditure Staff cost Audit fees Other expenses

(11,289)

(11,289)

(157,788)

(157,788)

Depreciation

Utilisation of fund during the year

(42,708)

(773,941)

(32,615)

(4,451)

(93,000)

(200,160)

(1,146,875)

(42,708)

(773,941)

(32,615)

(4,451)

(93,000)

(200,160)

(1,315,952)

614,405

32,654

10,639

(93,000)

65,099

1,105,834

32,654

10,639

Total resources expended

(169,077)

(Deficit) Surplus for the year

(80,851)

556,888

Other comprehensive income Available-for-sale investments - fair value gain during the year, representing other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax Total comprehensive income for the year

— (80,851)

5,075 561,963

— 614,405

— (93,000)

— 65,099

5,075 1,110,909

41


Alumni Relations

9,876 176 374 Contactable alumni as of July 2013

Universities represented by alumni mentors

Volunteer alumni mentors

Top 20 known alumni locations – 112 countries in all

Does this map look different? In keeping with the UWC ethos, we are now using the Hobo-Dyer Projection for our maps which, as a cylindrical equal area projection, more accurately reflects the relative size of the continents. Thanks to the alumnus who brought this to our attention.

42


Donors 2012/2013 The College is extremely grateful to all the people who, through financial giving, gifts-in-kind, or volunteering, have helped us to provide an outstanding education for our students and, through them, to fulfil our mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

1971 Society Named in honour of the year the Dover Campus was opened by the then Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, the 1971 Society recognises individuals, families, foundations and corporations that have made accumulative lifetime gifts of $10,000 or more to UWCSEA. All information correct as of 31 July 2013.

Society Members Chairman’s Circle Lizanne ’83 and Robert A. Milton ’78 Lee Hysan Foundation Patrons Kewalram Chanrai Group Benefactors Shelby Davis Foundation Trafigura Pte Ltd. S and V Foundation Capital International Inc. Andy and Mei Budden Sassoon Family MacFadden Family Anonymous gift

Fellows Prince of Wales Trust Dato Abdul Rahman Abdul Shariff and Datin Dr Mona Abdul Rahman Family Harrold Mary Ann Tsao Robinson Anonymous gift Members James Dalziel and Nancy Fairburn Jean de Pourtales Iain and Tejas Ewing Craig Flood ’78 Lester and Christine Gray Kush Handa ’78 Haeyong Jung Kishore Mahbubani Kirtida and Bharat Mekani Charles and Jenny Ormiston John Shang ’78 Mr and Mrs Zain C. Willoughby ’78 Julian and Buff Whiteley In honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr Rajadurai Sanjay and Ravina Kirpalani Satish and Anita Shankar Tord and Kimberly Stallvik Gay Chee Cheong Mark Koczanowski and Vicky Binns Bindiya and Raj Mishra Dale Fisher ’78 Dr and Mrs Jean-Francois and Anne Manzoni Tatvam Foundation Artist-in-Residence Programme Vinod Sahgal Parents’ Association of UWCSEA-Dover Peter and Tine Jessen Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan Kennedy-Cooke Family David and Sonja Chong Anonymous gifts made by three donors

43


Annual Fund 2012/2013 The Annual Fund is used to support scholars, maintain and enhance the UWCSEA curriculum and provide professional development opportunities for staff. Abad Merritt Family Billal Abdul Motin Amni Raihan Abdul Rahman ’13 Miguel Bernardino Abrao Da Silva Guterres ’13 Kevin and Zinnie Aepli Rajendra Agrawal Chelsie Gail Ah Teck ’13 Patrice and Christine Ah Teck Diana Ah Teck Syed Hyder Ahmad Bethan Alexander ’13 Emily Allen ’13 Apurv Alok ’13 Marie and Laurent Amestoy Ruhi Amin and Sama Amin Ram Ananthanarayanan ’13 Sandeep and Jyoti Angresh Louise Arild ’13 Mark Arrowsmith ’13 Devaki Ashwin Muthiah ’13 Robert Aspin Mr and Mrs Ne Aung Avana Shukura Babirye and Miles Kato Balaji Bhashyam Srijoni Banerjee ’13 Christian Barbier Barlow Family Barnard Family Jordan Barnard ’13 Ethan Barnes ’13 Prithvi Batra ’13 Jaiveer and Naira Bedi Haerul Bengardi ’87 Arya Bhandari Yash Jayasheel Bhansali ’13 Vidya Bharam ’13 Manoj Bhargava 44

Iresh Bhaskar ’13 Tanvi Bhaskar ’13 Ayesha Bhattal Vicky Binns and Mark Koczanowski The Blumer Family Åsa and Magnus Böcker Sameen Boparai ’13 Erik Borgen Linnea Borglin ’13 Susan Bradshaw Charlie Bransden ’13 Jennifer and Paul Bransden Andrew and Donna Brereton Brezac Thierry Lachlan Brock ’13 Cameron Brohier-Wood ’13 Kim Brumby Andy and Mei Budden Jeffrey Bullwinkel and Kimberly Latham Harrison Butcher ’13 Friends of the Butterworth Family Frederic Cabay Beverly Yang Cahyadi Frazer and Rebecca Cairns Capital International Inc. – Corporate Matching Gift Ludmila Cardoso De Brito ’13 Sheena Camilla Hirose Carlsen ’13 Courtney Carlson and Tony Lee Liliana Carrillo Barba ’13 Colin Christopher Carson ’13 Jonathan Carter Thomas and Sarah Casanova Thomas Casanova ’13 Sally and Dean Cashman Tamara Cave Jones ’13 Chris and Shiao-Ling Cave Jones Min Sun Cha ’13 Jacky and Martine Chaberty Nicholas KC Chan Joyce Chan ’13 Biju Chandrasekharan Chang Boon Hua Dr Xin Chang Nikita Chaturvedi ’13 How Poon Chegne Hong Bing Chen and Chen Yong

Anthea Cheng ’13 Timothy Cheung and Sue-Ann Yong Chia Sew Kim Chia Yoke Chee Chiew Sin Cheok Sayorn Chin ’13 Doreen Chng Eugene Choe ’13 Do Hyung Choi ’13 Nicholas Chong ’13 Ronald Chong ’78 William Meng Wan Chong ’78 David and Sonja Chong Ishbel Christie ’13 Marcus Chu ’13 Eugenia Chui ’13 Javier Cifuentes Garzaro ’13 Philip Clausius Karen Cockburn Diwa Cody ’10 Margaret Cody ’13 Sinéad Collins Fred Combe Eric Conrad Angelo and Megan Coskinas Craig Coutts Mark and Laurel Crawford Paul Cummins ’78 Katherine and Ceri Davies Nicola Davies ’13 Ian Delabie ’13 Jan and Anne Delabie-Tierrens Andrew Denney Pippa Derry Viren and Ruchee Desai Ibrahima Dieye ’13 Cem and Nadja Dinckol Ashnil Dixit ’99 Kasper Djernaes ’13 Annelieke Dompeling ’13 Alex Dong Saya Elizabeth Douglas ’13 Olga Dubaniowska ’13 Duker Family Dang Bach Duong ’13 Amanda and Sveinung Dybdahl East Pacific Capital Limited


Susan Edwards Neil and Elizabeth Emerson Karin Esmaeili Daphne and Dylan Claudio Facchini Amirah Fadhlina ’13 Nancy Fairburn and James Dalziel Christon Fam ’13 Lily Fang McMahon Anthony Farmer ’13 Dale Fisher ’78 Craig Flood ’78 Renata Flotow ’13 Timothy Fong Christian Foo Deborah D. Fordyce Forest Adventure Amir and Simin Naderi Foroughmand Arabi Kenneth Forssell Craig Foster Samantha Ann Francis ’13 Douglas Fraser ’13 Marc and Francesca Freydefont Ai Fukuda ’13 Family Gaier Anesu Gamanya ’13 Ken Zhi Gan ’13 Avinash Ganesan ’01 Gay Chee Cheong Rose Geoghegan Joshua George ’13 Abheek Ghatak ’13 The Ghirardello Family Erin Gibson ’95 Gabriele Giucca ’13 Rukun Goel ’13 Goh Leep Giap Ajay and Charu Goyal Frédéric Grandjean ’02 Lester and Christine Gray Grundlingh Family Ritu and Gaurav Gupta Navisha Gupta ’13 Joanna Haeger ’13 Kristi May Haller ’13 Nick and Anna Hamilton

Kush Handa ’78 Bob and Nicola Harayda Rolf and Shareen Khattar Harrison Family Harrold Amanda Harvey Kaho Hasegawa ’13 Lakish Hatalkar and Family Jake and Hui Pin Hawila Regina Henares Holly Henderson ’13 William Hernstadt KC Hew Paul and Lisa Hewitt Lisa Hildebrand ’13 Audrey and Seng Chee Ho Charlene Ho ’13 Shareffa Hodge ’13 Liam Holohan Mr and Mrs Hooi Siew Yan Isabel Hope April Hu and Fritz Horlacher Zoe Horlacher ’13 Mr and Mrs Al Hornsby Shweta Hota ’13 Jacqueline Howard Paul Hughes Max Hull Hung Chun Fai Tiffany Hung ’13 Ngoc Yen Chi Huynh ’13 Jenny Huzell ’13 Doyoung Im ’13 David Immanuel ’13 Mark Inkster and Kathryn Lilienthal Nayana Jain ’13 Rohan Jain ’13 Tim Jarvis Patrick and Yuko Jelfs Nina Jessen ’13 Tine and J. Peter Jessen You Lim Jin ’13 Johnston Family Cathy Jones Geraint Jones Leia Renee Jones ’13 Hye In Jung ’13 Jung Ji Yeon

Aakash Kadam ’13 Ridhima Kalani ’13 Lakshmi Kandasamy Mr V. Kannan and Mrs Usha Kannan Lakshmi Kartik Anisha Kaul Felipe and Anisha Kedia Justin Kendrick Kennedy-Cooke Family Sinath Keo ’13 Priyanka Kewal Ramani ’13 Susanne Khalek Gyeong Yeon Kim ’13 Hae Kyung (Kimmy) Kim Hankyeol Kim ’13 Han Hee Myung Hikaru and Richard Kincaid Kanika Kirpalani ’13 Ravina and Sanjay Kirpalani Mr and Mrs Robert and Edna Dompeling Sara and Kento Kobayashi Michel Koch Julie Kohn and Dan Swift and Family Pat Kongboonma Sibonay Koo ’13 Alexander Krefft ’93 Olivier Kreijkes ’13 Prithvi Krishnan ’13 Ashutosh and Monica Kumar In honour of the late Lal Kumar and Dr Rajadurai Balakrishnan Kunnambath Lai Ang Tau Lai Chin Khong, Matthew George and Suzie Laing Anthony Lam Yan Yu ’10 Nick Lambert Thomas Lambrou ’13 Lamy Family Catherine Lane ’13 Isha Latif ’01 Su-In and Vinson Lau Hannah Lavender-Jones ’13 Iain Lawson Adam and Joyce Le Mesurier Maite Ledig ’13 45


Lee Buyng Yel Calvin Lee and Eunkyung Jun Eui Sun Lee ’13 Justin Lee ’13 Jonathan Lee ’13 Bryan Lee ’13 Sam and Poni Leong Tiara Lesslar Renata and Ronald Lichtenecker Melanie Liew ’13 Maarten Buitelaar and Alison Lim Dena Lim Lim Huey Yuee Jovanka Gabriella Lim ’13 Nancy Lim Philip Lindenhayn ’13 Bjorn and Mia Linder Sharky and Liz Loh Phui Cheu Loo Kuen Feng Lord Family Wendy Lotter and Stephen Lyon Kengthsagn Louis ’13 Margarita Louis-Dreyfus Ming Wei Low ’13 Inna Luengas Angie Carolina Luna Pinzon ’13 Elizabeth MacLachlan The MacSwain Family So Hee Maeng ’13 Mohit Maheshwari ’99 Avantika Makar ’13 Arijit Malik ’13 Catherine Malone Jonathan Mancer ’13 Bhavya Mandloi ’13 Michelle Maneth and Akmal Alhamawi Aditya Manikantan ’13 Marietta Louise Martin ’13 Philippe Martin-Achard Marx Family Masuhr Family Nikita Mathur ’13 Christine and Oliver Maunder Kim Maxwell Mara McAdams and David Hand Andrea McDonald 46

William Mcghie ’13 John McGrath Tanis Mcgrath ’13 Palecanda and Monisha Medappa Aidan Meehan ’13 Caroline Meek Siddharth Mehra ’13 Kirtida and Bharat Mekani Sumitra and Naveen Menon Roma Menon ’13 Bruno and Analida Merlino Marlene Meunier ’13 Mallika Miglani ’13 The Mikkelsen Family Josie Millichamp ’13 Eunhong Minford Family Jerónimo Miranda ’13 Bindiya and Raj Mishra Jonathan and Kim Mitchell Nadine Mivelaz ’13 Anders Mogensen and Monique Morley Monjurul Ben Morgan Nicole Morin ’13 MS Student Council SY 2012-2013 Gordon Muir ’13 Mikayla Ida Murphy ’13 Sharon Murray ’98 Sriram Nadathur Sanjana Nair ’13 Kanchan Nannavare ’13 Anirudh Arvind Narain ’13 Rohit Narang and Shweta Asnani Nitin Natrajan ’13 Fred and Heidi Neve Newman Family Minh-Tam and Jessica Nguyen Aryan Nicolai’s parents Mr and Mrs L.Nippress Terutake and Kazumi Niwa Usmanto Njo Lynn Nor André Nurman ’93 Brian Ó Maoilleoin Calvin O’Brien Danny and Alison O’Connor

Lochlainn Joseph O’Driscoll ’13 Junichi and Chikage Ogawa Ong Chaw Yin The Onitiri Family George Oommen Sadbh O’Reilly ’13 Charles and Jenny Ormiston Dan and Libby Orr Line Ostad ’13 Advait Padhye ’13 Aryaman Pai Pak Yue Hong Keshav Pant ’13 Parents Association UWCSEA East Na Yon Park ’13 Rachel Park ’13 Sang Ook Park ’13 You Mi Park Parr Family Cynthia Paul Emily Payne ’13 Alexander Pflaum ’13 Platinum Visual Data Systems Sander Ploumen ’13 Cathy and Nigel Pool N. Prasad Tom Preststulen Halcyon, Horatio and Ottilie Price Edward Pyrgos ’13 Santosh Raghavan Dr Andrea Rajnakova Ravi and Lakshmi Raju Gayathri Ramaswami Aishwarya Ramesh ’13 Mr and Mrs GS Ramesh Ayush Bickram Rana ’13 Fiona Read Zachary Rees ’13 Chaylee Reeve Celine Rendboe Gronning ’13 Victor Repkow ’13 Emiliano Rinaldi ’13 Martin and Christine Rinck Joe Rivera Miguel Rodriguez Olivares ’13 Gerhard Roux Ida Royana


Aswin Ruanglertbutr ’88 Nety and Abhishek Sahai Ken and Yuko Sakurai Kenji and Azusa Sakurai Anjali and Sajith Fernando Salud ’13 The Sandlund Family Sanjana Sankaran ’13 Sara Taseer Fine Jewellery Pte Ltd Kapil and Sangita Sarin Claire Sassoon ’03 Victor and Michelle Sassoon ’82 Christopher Sastropranoto ’13 Sommit Satjayakorn and Boonkuer Boonsiripat Hisaaki Sato Jason Scott Kumba Seddu ’13 Ward Wytze Seeger ’13 Arindam Sengupta Gary and Mel Seston Vidya Sethu ’13 Tanay Rakesh Shah ’13 Satish and Anita Shankar Samriddhi Sharma ’13 Dave and Sue Shepherd Lauren Shillabeer Jota and Claudia Shohtoku Nompendulo Mpesh Shongwe ’11 Monika Shrestha ’13 Singapore in the ’70s, Reunion 2012 Narinder and Bindu Singh Richard and Zainab Slovenski Hanna, Xander and Benjam Smit Bruce A Smith Smith Smithangura Mr and Mrs Sohmen-Pao Tom and Lizzi Soper Francisca Soto Bravo ’13 Ishaan Srivastava ’14 Jessica and Johan Stael von Holstein Anne and Christian Stauffer Mr and Mrs Daniel Steele Eric P. Suan, MD Kae Sugawara ’97 Suzuki Family Tomohito Suzuki ’13

Lynn Tachihara ’13 Gregory Tan ’13 Jei-Jei Tan ’13 Tan Lee Hong Li Shan Tan ’13 Phuay Miang Tan Rachel Tan ’13 Samvit Tandan MD, PhD Erasmo Tani ’13 Teagle Family Linda Teagle ’78 Teo Shiok Fu Cecilia Teo Bhavik Bharatchandra Thakker ’13 Dean and Dolly Thomas Peter Thomas ’13 Simon Thomas Jack and Ella Thomson Timothy Thong ’13 Mukund Tibrewala ’13 Armand Tiphonnet ’13 Cheri Toh Evelin Toth ’13 Zak Towle ’13 Stephen Trevis Caitlin Trew ’13 Karan Trikha ’13 Alvaro Trujillo ’13 Mary Ann Tsao Robinson Nick and Annie Tsinonis Bonheur Tumurere ’13 Adam and Angela Turner Glenn William Turner and Lehing Tu Sherveen Uduwana ’13 Greg and Michelle Unsworth Marc Jean Van De Walle and Fabienne Hankard John and Rosalie Van Oost Marco Van-Boswell ’13 Diya Varadaraj ’13 Rhea Varghese ’13 Atul and Rashmi Varshneya Bala and Rajee Vissa Nambi and Kayal Viswalingam Elizabeth Vogtle Rupinder and Gurpreet Vohra The Vorster Family

Michiel Pieter Vriens ’13 Jessica Wagner ’06 Josh Wagner ’10 Stan Wagner Wai Chee Hoong Sota and Kiyomi Wakabayashi The Wallner Family Samuel Wangsaputra ’13 Alicia, Matthew and Genevieve Waters Cameron Watts ’13 Bruno and Sekar Wauters Maria Wee Tracy and Rene Wenger Rohan Westcott Virginia Westcott Brenda Whately Julian and Buff Whiteley Patrick Widjaja ’78 Charles and Marina Wigley Linn Lett Win ’13 The Windheim Family Annika Winsnes ’13 Madeleine Wong ’13 Ian, Vangie and James Wood Laura Wood ’13 Kate Woodford Denise Wright Mark Wyrill Farhana Yaakob Junichiro and Keiko Yamada Mr and Mrs Yaw C M Hyun Ki Yang ’13 Min Yi Yang ’13 Alicia Yi and Dennis Shen Marianne Yong-Macdonald Joanna M Youngson (Maldonado-Saldivia) ’96 J K Zastera Ariana and Marina Zilliacus Welile Zwane ’13 Anonymous gifts made by 38 donors

47


Gifts in Kind

Services

Individuals, businesses and corporations have made a significant contribution of time, expertise and services to the Foundation. Through their commitment, the Foundation has been able to provide even greater support to the College in achieving its vision of becoming a leader in international education.

Bain & Co. South East Asia Inc. T.K. Lai Charles Ormiston Lateral Plains Lizzi and Tom Soper EFG Bank David Chong & Co. Deutsche Bank AG Singapore Sassoon Family Nand and Jeet Khemka Foundation

Volunteers UWCSEA is privileged to have a very enthusiastic and active volunteer community across all areas of College life who provide us with generous support. Parent ambassadors Sumita Ambasta Morten Andersen Jyoti Angresh Samantha Hague Midori Isozaki Lori Kaufman Anisha Kaul Navranjan Khanna Nauleen Kohli Ausra Larbey Henrik Mikkelsen Vinitha Mukherjee David Neidel Mark Newman Dhooleka Raj Jenifer Raver Sanjay Sharma Simon Weston Jenny Windheim Helen Yang Susana Zilliacus

48

50th Anniversary Ball The UWCSEA Foundation is deeply indebted to a passionate and committed group of parents who initiated, coordinated and ran the UWC 50th Anniversary Ball in November 2012. Through the generosity of the attendees, the ball raised the funds to award three new two-year scholarships. Michelle Fisher Nicola Harayda Gisella Harrold Else Igesund-Kyrkjeboe Sally Letele Henny Scott Nishta Sipahimalani Susana Zilliacus


066COM–1314 MCI (P) 120/04/2013

UWCSEA Annual Report 2012/2013  
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