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Issue 7 April—June

This issue Sleeping Better P.1 Child Health Checks P.2

Visiting Specialists Dates:

A shot of Men’s group P.4 What Will My Baby Learn? P.5 IGA T10 Big Bash Cricket P.6 Anniversary of National Apology Day P.8 Pit stop Men’s Health Program P.10 Baby Corner P.11

DOCTORS: 

Dr. Judy McDonald

Dr.Jodie Whillas

Dr.Helen Sage

Dr. Neville Carlier

SPECIALISTS: 

Dentist

Psychiatrist

Physician

Podiatrist

Deitician

Physiotherapist

U mo o n a T j u t a g ku H e a l t h S e r vi ce A b o ri g i n a l C o rp o ra t i o n ICN 7460 Lot 8 Umoona Road Po Box 166 Coober Pedy SA 5723 Ph.: 08 8672 5255 Fax:08 8672 3349

www.uths.com.au

Doctors & Specialists visits P.12


Sleeping Better

One of the down sides of getting stressed, anxious and worried is sometimes it’s hard to get to sleep. So often people take alcohol, drugs or prescribed medication to get over this. This works for a while but then the body develops a tolerance and it takes more of that substance to get the same effect and before long people become dependent on the alcohol, drugs or prescribed medication. So what is the solution

?

What helps you get to sleep and stay asleep

?

There seems to be nothing worse than going to bed and just lying there. About 3 out of 10 people have problems with sleeping and 3 out of 20 have long lasting problems. Some of the common complaints of people with insomnia ( not being able to sleep) are: Difficulty falling asleep; difficulty staying asleep; waking up early at the end of a sleep period; feeling anxious and irritable; racing thoughts when wanting to go to sleep; feeling physically or mentally tired during the day. Some of the effects of insomnia are: Fatigue is a major cause of death in road accidents (1 in 6). Older people have 4 times more falls due to insomnia; and staying awake greater than 17hours has the same effect as being .05 % in Blood alcohol. Insomnia is often caused by sleep interruption due to stress which usually is temporary but then people become preoccupied about the lack of sleep and worry about not getting to sleep becomes a vicious cycle stopping people sleeping. Not all people need the same amount of sleep; people in their 60’s may function ok on 5-6hours sleep where as teenagers need at least 10 hours sleep per night or the brain does not concentrate or develop in some areas. Strategies to help you sleep include: During the Day 

Organise your day with set times for meals- get your inner clock going;

Regular exercise during the day;

Set aside time to problem solve and avoid napping during the day.

Reduce coffee, tea and Cola Drinks as well as quit smoking.

Make sure bed and bedroom is comfortable and dark

Avoid heavy meal or don’t use alcohol to make you sleep


During the evening: 

Put the day to rest

Light exercise in early evening

Develop a routine of winding down; avoid caffeinated drinks after 4.00 pm

Avoid smoking 1 hour before bed

At Bedtime Try to do the same thing before you go to bed each night Develop a calming routine: warm bath, relaxation music or Progressive Muscle Relaxation technique Go to bed when you feel ‘tired’ Don’t read, or discuss plans, don’t watch TV in bed or argue. Keep the bed room for sleep and sex. Relax and tell your mind that sleep will come soon. Avoid sleeping pills –they don’t produce a long term solutions but some herbal potions can help including camomile tea. If you don’t sleep within 30minutes get up, have a drink of milk or camomile tea and try again.

Date

Program

15th of April

Women’s Health Program

15th of April

Fluvax immunization program

27th to 29th of May

Kid’s Health Program

29th of April

Men’s STI Screening Program

13th of May

Women’s STI Screening Program

2nd and 3rd of June

Umoona Kuru Takata program


A shot of a Men's Group with Men relaxing after a talk on Drug and alcohol issues 2013

QUIT Smoking Seminar March 2014


engaging / relating / bonding with me?

Babys need you to be their secure base. This is how your baby feels safe and learns to trust. When babies feel safe and secure, they will have the confidence to learn about themselves and their world! Your baby wants and needs to relate to you! Getting started 

Smile at your baby and look into their eye eyes s.

Talk to your baby when they are relaxed an and d ready to listen.

Cuddle and gently touch your baby baby- tell them how beautiful they are. Learn baby massage and try it with baby (usually after they are 6 weeks of age) age)..

Sing them a simple son sonor or nursery rhyme

Show them a book and share delight in the pictures.

Explore a simple toy with baby , move it in your hands slowly and let them touch and grasp it. Talk about it.

How does it feel when you and baby connect?


Lyn Breuer Member for Giles visits Umoona for last time as MP. Lyn has always shown great support to the local Community all round and has shown a great suppor t for Aboriginal health. She’s a very much loved person that shows a lot of interest in the development in Coober Pedy. Umoona Tjutagku Health Service would like to Thank Lyn for all her support over the years and wishes her the very best in the near future. Lyn Breuer on her last visit to Coober Pedy Called in at the UTHSAC clinic and UTHSAC Drug and Alcohol and said; ’ I couldn’t leave politics and Coober Pedy without saying goodbye to my good friends at Umoona Health especially Priscilla Larkins, Robin Walker and George Laslett; I am so appreciative of being able to work with you and your creative processes in Aboriginal health. I won’t be leaving here for good I’ve got some [plans in my retirement for mentoring Aboriginal young people here and in Whyalla’. On her last trip she caught up with long-time friend Lourdes Ordasi, the new manager Of Umoona Tjutagku Health Service Drug and Alcohol Service. We will remember her for her long term commitment and advice to our service and especially latterly where she advocated for funds for COBRA 2012 and drove to Oodnadatta to present the Certificates to all who participated.

Enjoy your rest Lyn and thanks from us all.


April 2014 Mon

7 Dr.Jodie Whillas MSOAP

14 GP- Dr.Helen Sage

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8 Dr.Jodie W,

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Dr.

Nigel

Nigel

Dr.

Nigel

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GP- Dr.Helen Sage

GP- Dr.Helen Sage

GP- Dr.Helen Sage

22Podiatrist, AMIC (Aboriginal

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Maternal 28

Dr.

Infant

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May 2014 Mon

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Dentist Dr,Neville Carlier

Dr,Neville Carlier

Dentist

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Dr. Judy McDonald

Dr. Judy McDonald

Dr. Judy McDonald

Dr. Judy McDonald

Dr. Judy McDonald

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Igor Nikitins: Resp ,Physician

Igor Nikitins:

27 Dentist

28 Dentist

29 Dentist

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Dr Neville Carlier (GP)

Dr Neville Carlier (GP)

Dr Neville Carlier (GP)

19 Igor Nikitins: Resp ,Physician 26

Dentist Dr Neville Carlier

Podiatrist Physio


June 2014 Mon

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Dr. David Jasudason

Dr. David Jasudason

16 Dr.Jodie Whillas

17 Dr.Jodie Whillas

18 Dr.Jodie Whillas

MSOAP,

MSOAP,

MSOAP,

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Igor Nikitins Resp Physician,

Igor Nikitins Resp Physician,

Igor Nikitins Resp Physician,

Dr. Adriana Lattanzio: Psychiatric

Dr. Adriana Lattanzio: Psychiatric

Dr. Adriana Lattanzio: Psychiatric

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24 Dentist Dr. Helen Sage (GP)

25 Dentist Dr. Helen Sage (GP)

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Dentist Dr. Helen Sage (GP)

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For More Information ………... Pop In Call us 08 8672 5255 Visit us Www.uths.com.au


ANNIVERSARY OF THE NATIONAL APOLOGY Healing our Past, Building our Future- Together The Apology day was celebrated on 13th February, 2014 at Umoona Aged Care, Coober Pedy, and SA 5723. There were 63 people attended the events. There were 24 clients from Umoona Tjutagku Health Services (UTHS), 10 students from Coober Pedy Area School, 12 clients from Umoona Aged care and 12 UTHS staff and 5 service providers’ staff attended………………………………………………………..

Umoona Tjutagku Health Service (UTHS) and UAC for holding such events. As a part of the CEO’s speech a 1 minute silence was requested to remember for those stolen generation who passed away. Lunch was provided, a traditional show case was organised for all the participants to learn and enjoy. The Show case included: a demonstration The Apology Celebration started with a welcome to of bush medicine, bush tucker, basket weaving and country speech and an opening ceremony which is craft. Demonstration of cutting and cooking of to commemorate the stolen generation organised Kangaroo and kangaroo tails, stories played on by Umoona Aged Care (UAC). During the Apology DVD of Stolen Generation; traditional painting, Cake with Words Reconciliation written on it was Celebration, 10 students from the Coober Pedy cut and eaten. The participants also enjoyed Area School lighted candles (10 Candles of different sizes was lit to represent people affected participating in the group yarning sessions with elders. The Apology Celebration concluded with an for being excellent speech

removed from their family at that time). The morning tea was served to all participated in the celebration. Thus, Phil Cameron (Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Coober Pedy District council) delivered an apology speech and congratulated


by George Laslett and reading of 2008 apology speech and the reason for the need to commemorate Apology Day. The celebration of the national apology highlighted the members of the stolen generation and their families who have been taken away from their family and traumatised at that time. It was also an opportunity to gain further knowledge in relation to stolen generation and able to engage in traditional practices.

Positive feedbacks were received from the participants who expressed their opinions in relation to the celebration. The feedback received included:  That the Apology Celebration helped Aboriginal people to follow their traditional ways, building and restoring their sense of identity and developing cultural knowledge and pride. 

That the Apology Celebration was very enjoyable and educational.

That young people from Coober Pedy School stated that they enjoy the celebration and learnt traditional ways from the elders.


Umoona Pitstop Men’s Health Program

G

eneral health of Aboriginal men is rapidly deteriorating, and however it is largely within their means to pre-

vent it. But it simply won’t happen unless we first shift our attitudes and approaches on the way we educate men about health concerns. Dr. Richard Buzcott is giving a warm welcome to a client before The Pit Stop – Men’s Health programme held on 28th March 2014 at Umoona clinic jointly with Drug and Alcohol at DAS Day centre which is created a successful community event that not only focused on Men’s health but also provided fluevax immunisation to prevent diseases could happen during upcoming season within the Community.

health check done

Dr. Richard Buzacott (GP) and all Nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, counsellors at drug and alcohol provided tremendous contribution to success of the program and the end result provided us with no option than to run the event each year, if not two to three times a year. The Pitstop health screening program targets men living in rural and remote areas and promotes the importance of regular health screening to prevent or manage chronic conditions. It’s aimed to encourage men to make the time and effort to look after their own health and wellbeing just as they would make the time and effort to look after their vehicle. Ummona Pitstop executed following health check stations 1st Stop – Registration – Service Sheet 2nd Stop – Chassis check – measure the client’s waist to see if they are carrying excess fat around the stomach 3rd Stop – Oil Pressure - Blood Pressure is taken. If either Chassis or oil pressure is outside of the norm we offer advice and encouragement on how one could regain control through diet and exercise. 4th Stop – Shock Absorber – 10 preset questions are asked to determine how someone is coping emotionally. 5th Stop – Turbo Charge – Immunisation boost Pit Stop registrants received a Pass or Fail sticker at the end, and those who received a fails sticker indicated they would seek medical intervention Significant number of people within the community and also some transients participated in the program. We predominately focused on real health issues that directly raised awareness and changed attitudes of participants. Reported by Michael Fernando, Practice Manager


Welcome to Indiarnah Thomas born on the 23rd of February

Congratulations to Janine and Rameth. Welcome to Angel Eenltuizen New granddaughter of Glenys and Robert Hele. Breast Feeding Come on you new mummas out there breast milk is the best food for your baby. Ask any one, and they will say that the healthiest way to feed your baby is to breastfeed. Babies who are breastfed from birth are much less likely to be ill in their first year of life. Being breastfed may help your baby fend off illnesses such as: Gastroenteritis Pneumonia and bronchiolitis Urinary tract infections Eczema Ear infections Breast milk is a complete food. It contains at least 400 nutrients as well as hormones and diseasefighting compounds, which are not in formula milk. Its nutritional make-up even adjusts to your baby's needs as she grows. Find out more about how your body makes breast milk. And apart from the brain-building, infection-fighting benefits of your milk, which no formula can offer, breastfeeding helps to build a special bond between you and your baby. If you want to know more contact our midwife Janice and she can talk to you more about it within your own home or environment you wish.


Umoona Tjutagku Health Service Aboriginal Corporation Po Box 166 ,Coober Pedy SA 5723 Ph:0886725255 Fax: 86725664

UTHSAC Newsletter April to June  
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