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UWC South east asia Annual Report 2011-2012

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Contents Letter from Charles Ormiston, Chair of the Board of Governors �����������������������������������������2 Letter from Julian Whiteley, Head of College............................................................................3 UWCSEA guiding statements....................................................................................................... 4 UWCSEA governance and leadership..........................................................................................9 Board of Governors..................................................................................................................14 Organisational structure.........................................................................................................18 Student achievement.....................................................................................................................21 Academic................................................................................................................................... 22 Activities.................................................................................................................................... 33 Outdoor education.................................................................................................................. 39 Personal and social education.............................................................................................. 43 Service........................................................................................................................................46 Our community............................................................................................................................. 53 Boarding..................................................................................................................................... 55 Scholars ..................................................................................................................................... 57 Parents’ Associations..............................................................................................................60 Strategic plan .................................................................................................................................63 Business report............................................................................................................................... 67 Human Resources....................................................................................................................68 Admissions................................................................................................................................. 70 Finance........................................................................................................................................74 Statement of financial position............................................................................................ 76 Statement of comprehensive income................................................................................. 78 College Advancement................................................................................................................... 81 The Foundation........................................................................................................................ 81 Financial Report.......................................................................................................................84 Alumni Relations......................................................................................................................86 Statement of financial position............................................................................................90 Statement of comprehensive income..................................................................................91

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Letter from Charles Ormiston Chair of the Board of Governors It is my pleasure to introduce the second UWC South East Asia Annual Report, which highlights aspects of the UWCSEA experience during the 2011/2012 academic year. Another year of commitment from our whole community to the mission, vision and values of the College has resulted in outstanding student achievement and purposeful institutional progress. Chairing the Board of an ambitious non-profit institution like UWCSEA is a complex undertaking. Effective leadership requires balancing the needs of a range of stakeholders (students, parents, teachers, staff, alumni, UWC International, community leaders, other schools) who hold passionate beliefs about what is best for the students and the school. Added to this are the challenges that the education sector as a whole is facing: cost pressures after years of tuition increases that are greater than inflation; the need to equip students to manage themselves in a world where information is readily available and IT tools can both benefit and distract; and above all, ensuring that the education we are providing is holistic and is preparing students not just for university, but for life in an unknown future. The UWC schools, colleges and programmes provide challenging and transformational educational experiences to students, inspiring them to create a more peaceful and sustainable future. Our vision at UWC South East Asia is to be a leader in international education with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education. As the Board of Governors 2

sets priorities and allocates resources, we constantly come back to this vision. We ask ourselves if what we are doing is ambitious enough, if it will contribute to our being an international leader, if what we are doing is consistent with our values. On many questions we have to chart our own path. The role of the administration is to run the school; the role of the Board of Governors is to ensure the school is well run. In addition to the standard compliance and fiduciary roles that a Board must play, we work together with the school to ensure that the administration and teaching faculty set ambitious objectives aligned to the vision, seek out global best practices and show boldness in action. Each committee of the Board has an ambitious agenda and an admirable set of accomplishments, which are outlined in the Governance and Leadership section of this report As we reflect on the 2011/2012 year, we also look to the challenges that face us in 2012/2013 and beyond. The five most important challenges the Board of Governors faces in the next three years are the following: 1. Selecting a new head of College to succeed Julian Whiteley in July 2014 2. Prioritising and resourcing the key initiatives that will continuously improve the quality of our students’ education, consistent with our “challenging, holistic, values-based” commitment 3. Re-thinking our communications and our stakeholder interaction model, in order to engage more members of our community in

service, the arts and sport, which will in turn enhance the student experience. 4. Ensuring the two-campus model is a source of strength for the College and provides us with pooled resources for major undertakings, two springs of innovation and greater visibility in attracting students, teachers and staff 5. Continuously upgrading and refining our governance processes to ensure the Board of Governors will selfrenew in a meritocratic way I am very grateful to every full and coopted member of the Board of Governors, who volunteer to support the school and have a real impact on the educational experience of our students. The Governors are intensely proud of the school’s performance, which we measure across holistic factors, not just our outstanding IB and other examination results. I hope this annual report provides some insight into another year of progress at UWCSEA. In closing, I’d like to thank Julian, James, Frazer, all the teachers and staff, alumni, parents and students, who contribute to the school. Our agenda is ambitious but it has the best of goals: to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. Not just the students; all of us.

Charles Ormiston


Letter from Julian Whiteley Head of College Welcome to the second UWC South East Asia Annual Report, intended to provide an overview of the many achievements of our students, along with developments across both campuses and details of our operations. Kurt Hahn, the founder of the UWC movement, believed that education should be a preparation for life not just for university, and this belief underpins the philosophy of the College. While academics are important in providing the gateway to opportunity, it is the skills and qualities the students develop, coupled with a strong set of values, that will enable them to make a meaningful contribution to society as autonomous human beings ready to face life’s challenges. The education we provide is therefore multifaceted, embracing all five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service. This report provides many examples of the impact of this approach on our students, and we hope illustrates how proud we are of them as they embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. In August 1971, UWCSEA was opened as Singapore International School by then Prime Minister Lee Kwan Yew, later becoming the second College in the UWC movement. It was therefore rather poignant that in August 2011, 40 years to the month after Dover Campus was established, the East Campus in Tampines opened its doors. The rationale for establishing the East Campus was very clear. Not only did we want to help the Singapore

community—in 2007 capacity constraints within the education sector were preventing families from moving to Singapore—we also believed that the UWC mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures required us to offer our holistic, values-based education to as many students as possible. The opening of the East Campus allowed us to meet the needs of our host country while fulfilling our mission and vision. On several occasions during the year I had the opportunity to sit with East Campus students to discuss their experience. As you would expect given the nature of our students, the discussions covered many aspects of their education both within and without the classroom. I was fascinated not only by their confidence but how articulate they were, able to express their views on a wide range of global issues—social, environmental and political. They are an exceptional group of students and we are fortunate to have them as members of our community. At the same time, life continued apace at the Dover Campus. For the first time in its history the campus was accredited by two external agencies, the Council of International Schools (CIS) and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The team of 16 respected international educators who visited in October 2011 wrote in their concluding statement, “The UWC mission and the UWCSEA mission, vision and values are strong statements of who the College is, and what the College stands for, and the Visit only served to reinforce the fact that the College community does indeed ‘walk the talk.’ The focus and emphasis

on quality of relationships was palpable, from the Board/Head of College on down throughout the school.” Phase 2 of the Dover Campus Master Plan reached a conclusion with the opening of the Middle School building in the centre of the campus. The next project, the refurbishment of the Humanities Block, had begun by the end of the academic year. Finally, at an institutional level, the Curriculum Articulation Project commenced; iLearn, the programme to integrate the use of technology into the learning programme, was launched; a new Admissions policy aimed at opening up access to the College and eliminating wait-lists was introduced; a site was found on Pulau Sibu to cater for the expansion of the Outdoor Education programme; and the newly established UWCSEA Centre for International Education hosted the IB World Heads Conference, which attracted over 450 delegates from across the globe. 2011/2012 was certainly a significant year for UWCSEA. I would like to finish by thanking the many people—students, parents, Board members, staff, alumni and other friends of UWCSEA—who contribute to our school’s success. It is a privilege to be working here.

Julian Whiteley 3


UWCSEA guiding statements UWC mission

Philosophy

The UWC movement makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

UWCSEA aims to develop high achieving, socially confident and morally responsible individuals through an active commitment to a coherent set of values and practices based upon the philosophy of Kurt Hahn, the 20th century educationalist and founder of the UWC movement.

UWCSEA educational goal The UWCSEA goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world.

UWCSEA ambition UWCSEA will be a leader in international education. We will have a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education with an emphasis upon academic achievement, service to others, environmental stewardship, teamwork and leadership.

Values The UWCSEA community expects members to: • be honest and act with integrity • avoid prejudice by developing views based on evidence, reasoning and understanding • be compassionate and morally responsible • embrace challenge in order to maximise their potential • help other people • take an interest in and enjoy friendships with people of all cultures and backgrounds • minimise their harmful impact on the environment

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Hahn was a leading figure in the creation of the concept of experiential learning. He believed that education was about the development of the ‘whole person’ in order to prepare students for life, not just for university. His philosophy can be encapsulated in the phrase:

“Plus est en vous.” – There is more in you (than you think). The UWCSEA learning programme actively combines challenging experiences with academic rigour and creative opportunity for every student. The College has high expectations of the students who in turn develop high expectations of themselves. We expect students to think critically and seek out evidence, challenge the perceived wisdom and develop their own ideas, place prejudice to one side and act with conviction. A curriculum of this ambitious nature cannot be confined to the classroom. It is our educational philosophy that an active, challenging curriculum across the five elements of our learning programme (academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service) provides our students with the opportunity to develop into well-balanced, perceptive

individuals who have the confidence and optimism to take action to improve the lives of others. Students are encouraged to use their initiative, embrace challenge by extending the boundaries of their experience, embark upon journeys of self-discovery without fear of failure and develop the ability to cope with ambiguity. A good school will ensure that all students experience success in order to develop their self-confidence: exceptional schools allow students to experience failure in a supportive and caring environment so that they learn to persevere and turn such events into opportunities. As we prepare our students for their future, self-discipline becomes paramount. As the students grow older, they are provided with greater autonomy, giving them increased opportunity for negotiation and selfdetermination. In so doing, we create an environment in which students develop a positive attitude to learning which enables them to indulge their curiosity and develop their creativity. In order to develop a sense of social responsibility and compassion, Hahn believed that service should be at the heart of education. College, local and global service is a fundamental component of a UWCSEA education and as a consequence is embedded into the learning programme. We expect all members of the College community to actively support and become involved in service. Similarly, we stress the importance of both understanding and active involvement in environmental issues.


Whilst trying to minimise our harmful impact on the environment, the community is encouraged to become custodians and ambassadors for sustainable development. Key to any school is the quality of the human relationships and interactions between members of the community. UWCSEA believes that all interactions should be based upon trust, honesty and mutual respect as we aspire to create a harmonious community

in which all members are actively involved in and work collaboratively to help the College achieve its mission and ambition. It is our belief that education should be truly life defining. We, therefore, provide students with the opportunity to develop a strong value system and the necessary skills, knowledge and dispositions to make a positive impact upon the world.

The College serves the global community and is open to students of all backgrounds who meet its admissions’ standards. In keeping with Hahn’s aspirations, we bring together a rich diversity of cultures and promote intercultural understanding through shared life experiences, and cooperative and collaborative living. This is further developed through a reflective dialogue on global issues and approaches to critical engagement in the pursuit of peace. 5


UWCSEA profile Our UWCSEA community is committed to being aware, able and active. As global citizens, learners understand that the competencies of the UWCSEA profile supports the UWC mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

Learners:

Learners:

• act on creative ideas to produce original works as a means of personal or group expression

• articulate thoughts and ideas effectively in a variety of forms and contexts

• adapt ideas as circumstances change to initiate new solutions while understanding that success and setbacks are part of creativity and innovation

• make informed choices about medium and content according to audience and purpose

Skills

• connect ideas and experiences in inventive ways by transferring understanding to new situations

Critical thinker and problem solver

Collaborative

Critically solve complex problems based upon informed and ethical decisions

Work collaboratively in diverse settings to learn and lead by influence

(inquiry, questioning, connection, analysis, synthesis, evaluation)

(cooperation, participation, leadership, flexibility, adaptability, responsibility, trust)

Learners:

Learners:

• identify and ask relevant questions towards developing solutions

• work respectfully to resolve issues and build consensus with diverse teams

• systematically plan to gather information from different perspectives to deepen understanding about how to resolve problems • analyse and synthesize the information in order to develop an informed and ethical solution • enact solutions to complex problems • reflect upon experiences and new understanding to inform future thinking

• demonstrate flexibility and adaptability to work effectively in a climate of ambiguity and change • assume shared responsibility, value individual contributions and be accountable for outcomes • lead by influence rather than authority while behaving ethically and acting with integrity • build and sustain effective networks using appropriate tools

Creative and innovative

Communicator

Think creatively to produce original works or to develop innovative ideas

Communicate effectively according to audience and purpose

(originality, imagination, curiosity, adaptability, connection, persistence, risk-taking)

(communication,interpretation, perspective, intent)

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• analyse and evaluate a range a sources to understand perspective, emotion and/or meaning Self-manager Take responsibility for managing and directing their own learning (metacognition, independence, perseverance, diligence, organisation, responsibility) Learners: • use metacognitive skills to define learning goals, monitor progress, reflect and adjust their approach to improve learning • work independently and safely towards a goal without direct oversight • organise time and resources to manage a workload and complete a task

Qualities Concerned and committed Demonstrate a commitment to care (stewardship, caring, empathy, compassion, open-minded, service, sustainability) Learners: • sustain an empathetic and compassionate outlook • demonstrate a concern for inequity and a commitment to social justice


• value diversity and engage respectfully in an open minded manner • demonstrate concern for the environment and a commitment to a sustainable future • initiate and sustain responsible action with the belief that people can make a difference Principled Act with integrity and honesty with a strong sense of fairness and respect for self and the dignity of others (integrity, honesty, responsibility, respect, fairness) Learners: • demonstrate ethical and socially responsible behaviour • take responsibility for individual actions and the consequences that accompany them • display moral courage when confronting injustice

Self-aware Develop intellectual, physical, spiritual and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being (self-discipline, self-esteem, self-confidence, reflection) Learners: • understand the importance of a healthy lifestyle and demonstrate the self-discipline to support personal well-being • realistically reflect upon personal feelings, values and strengths to make informed decisions • celebrate the strengths and achievements of self and others • remain positive and optimistic when faced with personal challenge, seeking advice and support when needed

Learning and learning principles

(optimism, confidence, courage, diligence, perseverance)

Learning is a life-long process in which the learner engages with and reflects upon information and experiences to construct new or modify existing understanding as well as develop and apply skills and qualities.

Learners:

We know learning is effective when:

• demonstrate a sense of courage in unfamiliar situations

• learners construct new understanding by activating prior knowledge and experiences Therefore, it is important that new learning is connected to what the learner has previously experienced or understood.

Resilient Anticipate, persevere and confront challenge

• exhibit an optimistic and confident attitude when faced with challenge • work effectively in a climate of ambiguity and changing priorities • persevere by viewing obstacles as opportunities to learn

• learners use timely and goal directed feedback Therefore, ongoing assessment should be regular and structured in a manner that allows for specific

feedback to guide the learner in constructing meaning. • learners collaborate Therefore, learners must have opportunities to interact with others in a variety of situations and groupings. • learners are challenged Therefore, learners need to be challenged in developmentally appropriate ways. • learners feel secure and supported Therefore, learners need a safe and respectful learning environment. • learners construct meaning by seeing patterns and making connections Therefore, learning needs to be organised around core concepts. • learners actively process and reflect Therefore, time is required for learners to practise, reflect and consolidate learning. • learners apply metacognitive skills Therefore, learners should develop an awareness of their own thinking processes to develop intellectual habits. • learners understand the purpose of the learning Therefore, learning should occur in context with clear connections to real world. • learners have ownership of their learning Therefore, opportunities for selfdirected learning are needed to sustain and motivate learning. 7


Governance and Leadership UWC movement

UWC South East Asia is a member of the UWC movement. UWC schools, colleges and programmes deliver a challenging and transformative educational experience to a diverse range of students, inspiring them to create a more peaceful and sustainable future.

“The striking thing about the United World Colleges is that they embrace the entire world across all divides of race, history, culture, wealth, religion, economic status and political belief.” Nelson Mandela Honorary President, UWC International

UWC Maastricht Maastricht, Netherlands

UWC has 12 schools and colleges across five continents. Most of the schools enrol students only for Grades 11 and 12 (the IB Diploma). However, Waterford Kamhlaba enrols students from Grades 6 to 12, while UWC Maastricht and UWC South East Asia enrol students from K1 to Grade 12.

UWC Red Cross Nordic Flekke, Norway

Li Po Chun UWC UWC Pearson College Victoria, Canada

Hong Kong SAR, China UWC Atlantic College Llantwit Major, UK

UWC Mahindra College Pune, India

UWC-USA Montezuma, New Mexico, USA UWC Costa Rica Santa Ana, Costa Rica

UWC South East Asia Singapore UWC Adriatic Duino, Italy

UWC in Mostar Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina Waterford Kamhlaba UWC Mbabane, Swaziland

The other UWCs are significantly smaller than UWC South East Asia, as illustrated in the table below. School

Age

Number of students 2012/2013

UWC Adriatic

16–19

200

UWC Atlantic College

16–19

350

UWC Costa Rica

16–19

200

Li Po Chun UWC of Hong Kong

16–19

250

UWC Maastricht

2–18

525

UWC Mahindra College

16–19

200

UWC in Mostar

16–18

154

Pearson College UWC

16–19

200

Red Cross Nordic UWC

16–19

200

UWC South East Asia

4–19

4,900

UWC-USA

16–19

200

Waterford Kamhlaba UWC

11–20

600

UWC South East Asia was the second member of the UWC movement, opened by Lee Kuan Yew as Singapore International School in 1971. SIS became UWC South East Asia in 1975 and gradually expanded to become the K–12 international school of nearly 5,000 students across two campuses that it is today. The schools and colleges of the UWC movement are united by their common mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future.

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Kurt Hahn: A Life

Timeline of Kurt Hahn’s Life 10

and perseverance—some of the many skills and qualities we develop at UWCSEA through our Outdoor Education programme today. Fifteen years later, in 1956, Hahn founded the Duke of Edinburgh’s award, which for more than 50 years has encouraged young people to challenge themselves

1933 Exiled to Great Britain

The ideals of Gordonstoun were partly manifested in an enormous emphasis on outdoor activities, particularly seamanship and mountaineering. In 1941, more and more convinced of the importance of learning outside the classroom, Hahn established Outward Bound, with a founding mission to give young people the ability to survive harsh conditions at sea by teaching confidence, tenacity

1910 Attended Oxford University

1886 Born Germany

Born in 1886, the son of a wealthy German industrialist, Kurt Hahn was educated in Germany and then in Oxford, before World War I brought him back to Germany. His early interest in education as a force for good was crystallised by the destruction he witnessed during the war, and with the support of Prince Max von Baden, the last imperial chancellor in Germany, in 1920 founded Salem School in Germany, based on respect for the individual, responsibility to the community and an awareness of the importance of the democratic process in sustaining both.

1920 Founded Salem School

Kurt Hahn Founder of the UWC movement

In 1933, Hahn was exiled to the UK after speaking out against the Nazis, and founded Gordonstoun School in Scotland, based on the four pillars of internationalism, challenge, responsibility and service. Hahn believed that school should be a preparation for life, not just for university, and that education should help students to develop resilience and the ability to experience failure as well as success.

1914 Returned to Germany, two days before war was declared

“Confidence in effort, modesty in success, grace in defeat, fairness in anger, clear judgement even in the bitterness of wounded pride and readiness for service at all times.”


He championed the importance of developing the whole person, and based his thinking on the ideals of a holistic, experiential, valuesbased education.

While Atlantic College and the UWC movement worked with the Geneva International School and the United Nations School in New York to develop the International Baccalaureate curriculum, Kurt Hahn went on to found the Round Square organisation in 1967.

“I regard it as the foremost task of education to insure the survival of these qualities: an enterprising curiosity, an undefeatable spirit, tenacity in pursuit, readiness for sensible self denial, and above all, compassion.”

The world is a very different place since Hahn founded the UWC movement 50 years ago. But his educational philosophy, with a focus on academic achievement, leadership, experiential learning and service to others has remained, and will continue to provide our students with a unique learning experience for many more years to come.

1974 Died Germany

There is no doubt that Hahn had an enormous impact on the world of education.

Kurt Hahn

1967 Founded Round Square movement

Hahn died in Germany in 1974. The entry in Britain’s Dictionary of National Biography calls him “headmaster and citizen of humanity.”

1962 Opened UWC Atlantic in St Donat’s Castle in Wales

1941 Founded Outward Bound

1934 Founded Gordonstoun School in Scotland

The founding of the UWC movement in 1962 was the culmination of Hahn’s thinking about education. While attending the 1958 NATO Staff Conference, he was inspired by the cooperation he witnessed between former adversaries from World War II. He thought that if we could educate young people from around the world together, we could prevent future conflicts. From this belief in the power of education to change the world, the UWC movement was born, with a mission to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. In 1962, the first UWC, Atlantic College,

was opened in Wales. UWC South East Asia, the second UWC college, was opened in 1971 as the Singapore International School, and so the story of UWCSEA began.

1956 Founded Duke of Edinburgh Award (internationally known as NYAA)

through service, physical recreation and adventure. Since 2008, more than 300 of the College’s students have achieved the Duke of Edinburgh’s award, known internationally as the National Youth Achievement Award.

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UWCSEA Governance and Leadership UWCSEA is a non-profit organisation (NPO). In Singapore, an NPO is a legally constituted organisation whose main purpose is to support or engage in activities of public or private interest without any commercial or monetary profit. Our legal status is as a public company limited by guarantee, registered with the Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA). We are also a registered charity with the Commissioner of Charities. Finally, UWCSEA is a foreign system school, registered with the Ministry of Education (MoE) and the Council for Private Education (CPE). As a member of the UWC movement, UWCSEA is overseen by the UWC international Board, which is constituted from member colleges, alumni and National Committees.

Board of Governors

Education Committee

UWCSEA benefits from a highly experienced Board of Governors, who are regulated by the organisations above. The Board of Governors works with the College administration and staff to realise our shared vision to be a leader in international education. The role of the Board of Governors is to set direction, establish policies, ensure accountability and provide leadership for the College. The Board is made up of both elected and selected (co-opted) members. Board members also serve on one of the Board committees as well as occasionally assisting with other matters on an ad hoc basis.

The role of the Education Committee is to ensure that the UWCSEA learning programme is aligned with the College’s philosophy and the UWC values. The Education Committee also monitors trends in (international) education and oversees major initiatives in the learning programme, for example iLearn and CIS accreditation. During 2011/2012, the Education Committee supported the curriculum articulation project, which is ensuring that the curriculum for all five elements of the programme is grounded in best practice and fully documented from K1 to Grade 12. The Education Committee also oversaw the College language review, supported a review of the university counselling function, and endorsed the College educational leadership decision to move beyond the IB Primary Years Programme. Over the next two years, the Education Committee will continue to ensure the curriculum articulation project and the iLearn programme remain on track and will review changes to University Counselling (now known as University Advising). In addition, it will advise on implementation of some of the recommendations from the College language review and will begin discussions of a College-wide philosophy and policy for sports.

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Governance Committee The role of the Governance Committee is to ensure the effectiveness of the full Board and the work it does for the College. The Governance Committee also oversees Board policies, recommends the Board’s annual objectives, oversees the annual review of the Board’s structure and composition and is responsible for new Board member nominations and induction. During 2011/2012, the Governance Committee supported the implementation of the new College admissions policy, as well as approving the revised College guiding statements. The Governance Committee also created an action plan for the Board, based on recommendations from the Council of International Schools/ Western Association of Schools and Colleges (CIS/WASC) accreditation. In addition, the committee selected an external firm to conduct the Board Effectiveness Review, revised the orientation of new Governor and co-opted Committee members process and reviewed the Board compliance with the Private Education Act and memorandum and articles. From 2012–2014, the Governance Committee will respond to recommendations from the Board

effectiveness review and begin a longterm project aimed at measuring our holistic education. In addition, the committee will review succession planning for the Board of Governors and senior management at the College, oversee the implementation of the Professional Learning Programme (incorporating teacher appraisal) and review measures in place to ensure our teachers reflect the diversity of our community.

Facilities Committee The role of the Facilities Committee is to ensure the effective delivery of the College’s Dover and East Campus master plans. During 2011/2012, the Facilities Committee oversaw the Dover Master Plan, including the new Middle School building, the Art Department and related works, the refurbishment of the Humanities block, the artificial turf at the Ayer Raja Field and the link between Music and Drama. At the same time, the committee oversaw the opening of the East Campus and commissioning of the facilities there. For the next two years, the Facilities Committee will continue the Dover Master Plan and will ensure that the East Campus continues to operate efficiently.

Finance Committee The role of the Finance Committee is to ensure the longterm financial stability of the College and recommend the yearly operational budget to the Board. During 2011/2012, the Finance Committee completed a review of the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP) and cash reserves policies, and a survey of salary and benefits. The committee also conducted a fee comparison survey with international schools in the region and worldwide, and finalised the College budget and tuition fees for the 2012/2013 academic year. During 2012/2013, the Finance Committee will review UWCSEA staff salary and benefits and set the College budget and tuition fees for the 2013/2014 academic year.

Management Committee The Management Committee is made up of the Chairs of each of the other committees, plus Chair and Vice Chair of the Board of Governors. The Management Committee has two functions: to agree the key initiatives and Key Performance indicators of the Head of College and to review his or her performance against them; and to act quickly in the event of a crisis to provide recommendations to the Board of Governors. All recommendations of the Management Committee must be approved by the full Board, but their deliberations are conducted in private.

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UWCSEA Board of Governors

Alexandra De Mello

Andrew Gaze

Charles Ormiston (Chair)

Kevin Bennett

Barry Daniels

Will KennedyCooke (Chair, Facilities Committee)

Ravi Raju

David Burks

Katherine Davies

Alexander Krefft

Doris Sohmen-Pao

Chegne How Poon (Secretary to the Board)

Driek Desmet (Chair, Education Committee)

Yvonne Krishnan

Julian Whiteley

Anna Lord

Wayne Yang (Chair, Finance Committee)

Miles Beasley

David Chong (Chair, Governance Committee and Audit Committee)

Dale Fisher

Co-opted members Thierry Brezac

Ho Seng Chee

Vivek Kalra

David Maxwell

Nicholas Chan

Lily Fang

Davy Lau

Eric Sandlund

Douglas J. Farber

Nilanjan Sen Yap Meen Sheng

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Management Committee

Facilities Committee

Governance Committee

Charles Ormiston (Chair)

Will Kennedy-Cooke (Chair)

David Chong (Chair)

David Burks

David Burks

David Burks

David Chong

Thierry Brezac

Driek Desmet

Driek Desmet

David Maxwell

Alexander Krefft

Wayne Yang

Miles Beasley

Barry Daniels

Will Kennedy-Cooke

Kevin Bennett

Julian Whiteley

Julian Whiteley

Ho Seng Chee

Audit Committee

Simon Thomas

Davy Lau

David Chong (Chair)

Chegne How Poon

Nicholas Chan

Education Committee

Finance Committee

Driek Desmet (Chair)

Wayne Yang (Chair)

Alexandra De Mello

Ravi Raju

Dale Fisher

David Burks

Doris Sohmen-Pao

Kevin Bennett

Julian Whiteley

Andrew Gaze

Douglas J. Farber

Anna Lord

Yap Meen Sheng

Katherine Davies

Chegne How Poon

Julian Whiteley Nilanjan Sen Eric Sandlund Lily Fang Vivek Kalra Cecilia Teo Chegne How Poon

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Board Effectiveness Review According to Board guidelines, the Board is required to:

• processes and practices

• on an annual basis evaluate its own performance and agree objectives for the following year; and

• relationship with management

• arrange for an evaluation of its work by independent assessors and their report shall be published unedited and also submitted to UWC International.

The assessment and recommendations came from analysis and synthesis of Board effectiveness questionnaire, face-to-face interviews with key members of the Board and leadership, observation of a cycle of committee and full Board meetings and a review of key Board documents.

During 2011/2012, the Board went through a comprehensive effectiveness review, conducted by external consultants Heidrick and Struggles. The review was organised around three key questions, as follows: 1. How effective is the Board at addressing the needs and issues of today? 2. How prepared is the Board to deal with the needs of tomorrow? 3. How can the Board enhance its effectiveness? The review was done across the six elements of highly effective Boards, as follows: • strategic alignment and direction • Board composition and structure

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• Board culture and dynamics • effectiveness of committees

The full report can be found on the College community website. Key recommendations coming from the review were as follows: • increase alignment between Board and senior management in areas of: –– definition of holistic, values-based education –– key strategic priorities along with measures of their success –– implementation of the ‘One College, Two Campuses’ philosophy • ensure focus on strategic priorities while providing a clear process for dealing with ad hoc issues

• re-focus mandate and role of the Education Committee • succession planning for senior management, to include: –– establishing key success/selection criteria for the roles –– identifying and developing potential internal candidates • Board policies and practices –– implement plan for succession and renewal of Board members –– select successor to the Chair of the Governance Committee –– ensure key skills and expertise are present on the Board –– embed an understanding of the history of the Board in the orientation for new members –– provide committees with a simple framework for recommendations to the Board All the recommendations were endorsed by the Board of Governors and implementation has begun.


Board-Supported Areas of Focus 2012–2014 Below is a list of the key College initiatives and projects that the Board is supporting and advising the College on from 2012–2014. For further information on key strategic initiatives in the College, please see the strategic plan section of this report. • appoint new Head of College • review effectiveness and impact of the Admissions policy, implemented from August 2011 • review East Campus in preparation for accreditation in 2015 • develop the scholarship programme to increase the number of scholars • support the curriculum articulation project, which is ensuring that the K1–Grade 12 curriculum is based on up-to-date research and fully articulated across all five elements of the learning programme • implement recommendations from the language review

• implement the Dover Campus master plan

• oversee iLearn programme, supporting the use of technology to enhance learning

• oversee a programme that will measure UWCSEA’s holistic education

• support the university advising programme after providing increased resources during 2011/2012

• Board self-appraisal and governance

• lead discussions of a College-wide philosophy and policy for sports

• ensure comprehensive succession planning for Board and senior leadership • oversee the implementation of the Professional Learning Programme (incorporating teacher appraisal)

• ensure the diversity of the community is reflected in teacher diversity • ensure the implementation of communications strategic plan, incorporating internal communications, marketing, advertising and awarenessraising and school reflection and self-assessment • support the Foundation and the Foundation Board as they prepare for a capital campaign

17


Organisational Structure The College is a complex organisation, requiring a large network of individuals and teams, working together to ensure that students are receiving the best possible educational experience every

day. This network of individuals and teams is led by the Head of College and the Heads of Campus, under the direction of the Board of Governors.

UWCSEA Foundation Board

UWCSEA Board of Governors

During 2011/2012, the organisational structure put in place during 2010/2011 was fully realised with the appointment of a Head of Campus on Dover and the defining of the Head of College role.

UWC International Board

Head of College

Director of IT

Director of Admissions

Director of Administration

Director of College Advancement

Head of Dover Campus

Head of East Campus

Deputy Head

Director of Boarding

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Infant School Principal

Junior School Principal

Middle School Principal

Director of College Staffing and Development

Director of Facilities and Operations

Director of Communications and Marketing

High School Principal

Director of Boarding

Deputy Head

High School Principal

Primary School Principal

Middle School Principal


The Role of the Head of College The Head of College is responsible to the Board of Governors for all aspects of UWCSEA’s provision and in particular for providing guidance and vision for the future of the College. He works closely with, and is supported by, the Board of Governors, the Board Committees and the College Executive Board (CEB). The Head of College provides leadership and strategic oversight to enable the College to achieve its ambition of being a leader in international education. He is the educational leader of the College, nurturing the school as a dynamic environment with appreciation for its special culture and values, and ensuring that the ethos of a holistic, values-based education is maintained and developed. The Head of College is also responsible for enhancing the reputation, reach and influence of the College, maintaining our reputation for excellence in learning and leadership in international education. As a learning institution, the College is constantly changing and improving, and the Head of College is responsible for coordinating and leading those change processes. The Head of College is also responsible for growing leaders in the College, recruiting, developing and supporting future leaders in international education. In addition, with more than 500 employees, including 380 teachers, an annual turnover of S$90m and

property assets worth several S$100 million, the College has significant business operations, and the Head of College is responsible for the yearto-year operations, including finance, recruitment, admissions, facilities, communications and marketing strategy, development of IT systems and ensuring that the College satisfies the legal requirements for Foreign System Schools in Singapore. The Head of College ensures that both campuses operate coherently and cooperate with one another, while allowing innovation to flourish within each campus in line with the College’s ‘One College, Two Campuses’ strategy. The Head of College also sits on the College Foundation Board and oversees the newly created Centre for International Education. Finally, the Head of College is responsible for external relations, including working with the UWC International Office and the broader UWC movement and fostering close relationships with bodies such as the Economic Development Board, the Ministry of Education, the Council for Private Education, the Immigration Control Authorities and the International Baccalaureate.

The Role of the Heads of Campus The Heads of Campus support the work of the Head of College and provide valuable input to College strategy and policy. However, their main focus is on leadership and management within their respective

campuses. As educational leaders they must develop the UWC ethos, ensure that students are provided with an exceptional experience across all five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme, inspire staff through the setting of aspirational and achievable goals and oversee improvements in the quality of teaching and learning. Alongside this, they too have significant organisational responsibilities including the selection of teaching staff; the preparation and delivery of the campus budgets within the parameters of the global budgets; liaising with the Director of Facilities and Operations to ensure that all aspects of the functioning of the campus such as catering, transport, housekeeping, maintenance, security, health and safety are operating effectively; and working closely with the Directors of the other cross-campus functions to ensure that their needs are met. The Head of College and Heads of Campus are supported in their educational leadership by Deputy Heads of Campus, Principals, Vice Principals, Heads of Grade, Heads of Subject, Heads of Departments, counsellors, directors of activities, outdoor education and service, people in positions of responsibility, teachers and support and administrative staff. For further information on the staff at the College, please see the HR section of this report.

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Student Achievement The learning programme at UWCSEA consists of five interlinking elements: academics, activities, outdoor education, personal and social education and service. These elements combine to provide our students with a values-based education that develops them as individuals and as members of a global society. Our goal is to educate individuals to embrace challenge and take responsibility for shaping a better world. We define learning as a life long process, in which the learner engages with and reflects upon information and experiences to construct new, or modify existing, understanding. At the same time, students are developing the skills and qualities that will ensure they can

respond positively to the challenges that an uncertain future will bring.

identified in their academic learning, and so on.

Each of the five elements of the programme is developed to ensure that the students are gaining the experience and knowledge they need in each area. At the same time, the elements complement each other to create a whole that is greater than the sum of the parts. This is a carefully planned and purposeful process, where outdoor education is connected to subject areas in the academic curriculum, where the Personal and Social Education programme support students in the Activities programme, where students can use the Service programme to address social questions

Above all, the skills and qualities that students are developing through the programme are embedded in all five elements of our learning programme. For example, resilience is developed as students gain the confidence to perform on the stage, practice a new skill in mathematics, bounce back from a challenging sports match or persevere on an expedition. This section of the Annual Report is an overview of the main highlights of the 2011/2012 year in each of the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme.

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Learning Programme: Academic Stimulating a passion for intellectual pursuit

The 2011/2012 Academic Year

The academic element of the UWCSEA learning programme allows students to experience the satisfaction of intellectual engagement and scholarly pursuit. They gain a deep understanding of the individual disciplines of reading, writing, mathematics, science, humanities and the Arts, while at the same time investigating the connections between these disciplines and how to critically solve complex problems using different approaches.

IB Diploma

Together with our mission and educational goal, the UWCSEA profile (the skills and qualities we believe students need) and learning principles (what we know about how students learn) provide us with a framework for the academic curriculum. Learning goals for individual subject areas build logically through each grade so that students grow in knowledge and understanding and are prepared for the next academic challenge. During 2011/2012 students followed the IB Primary Years Programme in K1 to Grade 5, a UWCSEA-designed Middle School programme in Grades 6 to 8 and the (I)GCSE programme in Grades 9 and 10, with students who enter in Grade 10 taking a Foundation IB course. Grade 11 and 12 students follow the IB Diploma programme.

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For the final two years of High School, students at UWCSEA follow the IB Diploma programme, which is regarded as one of the best preuniversity courses in the world. It is an academically rigorous programme, which also places a strong emphasis on a core curriculum that aligns with the mission and values of the College. Designed for students of different linguistic, cultural and educational backgrounds, the IB Diploma programme provides students with the intellectual and social skills necessary for the adult world that lies ahead.

Year

In total, 310 students of the Class of 2012 took a full IB Diploma and sat for the examinations in May 2012. The average IB Diploma score was 36.0 points, as compared with a worldwide average of 29.8. At the subject level, the UWCSEA student average was a full point above the world average in 27 different subjects or levels. The table below summarises IB Diploma results at UWCSEA for the last five years. They indicate that the College has consistently had a pass rate and average score that are significantly higher than the worldwide average.

No of IB No of IB Percent Diploma Certificate passed candidates candidates (diploma)

Worldwide average percent passed

UWCSEA average diploma score

Worldwide average diploma score

2012

311

3

99.7

78.2

36.0

29.8

2011

300

8

100

77.9

36.8

29.6

2010

295

6

98.9

78.0

36

29.5

2009

286

7

97.6

78.7

35.7

29.5

2008

308

8

98.0

79.0

34.2

29.6


IB DIPLOMA MAY 2012 Numbers

56,270 311 Students worldwide taking IB Diploma

UWCSEA students taking IB Diploma

78.4%

Worldwide

99.7%

UWCSEA

Pass rate

29.8

Worldwide

36.0

UWCSEA

5.85%

Worldwide Average diploma score

22%

UWCSEA

4.6

Worldwide

5.6

UWCSEA

Average subject grade

Students receiving 40+ points

28%

UWCSEA students receiving a bilingual diploma 23


Gap Year – 10% National Service – 4% Asia – 6% Europe – 3%

Destinations of Class of 2012 On average, 99% of UWCSEA students enrol at post-secondary educational institutions around the world. A number of students go on to do national service or complete a gap year, before continuing their studies. Further information about the Gap Year programme at UWCSEA can be found in the service part of the student achievement section of this report. Below is a breakdown of the destinations of the Class of 2012.

University acceptances 2010–2012 In 2012, 100% of the graduating class received an offer of a place at one or more of the universities listed below. These universities represent acceptances from 2010 to 2012. Australia Australian National University Bond University Griffith University University of Melbourne Monash University University of New South Wales Queensland University of Technology University of Sydney Canada University of British Columbia McGill University Quest University Simon Fraser University University of Toronto Costa Rica Universidad de Ciencias Medicas France Paris College of Art Sciences Po-College Universitaire du Havre 24

North America – 47% Australia – 8%

UK – 22% Germany Jacobs University Bremen

Norway University of Oslo

Hong Kong University of Hong Kong Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Singapore James Cook University LaSalle College of the Arts National University of Singapore Singapore Institute of Management Singapore Management University

India Manipal University Ireland Trinity College, Dublin Japan International Christian University Keio University University of Tsukuba University of Tokyo Waseda University Korea Ewha Woman’s University Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Seoul National University Yonsei University Mexico Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Netherlands Amsterdam University College Delft University of Technology Design Academy Eindhoven New Zealand University of Auckland

Spain IE University Switzerland Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne Thailand Chulalongkorn University United Arab Emirates New York University Abu Dhabi United Kingdom University of the Arts, London University of Bath University of Birmingham University of Bristol University of Cambridge Cardiff University Central St Martins College of Art and Design City University London University of Dundee Durham University University of East Anglia University of Edinburgh University of Exeter


Goldsmiths College, University of London Hull York Medical School Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine Keele University University of Kent at Canterbury King’s College London Kingston University Lancaster University University of Leeds Leeds Metropolitan University University of Leicester London School of Economics University College London Loughborough University University of Manchester Newcastle University University of Nottingham Oxford University Oxford Brookes University University of Portsmouth Queen Mary, University of London University of Reading Royal Academy of Dramatic Art Royal Agricultural College Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Royal Holloway, University of London School of Oriental and African Studies University of Sheffield University of Southampton Southampton Solent University University of St Andrews University of Surrey University of Warwick University of the West of England University of York United States of America Amherst College Babson College Bard College Barnard College Bentley University Berklee College of Music Boston University Brandeis University Brown University

Bryant University Bucknell University University of California (Berkeley, Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz) Carleton College Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University University of Central Arkansas University of Chicago Claremont McKenna College Clark University Colby College Colgate University Colorado College Columbia University University of Connecticut Cornell University Dartmouth College Duke University Earlham College Emory University Franklin & Marshall College George Washington University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Grinnell College Harvard University Harvey Mudd College Hood College University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Indiana University at Bloomington Johns Hopkins University Kenyon College Lafayette College Lehigh University Lewis and Clark College Loyola Marymount University Luther College Macalester College Methodist University University of Michigan Middlebury College New York University Northeastern University Northwestern University

Oberlin College Occidental College University of Oklahoma Parsons The New School of Design Pennsylvania State University University of Pennsylvania Pomona College Pratt Institute Princeton University Reed College Rhode Island School of Design Rice University University of Richmond Ringling College of Art and Design University of Rochester Rutgers, State University of New Jersey Saint Louis University San Francisco Art Institute University of San Francisco San Francisco State University Santa Clara University Savannah College of Art and Design School of the Art Institute of Chicago School of Visual Arts Scripps College Skidmore College Smith College University of Southern California St. Mary’s College of Maryland St. Olaf College Stanford University Swarthmore College Syracuse University Texas A&M University The University of Texas, Austin Trinity College Tufts University Union College Vassar College University of Virginia Washington University in St. Louis University of Washington Wellesley College Wesleyan University Williams College University of Wisconsin, Madison Yale University 25


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Other Academic Highlights of the 2011/2012 Year Achievement in the academic element of the programme was consistently high throughout each of the school sections and on both campuses during 2011/2012. Students were continually challenged to extend their knowledge and understanding in each of the academic subject areas and in each of the transdisciplinary skills that support their learning across all five elements of the learning programme. The introduction of the iLearn programme in August 2011 had a big impact on teachers and on student learning, as classroom practice shifted to take advantage of technology in the classroom. At the same time, the College joined the Generation Safe™ programme to support students in navigating the digital environment. A survey of parents, students and staff about iLearn in April/May of 2011 helped the College to understand where the programme is most effective and how it can be improved to enhance student learning. Recommendations from the survey will be implemented during the 2012/2013 academic year.

The Council of International Schools/Western Association of Schools and College (CIS/WASC) accreditation process for Dover Campus was completed with the official visit of the Visiting Team in October 2011. Commendations and recommendations from the team, based on their visit, the College’s selfstudy report and their observations and meetings with students, staff and parents, were fully incorporated into the Dover Campus strategic plan during 2011/2012. This will be ongoing over the next three to five years. The language review, examining English language support, the second language programme and mother tongue provision at the College, was completed during the 2011/2012 academic year and recommendations given to the Board early in 2012/2013. The introduction of Mother Tongue Language Day celebrations in February gave the whole College a muchneeded opportunity to celebrate the diversity of languages in the school and the importance and value of mother tongue for all our students. More information on these strategic initiatives can be found in the strategic plan section of this report.

Infant and Junior Schools In the Infant Schools on both Dover and East Campus, our K1, K2 and Grade 1 students continued to benefit from an emphasis on the importance of play in learning. In particular in K1, the central pod spaces continued to be an extension of the classrooms so that stimulating, collaborative play with extended elements could become everyday practice. At the same time, wordless picture books were introduced in the early part of K1, in order to foster students’ imagination, creativity, observation and storytelling skills, with less emphasis on decoding words. Reading Workshop (on East Campus) and Writing Workshop (on Dover Campus), from Teachers College at Columbia University, were introduced from K2 to Grade 5. Experts from Columbia University spent a week on each campus, doing labsites

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mathematics, to ensure that students at both extended and remedial levels were receiving the appropriate support and stimulation in the classroom. A successful artist-in-residence programme brought life to visual arts in the classroom and the scholars from the boarding house were incorporated as special visitors during the Unit of Inquiry on conflict in Grade 5. Each of these initiatives enriched the experience for students in the Primary School.

and Workshop training with all Primary School staff. This enabled staff to see the model in action and being delivered by experts, and to understand better the process of conferencing with students to move them forward in their individual reading and writing goals. The visitors also delivered workshops for parents, which were well attended and helped parents to understand the theory behind the practice and the benefits to their children of this shift in focus at the College. At the same time, literacy coaches were employed on each campus to support teachers and students in this key area of student academic development. On East Campus, there was a strong focus on differentiation within

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On Dover Campus, mathematics was also a focus, with setting discontinued in Grade 3 and replaced by a ‘pull-out’ model for those students requiring extension. A new timetable was introduced in the Junior School, allowing teachers to teach in five one-hour blocks, resulting in a slower pace during the day and more focus for longer on key areas. A review and redesign of grade level performances and celebrations addressed their impact on core curriculum time by compacting rehearsal time and integrating performance themes with curriculum themes. Finally, the Junior School introduced professional study groups to look at the work of Dylan Wiliam on assessment for learning and a Japanese framework for the development of reflective practice among teachers.

Middle and High Schools In 2011/2012, the Middle School on East Campus grew from Grade 6 in 2010/2011 to a full Grade 6 to 8 school. The focus was on establishing all five elements of the learning programme and ensuring that students were fully integrated into UWCSEA. In the academic area, the Exploratory Programme was developed and the UWCSEA profile was embedded in units of study in mathematics and science. At the same time, newly adopted standards for mathematics and science were piloted and 87 students participated in the American Maths Contest 8 or the University of Waterloo Gauss Mathematics Contest, with excellent results: in the Gauss contest, three Grade 7 students were just one question away from a perfect score. Visits from Taylor Mali, slam poet, humorist and teacher and the Two Steves (Steve Barlow and Steve Skidmore), collaborative writers of children’s literature, energised and inspired students in their own writing. Meanwhile, teachers were using Understanding by Design planners to plan and deliver lessons based on clearly defined learning outcomes that can be measured and reported.


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students and Grade 9 and FIB students sat the first round of exams in the purpose built exam hall.

It was a significant year for East Campus High School, as the first Grade 9 and 10 students began their studies. The campus received final authorisation by CIE and EdEXCEL to offer the (I)GCSE programme and the IB organisation paid their verification visit. Staff were trained in IB Diploma and 53 new Grade 11 courses were prepared for the 2012/2013 year. UWCSEA Global Perspectives course became compulsory for all students and 37 students entered the American Maths Contest, with one Grade 9 student entering the Grade 12 competition and qualifying for the Invitational Mathematics Exam. In English, Writers Fortnight saw visits from professional writers, who threw light on the world of writing outside of school and gave students individual feedback on their writing efforts. In May, the first round of IB Diploma packages were offered to 97% of

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On Dover Campus, the move to a dedicated Middle School building supported the drive towards creating a strong Middle School culture and dedicated learning spaces for students from Grades 6 to 8. This allowed both students and staff to feel they belong to a specific Middle School community and the move to cross-curricular staff rooms resulted in better dialogue around students, helping teachers to further coordinate specific teaching and learning strategies for students in this age group. New initiatives in 2010/2011 such as the UWCSEA Maths Challenges, Middle School Book Club and ‘Super Scientist’ awards were continued in 2011/2012. In addition, students participated in Mangahigh, a gamesbased mathematics competition that allows students to compete with their peers in other schools, while the focus on taking an investigative approach and linking mathematics to the real world continued. In English, Taylor Mali and the Two Steves also visited Dover Campus, supporting students in their creative writing. The overall focus on providing students of this age group with opportunities to explore solutions to real-world problems remained in 2011/2012. With no exam at the end of the Middle School years, students are motivated by investigation, problem-solving and connecting to the real world.

The introduction of a Grade 8 Film Festival, based on the theme of change, provided an opportunity for Middle School students to celebrate their learning and growth during the three years of Middle School. Taking in technology, film, English and, most significantly, students’ ability to communicate their understanding of key concepts around change, this transdisciplinary project was a fitting end to their Middle School journey. In pilot in 2011/2012, it was a great success, and will be further developed during 2012/2013. The Dover Campus High School continued to produce excellent results in the academic area, with the largest ever cohort (311) graduating from Grade 12. In addition, students explored the ideas about knowledge through the Theory of Knowledge curriculum. The four-day miniweek for Grade 11 focused on the Knowledge Issues in science, language and religion. Students played a major role in organising the week and introduced speakers such as our own Frazer Cairns and David MacIntyre speaking on Bilingualism, as well as guest speaker Andy Fletcher who gave a two part-lecture on Science the Universe and Everything. There were also student and staff speakers on all major religions in response to the controversial Richard Dawkins documentary The Enemies of Reason. Students debated and researched in classes as well and were able to use


these ideas in their presentations that formed part of the overall TOK assessment in IB.

trip. There were major changes to the languages options at IB level and staff were trained to support those changes.

The links between the core parts of the IB programme were strengthened with the introduction of a major piece of reflective writing that encouraged students to think about their metacognition in the CAS programme—how they learn and what level of certainty they can reach about the knowledge they acquire. Entitled ‘Is a smile enough?’ this reflection for Grade 12 students was inspired by the desire to have students look for better evidence for the benefits of their work in our Service programme and on Project Week in particular.

In History, students ran history clubs and partnership teaching with EAL supported history students who do not have English as a first language. A new multimedia Design and Technology Department allows students to undertake practical activities in a safe and welcoming environment. The new GCSE DT curriculum for Resistant Materials and Graphic Products was successfully introduced. In PE, the opening of the new gymnasium, fully fitted with trampolines, foam pits and multiple apparatus, allowed students to develop their gymnastics and movement skills. In Sports, Exercise and Health Science (SEHS), UWCSEA staff continued to support the IB in developing materials for the subject, with a chapter in their new textbook. Finally, in Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS), students put ecological fieldwork techniques into practice during a field trip to Tioman and had the rare opportunity to spend the day learning about Singapore’s high-tech solution to its solid domestic waste disposal problem, firstly with a visit to a waste-to-power incinerator and finally by sailing to the world famous ‘Garbage of Eden’ offshore incinerator ash landfill reclamation project/nature reserve.

In physics, 34 students (the highest number ever) chose physics as the area for investigation in their Extended Essay, while nearly 300 students attended physics lectures at the College, the science centre and NUS. In languages, as well as developing skill in written and spoken language, the focus continued on understanding and celebrating the cultural aspects of each language. More specifically, in Chinese Grade 10 students came fourth in the first Singapore International Schools Chinese Competition organised by the Singapore HSK Center Competition; in French, students supported Middle School French students and did an e-exchange with a school in Montpellier and in Spanish, students travelled to Spain for a residential

The Arts in the Academic Curriculum Much of the artistic pursuit at the College takes place through the activities element of the learning programme. However, the emphasis on music, drama, film and visual arts in the Academic programme ensures that those students who are committed to the Arts have the opportunity to participate deeply in both the processes and outcomes of great artistic achievement. On East Campus, the Primary School music programme focused on helping students to understand music as a form of communication, with all students using Garageband on the iPad to create music expressing a feeling or emotion, while Grade 3 created their own podcast advertisements as part of their ‘Media Mania’ Unit of Inquiry. In High School, a collaboration between FIB Music and FIB Drama culminated in three sell-out performances of the play Metamorphosis, with music composed by our students. The Drama Department was busy setting up drama facilities in the new campus and designing and implementing the Grade 6 to Grade 10 curriculum. East Campus joined the International School Theatre Association (ISTA) and attended two Middle School festivals. Middle School students travelled to Tanglin Trust School in Singapore, and Nanjing International School, China, to collaborate with students from around the world in playbuilding

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Performance remained a significantly important part of the drama curriculum, the main features being: Students

30 8 30 75 8

Independent project performances Presentations independently devised by IB Theatre students Abigail’s Party Student directed by theatre student (Grade 12) Clown performances For Primary School students at East and Dover GCSE group performance examinations (Grade 10) Black Comedy Student directed by theatre student (Grade 11)

and professional theatre workshops. Argentinean lighting designer Manuel Garrido joined the full-time staff to design, rig and control lights for classes and productions while working with staff and students to further their technical abilities and knowledge. Visiting artist-in-residence Matt Godfrey worked with students on clowning and physical theatre in both Middle School and High School drama classes. On Dover Campus, visual arts students orally defended their recent work before a live audience, as a way of deepening their understanding of the process they go through to develop their work. 500 works of art were produced by IGCSE, IBDP and FIB students, and the second annual collaboration with other international schools to allow students to exhibit their work publicly in a professional gallery took place at One East Asia art gallery on Orchard Road.

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The number of students taking music for (I)GCSE and IB Diploma continued to increase, all achieving excellent results, with two students gaining places at Berklee College of Music (Boston, USA) and one at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (Glasgow, UK). The introduction of ‘Brass Days,’ weekend workshops with guest artists, inspired our aspiring brass players and helped to ensure diversity of instruments being played across the College, allowing for greater ensemble performance. There was increased access to music technology, including notation software for all (I)GCSE and IB students, Logic Pro sequencing software for all students in Grade 9 to Grade 12, while all Grade 5 students took part in an iPad music exploration. Visiting musicians gave demonstrations to students in harpsichord and brass instrument performance.

In the Lamdon School Music Project, Ladakh, following from the Hill family’s second visit in July 2011, the Music Department sponsored the visit of George Schlub, trumpeter and instrument-maker, to Ladakh in June 2012. George taught the Lamdon School brass students and carried out research into Ladakhi music. Drama remained a popular subject throughout Grade 6–8 as a compulsory subject. 2011/2012 saw a significant increase in those students taking IB Theatre, while numbers at GCSE Drama level remained stable. IB Theatre results were particularly high in July 2012 and as a result a number of theatre students were successful in their applications for prestigious universities both in the United Kingdom and the USA. There was also an increase in visiting workshop facilitators—Commedia dell Arte, Beijing Opera, Theatre of the Oppressed and Japanese Butoh.


Learning Programme: Activities The College offers an extensive Activities programme to students from Grade 2 onwards. The programme is deeply embedded into the life of the College and is one of the foundations of the educational provision. The goal of the programme is to provide students with the opportunity to pursue their passions and develop their skills and interests outside of the other elements of the learning programme. Students have the opportunity to meet like-minded peers from across agegroups, and to interact with students from other parts of the school. The Activities programme is roughly divided into sports, arts (music, drama, visual art), leadership, clubs and special interests. By being involved in the programme, students also learn skills in time management and self organisation, planning and the value of commitment. The programme is structured so that as students progress into Grade 11, some essential elements of the requirements for successful fulfilment of the IB

318 238

PS

194

MS

US

136 SS

Number of events each week across the College* *Senior School is for Dover Campus only

Diploma programme’s CAS (Creativity, Action and Service) are able to be fulfilled via participation in the Activities programme. Participation in the Activities programme from Grade 2 on is highly recommended, and students are able to self-select from a range of activities

in four different ‘seasons’ each year. The sign-up process provides students an annual overview of the available options, and takes into account both the Activities programme, service commitments and representative sporting teams when presenting options. This allows students to elect a balanced programme across the full academic year.

33


Ne Ho tba ll ( ckey g Rug by ( irls) boy s) Sailing Softball

34

Range of sports offered through the Activities programme

Vo lle yb al l

ld fie nd ) ka ir l s ac Tr ch (g Tou is Tenn g Swimmin

At hle ti Bad min c s ton Baske tball Cross country oys) b ( t e k c i r C all b r o Flo ll a b t Foo irls) (g s tic s na m Gy


The 2011/2012 Activities Year Sports In addition to the well-developed PE programme offered through the academic element of the learning programme, the Activities programme offers a wide range of competitive, development and recreational sports. There are both developmental sports teams, where students are given the opportunity to participate and develop skills, and representative sports, where students try out to represent their campus in competitions. Mascot The initial idea of having a mascot for UWC South East Asia began in 2008, when students on Dover Campus requested something that sports teams could rally around. During the 2011/2012 academic year, the student Sports Councils on both campuses worked with the Communications Department to research and create a mascot that would fit with the UWCSEA values and ethos, have appropriate association in all cultures and help support the ‘One College, Two Campuses’ philosophy. It was decided that the Asian dragon and phoenix were appropriate animals, as their associations fit with the College values: the dragon gracious, wise, powerful and noble, the phoenix prosperous, connected with peace and a symbol of a constant striving spirit. Together they represent the yin and yang in Asian mythology—both complementary and competing— representing the connection between

the campuses. The design itself retained the colours of blue for Dover and green for East, with a subtle reference to ‘E’ and ‘D’ in the individual mascot designs, while together they make a single globe, which connects back to the College logo and mission. In 2011/2012, both Dover and East Campus participated in the Athletic Conference of Singapore International Schools (ACSIS). UWCSEA teams produced some amazing results and were highly competitive in all the sports in which they participated. East Campus competed for the first time across all age groups in the ACSIS conference. In spite of the relatively low numbers higher up the school,

teams played in every sport at every age-group. Overall, 84 teams were run in 13 sports and over 70% of High School students were involved in the competitive sports programme. In addition, the East Campus launched swimming and gymnastics programmes, both of which were very well supported by students and achieved excellent results. Highlights of the year were travelling to Bangkok to compete in their first overseas sporting event and the Middle School girls team winning the highly competitive ACSIS championships. Gymnastics started in Term 2 and 150 students enrolled in the programme.

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727

Instrumental Teaching Programme students

Music The level of music-making in the College is outstanding, with students performing at an exceptionally high level, and a significant number progressing to careers in music. The curricular music programme is supported and extended by the Activities programme, available from Grade 2 to Grade 12. The goal of the Activities programme in music is to provide students with a path to pursue music at increasingly high levels, by enabling them to get involved at their individual ability level and giving them opportunities to perform. There is a broad range of ensembles at the College, covering choral music, orchestral music, jazz and rock bands. There are both participatory and auditioned ensembles, allowing everyone the opportunity to take part while providing the more advanced students the opportunity to make music at the very highest level. One of the key benefits of the music activities programme is the performance opportunities. Dover Campus students collaborated with the Drama Department to produce The Sound of Music, which played to sell-out audiences over three nights in December. OPUS 2012 featured over 500 students in a highly acclaimed

36

> 100

Students taking instrumental exams each year

53

Clubs and societies offered by the College


concert at the Esplanade, that culminated in a performance of Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana by the Dover Campus Orchestra and Combined Choirs. Also on Dover Campus, Finale! and Encore! concerts featured student ensembles and choir from the Grade 2 to Grade 12 at Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music Concert Hall. On East Campus, students also collaborated with the Drama Department, for a performance of Metamporhoses, with Foundation IB (FIB) students composing and performing the music for FIB Drama students. The larger ensembles also performed at the East Campus Official Opening Ceremony in December and the Viva La Musica concerts in February.

Instruments available Piano Cello Double Bass Guitar: Classical/Acoustic/ Electric/Bass Violin Viola Ukelele Percussion/Drum Kit Trumpet Cornet Tenor Horn Euphonium French Horn Trombone

Instrumental Teaching Programme (ITP)

Tuba

The Instrumental Teaching Programme continued to provide students with the opportunity to learn an instrument on campus. As well as developing each student’s individual ability, the programme increases the standard of ensemble playing across the College. During 2011/2012, East Campus joined the Dover Campus as a centre for the ABRSM examinations, providing students with the opportunity to take their exams in familiar environment.

Clarinet

Baritone Flute Saxophone Bass Clarinet Tenor Saxophone Recorder Voice: Pop/Classical

Drama The activities drama programme complements and extends the curricular programme, allowing students to get involved in all aspects of drama production, from performance to design and technical support. Major productions at the College happen through the Activities programme and are open to all students, whether or not they are involved in drama studies through the curriculum. Performance opportunities Once again, students on Dover Campus had a huge range of performance opportunities to choose from. From productions involving small numbers of students in specific grades such as One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (20 Grade 9 and 10 students) to large-scale productions involving large numbers of students across multiple grades such as UN Night (400 students from Grades 7 to 12), students had the opportunities to participate in all aspects of the performance.

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List of productions on Dover Campus One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest The Sound of Music UN Night Performance Bengal Tiger at the Bahgdad Zoo TheatreSports Jungle Book Picnic at Hanging Rock Counterpoint Kes The Annual Revue On East Campus, the establishment of a drama programme within the curriculum and the setting up of facilities so that they were usable did not prevent a number of productions from taking place. Middle School students performed in Rufus Norris’ Sleeping Beauty while High School students performed Metamorphoses, accompanied by music composed by students. A Night of Shakespeare gave students the opportunity to perform various scenes from the plays of William Shakespeare. Theatresports gave Middle School students further opportunity to develop their interest in dramatic performance.

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Leadership activities UWC South East Asia is preparing students to become leaders in shaping a better, more sustainable future. Students have the opportunity to show leadership through all aspects of the learning programme. However, through the Activities programme, students can participate in organised leadership teams, where they focus on these skills and provide guidance for their peers and younger students. From Student Councils to Sports Councils to Global Concerns Executives, students are elected by their peers to provide leadership and guidance to their peers. Ambassadors and peer support students work with counsellors to help ensure that other students transition well both in and out of College and are happy during their time there. Debating and Model United Nations give students the opportunity to put forward their ideas in constructive ways and to interact with students from other international schools. Student-led publications give students the chance to lead a complex process of compiling and editing yearbooks and other publications. All these activities, and more, ensure that students at UWC South East Asia get plenty of experience in leadership.

Leadership and teamwork High School Student Council Global Concerns Executive Sports Council Round Square Committees Initiative for Peace Alumni Council Ambassadors Peer Support Model United Nations Debating Student-led Publications National Youth Achievement Award Middle School GC Executive Council Junior School Student Council Junior School GC Initiatives Junior School EcoCommittee

Clubs and societies Clubs and societies are formed so that students can find like-minded individuals outside of their immediate peer group. These are usually studentinitiated and range from Lego-building and friendship-bracelet making in the Junior School to Chess Club and Java programming in the High School.


Learning Programme: OUTDOOR EDUCATION The Outdoor Education programme is a powerful part of the UWCSEA educational experience. Kurt Hahn, who inspired the UWC movement, believed that education should have the effect of drawing from students a greater range of skills and talents than they knew they possessed. His motto was ‘Plus est en vous’—there is more in you than you think. This is one of the foundations of adventure-based learning. Outdoor education experiences begin in Grade 1 and, through careful planning and building of skills, understanding and confidence, culminate in Grade 11 students undertaking their own personal expedition, from choosing a destination, developing an itinerary, going through all safety checks and completing the expedition, with only supervisory support from adult sponsors. Further information about this Grade 11 experience (Project Week) can be found in the service section of this report. Outdoor education experiences range from day, adventure and service trips in Singapore, to service, sporting and

adventure trips overseas, to overseas trips that combine elements of all of these. In all cases, students are asked to stretch themselves beyond their comfort zone and to build their teambuilding and leadership skills, resulting in greater confidence, empathy and self-awareness. The skills and qualities that students acquire through the Outdoor Education programme are applied in all other areas of the learning programme. All trips are carefully planned to address clear learning objectives and in many cases are connected to other elements of the learning programme and/or to parts of the academic curriculum. In the Primary School on both campuses, they are usually part of the Unit of Inquiry (for example, visits to the Botanical Gardens as part of the K1 Living Things unit). In the Middle School and High Schools, the more complex trips will have elements of service and activities and in many cases tie back in to the academic curriculum (for example, students of Chinese language take a cultural and language immersion tour to Cheng Du in China).

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G1 Overnight stay at College

G2 Two-day camp at Singapore Zoo

G3 Three-day trip to Riders Lodge in Malaysia

G4 Four-day trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G5 Five-day trip to Taman Negara in Malaysia

G6 Five-day trip to Tioman Island in Malaysia

G7 Five-day sea kayaking trip to Pulau Sibu in Malaysia

G8 Eleven-day trip to Chiang Mai in Thailand

G9 The opportunity to join various trips and expeditions: Ship Puteri Malaysia/Discover Korea/Everest Base Camp/ Climbing in China/Annapurna Adventure/Everest region Service Expedition/Diving in Lombok/Mountain Biking in Thailand/Sea Kayaking in Malaysia/Amazing Journey in Langkawi/Hong Kong Trek/Sail Australian Tall Ship Leeuwin/Climb Mount Kinabalu via the Via Ferrata/Ladakh Trek and Service Expedition/Japanese Alps Adventure/Wales Adventure

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G11 Project Week—trips designed by the students in groups


Countries visited during 2011/2012

National Youth Achievement Award (NYAA)

society. It is a balanced programme of activities, that together support young people with the skills and dispositions that will help them to make a difference to themselves and to the world. The programme is a natural fit with the mission and values of UWCSEA, and it was introduced to students in 2008.

The aim of the NYAA programme is to encourage young people between the ages of 14 and 25 years to develop personal qualities of selfreliance, perseverance and a sense of responsibility to themselves and to 60 60

66

69

50

09 10 11 12

8 14 32 25

20

Students achieving NYAA award since 2009

0 9

09 10 11 12

09 10 11 12

There are three levels of the award, with each level requiring a bigger commitment of both effort and time. The Bronze Award is for students aged 14 and over and requires a minimum participation of 6 months; the Silver Award is for students aged 15 and over and requires a minimum participation of 12 months; and the Gold Award is for students aged 16 and over and requires a minimum participation of 18 months. The programme requires students to participate in five sections of service, adventurous journey, skills development, physical recreation and a residential project. While many of the requirements can be completed through the service, outdoor education and activities elements of the UWCSEA programme, many students also use additional, external activities to complete their NYAA requirements. In 2010/2011, a total of 108 students received an NYAA Award. The graphic indicates the number of students that have successfully gained the award since 2009.

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Everest Base Camp

Annapurna expedition

Climbing in China

Climbing Mount Kinabalu

Equipment and facility development

Walking in Wales

Diving in Lombok

Six new challenging expeditions were introduced in Grade 9

585,622 42

Strategic Developments 2011/2012

Student hours spent overseas

The development of a new outdoor education facility at Twin Beach, Sibu, continued during 2011/2012. Further agreements enabled the beginning of the construction of an Eco Village on the island, which will further enrich the experience for our students. A dedicated UWCSEA outdoor education site has been a dream since the first Beluntu site in Malaysia, built by groups of students in Malaysia from 1974–1976, was closed in 1984. This project will provide our students with many more opportunities to develop their skills in an outdoor education setting. We are grateful to the parents of former students at UWCSEA Dover, who own the Twin Beach site and have made this opportunity for our students possible.


Learning programme: Personal and Social Education As one of five elements that make up the learning programme, personal and social education (PSE) is a crucial part of the student experience at UWC South East Asia. The quality of PSE influences the ethos and atmosphere of the whole College. One of the UWCSEA learning principles is learning is effective when learners feel secure and supported; the PSE programme helps to ensure that students feel secure, valued and encouraged in their learning, growth and social development. Self-confidence and self-esteem are built through all aspects of the learning programme, and all their interactions at the College contribute to a students personal and social education, but making PSE a unique strand within the programme ensures that time is dedicated to this important part of the student educational experience. All members of staff have responsibility for the well-being of students, with class teachers, tutors/mentors, counsellors and Heads of Grade building the individual relationships with students that ensure they feel supported in their life at school. The learning support and counselling teams are central to the programme and they work closely with teachers to ensure that students are supported both within and outside of the classroom.

The 2011/2012 PSE Year During 2011/2012, the College made the decision to change the name of the Pastoral Care programme to Personal and Social Education (PSE). This was driven by the need to be more specific about the intentions and purpose of this element of the learning programme. The words ‘pastoral care’ did not capture what is provided for students through the various activities and support mechanisms that make up the programme. Personal and social education expresses more clearly that the goal is to provide students with opportunities to examine how they are connecting to their learning, friends, family, technology and the outside world. The iLearn initiative continued to be supported by the Generation Safe™ programme. Their iKeepSafe Generation Safe helps schools navigate the digital environment and integrate technology into existing whole school initiatives. Because experiences online affect school climate, the programme teaches schools how to build a network of support for all stakeholders— teachers, administrators, school counsellors, network administrators, technology and media specialists, parents and students. A number of initiatives were launched during the first two terms of 2011/2012 to support the community. Lessons for students ranged from password safety and Million Dollar

footprint, to learning how to use tools such as Self-Control or i-Procrastinate to improve study skills. The digital literacy coaches worked closely with teachers to enhance students’ ability to manage digital devices. During Term 2, they also offered a number of parent workshops to help parents in supporting students. In Term 2, Dr Michael Carr-Gregg and Robyn Treyvaud visited to support the digital citizenship programme. Dr Carr-Gregg is a well-known expert on adolescent development, and is a founding member of the Australian National Centre Against Bullying. He spoke to parents and worked with teachers and students. As part of the THINK B4U week, Robyn Treyvaud spoke to students in Grades 6, 7, 9 and 11 and worked in small groups with teachers from the Infant School to Grade 12. Her parent talk provoked lots of discussion about managing the parenting challenges related to use of digital devices, and she also shared some perspectives on cyber behaviour in a presentation to staff.

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Infant and Junior Schools In the Infant Schools, learning is strongly connected to the individual child’s developmental milestones and so is inextricably linked with personal and social education. Creating an environment in which all students can be supported and successful is a key goal. All classroom activities, assemblies, performance, sports and artistic activities have a pastoral nature and all teachers who interact with our youngest learners have their social and emotional well-being at the forefront of their minds. The Bucket Filler programme in Infant Schools encourages positive behaviour and supports students in understanding how very easy and rewarding it is to express kindness and appreciation every day. By filling each other’s buckets through doing or saying nice things for other people,

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students are filling their own buckets at the same time. This helps younger students to understand their own feelings, those of others, and how the two are related to each other through choices and actions. The Junior School on Dover follows the Social Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme, a resource from the UK that supports students in developing skills in the five domains of self-awareness, managing feelings, motivation, empathy and social skills. Students look at how to make friends, how to resolve conflict, how to set goals for yourself, how to give and receive compliments and so on. Through the Activities, Service and Outdoor Education programmes, students develop independence within their own selves, and empathy for others.

A large focus in the Junior School on Dover during 2010/2011 was reorganising the timetable in order to move away from the High School timetable model and provide more contact time with classroom teachers. There was also a lot of work done on managing the playground, including the establishment of zones that are dedicated to each grade, the addition of astro turf to the Junior School playground space and allocation of the bus bay and the adventure playground to specific grades during different days of the week. Alongside these initiatives, additional work was done with students on behaviour on the playground, and teacher assistants received some professional development in responding quickly and appropriately to behavioural issues with students, resulting in a safer and more positive playground environment. The Junior School on East Campus began a review of provision for sex and relationships education with a view to aligning it with national curricula. Using the Common Sense Media curriculum, digital citizenship was introduced to younger students. Planning for a restructuring of the timetable to allow for each class to have 30 minutes with their class teacher began; this time will be when the majority of the PSE curriculum learning objectives are taught and will provide a structured and caring start to the school day and set the tone for respectful day.


Middle Schools The middle years are some of the most exciting and uncertain years in a student’s life and social and emotional support is critical as they explore their identity and develop the personal characteristics that will help them to succeed. The Middle Schools on both campuses work hard to ensure that students are supported during this important time in their lives. On Dover Campus in 2010/2011, the appointment of a dedicated principal focused on PSE was the first step towards a more pro-active approach. Planning for a dedicated Life Skills course as part of the regular timetable began. This course will look at health and well-being, friendship and belonging, peer and social pressures, bullying, goal-setting and time and self-management. Planning also began for the introduction of JUMP leadership and team-building course in Grade 7, in response to the typical issues of change and peer group that come up in Grade 7. Also on Dover Campus, the Heads of Grade began their three-year cycle, which means they will stay with the same group as they move through the three Middle School grades. This ensures a strong connection between students and teachers, as teachers get to know students properly, see their development and build relationships with their families. This will certainly have a positive impact on student-teacher relationships in the Middle School.

On East Campus, the Middle School grew to a complete Grade 6 to 8 group and there was a strong focus on setting the expectations and culture for the students. Embedding the UWCSEA profile was a key part of the PSE programme, and a specific Middle School PSE programme was planned and implemented during mentor time. The adoption of the word ‘mentor’ rather than ‘tutor’ was intended to signal that the teacher and student build a relationship that gives the teacher responsibility for all aspects of student development. Work began on embedding the UWCSEA profile in the all aspects of Middle School life. High Schools On Dover, the robust pastoral programme in Grades 9 and 10, focused on developing skills for students as individuals, as members of the College community and as global citizens, was further developed with the introduction of more student input into the content of the programme. This was an aspect of an ongoing focus on student empowerment, so that students feel it is their school, and student recognition, so that each student feels known and valued within the community. Guiding students through their final years of school and preparing them for their next steps is a collective effort from parents, staff and students themselves. The programme in the Senior School is a continuation of the Upper School programme, with further emphasis on student independence and self-management.

On East Campus, the first Grade 9 and Foundation IB students began the High School and the PSE focus was on ensuring that they became part of the UWCSEA community and fully embraced the College values. JUMP day gave them an opportunity to build teams and explore the College values, while a dedicated PSE programme with such topics as Teenage Temptations, Growing up Digital, Planning for my Future, FIBxTalks, Looking ahead to Grade 10, Looking ahead to Grade 11, Study Skills, Exam Preparation and so on, gave students the opportunity to explore issues directly related to them. The Naviance online programme for career exploration was implemented, with students getting an early start on their plans after UWCSEA. Weekly student-led assemblies, Sports Council events (including staff vs. student games) and Student Council events including High School dances and Spirit Week, all helped to build community at East Campus High School and provide students with a supportive environment.

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Learning Programme: Service “There are three ways of trying to win the young. There is persuasion, there is compulsion and there is attraction. You can preach at them: that is a hook without a worm. You can say ‘you must volunteer’; that is the devil. And you can tell them ‘you are needed.’ That hardly ever fails.” Kurt Hahn

UWC South East Asia has service at the heart of its mission, and service activities are a vital aspect of the learning programme. Long before the concept of service became common in schools and a compulsory element of the International Baccalaureate, all Grade 11 students at UWCSEA were involved in local service. In

46

1980, recognising that involvement in service was beneficial to students of all ages, the College extended service requirements to all students. With expansion to a K1–G12 school in the late 1990s, the challenge of providing meaningful service experiences to students from age 4 to age 18 was met through a comprehensive Service programme, with a goal of empowering students to be ‘aware, able and active.’ Today, the Service programme at UWCSEA is recognised as a model of how meaningful action by individuals and groups can help students to grow and develop as compassionate people and active agents of change. The College has three levels of service: College service, where students offer a service to other members of the College community, for example when older students help younger students in sports teams; local service, a faceto-face service performed in the local community by students of all ages, for example visiting homes and hospital for the elderly and disabled; and global service, incorporating Global Concerns projects (themselves divided into Development, Environment, Empowerment and Education/Health), the Initiative for Peace and the Gap Year, where projects are focused on communities and causes in developing nations outside of Singapore.

The breadth and complexity of the Service programme at UWCSEA requires leadership, staff and students to make an enormous commitment to putting ideals into action. But the impact of the activity, on both students and the organisations and people they interact with cannot be underestimated.

The 2011/2012 Service Year In 2011/2012, the commitment to service from all students continued, with high levels of participation and impact across the whole College. There was an emphasis on creating stronger links with local organisations in Singapore, with the number of local service options for students increasing. At the same time, with the expansion of the East Campus, the number and range of connections with local organisations increased along with the number of students involved with Global Concerns. In the Infant Schools (K1 to Grade 1), students took part in the ‘Shoe Box Appeal’ which involves filling a shoebox with food and other essential items for elderly people in Singapore, which the students then deliver to senior citizens in their homes and at a Chinese New Year Lunch. The Infant School hosted 38 elderly


Service by the Numbers

74 $930,950 Global Concerns across the College

38 1,995 Visitors who addressed the students on service issues during the year

Raised by students across the College

=$=

Classrooms built from laptop accessories sales

Clients interacting with UWCSEA students through local service

18 Countries supported through Global Concerns

69 28

Local service partners

College service programmes

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residents from St Joseph’s Home and St Theresa’s Home to afternoon tea in the K2 classrooms. The children entertained guests with songs in Chinese and English, played games with them, before presenting them with shoeboxes filled with useful items that they had bought with money earned by doing chores at home. The students also continued to develop strong links with local preschools for disadvantaged children and homes for the elderly. The Infant Schools on both campuses also supported Global Concerns with fundraising activities such as doing chores at home or having bake sales. On Dover, 12 Infant School students decided to ask for donations instead of presents on their birthdays and together raised $4,287 for Global Concerns and other projects. The Ray of Hope fundraiser raised over $11,000 for the Mumbai Mobile Creche, the Infant School Global Concern. In the Junior Schools, students engaged in College service in a broad range of ways, including becoming a buddy to a younger student in ‘Peer Play’ activities, taking part in the campus gardening service to enhance the environment for all, or becoming a member of the Junior School Student

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Council. Through Local service, students visited elderly Singaporean residents, worked with Singaporean children from a local after-school care facility for literacy and art activities, or taught domestic workers computer skills. The Junior Schools also supported Global Concerns. At this level, while support may include fundraising, students also connected with their Global Concern through links in the curriculum and visits from members of the community they were supporting. In the Middle School, students must complete two consecutive seasons of College, local or global service. At this stage, the opportunities are more complex and expectations of students are higher. In 2011/2012, the Dover Middle School offered 7 College service, 15 local services and 9 Global Concerns groups that students could become involved with. These ranged from Helping in the Primary School or Greening the Campus as part of College service, through to reading with local school children or working with young people with intellectual disabilities as part of local service, through to support of The Island Foundation, Underprivileged Children of Vietnam and Promoting Animal


303 15 Students participating in Project Week

Countries visited

Welfare through Global Concerns. On East Campus, grade levels in the Middle School chose Global Concerns to focus on and a small group of students went to Siem Reap on a capacity building trip in May, to consolidate the relationship ready for the following year’s work with Green Gecko. There was also preparation for the GIN Conference, to be run by UWCSEA Middle School on East in November 2012. In Grade 10, students must complete a minimum of two consecutive seasons of local service while Grade 9 students must complete a full year of College service. All Grade 11 students join a Singapore-based local service project, visiting every week for at least one academic year. In 2011/2012 students were involved in more than 106 College and local service activities, ranging from organising activities for children with multiple disabilities, through to teaching cooking to domestic workers from HOME shelter and visiting patients in long-stay hospitals. If students join a Global Concerns group, they must commit for the full year. In 2011/2012, there were 74 Global Concerns groups that students could join.

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Organisations visited

Countries visited

Project Week Every year, Grade 11 students are presented with the challenge to research, plan, organise, and then carry out an independent low budget trip to a place where they can make a difference. In March 2012, 303 students organised themselves into 83 groups to visit 47 organisations in 15 countries. The students put together an incredible range of activities: teaching, trekking, painting, playing, building, cooking, cleaning, nursing and training. They supported invaluable conservation projects, and took care of lepers, orphans, street kids and disabled people in cities and towns throughout Southeast Asia.

Spotlight on UN Millennium Goals How many of our Dover Global Concerns address the goals 1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

14

2. Achieve universal primary education

12

3. Promote gender equality and empower women

7

4. Reduce child mortality

3

5. Improve maternal health

1

6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases

2

7. Ensure environmental sustainability

5

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Spotlight on Initiative for Peace Initiative for Peace (IfP) was founded in 2001 by a group of students and teachers. The event, held annually in the first week of the summer break, follows a year of preparation by students. Student leaders plan the event for youth leaders in their host country, and receive pro bono training by specialists in the fields of conflict resolution, public administration and negotiation, as well as leadership coaching. At the end of the academic year, students then run and facilitate the IfP conference. The IfP conference aims to bring youth leaders together; to equip them with the tools that will empower them to lead their own initiatives after the conference; initiatives that contribute to the prevention or resolution of conflicts within their communities. IfP has previously worked with youth in Kashmir and Sri Lanka; and for the last five years has focused on supporting youth leaders Timor Leste. In June 2012, UWCSEA students travelled to Timor Leste to facilitate a conference for 36 young Timorese. There, they facilitated a series of workshops focused on a broad range of topics: from public speaking and presentation skills to discussions of how young people can be of service in Timor Leste; from tree-planting in support of reforestation, to roleplaying government officials and donors; and from learning about the variables that affect policy-making to debates on human rights. Through the

workshops, students came together to learn how they could instigate social change in their country. After the 2009 conference, two of the Timorese delegates, Leonardo Rosa and Salles de Sousa, were galvanised into action. Together with co-delegates they established a project to reforest the hill behind their community. In support of this initiative, as well as to inspire the new delegates, every conference since has seen the IfP team on the slope engaged in tree planting during a morning conference session. In the most recent 2012 conference, held in June, a further 173 trees were planted. The 26 facilitators from UWCSEA Dover and Timorese UWC alumni (2012) from Red Cross Nordic UWC, Li Po Chun UWC of Hong Kong and UWC of the Adriatic and 40 Timorese students from 10 schools in Dili took part.

Gap Year Programme The Gap Year programme offer students the opportunity to put UWC values into practice in Southeast Asia before going to university. Students work with human rights, environmental and child protection NGOs, all of whom have direct connections to UWC South East Asia.

Other highlights of the 2011/2012 gap year programme • UWCSEA Gap Year has attracted sponsorship for National Committee scholars wishing to undertake a service project • new service is being initiated at

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• the UWCSEA internship programme is being developed • links with The Round Square Gap Year programme were created so that students have further access to opportunities • new projects being initiated at the Centre for Intercultural Education in Kunming in China, at the Widhya Asih Foundation in Bali and at the Joao Paolo II Centor de Formacao Dili in Timor Leste • Gap Year volunteers continue to support the UWCSEA Outdoor Education programme at Tioman Turtles Conservation project • new project at UWCSEA sponsored school in Bandipur in Nepal

Sealinks Inspired by the student-led Service programme at the College, parents and teachers came together to champion outreach initiatives for the community at large. Under the umbrella of SEALinks, members of the UWCSEA community lead various fundraising programmes for NGOs and organisations in need of support. These include: working with communities in Aceh, devastated by the 2004 tsunami; raising awareness and fundraising for various organisations in the region who support those living with HIV and AIDS; ‘Bali Bridges,’ which supports orphans in Bali and more. They also organise projects such as the housebuilding trips to Cambodia with Tabitha Foundation. For further information on the impact of the Service programme at the College during 2010/2011, please refer to the Philanthropy Report 2009/2011.


Gap Year projects

40 10

Students participating in the Gap Year programme

Gap Year destinations

Gap Year projects that the class of 2012 were involved in (note, some students in more than 1 destination hence the different number of individual participants): Lamdon Schools Ladakh

8

Equitable Cambodia Phnom Penh and Kep

13

Leeuwin tall ships Western Australia

3

UWCSEA expeditions Tioman/ Sibu /Chiang Mai 10 Tioman Turtles

1

Lihuk Panaghiusa Cebu Philippines

1

BABSEACLE Chiang Mai

5

Gili Reef Conservation Lombok 3 Ko Phi Phi Village school Thailand

2 51

The Island Foundation Bintan

1


4,557 76

Students on both campuses

Nationalities

5% 15% 12% 44% 52

Students leaving Dover Campus

New students on Dover Campus

Students leaving East Campus

New students on East Campus


Our Community The UWC South East Asia community is a vibrant, truly international community that is united in a common purpose. This section of the report provides some information and statistics about our community.

Enrolment Dover Campus 2011/2012 363

277

In 2011/2012, our community consisted of 4,557 students, 3,162 families of 76 nationalities, spread over two campuses at Dover Road and Tampines.

205

318

293 292 298

224

179 135 88

91

K1

K2

158

111

24 G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

70

80

G8

G9

G10

FIB

G11

G12

East Campus 2011/2012

136 137

164 160 160 160

133 140

92 K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

69 FIB

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Nationalities in the College

Nationality Spread

Language Profile

Dover Campus

Dover Campus

USA – 11%

Australia – 9% Canada – 3%

UK – 23%

India – 26%

Singapore – 10%

There are 49 languages spoken as a first language on Dover Campus. The breakdown of these is summarised on the right. Please note that those who have not nominated a first language in their application are recorded as speaking English as a first language.

Japan – 4%

Netherlands – 3%

Dutch – 1% German – 1% French – 2% Spanish – 2% Korean – 2% Japanese – 2% Hindi– 3% Chinese – 5%

English – 82%

Korea – 8%

Malaysia – 3%

East Campus USA – 14%

East Campus Australia – 9% Canada – 3%

India – 25% UK – 26%

There are 47 languages spoken as a first language on East Campus. The breakdown of these is summarised on the right. Please note that those who have not nominated a first language in their application are recorded as speaking English as a first language.

Tamil – 82% Korean – 82% Japanese – 82% French – 82% German – 82% Hindi – 82%

Chinese – 82% Japan – 4% Korea – 4% Singapore – 7% Malaysia – 3% New Zealand – 3% Netherlands – 2%

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English – 82%


Our Community: Boarding 2011/2012 in UWCSEA boarding was a year of exciting and dynamic change, and will be remembered for the establishment of UWCSEA boarding on our East Campus. On 7 August 2011, East Campus’ Tampines House opened its doors, welcoming 55 new East boarders, including 5 scholars, to their new ‘home from home,’ so joining our Dover Campus boarding houses in creating an enlarged UWCSEA boarding community. With over 20 nationalities amongst the founding East boarders, Tampines House from the beginning offered a truly international residential experience. As at Dover, a thorough boarding orientation programme was organised for the start of the academic year, in which new East boarders— members of Grades 7, 8, 9 and FIB respectively—were familiarised with their house, campus and Singapore. East boarding’s orientation included the Tampines House Weekend Away, when all the East boarders travelled to Desaru (Malaysia) for a weekend of bonding activities, games and sports, in which they were joined by their colleagues from Dover Campus’ Mahindra House. As at Dover, an East Boarding Council was established, enabling student leadership and involvement in the shaping of this vibrant new community.

In addition to the East Director of Boarding, the founding East boarding staff was made up of two deputy houseparents, a team of assistant houseparents and a Boarding Services Executive; together they delivered the quality care of boarders that has long been associated with UWCSEA boarding. The substantial growth of boarding at East, envisaged for 2012/2013, was realised through the demand for UWCSEA boarding. Promotional tours to countries in Asia and Europe, ranging from China to Germany to India, were undertaken by the Director of Admissions and Directors of Boarding on both campuses. As a result, many strong applicants secured admission to UWCSEA/boarding, at the East or Dover Campuses. There are now nearly 250 young people aged between 11 and 18 years boarding at both campuses, with this number set to grow by more than (another) 100 as East boarding expands. On Dover Campus, in the spirit of the UWC mission, the boarding houses were renamed after two inspirational figures in the UWC story, Kurt Hahn and Nelson Mandela. With Kurt Hahn as the founder of the UWC movement and Nelson Mandela as honorary President of the UWC movement, this choice of names was felt to be highly suitable and inspirational.

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The quality of the Dover boarding experience was recognised in the Dover Campus’ Council of International School/Western Association of Schools and College (CIS/WASC) visiting team, who found much to commend in their report. A major investment in new bedroom furniture, as well as a re-decoration, evidenced the College’s commitment to the continuing successful development of boarding at Dover. The change of names of the Dover houses was also aligned to a strategic move to adopt a vertical boarding arrangement at Dover, with both senior and junior boarders in each Dover house; reflective of this change, the now inaccurate name of ‘Senior House’ had to be gracefully retired. The introduction of vertical boarding at Dover proved a great success, with both houses feeling very much as one integrated boarding community, with our incredible diversity of 50 different nationalities maximised across both houses. As envisaged, many excellent opportunities were created for older boarders to act as positive and inspiring role models to younger boarders.

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A particular feature of UWCSEA boarding has been our strong scholar community, which across both campuses numbered 55 students. At Dover, our scholars came from countries as diverse as Swaziland, Chile, Hungary and Vietnam; our first scholar intake at East boarding saw scholars coming from Cambodia, China Indonesia (Aceh) and Timor Leste. Extensive and varied opportunities for participation in boarding life were provided on both campuses. Boarders’ International Evenings and Boarders’ Committees thrived, as did our use of the sports halls for everything from basketball to aerobics. House football was ever popular, as were off-campus activities such as cycling and cultural

trips. The ‘Amazing Race,’ included in our orientation programmes, was a particularly memorable event, as boarders were able to learn first-hand about what Singapore has to offer. The support that UWCSEA’s boarders has traditionally offered school events, such as plays and musical concerts, has traditionally been strong, and this year was no exception. One particularly memorable occasion at Dover was the International Mother Tongue Day, where the inspiring diversity of our boarding community made a significant contribution to the range of language activities on offer. Kurt Hahn once recalled how the motto of educationalist Dr. Carl Reinhart, ‘Grow to be what you are,’ had made a real impression on him. It is in this spirit, through developing and nurturing the potential of all our boarders, that UWCSEA’s international residential experience prepares boarders for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century world. 2011/2012 proved a very special, indeed remarkable, year for us, with boarders on both campuses now able to share in—and personally grow through—UWCSEA’s vibrant, valuesbased boarding.


Our Community: Scholars In 2011/2012, the UWCSEA Scholarship Programme supported 69 scholars from more than 30 countries. Scholars came from across the globe, with students from as far afield as Aceh, Guatemala and Zimbabwe, and there was a large representation of students from Asia, Central and South America and Africa. Most scholarship students come to the College to complete the IB Diploma in Grades 11 and 12. Candidates are selected through National Committees, operating in over 130 countries worldwide, who find and select most of our scholarship students. The remaining students are selected directly by UWCSEA, in partnership with organisations in the students’ home countries. The application process varies across countries to ensure that it is applicable and relevant to the local culture and education system. While scholarship students must have the academic ability to meet the demands of the UWCSEA programme, they are also selected on the basis of their potential to have a positive impact on the local and global community. Each process allows the selection committee to take a holistic view of the student, and understand their potential to contribute, support and participate fully in the life of the College.

Nationalities of scholars by continent

Africa – 19%

South America – 12%

North/Central America – 14%

Europe – 10%

Asia – 45%

In addition to the Grade 11 and 12 scholarships, the College awards three-year and five-year scholarships that commence in Grade 10 and 8 respectively. Through the Foundation, the College was able to raise money during 2011/2012 to offer an additional eight scholarships for the 2012/2013 year. The College community benefits tremendously from the presence of our scholarship students. The diversity they bring enriches the everyday life of students, teachers and parents. They also bring a fresh perspective to their fellow students and the whole community, and their commitment to making the most of their opportunities ensure that they are actively engaged in the school community.

“A UWCSEA education has completely changed my whole life, most importantly in the way I view the world and the way I treat others around me. I will take everything I have got during my three years here, and it will be my guidance to become an even better individual for the world society.” Irham Scholar from Indonesia

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Financial Support: Scholar Programme Funding for scholarships is generated through school fees (3% of tuition fees are dedicated to the scholarship programme), the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP), corporations, National Committees, parent donations and alumni donations. A total of $4.21 million was given to scholars on both campuses during the 2011/2012 academic year.

Percentage contribution to scholarship funding Dover Campus

Alumni – 3% Parent – 5% Corporation – 7%

National Committee – 8%

UNP – 12%

UWCSEA parental contribution – 65%

Percentage contribution to scholarship funding East Campus

National Committee – 21%

UWCSEA parental – 79%

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“If many other youngsters from different countries could experience the same thing in UWCSEA, the College would be definitely working towards a better world. This is why not only the scholarship programme is important, but the school is important.� Marlon, scholar from Costa Rica

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Our Community: Parents’ Associations The level of engagement of the parent community is an important measure for the College in assessing its success. We are fortunate to have a remarkable community of parents who volunteer their time and energy in a myriad of ways. This is especially evident in the commitment of the members of the Parents’ Associations on both campuses. Their work organising events, connecting the parent community, fundraising and building community spirit is an important part of making the College a great place to be—for students, for staff and for other parents. The 2011/2012 year was another busy year for the Parents’ Association at Dover. Aside from the usual important orientation and welcome events, the Parents’ Association achieved two major objectives during the year. The first was the successful launch of a Sports Outreach programme to enhance the involvement of parents in supporting their child(ren)’s chosen sport. Piloting the programme with swimming, the parent committee established a large and busy parent group to assist the PE Department with many aspects of the sport at the College. By linking the swimming team’s activities to a charity element, the parent group gave the students’

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swimming meets purpose and helped to fulfill the College’s mission and vision. The Parents’ Association Sports Outreach team plan to apply this formula to other sports in the coming years. The second major initiative was the work experience programme. Drawing on the success and involvement of so many in the annual Careers Fair, the Parents’ Association established a scheme to provide real-life work experiences for Grade 11 students throughout the year. Other highlights include the Holiday Fair, which raised funds for Initiative for Peace activities, and the sixth annual Community Fair which made close to $50,00 for Global Concerns. One major donation was $30,000 to the Middle School for comfortable casual seating for students. The main objective for the Parents’ Association on East Campus in 2011/2012 was to further strengthen East community spirit, through a series of welcome events, close relationships with leadership teams and staff and community initiatives. Other objectives included the consolidation of existing events and activities, review of policies and procedures and to plan for growth in the 2012/2013 year.

The major achievements included the introduction of a trustworthy online voting system for the Board of Governors election, the launch of the first Parents’ Association East merchandise item (water bottles), coordination with Parent’s Association Dover on the Careers Fair (to be hosted on East Campus in 2013), implementation of online RSVP signup and the creation or ongoing support of subcommittees and volunteer groups, including the nationality representatives, grade representatives, welcome committees and major event subcommittees. The many events organised by Parents’ Association East included coffee mornings, Friends Rock and Middle School Madness, Mother Tongue Language Day, Understanding UWCSEA, family picnic and treasure hunt and treasures of the world buffet, Family Summer Festival, PA Bar at events, staff appreciation high tea and more. All these events, and ongoing activities such as book club, family service and support for various family groups helped the growing East Campus community to connect with and support each other, despite the rapid growth in size.


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The Strategic Plan In 2006, UWC South East Asia developed a new strategic planning process and plan. The plan looked in depth at the development of the College over a three-year period up to June 2009 and included ideas for beyond that period. In June 2009, the plan was revised to take into account the invitation from the Singaporean government to expand the College to a second campus in Tampines, with a capacity of 2,500 students, to be opened in August 2011. At the same time, a six-year S$100 million redevelopment of the Dover Campus was commenced, to be completed in June 2015. The College Master Plan 2011–2017 takes into account the major initiatives that will take place at the school during that period. They are organised around the learning programme and the key business functions of the organisation. This section of the Annual Report focuses on developments in the key areas of the strategic plan during the 2011/2012 academic year.

SUMMARY Strategic Aim 1: To develop the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme Developments 2011/2012: • CIS/WASC accreditation of Dover Campus • completion of UWCSEA profile and learning principles and development of standards and benchmarks for maths, science and English in the academic element of the learning programme, as part of the curriculum articulation project • implementation of the iLearn programme across both campuses • launch of the language review • training of Primary School staff in preparation for implementation of Reading and Writing workshop (East and Dover campuses, respectively) • pilot of Looking for Learning approach in the Middle and High School on East Campus Strategic Aim 2: Actively address social and environmental issues Developments 2011/2012 • universal design award received for East Campus • ongoing expansion of the Service programme • donation of solar panels for the pool at Dover Campus • work with external providers Sodexo and Yeap to reduce environmental impact of services Strategic Aim 3: Enhance our high quality learning environment Developments 2011/2012 • opening and full deployment of the new campus in Tampines • construction of dedicated Middle School building and resurfacing of the Ayer Raja pitch on Dover Campus • development of the outdoor education centre on Sibu • launch of the Centre for International Education • planning and development of a new Professional Learning Programme • recruitment of key leadership roles • development of leadership standards across the College • Board Governance Review by Heidrick and Struggles Strategic Aim 4: Extend our reach and increase diversity of the community • implementation of the new admissions policy, with a view to admitting a more diverse community of students • further extension of the scholarship programme, with the support of the Foundation Strategic Aim 5: Ensuring long-term financial stability for the College • continuation of building of reserve for Dover Campus • second Annual Fund launched by the Foundation • continuation of the UWCSEA Nominee Programme • commercial letting of College facilities during ‘down times’ 63


STRATEGIC AIM 1 Develop the five elements of the UWCSEA learning programme There were a series of interconnected developments in this area of the strategic plan in 2011/2012. The first of these was accreditation of Dover Campus from Council of International School/Western Association of Schools and Colleges (CIS/WAS). There are three stages to the evaluation and accreditation process: the self-study (completed by Dover Campus in the 2010/2011 academic year), the onsite visit from the evaluation team, and the follow-up programme carried out by the school as a result of the commendations and recommendations in the accreditation report. During 2011/2012, Dover Campus completed the team visit and began the programme that followed on from the report. The report gave full accreditation to the campus and provided Dover with a series of commendations (areas of great strength) and recommendations (areas that need attention). In 2011/2012, the curriculum articulation project made significant progress. As well as completing the UWCSEA profile and the learning principles, staff members developed new standards and benchmarks for mathematics, science and English. Discussions also began on the learning goals for service, outdoor education and personal and social education. The iLearn initiative was launched to students in August 2011, with the distribution of laptops to students in various Middle and High School grades across the College. At the 64

same time, additional digital literacy coaches and a significant staff training and parent communication programme, ensured that the focus was on enhancing learning and not simply usage of devices. In March, the College launched the ‘Tech Mentor’ initiative, where up to 24 staff who had demonstrated leadership with their peers in the use of technology to support teaching and learning were rewarded with additional professional development opportunities. At the same time, the Internal Communications Review was driving a review and consolidation of the College’s systems related to teaching, learning and parent communications. This was supported by a new Director of Communications and Marketing. In January 2012, the Board decided to conduct a full language review, taking into account current provision for mother tongue, second languages and English as a Second Language across the College. This review was intended to provide an analysis of the current situation along with recommendations for any changes, based on recent research and best practice in language learning. The review and recommendations will be presented to the Board during the 2012/2013 academic year. In literacy, Reading Workshop (East Campus) and Writing Workshop (Dover Campus) were implemented throughout the Primary Schools. This was supported by extensive professional development for teachers, including an intensive week of training when staff developers from Columbia University introduced the practice to our Primary School teachers.

On East Campus, the leadership team and staff implemented a pilot of Looking for Learning, which focuses on learning outcomes for students, rather than teaching inputs for teachers. Using a series of guided conversations with students, teachers and leaders can reflect on the learning that is actually taking place in the classroom, based on the student experience.

Strategic Aim 2 Actively address social and environmental issues In 2011/2012, the College continued to implement the environmental policy. In December, East Campus was officially opened by Minister Heng Swee Keat as a Greenmark Platinum school. The campus is conservatively estimated to be 40% more energy efficient than a standard building of its size. 30% of its air conditioning needs are provided by solar power— the largest such installation in the world. In March 2012, the East Campus was also awarded first prize in the Universal Design Awards (UDA) for Singapore. The UDA acknowledges the ability of buildings to be used by everyone, regardless of their age, ability or situation in life. The donation by a parent of 50 KW solar panels for the pool at Dover Campus have reduced energy consumption on the campus. The canteen operator Sodexo began a range of ‘Green Canteen’ initiatives, including the reduction of plastic use, ethically sourcing product, recycling and the reduction of harmful chemical waste. The transport provider moved to Euro 3 and 4 Engine buses that will reduce emissions.


At the same time, the service programme was expanded once more, with many of the Global Concerns focusing on UN Millennium Goals related to poverty, education, gender equality, child mortality, mental health, diseases and environmental sustainability.

On Dover Campus, a dedicated Middle School building was opened in April. The decision to resurface the Ayer Raja pitch, though not without disadvantages in terms of the environmental impact, ensured a safe playing field that is usable in all weathers for our students.

There is ongoing involvement of the whole community in addressing social and environmental issues with staff supporting scholarships to both UWCSEA and Mahindra College and providing professional development to teachers in Bintan and Cambodia, and parents and families supporting communities in the region who are coping with AIDS, the aftermaths of the 2009 tsunami or other social problems.

The ongoing development of the facility on Sibu Island will result in a dedicated space that our students can access year-round.

Strategic Aim 3 Enhance our high quality learning environment In August 2011, the East Campus at Tampines welcomed students from K1 to Grade 10, offering a purpose-built, high quality learning environment to our students. The launch of the Centre for International Education on East Campus, with the hosting of the IB World Heads Conference in October, highlighted the benefits of a dedicated conference space at the College. Throughout the year, conferences and professional development opportunities for teachers further enhanced the learning environment for students and teachers.

In 2011/2012 the leadership teams on both campuses planned and developed a new Professional Learning Programme, including the development of a cohesive and comprehensive training programme for teachers that will help to ensure a consistently high quality experience for our students. At the same time as the College recruited a High School Principal and 50 new Middle and High School teachers for East Campus, we began preparations for a comprehensive succession planning across the College, for teachers and for administrative and support staff.

Strategic Aim 4 Extend our reach and increase the diversity of our community The mission of the College makes it imperative that we have diversity of nationality, cultural background and economic background within our community. In 2010/2011, the Board made the decision to change the admissions policy in order to increase diversity among our student population. In 2011/2012, this policy was implemented. More details of this can be found in the admissions section of this report.

The increase of students through the expansion of the East Campus further extended our reach and the establishment of the UWC ethos among those students was a key strategic focus during 2011/2012. The scholarship programme was expanded so that more students, who would not otherwise be able to access our education, could benefit from the programme at the College. In 2011/2012, there were 69 scholars from more than 30 countries studying at UWCSEA, an increase of 15 from the previous year. More information on the scholarship programme can be found in the scholars and advancement sections of this report.

Strategic Aim 5 Ensure long-term financial stability for the College The two campuses are set up as separate legal and financial entities. One of the aims of the strategic plan is to create a small reserve fund for each campus that will allow the College to keep operating in the event of a force majeure. During 2010/2011, that reserve was increased on Dover Campus. Because the East Campus is in its start up phase, it is not in a position to build up a reserve. The establishment of alternative sources of income through the UWCSEA Foundation continued with the establishment of the Annual Fund and continuation of the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP). For further information on the activity of the Foundation, please see the College Advancement section of this report.

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Business Report With more than 500 employees, including 380 teachers, an annual turnover of S$90m and property assets worth several S$100 million, the College has significant business operations. This section of the report provides an overview of Human Resources, Admissions and Finance for the 2011/2012 year. The human resources function at the College is overseen by the Director of Staffing and Development (teaching staff) and the Director of Finance and Administration (support and administrative staff). The report shows the staff breakdown by function and nationality, as well as an overview of the teaching faculty, the recruitment figures and transition.

The admissions report shows the life cycle of each application to the College during 2011/2012, organised by campus and grade. It also outlines the change to a new admissions policy at the beginning of 2011 and its impact on the application process during the year. The finance function at the College is overseen by the Director of Finance and Administration. The report offers an analysis of income and expenditure on each campus during 2011/2012 as well as statements of financial position and comprehensive income.

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Business Report – Human Resources UWCSEA’s vision is to be a leader in international education, with a worldwide reputation for providing a challenging, holistic, values-based education. The recruitment and retention of excellent teachers and support staff remains central to this vision. It is our aim to recruit a diverse range of teachers who will ensure that we are able to offer the highest quality experience to our students, and to provide those teachers with support and administrative staff that will enable them to focus their energy on providing an outstanding educational experience for our students.

The College has a reputation for providing a stimulating, dynamic and challenging professional experience, resulting in significant interest whenever opportunities are advertised. In the 2011/2012 academic year, 70 full-time teachers joined the teaching staff of UWCSEA. Of these, 44 were recruited to meet the needs of the expansion at the East Campus. Two teachers transferred from Dover Campus to East Campus in August 2011.

Staff Breakdown Distribution of staff—please note that this is reported according to the financial structure of the College (i.e., each campus and the Foundation). Dover Campus Management – 3%

Educational support staff – 27%

Boarding support staff – 3% Administrative staff – 16% Academic staff – 52%

Other (22 others) – 17%

East Campus Management – 2%

Educational support staff – 38%

Singapore – 3% USA – 3% UK – 45%

Boarding support staff – 1%

New Zealand – 8%

Administrative staff – 11% Academic staff – 49%

Canada – 9% UWCSEA Foundation

Australia – 15%

Management – 25%

Administrative staff – 75%

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52 2,937

Posts advertised

39%

17

Full-time teachers holding a Masters or higher degree

6 71

IBDP Authorisation Team Chairs/Consultants/ Team members

IBDP Examiners

17

IBDP Workshop Leaders

Teaching applications received

Average years of experience of College teachers

10

8

ECIS/CoIS Visiting Team Members

IB PYP Trainers

Tenure

Dover Campus teaching staff has an average tenure of 6.5 years

50%

25%

13% 8%

4%

21+ years

16–20 years

11–15 years

6–10 years

0–5 years

Transition UWCSEA enjoys an extremely stable teaching environment, with a low transition rate of teachers each year. The table below shows the numbers of teachers leaving Dover Campus each year since 2005. Please note that East Campus is not included yet as the large number of teachers joining and small number leaving would skew the comparative data.

202

211

217

229

234

233

237

Total number of teachers

19 13

12

14

13

12 9

Total number of leavers 2005/06

2005/06

2005/06

2005/06 2

2005/06

2005/06

69 2005/06


Business Report – Admissions Announcement of a new Admissions Policy

The first phase of implementation involved contacting all families who had applications with the College to advise them of the policy change and the transition arrangements. This took place in August and September 2011.

The 2011/2012 academic year began with the announcement and implementation of the new admissions policy as approved by the Board earlier in 2011. Essentially, the new policy meant that, from September 2011:

In addition to contacting the families of the approximately 3,500 applicants registered at the College, emails were also sent to over 2,500 families who had registered their interest in applying.

• applications were made annually, opening approximately 12 months in advance of each new academic year with an annual application fee replacing the significantly higher old registration fee; and

The reason for the changes and what they would mean in practice for current registrants and those interested in applying was explained in detail both in the direct communication with families and on the College website. Information forums were held at East and Dover over four evenings which gave families, those with children attending the College and prospective families the opportunity to hear from the Head of College and Director of Admissions and to ask questions. Over 500 families attended across the four events. A detailed question and answer information sheet was posted on the College website. The announcement was also reported, together with the opening of the East Campus, in the Singapore news print media and radio.

The Admissions Department is responsible for all aspects of the admission of students to the College.

• places would be allocated based upon a range of defined criteria designed to reflect the commitment of the College to create an educational environment which enhances its mission, vision and values—in essence this meant ensuring as far as possible a diverse student body—whilst at the same time and to the extent possible recognising those families who already have a relationship with the College, with other children enrolled or who have attended the College in the past.

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Those who had applications registered at the College before the announcement were invited to maintain their applications on the register for the year their applications were currently on. For the vast majority, this meant maintaining their applications for entry in August 2012. In total, over 2,000 applications opted to remain on the register. These families received a refund of their original registration fee less the new annual application fee. Some 900 applications were withdrawn, and these families received a full refund of their registration fees. At the same time, applications opened to new applicants for entry in the 2012/2013 academic year. Over the course of the year, 2,050 ‘new’ applications were received for the 1,034 places that would be offered for entry in August 2012.

Implementation of the new policy Under the transition arrangements, new places at the College would continue to be offered under the previous policy (and so by date of application) to applicants who had applied prior to April 2011 and who had opted to remain on the list following the September 2011 announcement.


The tables below show the breakdown by grade of how applications were processed on the Dover Campus during 2011/2012 Number of Dover Campus applications processed during August 2011/2012 Dover entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Applications on the register at 1 August 2011

218

42

46

33

31

46

43

55

68

55

52

29

57

775

Received after 1 August 2011

22

77

120

125

112

105

89

91

85

68

71

80

87

1132

Total applications processed for entry

240

119

166

158

143

151

132

146

153

123

123

109

144

1907

Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications Dover entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted

88

3

23

25

24

27

27

27

57

43

44

46

16

450

Ineligible

3

0

3

11

23

13

19

20

18

27

24

20

26

207

88

99

65

67

64

46

42

5

3

Eligible but disappointed

64

Transferred to East

3

Withdrawn

82

28

41

57

29

47

40

57

73

50

5

4

27

579

3

4

1

11

47

35

74

660

The tables below show the breakdown by grade of how applications were processed on the East Campus during 2011/2012 Number of East Campus applications processed during August 2011/2012 East entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Applications on the register at 1 August 2011

169

110

96

104

45

43

55

38

47

29

38

42

37

853

Received after 1 August 2011

42

49

14

15

31

77

74

90

98

108

105

72

143

918

Total applications processed for entry

211

159

110

119

76

120

129

128

145

137

143

114

180

1771

Outcome of processed East Campus applications East entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Accepted

109

30

10

32

11

33

33

46

56

52

54

39

79

584

Ineligible

5

6

2

11

3

11

26

24

41

31

39

38

51

288

Eligible but disappointed

23

86

57

52

43

50

35

19

5

2

2

2

7

383

Transferred to Dover Withdrawn

2 74

37

41

24

19

26

35

39

41

2 52

48

35

43

514

The table below shows the outcome of the application process for each application on the Dover Campus broken down by grade and expressed in percentages Outcome of processed Dover Campus applications by percentage Dover entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total 24%

Accepted

37%

3%

14%

16%

17%

18% 20% 18% 37% 35% 36% 42% 11%

Ineligible

1%

0%

2%

7%

16%

9%

Eligible but disappointed

27%

74%

60% 41%

47% 42% 35% 29% 3%

2%

0%

0%

0%

Transferred to East

1%

0%

Withdrawn

34%

24% 25% 36% 20% 31%

0%

0%

14% 0%

14% 0%

12% 0%

22% 20% 18% 18% 11%

30% 39% 48% 41%

4%

4%

19% 30%

2%

4%

1%

38% 32% 51%

1% 35%

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The table below shows the outcome of the application process for each application on the East Campus broken down by grade and expressed in percentages Outcome of processed East Campus applications by percentage East entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

Accepted

52%

19% 9%

G1

27% 14%

28% 26% 36% 39% 38% 38% 34% 44% 33%

9%

9%

2%

G2

G3

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

Ineligible

2%

4%

Eligible but disappointed

11%

54% 52% 44% 57% 42% 27% 15%

3%

1%

1%

2%

1%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

4%

G4

0%

0%

G11

Total

20% 19% 28% 23% 27% 33% 28% 16%

Transferred to Dover

0%

0%

Withdrawn

35%

23% 37% 20% 25% 22% 27% 30% 28% 38% 34% 31%

0%

0%

4%

22%

0%

0%

24% 29%

The tables below shows the outcome of the application process for each application to the College as a whole broken down by grade Number of College applications processed during August 2011/2012 College entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Applications on the register at 1 August 2011

387

152

142

137

76

89

98

93

115

84

90

71

94

1628

Received after 1 August 2011

64

126

134

140

143

182

163

181

183

176

176

152

230

2050

Total applications processed

451

278

276

277

219

271

261

274

298

260

266

223

324

3678

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Outcome of processed College applications College entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

Accepted

197

33

33

57

35

60

60

73

113

95

98

85

95

1034

Ineligible

8

6

5

22

26

24

45

44

59

58

63

58

77

495

Eligible but disappointed

87

174

156

117

110

114

81

61

10

5

7

6

34

962

Transferred to other campus

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

3

4

1

13

Withdrawn

156

65

82

81

48

73

75

96

114

102

95

70

117

1174

G5

G6

G7

G8

G9

FIB

G11

Total

Outcome of processed College applications by percentage College entry August 2012/2013

K1

K2

G1

G2

G3

G4

Accepted

44%

12%

12%

21%

16%

22% 23% 27% 38% 37% 37% 38% 29% 28%

2%

8%

12%

9%

Ineligible

2%

2%

Eligible but disappointed

19%

63% 57% 42% 50% 42% 31%

22% 3%

2%

3%

3%

10% 26%

Transferred to other campus

1%

0%

0%

0%

1%

2%

0%

Withdrawn

35%

23% 30% 29% 22% 27% 29% 35% 38% 39% 36% 31%

72

0%

0%

0%

0%

17% 0%

16%

20% 22% 24% 26% 24% 13% 1%

0%

36% 32%


Welcoming Prospective Families Throughout the transition to the new policy, the Admissions Department continued to welcome new families to the College. Across both campuses, over 100 individual tours were held each week during term time. In addition a series of open days (or more accurately, ‘Information Mornings’) were held in April at the Dover and East Campuses for families interested in applying for their children to join the High School, the Grade 9 and 10 IGCSE programme, the Grade 10 Foundation IB programme or the IB Diploma in August 2012. Over 450 families attended these sessions.

Development of online applications and New Admissions Database In the second half of the 2011 academic year, Admissions worked closely with the IT Department to finalise the development of a new online application system and a comprehensive admissions database. The principal aims of the online application system and database are to facilitate the annual application process, improve communication with families applying to the College, increase the efficiency of the processing of received applications and to reduce the use of paper in the department. The online application system and new database was ready to launch in September 2012 when applications for the 2013/2014 academic year will open.

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Business Report – Finance UWC South East Asia operates three separate financial entities: Dover Campus, East Campus and the UWCSEA Foundation. This ensures that the campuses do not impact on one another financially. This section of the report outlines the financial data for the 2010/2011 academic year for both Dover and East Campus. Financial information for the Foundation can be found in the College Advancement section of this report.

Income, expenditure and surplus Sundries and other fees – 3.6% Other contribution – 0.9% UNP income – 2.4% Boarding fees – 3.9%

Tuition fees – 89.2%

Central Admin – 1% Depreciation – 6% Boarding exp – 4%

The College is a registered charity in Singapore and as such is a nonprofit organisation. However, as part of due diligence a small surplus is accrued each year that is put into a reserve. This reserve will allow the College to continue operating for six months in the event of closure due to circumstances beyond our control (for example, school closure due to Avian Flu outbreak). The 2011/2012 financial year was a continuation year for the Dover Campus, which has been at full capacity and mature financial model since 2006. On East Campus, a small deficit was generated as a result of the growth towards full capacity in 2015.

Dover income

Maintenance and Operations – 5% Marketing and Communications – 1% Educational resources – 4% Administration salary and benefits – 6%

Dover expenditure

Boarding salary and benefits – 1% Educational support salary and benefits– 9%

Teachers salary and benefits – 64%

Sundries and other fees – 3.2% Other contribution – 0.9% UNP income – 2.4% Boarding fees – 3.9%

Tuition fees – 89.6%

East income

Central Admin – 0.5% Depreciation – 4% Boarding exp – 1% Maintenance and Operations – 11% Marketing and Communications – 1% Educational resources – 7% East expenditure Administration salary and benefits – 5% Boarding salary and benefits – 0.5% Educational support salary and benefits – 10%

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Teachers salary and benefits – 60%


75


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION Dover Campus As of 31 July 2012 2012

2011

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and bank balances Trade and other receivables

15,553,960

23,599,903

27,942,744

25,314,224

43,496,704

48,914,127

118,060,786

102,866,940

205,000

205,000

Total non-current assets

118,265,786

103,071,940

Total assets

161,762,490

151,986,067

Trade and other payables

11,797,005

10,583,200

Deferred income

63,181,435

62,585,122

29,456

1,146,363

Total current assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Club membership

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Current liabilities

Tuition fee deposits Bank borrowings Total current liabilities

5,000,000 80,007,896

— 74,314,685

Equity Restricted funds: Building funds

115,503

115,503

50,008,732

46,010,030

50,124,235

46,125,533

Accumulated surplus

31,630,359

31,545,849

Total equity

81,754,594

77,671,382

161,762,490

151,986,067

Development funds General funds:

Total liabilities and equity

76


East Campus As of 31 July 2012 2012

2011

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

37,827,867

28,764,401

Trade and other receivables

27,518,164

25,368,086

65,346,031

54,132,487

3,340,917

1,177,007

68,686,948

55,309,494

4,956,176

4,175,874

40,265,225

31,314,362

Total current assets Non-current asset Plant and equipment Total assets

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Current liabilities Trade and other payables Deferred income Tuition fee deposits

77,895

83,874

45,299,296

35,574,110

5,707,111

4,556,797

Accumulated surplus

17,680,541

15,178,587

Total equity

23,387,652

19,735,384

68,686,948

55,309,494

Total current liabilities Equity Restricted funds: Development funds General funds:

Total liabilities and equity

77


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Dover Campus Year ended 31 July 2012 General funds

Revenue Other income Staff cost

Restricted funds

2011

2012

2011

2012

2011

$

$

$

$

$

$

72,876,978

69,795,597

5,767,619

4,191,230

9,239,793 —

(59,624,638)

(55,339,193)

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

(4,232,247)

(3,523,950)

(5,156,480)

Other operating expenses

(14,703,202)

(12,595,309)

(84,611)

Profit before income tax

84,510

2,528,375

3,998,702

Income tax Profit for the year, representing total comprehensive income for the year

78

Total

2012

— 84,510

2,528,375

— 3,998,702

9,110,392

82,116,771

78,905,989

5,767,619

4,191,230

(59,624,638)

(55,339,193)

(9,388,727)

(7,701,683)

(4,177,733) — 4,932,659 — 4,932,659

(14,787,813) (12,595,309) 4,083,212 — 4,083,212

7,461,034 — 7,461,034


East Campus Year ended 31 July 2011 General funds

Revenue Other income Government grant Staff cost Depreciation of plant and equipment Management and facility fee Operating lease expense

Restricted funds

2010

2011

2010

2011

2010

$

$

$

$

$

$

35,315,710

19,596,896

1,170,845

606,689

5,856,374 —

41,172,084

23,259,822

1,170,845

606,689

3,872,652

13,098,335

3,872,652

13,098,335

(14,909,902)

(25,887,589)

(14,909,902)

(1,535,971)

(720,880)

(1,535,971)

(720,880)

(1,400,000)

(1,000,000)

(1,400,000)

(1,000,000)

(4,702,560)

(9,033,693)

(3,989,541)

(3,500)

Profit before income tax

2,501,954

12,681,597

1,150,314

Profit for the year,

3,662,926

(25,887,589)

Other operating expenses

Income tax

Total

2011

— 2,501,954

— 12,681,597

— 1,150,314

(3,103,188)

(4,702,560)

(3,103,188)

(9,037,193)

(3,989,541)

559,738

3,652,268

13,241,335

— 559,738

— 3,652,268

— 13,241,335

representing total comprehensive income for the year

79


80


College Advancement The Department of College Advancement comprises the UWCSEA Foundation, the fundraising function at the College, and Alumni Relations, which helps us to stay connected to former students, staff and families.

UWCSEA Foundation Many leading colleges and universities are underpinned by a successful foundation. Through the work of a foundation an institution has greater freedom and flexibility to pursue bigger goals, recruit world class staff and invest in cutting edge technology and curriculum innovation, all the while establishing a sustainable development plan. This is why, in 2008, after becoming the first foundation supporting a Foreign System School in Singapore to be granted Institute of Public Character status (IPC), the UWCSEA Foundation was formally established. The sole aim of the UWCSEA Foundation is to support the College in its ambition to become a leader in international education. Since the Foundation commenced active fundraising in 2010, gifts and donations have helped to create a ‘margin of excellence’ that will help to make the difference between UWCSEA being a good school and an outstanding school. Although the Foundation was set up as a separate legal entity to UWCSEA, its priorities

and programmes are guided by the priorities and the strategic plan of the College. Serving both the East and Dover Campuses equally, gifts are directed according to the areas of most need and where the impact will be the greatest. Funds raised through the Foundation are dispersed back to the College within 12 months. Below is a summary of the key programmes that the Foundation is currently supporting. Scholarship programme Scholars add to the overall diversity of the college by sharing their culture and their community with fellow students. As well as benefitting from the educational experience of UWCSEA, they are an asset to the College and act as true ambassadors for their countries. In 2011/2012, there were 69 scholars from more than 30 countries studying at UWCSEA. This is an increase of 15 from the previous year. Many scholars are funded by the 3% fee contribution, which is part of our membership of the UWC movement. Today the scholarship programme has additional funding sources, including gifts received through the Foundation, the UWCSEA Nominee Programme (UNP) and UWC National Committees. In 2011/2012, donations to the Foundation, through major gifts and Annual Fund contributions,

provided an additional $985,864 for the scholarship programme. This allowed UWCSEA to award 8.5 scholarships for students for August 2012. The Annual Fund also allowed scholars to take part in additional learning programmes such as representing the College at Model United Nations or participating in the Initiative for Peace conference. The impact of a UWCSEA scholarships is marked and has long-term benefits for the recipient. The graduating scholars in 2012 who required financial support to continue their education secured scholarship at highly ranked international universities. “Studying at UWCSEA has shown me that even young individuals like me can make a difference … I have attended a school with students from more than 80 countries, and I have seen proof that tolerance and mutual respect are not just words from the vocabulary. I have made friends across the cultures who became my second family and, in doing so, found a home.” Son Tran Tran, Scholar (Class of ’12) Curriculum innovation The key to building a reputation as a leader in international education is a curriculum that is up-to-date, in line with the latest technology and at the forefront of learning.

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Through gifts to the Foundation in 2011/2012, the College has been able to invest an additional $60,500 in world class educational programmes. This funding has made the difference between a small number of teachers attending workshops to being able to bring experts to the College to implement alongside teachers. It has also allowed the College to assign teachers to curriculum research in key areas, including the curriculum articulation project, our major research and development project. Other projects initiated as part of this programme included: training for teachers in Reading and Writing Workshop; the development of literacy units within the Primary Schools; and teacher training in technology integration. “It was wonderful to get such high profile specialists and receive timely and goal-orientated feedback on our progress. Bringing the experts into our classrooms resulted in greater teacher ownership and engagement. It was a highly beneficial experience.” Helen Gamble K2 Head of Grade, Dover Campus Staff professional development Retaining the highest quality of staff and recruiting teachers that are leaders in their fields is the key to providing outstanding learning opportunities for students at UWCSEA. The Foundation provides support some of the support that enables the College to invest in the continued development of its teachers.

82

The Foundation has been able to direct $70,000 in funds to a range of staff development programmes that will enhance the learning experience for current and future students. One such initiative saw 26 curricular leaders from across the College attend an ‘Updates and Upgrades’ workshop with renowned world expert Jay McTighe in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The two day course enabled those attending to deepen their learning of the Understanding by Design model. Often referred to as ‘the backward by design’ process, it can be productively applied to planning a single unit, a yearlong course or, in our case, an entire K1–12 curriculum. “The professional development in Ho Chi Minh wasn’t just crucial consolidation of our understanding of backwards design and conceptbased learning, it was an invaluable opportunity to share and reflect on pedagogy and curriculum development as a College-wide team.” Kate Levy, Head of English and ESOL at East (G6–10) Since April, these same curricular leaders have worked with the College curriculum team to ‘cascade’ their understanding and approach to curricular planning with their colleagues. This work is on-going but will ensure that a common approach to curricular planning and revision will support the learning of every student at UWCSEA.

Other projects to benefit from funds raised during the 2011/2012 academic year include the ‘Looking for Learning’ programme on East Campus that focuses on student learning. Both are led by international training specialists Fieldwork Education. Capital development Donations to the Foundation also support the development of our physical environment, including learning spaces and the greening of our campuses. In 2011/2012, over 30 indigenous trees were planted at the East Campus. These trees not only add to the surroundings but also serve an educational purpose for students. A number of trees have been planted by families, some choosing to plant a tree to mark their departure of UWCSEA and celebrate their time at the College. Others have been planted by alumni, given as a gift to a friend or by a corporate or community organisation. As well as a special planting ceremony, there is also a personalised plaque designed to sit alongside the tree for the rest of its life. Encouraging a culture of giving During their time at the College, students are offered a number of ways to contribute through Global Concerns and service projects. Since 2009, the Foundation has provided an opportunity for departing graduates to come together with fellow classmates and collaborate on a project that will be an enduring reminder that they attended UWCSEA.


Last year, 75% of the Class of 2012 donated $12 and above to the gift— a wishing well. Located in the heart of the Middle School garden, donations through the wishing well will go towards the scholarship programme. Every gift is important Supporting the UWCSEA Foundation is a very real way for families, individuals, staff and companies to confirm their affinity with the vision and values of the College. In 2011/2012, 6% of parents and 0.6% alumni made a gift to the Annual Fund. 100% of Foundation Trustees, members of the UWCSEA Board of Governors and Senior Management made a donation. Gifts ranged in sizes and started from $2. In May 2012, the College held the first Donor Recognition Wall events to recognise, celebrate and thank those that chose to make a gift in the 2010/2011 academic year. To find out more about the work of the Foundation, see http://foundation.uwcsea.edu.sg or contact foundation@uwcsea.edu.sg or by phone +65 6419 9304.

83


Foundation Financial report The total donations received during the 2011/12 year amounted to $2,637,519, allocated as follows:

Annual Fund $293,275

Operations $336,991

Scholarships Programme $985,864

Endowment $1,021,389

Operating Income and Expenditure 2011/2012 Income

Expenditure Bank interest $991

Depreciation $34,646

College gift $336,000

Other expenses $164,593 Staff cost $296,847

84


Assets, Liabilities and Equity

Current liability $77,934

Non-current assets $2,125,705

Equity $5,138,306

Current assets $3,090,535

Endowment Fund

Available-for-sale bonds $1,875,705

Fixed deposit $2,192,527

Held-to-maturity bonds $250,000

85


Alumni Relations The UWCSEA alumni community extends around the globe, with alumni currently located in 110 countries worldwide. The Alumni Relations programme was established in 2006 to connect former students to one another and the school. Through these connections, the College has also been able to evaluate the impact of a UWCSEA education on students and how that continues in their life after graduation. In 2011/12, Alumni Relations increased its schedule of alumni events and enhanced services aimed at developing and maintaining strong relationships with our alumni community, including monthly electronic newsletters, biannual printed magazines, university mentor linkages between current students and alumni, intern and career services, regional networks and class activities centred around the annual reunions.

86

We have alumni in all walks of life and the alumni programme has helped to confirm that many, if not most UWCSEA students retain the UWC values throughout their lives. Some choose careers that fit very neatly with those values, while others live out the values in unexpected ways in their chosen career. UWCSEA alumni are happy to give back and stay involved. In 2011/2012, many alumni volunteered to be part of the Mentor programme, offering university advice and information to current students. Others came back to present to current students on their area of expertise. Some participated in panel discussions and the annual Careers Fair, and many of those located in Singapore attend events on campus like concerts, drama productions and UN Night. UWCSEA alumni are spread out around the world, in all walks of life, but what they have in common is the shared experience of a UWC education, the knowledge that they can make a difference and the desire to do so.

“Attending UWCSEA was a privileged time for me and it is only when you look back do you fully realise exactly what that means. It was not just about learning maths or physics or history from great teachers. Nor was it just about participating in the sports teams or the ECAs in world class facilities. It was more the fact that we were part of something larger than just being at school. Being part of the UWC movement is something that stays with you for life, no matter what path you chose. The experiences you share with your classmates make you more like family and like a family those relationships will endure. Here, in later life, when you meet anybody from any UWC around the world, you have that knowing look and common bond that you’ve been through something special that only a relatively small number of people can share. Now that is a privilege.” Kiron Chahel (UWCSEA Class of 1996) (December 2012)


87

Photo curtesy of NASA and JAXA


Alumni website statistics on a yearly basis since launch in 2007 Year ending July

Registered on Alumni website

Not registered but contactable

No contact details

2007

1,981

1,404

11,681

2008

3,940

1.939

9,635

2009

5,172

2,021

8,577

2010

5,968

2,790

8,132

2011

6,510

2,599

7,829

2012

6,907

2,439

7,649

Percent of the class year groups who are registered on the site Class year

Percentage

Class year

Percentage

Class year

Percentage

Class year

Percentage

1972

N/A

1982

34

1992

35

2002

37

1973

N/A

1983

34

1993

40

2003

43

1974

48

1984

32

1994

33

2004

43

1975

57

1985

38

1995

33

2005

43

1976

58

1986

35

1996

37

2006

50

1977

38

1987

37

1997

39

2007

51

1978

42

1988

37

1998

36

2008

71

1979

40

1989

37

1999

44

2009

70

1980

32

1990

40

2000

38

2010

60

1981

32

1991

37

2001

40

2011

54

2012

29

Mentor Programme

158 Universities represented

303

Alumni volunteer mentors 88

The mentor section of the alumni website contains lists of alumni who are willing to be contacted for advice and information about their universities, locations, gap years or careers.


Reunions Date

Location

Attendees

August 2011

Singapore

271

October 2011

Perth

29

October 2011

Melbourne

78

October 2011

Sydney

23

December 2011 Singapore

245

January 2012

270

London

January 2012

Amsterdam

18

March 2012

Hong Kong

14

April 2012

Los Angeles

34

May 2012

Kuala Lumpur 50

May 2012

Jakarta

37

June 2012

Bangkok

33

Social networking followers Facebook 2,718 Twitter 575 LinkedIn 995

Top 21 known alumni locations – 110 countries in all *Singapore may be overrepresented because some of the alumni from the past few graduating years have not updated their actual location.

89


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD July 31, 2012 2012

2011

$

$

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Other receivables Total current assets

3,068,447

3,437,515

22,088

1,479

3,090,535

3,438,994

Non-current assets Plant and equipment Held-to-maturity financial asset

—

34,646

250,000

250,000

Available-for-sale investments

1,875,705

358,030

Total non-current assets

2,125,705

642,676

Total assets

5,216,240

4,081,670

77,934

59,310

508,504

520,677 42,008

LIABILITY AND EQUITY Current liability Other payables Equity Restricted funds: Scholarship fund Capital fund

31,615

Outreach initiatives fund

13,390

5,860

Staff professional development fund

93,000

50,500

Annual general fund

200,160

121,521

846,669

740,566

(26,595)

2,626

820,074

743,192

Endowment fund

4,318,232

3,279,168

Total equity

5,138,306

4,022,360

Total liability and equity

5,216,240

4,081,670

Unrestricted funds: Accumulated (deficit) surplus

90


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME THE UWCSEA FOUNDATION LTD Year ended 31 July 2011 Restricted funds Unrestricted Endowment fund fund $

$

Scholarship fund

Capital fund

Outreach initiatives fund

Staff PD

Annual general fund

Total funds

$

$

$

$

$

$

31,615

16,500

45,000

16,500

45,000

2012 Income Donation income

961,789

Other income

336,991

59,600

Total incoming resources

336,991

1,021,389

985,864 — 985,864

— 31,615

200,160 — 200,160

2,240,928 396,591 2,637,519

Expenditure Staff cost

(296,847)

Audit fees

(12,030)

(12,030)

Other expenses

(152,563)

(152,563)

Depreciation

(34,646)

(34,646)

Utilisation of fund during the year

Total resources expended

(496,086)

(Deficit) Surplus for the year

(159,095)

(296,847)

(868,163)

(42,008)

(8,970)

(2,500)

(121,521) (1,043,162)

(868,163)

(42,008)

(8,970)

(2,500)

(121,521) (1,539,248)

117,701

(10,393)

7,530

42,500

78,639

42,500

78,639

1,021,389

1,098,271

Other comprehensive income Available-for-sale investments - fair value gain during the year, representing other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax Total comprehensive income for the year

— (159,095)

17,675 1,039,064

— 117,701

— (10,393)

— 7,530

17,675 1,115,946

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066COM-1213 MICA (P) 213/04/2012

UWCSEA Annual Report 2011/2012  
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