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Giving THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO SPRING 2014

THE POWER OF HISTORY

PHILANTHROPIST SHARES HIS LIFE’S PASSION

John and Bobbie Nau


John Nau, president and CEO of Silver Eagle Distributors, L.P., discovered his love of history while touring a Civil War battlefield as a child. That passion has led him to commit $1 million to UTSA for undergraduate scholarships, graduate teaching assistantships and fellowships in history.


UTSA Giving Spring 2014 Website: utsa.edu/giving

Giving

UTSA Giving is published

biannually by The University of Texas at San Antonio for donors and friends. The publication communicates the impact of philanthropy on the university.

PRESIDENT:

Ricardo Romo VICE PRESIDENT FOR EXTERNAL RELATIONS:

Marjie French ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING:

Joe Izbrand ASSOCIATE EDITOR:

Michelle Mondo DESIGNER:

Tom Palmer CONTRIBUTORS:

Lety Laurel Guillermo Garcia PHOTOGRAPHERS:

Patrick Ray Dunn Mark McClendon

If you prefer to receive UTSA Giving online only, please send a message to giving@utsa.edu.

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F E AT U R E D I N T H I S I S S U E :

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DEVOTED TO HISTORY Philanthropist John Nau shares his life’s love.

Renaissance Man, Ernest W. Bromley

The Ernest and Aimee Bromley Presidential Scholarships in the Liberal Arts, a $250,000 endowed Presidential Scholarship, are the first of their kind.

ART Passion The AT&T donation elevates UTSA's collection Recent Graduates Make an Impact Meet the Haug family

2 FROM THE PRESIDENT RICARDO ROMO TALKS ABOUT GIVING 3 NEWS BRIEFS UTSA IN THE NEWS 5 BY THE NUMBERS MEETING THE NEW GOAL OF $175M 18 GIVING SCENE SNAPSHOTS OF JUST SOME OF THOSE WHO ARE HELPING PROPEL UTSA TO TIER ONE 20 GIVING THOUGHT VICE PRESIDENT FOR EXTERNAL RELATIONS: GIFTS HELP UTSA STAND OUT CONTACT US: Office of the Vice President for External Relations One UTSA Circle • San Antonio, TX 78249 • (210) 458-4131 • giving@utsa.edu Antietam Battlefield at Sharpsburg, Maryland, USA

GIVING 2014

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DEVELOPMENT BOARD

DEAR FRIENDS, This edition of Giving highlights some very passionate donors. Have you ever wondered about what sparked someone’s interest in giving? Sometimes you need to look no further than their passions. My passion for collecting art started after I took an art history class in college. Being exposed to art through that one class gave me the insight to buy an unsigned painting on Paris’ left bank—because I was certain it was a piece by Mexican painter Rufino Tamayo. It turns out, I was correct, and my art collection was born. Similarly, it was a history class that first sparked John Nau’s passion at a young age for understanding the U.S. Civil War (see the story on page 12). Today, the leader of Silver Eagle Distributors has one of the most comprehensive collections of Civil War memorabilia in the world. And, as you’ll read, Mr. Nau has made a gift to UTSA to ensure his passion is passed on to a new generation. Ernest Bromley's study of liberal arts prepared him to be one of the country’s advertising industry leaders. He believes so strongly in the value of a liberal arts education that he decided to establish a first-of-its-kind scholarship for College of Liberal and Fine Arts majors at UTSA. You can read more about his commitment to the liberal arts in the story on page 6. We never know what is going to spark someone’s passion. We don’t know what will lead to the next great business idea or scientific discovery. But it is clear that education—higher education—can play a role. This is one reason why it is so important that UTSA attain Tier One status—so that we can continue to provide exceptional opportunities for students to learn and explore. Tier One universities foster the passions and ideas of tomorrow. Donor support is key to fulfilling our promise. You’ll note that in the examples of Mr. Nau and Mr. Bromley, both are putting their money behind their passions. Both men are giving to UTSA to ensure that our students have opportunities to learn from bright minds and the funding to attain higher education. When you give, your impact is similar. We all have a role to play in making our community stronger by taking UTSA to Tier One status. Because you give to UTSA, you’re an important part of students’ journeys to uncover new passions and knowledge.

MANY THANKS—MIL GRACIAS!

Ricardo Romo

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KATHLEEN K. ACOCK READE D. AHRENS JOHN D. ALEXANDER JR. STEPHEN W. ARNOLD J. DAN BATES KEVIN L. BELGRADE EDWARD GLENN BIGGS JAMES H. BODENSTEDT ’96 J. DARRYL BYRD SCOTT CARPENTER ROBERT M. CAVENDER HENRY G. CISNEROS LORETTA J. CLARKE ’87, ’90 PATRICK J. CLYNES ’89 SAMUEL G. DAWSON TRISH DEBERRY WALTER D. DOWNING JR. ’86 JOHN W. FEIK ALFREDO L. FLORES JR. DON FROST TOM C. FROST JR. GLORIA GALT HERIBERTO GUERRA JR. BETTY MURRAY HALFF ’76 ROGER R. HEMMINGHAUS SUSAN P. HOUGH ’91 BRENDA VICKREY JOHNSON CINDY L. JORGENSEN ’00 CLAYTON E. KILLINGER ’83 MILTON B. LEE STEVEN Q. LEE EDITH S. MCALLISTER JOHN F. MCFALL ’92 JANICE L. MEYR ’79 BALOUS T. MILLER WILLIAM E. MORROW ’86 HENRY R. MUÑOZ III CATHY OBRIOTTI GREEN GREG PAPAY HOWARD W. PEAK IV ’75 BOONE POWELL JAMES R. REED HARRIETT ROMO GARY K. SIMMONS ’00 GURVINDER P. SINGH DAVID A. SPENCER JOHN T. STEEN JR. (VICE CHAIR) SAM BELL STEVES II JULIAN H. TREVINO ED L. WHITE JR. KENNETH L. WILSON (CHAIR) NELSON W. WOLFF JEANIE RABKE WYATT ’86

CAMPAIGN LEADERSHIP COMMITTEE JAMES H. BODENSTEDT ’96 (CAMPAIGN CHAIR) JOHN D. ALEXANDER JR. EDWARD GLENN BIGGS ERNEST W. BROMLEY ’78, ’80 HENRY G. CISNEROS MARJIE FRENCH TOM C. FROST JR. CATHY OBRIOTTI GREEN CLAYTON E. KILLINGER ’83 STEVEN Q. LEE JOHN T. STEEN JR. KENNETH L. WILSON JEANIE RABKE WYATT ’86


NEWS BRIEFS early in their college careers,” said Romo. “This collaboration is leading to the discovery of new knowledge and elevating UTSA to top-tier status. At the same time, it is advancing San Antonio’s economic, business and scientific standing in the world.” The most recent commitments include a $1 million challenge gift from business leader Carlos Alvarez, which supports postA UTSA student makes a presentation to Carlos Alvarez at the Alvarez Scholarship Luncheon and Exposition. graduate studies and research through new endowed fellowship opportunities, primarily for Ph.D. candidates. Meeting the challenge are Dr. Lisa G. NunTSA received nearly $5.1 million in gift commitgesser, who committed $100,000 to support a graduate ments in fall 2013 to support priority programs in student fellowship in urban and regional planning, the next phase of its capital campaign. The funds and and the 80/20 Foundation, which has committed commitments, which now total more than $138 million, $900,000 to support nine post-graduate fellowships will support the university’s advancement to Tier One and research assistantships in open-cloud computing status. in the business, computer science and engineering We Are UTSA—A Top-Tier Campaign publically disciplines. The foundation has pledged an additional launched in 2012, and within a year met its initial finan$100,000 to create another graduate fellowship sepacial objective of $120 million—more than two years rate from the Alvarez match. early. Soon after, President Ricardo Romo announced a Other gifts include a $1 million pledge from San Annew phase of the campaign with a goal of $175 million tonio real estate developer Dan Parman to create the by end of August 2015. Gifts received during this phase Dan Parman Endowed Chair in Applied Mathematics, focus on four key areas: recruitment of top undergradua $996,000 commitment from the Robert J. Kleberg Jr. ate students, support for graduate students, faculty and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation to support stem cell research support and the construction of athletics research, and $1 million from the Valero Foundation facilities. for the new athletics facilities at Park West, “The support we receive from the community creates UTSA’s sports complex. opportunities for UTSA students to work side-by-side

$5 MILLION STRONGER

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with world-class faculty and researchers starting

A ROYAL UTSA HAND

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his year’s homecoming court raised a record-breaking $12,900 that will go toward UTSA scholarships. Students Zack Dunn, a finance major, and Rebecca Smith, a

A ROWDY ADDITION

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TSA students, parents, alumni and friends of the university helped raise $25,000 to bring a 1,000-pound iron roadrunner statue to campus. The statue, dubbed Iron Rowdy, was created by R.G. Box, a blacksmith artist from Lubbock. At 6 feet tall and stretching 11 feet from beak to tail feather, it took about 1,000 hours to create, feather by feather. The idea to have a Rowdy statue on campus began with UTSA students in 2010. “We had this idea a few years ago,” said Zack Dunn, president of the UTSA Student Government Association. “When you look at the Main Campus right now, there’s very little representation of our mascot on campus. To students, having Rowdy as a part of our campus is a way to distinguish ourselves from other institutions, show our school spirit and build tradition.”

kinesiology major, were named Mr. and Ms. UTSA. They were recognized for academic achievement, campus involvement and community service. Candidates competed in several categories including an application process, written essay, formal interview, fundraising and a student vote.

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NEWS BRIEFS RAISING VOICES

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anny Longoria ’97, a founding member of the Volunteer Organization Involving Community Education and Service (VOICES), has established the Longoria Endowment for Service Learning and Leadership Initiatives. The $55,000 endowment will be funded through a combination of personal and corporate matching gifts. The endowment will support volunteer, service-learning and leadership initiatives at UTSA. “I have seen the lifelong impact that servicelearning, volunteerism and leadership training have had on countless students at UTSA, including myself,” said Longoria, who is a life member of the UTSA Alumni Association. “I am proud to be able to help UTSA continue to foster these traits in its students, and I hope that I inspire more alumni to give back to the university.”

Longoria, who currently owns a Nationwide Insurance Agency, and his wife, April, formally presented their gift to Nico Cousby, UTSA VOICES president, at the organization’s 20th anniversary banquet. “We at VOICES thank Mr. Longoria for his contributions to the efforts of student-led service to our community,” said Cousby. “My fellow students and I will be able to participate in a variety of service opportunities, while keeping our experiential opportunity trips at a low cost.” To honor Longoria, VOICES has renamed its annual Volunteer of the Year Award to the Manny Longoria Volunteer Award. The award is presented each spring to the VOICES member with the most volunteer hours in the previous year.

ENGINEERED TO SUPPORT

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$250,000 gift from the Catherine and Francis Burzik Foundation will establish the Burzik Professorship in Engineering Design. The position will support the research and teaching of engineering design to nurture student-developed technology ventures and train the next generation of engineering business leaders. “Finding innovative solutions to life’s opportunities and challenges is at the heart of engineering and business,” Burzik said. “UTSA is a hotbed for innovation and we want to help create the environment in which young talent can explore and test their ideas.” Burzik, an industry-recognized senior executive in the health care field, recently served as president and CEO of Kinetic Concepts Inc. She now advises several venture capital-backed biotech companies in San Antonio and San Francisco and has joined forces with a local venture capital group to form Targeted Technology Fund II, which plans to raise $50 million for biomedical and biotechnology start-ups, mostly in the San Antonio area. Catherine and Francis Burzik

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GO WITH THE FLOW ICONIC SOMBRILLA FOUNTAIN GETS A GREEN FACELIFT

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he Sombrilla Plaza fountain at the UTSA Main Campus was turned on Friday, Jan. 10 after extensive renovations. The 35-year-old fountain is now fully sustainable and uses only reclaimed water from the air conditioning systems in neighboring buildings. An idea proposed by students, the revitalized fountain now uses “gray” water, which ensures it can remain operational year round with no strain on the water supply. In November, the UTSA Development Office conducted the “Fill the Fountain” campaign to support the fountain renovations. The UTSA Alumni Association and UTSA Green Fund contributed $150,000 to the project. Alumni Nancy Ozuna ’93 and Andrew Ozuna ’91 pledged a $10,000 matching gift to spur donations. Students, faculty, staff, alumni and other university supporters then raised matching donations of $10,000 to complete the fundraising. The Sombrilla fountain is a campus tradition and signature venue, where many photos are taken. According to legend, students who put thier hands on the fountain will pass their final exams with flying colors. A formal dedication of the refurbished fountain was held on March 4.


BY THE NUMBERS

Donors are advancing UTSA toward its capital campaign goal of $175M

FISCAL YEAR 2013 BY THE NUMBERS

number of DONORS

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OV G IF ER T $

50 0

DE G I F TS U N

THANK YOU! EVERY GIFT MATTERS

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86% of gifts were $500 or less

$5

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of the 8,153 donors, 3,239 are alumni

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CAPITAL CAMPAIGN BY THE NUMBERS

98 28 12 135+

New Endowments Committed Endowed Faculty Positions New Endowed Graduate Fellowships in 2013 New Scholarship Funds

$

$175 MILLION Goal

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79.1% RAISED as of 2/3/14

CAMPAIGN PRIORITIES Undergraduate Scholarships Graduate Fellowships Athletic Facilities Faculty Support

GIVING 2014


21ST CENTURY

RENAISSANCE As a youngster, Ernest W. Bromley’s first exposure to San Antonio came while passing through the city on a move from Pensacola, Fla., to Mexico City, where his mother would pursue a writing career. Six years later, because his mom was so impressed with the city’s strong bicultural heritage, the family moved to the Alamo City. Bromley eventually enrolled at UTSA, earning two degrees, a B.A. in political science in 1978 and an M.B.A. in business administration with a focus on Hispanic consumer research in 1980. “It was a very bilingual, bicultural town, and I was very comfortable with that,” said Bromley, whose mother was from Puerto Rico and whose father was an engineer from Alberta, Canada. Starting in high school and throughout college, Bromley held a full-time job at a local bank to help support the family. The years of dedication and hard work paid off. Bromley is a founder, the majority owner and CEO of San Antoniobased Bromley Communications, one of the leading Hispanic ad agencies in the country. For Bromley, getting a bachelor’s degree was the opportunity to explore a variety of disci-

plines to see what interested him most. It was his master’s degree that allowed him to hone in on his future career. “I believe a bachelor’s degree is to widen your aperture, your mind, as wide as it can. That’s what it did for me,” he said. “By the time you are finishing your bachelor’s degree, you need to start thinking about your master’s. That’s when you’re narrowing down your aperture.” Bromley shared this belief in the importance of extended education during a speech at UTSA several years ago. Recently, he decided “to put my money where my mouth is,” he said. Bromley and his wife have given a $250,000 endowed Presidential Scholarship, the first of its kind, to create the Ernest and Aimee Bromley Presidential Scholarships in the Liberal Arts. A Presidential Scholarship is one of the most prestigious academic awards available to UTSA students. The scholarships are used to recruit students who have achieved academic distinction but face economic difficulties in achieving their higher education goals. The gift is especially timely because cuts to state and federally funded programs have made the need for scholarships greater than ever. In 2012 UTSA had a $6 million decrease in state grants. University officials say that translates into as many as 1,000 students having to choose between working full-time through college, increasing their debt load, or putting their college dreams on hold. For many, it also limits the time they may commit to their academic pursuits. “The grants could make a critical difference for individuals in terms of how they’d be able to pay to get through the semester, to pay for their classes as they make steady progress toward their


MAN BY GUILLERMO GARCIA

degree,” said Daniel Gelo, dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. “Our appreciation for the gift is great. Ernest has always appreciated the fundamental importance of a broad liberal arts training for any role in life.” Indeed, in the 30 years he has been an employer, Bromley said he has often hired people with liberal arts degrees. “People we hire who have bachelor’s degrees in liberal arts and master’s degrees in communications or business turn out to be great thinkers, good communicators and strategic in their thinking,” he said. “That’s valuable in any career.” Thanks in part to his own liberal arts background, Bromley has been instrumental in developing marketing strategies and effective market segmentation approaches tailored to Hispanic consumers. Bromley’s unique marketing approach, born out of a thesis he wrote in college, segments the consumer market into levels of language and cultural comfort zones. It has attracted such heavyweights as Coors Brewing Co., General Mills, Proctor & Gamble and Burger King, as well as AstraZeneca, Nestlé and the National Basketball Association, all of whom have used Bromley Communications to develop their Hispanic marketing communications programs. Bromley's efforts to attract more Hispanics to various markets led the American Marketing Association to name him one of the Godfathers of Hispanic Advertising in 2008. His firm, originally known as Sosa & Associates, began in 1981, and was later renamed Sosa, Bromley, Aguilar & Associates. The company is now known as Bromley Communications LLC, and is affiliated with Publicis Groupe S.A., the fourthlargest marketing communications holding firm in the world, based in Paris, France. Bromley has always seen the potential for UTSA to become a top-tier university, or “the Harvard of the southwest,” he said. As an alum, he’s happy to help it get there. He hopes his gift will inspire other alumni to make significant gifts to the university. “I’m not the only alumnus who has done well

and has the capacity to give like this,” he said. “I did this in support of Ricardo Romo’s Tier One vision. UTSA is Tier One. It must be Tier One.” Bromley, who had a brief stint teaching economics at UTSA in 1981, said his roots with the university run deep. He was in UTSA’s first undergraduate class in 1975 and was among the first undergrads to graduate from the young university. "Mr. and Mrs. Bromley’s gift will go to selected talented [College of Liberal and Fine Arts] students, some of whom will be struggling to afford their education after working long hours off campus,” said Gelo. The college will be able to make between two and six generous awards each year, said Gelo. The grants will continue in perpetuity, as they will be funded from the interest that accrues from the endowment, Gelo noted. He says, the gift is a good example of someone who has succeeded in the business sector while drawing upon a broad liberal arts base. “This gift will be used to help one student at a time,” he said. “It will make a difference in students’ lives.”

A CREATIVE'S GALLERY (TOP) A local Spurs promotion and slogan developed by the Bromley team. (MIDDLE) A cross-cultural ad for Old El Paso. (BOTTOM) A Spanish-language advertisement for Western Union.

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Bicentennial Hats, 1975, by Lowell Nesbitt, medium used: silkscreen, 34 ½ x 34 ½ in


ART PASSION AT&T donation elevates UTSA collection BY LETY LAUREL

If Yazmin Anzaldua were to stretch her arms just a bit in front of her, she could almost touch the Judith Nulty painting that hangs on the wall of the John Peace Library. Instead, the junior business management major works diligently on her iPad.

But the soothing blues, greens and browns of the valuable oil painting, called “Garden at Thorrent,” don’t go unnoticed. Nor does the rest of the art that surrounds her in the library. “You know in museums, artwork is so far away and you aren’t allowed to get too close to them,” she said. “But here, they’re so close we can really enjoy them. You get bored looking at your books, and you look up and see a little bit of color.” Indeed, the white walls of the second floor of the JPL form an ideal gallery for the paintings, most of them from two donations from AT&T’s art collection. On one wall hangs “Garden of Thorrent.” On another, pop art by Nick Krushenick, considered a pioneer of the style, hovers over an intimate study area, the painting’s loud red, yellow, orange and blue color scheme demanding attention. Along a back wall looms artist Carmen Cicero’s “Fin de Siecle,” an acrylic on canvas that measures more than 96 inches across. It is the most expensive of the donated paintings, valued at $65,000.

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TOP:

Untitled, unknown artist, medium used: stained glass, 66 ¼ x 37 ½ in

ABOVE RIGHT:

Birch, unknown artist, medium used: acrylic on canvas, 60 x 39 7/8 in

LOWER RIGHT: Buick, Union Street, SF, 1974, by Kent Roberts, medium used: acrylic on canvas, 59 ¼ x 88 ½ in

WEB EXTRA:

To learn more and view the collection, visit

utsa.edu/attart

“It is like you’re coming into a museum,” said Arturo Infante Almeida, art specialist and curator for UTSA. “These are museum pieces.” Since 2008, AT&T has donated nearly five dozen works of art to the university, with a total donation value of more than $647,000. The first gift came on the heels of the communications giant’s announcement of the relocation of its headquarters from San Antonio to Dallas. AT&T is known throughout art communities for its robust art collection, which is used to provide a stimulating setting for the company’s employees, but also to reflect the diversity of employees and customers alike, said Renee Flores, AT&T regional vice president for external and legislative affairs. “AT&T is in the business of connecting people, and the arts represent the ultimate communicator. It has no boundaries and stretches across cultures, communities and continents,” Flores said. “AT&T believes education is at the forefront of San Antonio’s success, and UTSA plays a pivotal role to help achieve those results.” The artwork is stylistically diverse, from bold and bright photorealistic scenes and landscapes to pastel

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abstracts. Although the provenance of some paintings is unknown, most of the large-scale works are from the 1970s to the turn of the century. Among the most notable is Krushenick’s “Big Juice,” created in 1969 and valued at $18,000. “Even though most people think of Andy Warhol when they think about pop art, Nick Krushenick is a really important part of the pop art movement,” Almeida said. “It’s huge to get something like this.” Almeida’s favorite piece, an untitled street scene by Larry Chappelear valued at $6,000, hangs prominently on the first floor of the library. “What I hope we have accomplished with the art in this building is that people will take note of what is before them,” he said. “I want the art to be the first impression you get when you walk into any campus building. I want you to see what we have here at the university and I want it to be an enriching experience.” The artwork also has educational value, he said. Students who study an artist in class can walk into a building somewhere on campus and see that artist’s original work close enough to study each careful brushstroke. That was the goal of the donation, Flores added.


For years, AT&T and the AT&T Foundation have supported the arts and other philanthropic programs. As its art collection grew, the company saw an opportunity to share its pieces with educational institutions such as UTSA, she said. “UTSA’s partnerships have long resulted in excellent new learning opportunities for students,” Flores said. “For us to contribute art to the campus in a way that’s meaningful to students and faculty and helps propel UTSA toward meeting and exceeding its goals was a terrific opportunity for us.” The donation by AT&T elevates the entire art collection at the university, Almeida said. “AT&T’s gift to the university is testament to its continued support of art and education in our community,” he said. “This is an important collection of work that not only enriches the campus but is also an invaluable resource for education and research for students of art and art history.”

TOP:

Lady on Rocks, 1990, by Okser-Claire Klarewics, medium used: oil on linen, 66 x 84 in

ABOVE: Santarossa by artist Afro, medium used: aquatint, 26 x 32 in ABOVE LEFT: Arras, 1978, by John Hoyland, medium used: acrylic on canvas, 96 x 96 in

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JOHN NAU STANDS AMONG HIS CIVIL WAR ARTIFACTS. HIS LOVE OF HISTORY LED HIM TO COMMIT $1 MILLION TO SUPPORT UTSA STUDENTS.

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Donation Makes History J

A PHILANTHROPIST SHARES HIS LIFE’S LOVE BY LETY LAUREL

ohn Lambert fell in love with history while working as a missionary in Los Angeles. He quickly discovered he was more interested in hearing where people came from and why they were there, than in talking about his own background and religious beliefs. Erica Valle’s passion for history stemmed from a desperate attempt to know and understand her father, a Vietnam War veteran who died too soon to answer her questions. Students like Lambert and Valle have captured the attention of the Nau Scholars program at UTSA. A program funded by Bobbie and John Nau. John Nau, president and CEO of Silver Eagle Distributors, L.P., is a history enthusiast who discovered his love of history when he was just 10 years old and taking his first trips to Springfield, Ill., to visit Abraham Lincoln’s home and tomb, and Fort Donelson National Battlefield, formerly Fort Donelson National Military Park, outside Nashville, Tenn. “It was a combination of being fascinated with everything [related to] Lincoln and putting my feet on the battlefield,” he said. “That was where it all began for me.” It was a pivotal moment, and it continues to influence Nau today. His interest in Civil War history and belief in the importance of learning from the past have led him and his wife, Bobbie, to commit $1 million to UTSA for undergraduate scholarships, graduate teaching assistantships and fellowships. The Nau Scholars Program Fund is making it possible for 14 students, including Lambert and Valle, to pursue their educational quests to understand the past. “This is a game changer,” said history department chair Gregg Michel. “The amount of support is incredibly generous, but also it reaches across different constituencies. It affects and supports both graduates and undergraduate students, which from the same gift is unusual.” Undergraduates like Lambert receive up to $10,000 each, while Valle and other graduate students receive up to $12,000. Teaching assistants are awarded a maximum of $16,000. The one-year awards are designed to help

students complete their undergraduate degrees, then transition to and complete graduate study. “Simply put, the Nau Scholars Program Fund is transformative,” said Daniel Gelo, dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. “As a matter of student support, it brings the UTSA history department in line with other serious programs and lays a new groundwork for how we prepare our students to enter the nation’s top history doctoral programs. More basically, it is causing us to rethink how we teach history.” QUEST FOR KNOWLEDGE If you want to know how the United States became the superpower it is today, the key is to look to history. “We can learn about America’s values by understanding how those values were formed into who we are as a nation today,” Nau said. Everything has a backstory and a reason, Lambert agrees. There are numerous invisible boundaries that make up the structure of the country today, and an understanding of where those boundaries came from and why they’re there can only be learned through history, he said. “History explains or attempts to explain all the power structures that are in place,” he said. “That invisible ceiling, those invisible walls, those invisible bars; there’s a long process that has put all those boundaries in effect. “History teaches us two things: one, that there is a cause, and two, that nothing is permanent.” Lambert, a recent widower and father to twin boys, has wanted to teach history since his missionary days in the early ’90s. He began pursuing a bachelor’s degree in history, as well as a teacher’s certification, while working as a part-time actor in short films. After his wife, Ivania, died of breast cancer in 2012, his life went haywire. Money was tight. Really tight. “I was barely staying afloat,” he said. He participated in clinical trials for quick cash for himself and his children. He struggled to pay bills. Still, he continued on his educational journey. Just before the end of the spring 2013 semester, he heard about the Nau fund. It was a long shot, he said, but he had to try. When he was selected for the scholarship, it was life changing.

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FACES OF THE NAU SCHOLARSHIPS LEFT John Lambert, recently widowed, sits with his twin boys, Ivan, (left) and Johnny (right).

OPPOSITE PAGE Erica Valle holds a photo of her father who was her inspiration to study history.

“It was such a relief; you have no idea,” he said. Studying history has changed his life as well. It has given him the gift of perspective that he works to share with his sons, Johnny and Ivan. Someday, he’ll share it with his future students. “The biggest thing I’m taking away is being suspicious of simple answers,” he said. “I think that premise to dig deeper works for better relationships between countries and better relationships between individuals.” It was a yearning to seek a stronger relationship with her father that sparked Valle’s love of history. Her father died when she was just eight years old—too young to ask him the questions that burn in her brain today. How did fighting in the war affect him as a person? What did he experience? “My early interest in the Vietnam War and the 1960s began out of a desire to understand him and his world in ways I could not as a child,” she said. Then she started wondering about her extended family, especially her maternal great-grandparents who moved to Texas from Mexico in the 1920s and worked as migrant workers. Because of the Nau fund, she’ll work as a teaching assistant in the fall, where she can share her knowledge with other students and delve deeper into her own research. “I’m excited to give back by helping undergraduate students in their history work,” Valle said. “This gift has driven me to work as hard as possible in my classes and has given me the freedom to pursue internships and other opportunities to develop my skills as a historian.”

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HISTORY IN THE MAKING The Nau Scholars Program Fund is historic as well. It is the first of its kind given to the history department to fund teaching assistants. “It’s a huge development for us,” Michel said. “It helps the graduate students serve as teaching assistants, which helps the faculty they assist, which also helps the undergraduates that are being assisted by the TAs. It’s a phenomenal thing for us.” The fund will also raise the university’s visibility in the eyes of top-level history students from around the country, said Gelo. It also adds fuel to the college’s drive to add a history doctoral program. “I believe that years from now, we will look back on Mr. and Mrs. Nau’s gift as a turning point in UTSA History’s evolution toward a top-tier department,” he said. “No less important is the gift’s legacy through each of those worthy students who earn a Nau fellowship and, because of it, will go on to make important contributions in Texas and U.S. history, whether in scholarly or community settings.” While the majority of the fund is for students who specialize in various areas of history, each year one teaching assistantship is given to a student with a research focus on Texas history and another teaching assistantship is reserved for a student focusing on 19th century American history and the Civil War—a testament to Nau’s passion and interest in Civil War history. The lessons learned and the profound changes in America as a result of the Civil War are too important


to be lost, said Nau. His goal is to have people of all ages grasp how the nation’s historical landscape was altered by the war. To that end, dozens of artifacts are housed in a wing of his Houston office building where he hosts elementary school children on class field trips. He has amassed one of the largest private collections of historic artifacts, numbering some 20,000 documents and letters, 3,000 photographic images, uniforms, and about 300 weapons. As chairman emeritus of the Civil War Trust, Nau has purchased and donated land where major battles were fought. His goal to ensure that historical sites would not be lost. He also serves as vice chairman of the National Park Foundation and has served on the boards of the Texas Historical Commission, Texas State Historical Association and the San Antonio Parks Foundation. “Our students need to have the opportunity to learn about critical events in our country’s history, not just as dates and places on a map, but of the people involved in those momentous battles,” Nau said. Because history defines us as a country and as a people, Valle added. “History is a vital part of our lives, which I think has been demonstrated through the creation of the Nau fellowship,” Valle said. “One of the things I like best about history is that we’re making it and living it right now. As they say, we’ll someday belong to the ages.”

ITEMS FROM THE NAU CIVIL WAR COLLECTION TOP Letter from Abraham Lincoln, Jan. 16, 1864, pardoning a deserter.

MIDDLE Rope Tension Side Drum with infantry eagle used by Private Aplheus Holbrook, 19th Maine Infantry, circa 1862.

BOTTOM Virginia Cavalry Officer's Hat with original insignia and black ostrich feather plume.

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UTSA alumna Tanya Haug tailgates with her husband, Ryan, and their sons, Vincent (top) and Charlie.

Giving Back to Make a Difference Meet the Haug family BY GUILLERMO GARCIA

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I really, really

believe that the more I am able to ‘put back’ into the institution where I got my degree, it can only serve to increase the university’s

standing.

T

anya Haug ’97 is a firm believer in giving back. “I really, really believe that the more I am able to ‘put back’ into the institution where I got my degree, it can only serve to increase the university’s standing,” she said. “But for me personally, it will also increase the value of my diploma and my undergrad experience at UTSA.” The life-long San Antonio resident notes that by donating to the university—whether by six and seven figure amounts or in relatively smaller amounts like she has done—current and potential future students will also draw benefits. Tuition, fees and state support cover about 80 percent of UTSA’s operating expenses. Private gifts make up the difference, said Marjie French, vice president for external relations. “Private gifts from donors are the vessel for offering students scholarships and allow the university to hire faculty who are leaders in their fields,” she said. And that translates into a quality education that is available to even more students, Haug said. “Education is an opportunity that not all people have, so if I can help, even in my own small way, I am happy to do so.” The football-loving graduate of the College of Education and Human Development, where she earned her B.A. in interdisciplinary studies, began making donations to alumni programs, the Annual Fund and others beginning the year that she graduated. Small, regular donations are what gave a boost to UTSA’s capital campaign last year. Of the $21 million the university raised in 2013, 86 percent were gifts of $500 or less. “When you take all the $25, $100, and $1,000 gifts and add them together, the impact is amazing. Every gift to UTSA really does make a difference for our students and faculty,” French said. Many of those gifts, almost half, were from alumni. “Alumni giving is essential to UTSA,” said Anne Englert, director of alumni programs. “We as a university take seri-

­­—Tanya Haug ’97

ously the number of alumni who do give back because, every dollar helps. Every alum who gives is investing in our current and future students, faculty and the university as a whole, just as someone invested in them when they were students. And alumni giving to the university is used as a factor in national rankings, so when alumni give, they help enhance the reputation of UTSA.” Now Haug has donated an additional $1,000 and has been included in the university’s premiere giving group, President’s Associates. There are about 950 members who support programs across the university, from department and college funds to athletics. A smaller number, including Haug, give specifically to programs designated by President Ricardo Romo as high priority areas. These funds have helped band students purchase their uniforms and instruments, have brought Iron Rowdy to campus, and have supported scholarship programs. Haug said she is thrilled to donate and to join a group “that will give me the opportunity to meet [fellow President’s Associates] and get to learn about other people’s passions that I would not have been able to otherwise.” Although her husband, Ryan, graduated from Trinity University, UTSA activities—particularly football and the ritual pre-game tailgate party—have become a Haug family affair. “We purchased eight season tickets to the inaugural season and we renew every year,” she noted, adding that the couple were college sports fans long before sons Vincent and Charlie were born. Now the youngsters flash the Roadrunner hand sign like pros “and they absolutely love and look forward to all the tailgating and socializing,” Haug said. “Alumni like Tanya who stay connected, join the Alumni Association and make a gift each year are really special. Our students are so fortunate to have her and Ryan’s support. We certainly hope that even more alumni will follow her example, because it will make a huge difference for UTSA,” said French.

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Giving Scene The UTSA

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE COUNCIL DINNER (TOP) Gerry Sanders (Dean and Bodenstedt Chair, College of Business), and his wife Elena Sanders stand with David Spencer and spouse Jennifer Spencer B.S. ’93. (RIGHT) Laura and Jack Richmond visit with Dr. Jeanne Reesman. (BELOW) Dr. John Murphy poses with Shelly Horn B.A. ’08, (left) and Bruce and Jill MacDougal (right).

FROST LECTURE SERIES—25TH ANNIVERSARY (RIGHT) Audience members enjoy a lecture from Frost Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Dick Evans. (BELOW) UTSA Provost John Frederick, UTSA finance professor Palani-Rajan Kadapakkam and UTSA College of Business Dean Gerry Sanders join Tom C. Frost in the presentation of the Frost Finance Endowed Chair.

(INSET) UTSA Student Government Association President Zack Dunn presents a commemorative roadrunner statuette to Dick Evans from the College of Business.

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CELEBRATION OF SCIENCE (ABOVE) President Ricardo Romo and Dr. Harriett Romo stand with hosts Dr. Fernando Guerra and his wife, Beverly Purcell-Guerra, at the Guerra's home. (INSET LEFT) Dr. Michael Karcher attended the Celebration of Science event with wife Dr. Sara Karcher. (FAR LEFT) Dan Parman poses with sons Brad and Bryan Parman. FOOTBALL 2013 (ABOVE) H-E-B Vice President Winell Herron, M.B.A. ’00, flips the coin for the University of Alabama at Birmingham game Oct. 26. (INSET) John D. Alexander Jr. watches a game with his son, Robert.

FOOTBALL 2013 AND ROWDY RALLY (RIGHT) City Councilman Ron Nirenberg takes in a game with his dad, Ken Nirenberg and son Jonah. (FAR RIGHT) UTSA Quarterback Eric Soza B.S. ’13, and Center Nate Leonard touch Rowdy for good luck at the "Bring Rowdy Home" festivities on the University Center Paseo. (BOTTOM RIGHT) Ernesto Ancira Jr. and wife, Robin, enjoy Roadrunner football. (BELOW) Cathy and Clay Killinger B.B.A. ’83, stand on the sidelines.

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Giving Thought: GIFTS HELP UTSA STAND OUT

T

he world we live in today is much different than when I went to college. Information travels quickly and students certainly have more choices. In this

type of competitive environment, it is more important than ever that we understand what makes UTSA unique and that we offer the best experiences. As a young university with nearly 29,000 students and a community committed to both access and excellence, UTSA is certainly in a class of its own. Donor support is key in helping UTSA stand out. Gifts from donors attract top talent, reward hard work,

support bright students, who otherwise could not go to school and provide exceptional opportunities right here in San Antonio. There are so many examples of excellence at UTSA. Amanda Griffee, a freshman biology major with the goal of becoming a pediatrician, is just one of them. Amanda is looking forward to spending the next few years at UTSA and excelling in the new Top Scholars program. Top Scholars provides support and special opportunities for students who graduated in the top of their class with at least a 1400 SAT score. Your gifts are taking us to Tier One and beyond by funding a top-quality educational experience for Amanda and other students like her. Many people wonder whether their gift really makes a difference. Every week, I hear stories of students who were encouraged because there was a scholarship or other funding available to help them succeed. I can tell you, too, that it is not just large gifts that make a difference. Of the $21 million the university raised last year, 86 percent were gifts of $500 or less. That means that gifts of all amounts led to $18 million in funding for our students and faculty, and that is an impact that is undeniable. Every gift matters. Your support is helping us stand out from the rest and provide more opportunities for students. Thank you for everything you have done and will continue to do to make UTSA a top-tier university.

Until next time,

Vice President for External Relations

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MAKING A GIFT

IS EASIER THAN YOU THINK

Manyfriends ALUMNI of AND OF creMany alumni and allFRIENDS ages are ERINALEXANDER ALEXANDER‘is9a8 licensed family counselor from ERIN are having a powerful impact on San having a great family impact on the university by making UTSAplansALL ating gift thatAGES secure the university’s &Antonio. ‘01,Sheaislicensed the university. They are creating gift plans that

the beneficiary of two life insurance policies. future while protecting their own interests as counselor from San Antonio, secure the university’s future while protecting part of a comprehensive financial plan. UTSA is having a great impact on their own interests as part of a comprehensive can help you manage your assets and the university by making financial plan. UTSA can help yousecure manage yourfutures—all assets and secure your benefiting loved ones’ your loved ones’ while UTSA the beneficiary of two futures—all while benefiting exceptional top-tier opportunities for students. life insurance policies. opportunities for students.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT GIFT PLANNING TO UTSA, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT

utsa.edu/giftplan


UTSA

 ®

The University of Texas at San Antonio One UTSA Circle San Antonio, Texas 78249

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

PA ID

San Antonio, Texas PERMIT NO. 2474

WE ARE EDUCATING STUDENTS WHO TRANSFORM TEXAS AND THE WORLD. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT GIVING TO UTSA, GO TO UTSA.EDU/GIVE.

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UTSA Giving Magazine—2014