Page 1

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

NIH Taps Camarero for Big Idea Award School of Pharmacy and SPPD Establish New Schaeffer Center Wolf Celebrates Golden Anniversary at USC

pharmacy Volume 1, Issue 6, Winter 2010

New Faces... New Perspectives Innovative Ideas Propel the School of Pharmacy into the Future


IN PICTURES

FEATURES SENIOR EDITOR

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu CONTRIBUTORS

Olabisi Carr

Associate Director of Alumni Relations

carr@usc.edu

Mary Wackerman

Director of Major Gifts

mwacker@usc.edu EDITOR

Jennifer Watson

Executive Director of Development

freeh@usc.edu WRITERs

Carl Marziali Gabrielle Olya design

Leslie Baker Graphic Design

10 Alumni & Friends

4 New Faces,

New Directions Making changes and opening doors.

School extends its reach in Asia.

KUDOS

PHOTOGRAPHY

Mark Berndt Don Milici Jon Nalick Robert Roberts Lee Salem Glen Tao ILLUSTRATION

Frank Harris Stephanie A. Williams

2 7 Best in Show

Student wins best poster at ACCP annual meeting.

Please address your comments, opinions and questions to:

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

USC School of Pharmacy 1985 Zonal Avenue— PSC 700 Los Angeles, CA 90089-9121

phone: 323.442.3497 email: kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy

Send Us Your E-mail Address The School of Pharmacy is moving in a digital direction. While we will continue to use print publications delivered via snail mail, we are also using E-mail to keep in touch with you and to keep you informed of upcoming events.

Please send your E-mail address to carr@usc.edu.

…of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy

2 6 Talking Politics

Vanderveen will serve another 5-year term.

Hats off to associate professor Julio Camarero.

KEEPING UP

…and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Reappointment

2 4 “Big Idea” Award

Chairman Elect

2 2 Department of Pharmacology…

1 3 Dean Receives

School earns over $2 million in ARRA funding.

Ronald Belville

18 Titus Family Department…

School gets reaccreditation as faculty earn new appointments.

for Research

Chairman

Approval

1 4 Stimulus Grants

Denis Portaro

Interview skills, Alpha Iota Pi Health Fair & Career Showcase

1 2 Getting the Stamp of

Key DESIGNer

Alexis Mercurio

Board of Councilors

2 8 Student Snapshots

The Schaeffer Center aims to use research to change policy.

2 9 Globalization

dean

USC hosts AACP Summit.

and Economics Center Founded

New and continuing support ensures bright future for School.

R. Pete Vanderveen

1 3 Host with the Most

1 5 Health Policy 1 6 Giving

Homecoming game, reunions and a day on the links.

3 0 Two Trojans “Coat” Their Daughters

White Coat Ceremony inducts the Class of 2013.

ABOUT THE COVER The cover design, a graphic portrayal of the “new faces” highlighted in this issue’s feature story, rests on a background that uses elements from an illustration of the work of assistant professor Andrew MacKay (pictured in the upper left box of the cover). The full illustration of Dr. MacKay’s work is on page 6. Other faces on the cover include (clockwise): Kermit Crawford, Geoffrey Joyce, Dana Goldman, Neeraj Sood and Dianne Domingo-Foraste. Full story on page 4.

Legislative Day brings students together with elected officials.

2 6 International Symposium

“Moving Targets” provides a global perspective on cutting-edge topics.

3 0 Alumni

Updates, remembrances and staying connected.

3 2 Students

Accomplishments from the future of pharmacy.

Theresa Agboh-Taylor Melvin F. Baron Gale Bensussen David Breslow Rosemarie Christopher Kermit R. Crawford Judy Flesh Rosenberg Eileen Goodis K. Robert Hahn William A. Heeres Kathleen Hurtado Lee “Buzzy” Klevens Keith LaFond Kiran Majmudar Oscar Pallares Raymond T. Poon Wanda L. Sawyers Wayne T. Seltzer Richard Shinar Tim K. Siu Martin Solberg Holly A. Strom DeWight Titus Brad Trom Louis T.W. Wong Associate Members

Gavin S. Herbert Gerhard Renner Arthur M. Ulene Ex-Officio Members

Dolly Harris Fatin Sako Steven B. Sample


IN PICTURES

FEATURES SENIOR EDITOR

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu CONTRIBUTORS

Olabisi Carr

Associate Director of Alumni Relations

carr@usc.edu

Mary Wackerman

Director of Major Gifts

mwacker@usc.edu EDITOR

Jennifer Watson

Executive Director of Development

freeh@usc.edu WRITERs

Carl Marziali Gabrielle Olya design

Leslie Baker Graphic Design

10 Alumni & Friends

4 New Faces,

New Directions Making changes and opening doors.

School extends its reach in Asia.

KUDOS

PHOTOGRAPHY

Mark Berndt Don Milici Jon Nalick Robert Roberts Lee Salem Glen Tao ILLUSTRATION

Frank Harris Stephanie A. Williams

2 7 Best in Show

Student wins best poster at ACCP annual meeting.

Please address your comments, opinions and questions to:

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

USC School of Pharmacy 1985 Zonal Avenue— PSC 700 Los Angeles, CA 90089-9121

phone: 323.442.3497 email: kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy

Send Us Your E-mail Address The School of Pharmacy is moving in a digital direction. While we will continue to use print publications delivered via snail mail, we are also using E-mail to keep in touch with you and to keep you informed of upcoming events.

Please send your E-mail address to carr@usc.edu.

…of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy

2 6 Talking Politics

Vanderveen will serve another 5-year term.

Hats off to associate professor Julio Camarero.

KEEPING UP

…and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Reappointment

2 4 “Big Idea” Award

Chairman Elect

2 2 Department of Pharmacology…

1 3 Dean Receives

School earns over $2 million in ARRA funding.

Ronald Belville

18 Titus Family Department…

School gets reaccreditation as faculty earn new appointments.

for Research

Chairman

Approval

1 4 Stimulus Grants

Denis Portaro

Interview skills, Alpha Iota Pi Health Fair & Career Showcase

1 2 Getting the Stamp of

Key DESIGNer

Alexis Mercurio

Board of Councilors

2 8 Student Snapshots

The Schaeffer Center aims to use research to change policy.

2 9 Globalization

dean

USC hosts AACP Summit.

and Economics Center Founded

New and continuing support ensures bright future for School.

R. Pete Vanderveen

1 3 Host with the Most

1 5 Health Policy 1 6 Giving

Homecoming game, reunions and a day on the links.

3 0 Two Trojans “Coat” Their Daughters

White Coat Ceremony inducts the Class of 2013.

ABOUT THE COVER The cover design, a graphic portrayal of the “new faces” highlighted in this issue’s feature story, rests on a background that uses elements from an illustration of the work of assistant professor Andrew MacKay (pictured in the upper left box of the cover). The full illustration of Dr. MacKay’s work is on page 6. Other faces on the cover include (clockwise): Kermit Crawford, Geoffrey Joyce, Dana Goldman, Neeraj Sood and Dianne Domingo-Foraste. Full story on page 4.

Legislative Day brings students together with elected officials.

2 6 International Symposium

“Moving Targets” provides a global perspective on cutting-edge topics.

3 0 Alumni

Updates, remembrances and staying connected.

3 2 Students

Accomplishments from the future of pharmacy.

Theresa Agboh-Taylor Melvin F. Baron Gale Bensussen David Breslow Rosemarie Christopher Kermit R. Crawford Judy Flesh Rosenberg Eileen Goodis K. Robert Hahn William A. Heeres Kathleen Hurtado Lee “Buzzy” Klevens Keith LaFond Kiran Majmudar Oscar Pallares Raymond T. Poon Wanda L. Sawyers Wayne T. Seltzer Richard Shinar Tim K. Siu Martin Solberg Holly A. Strom DeWight Titus Brad Trom Louis T.W. Wong Associate Members

Gavin S. Herbert Gerhard Renner Arthur M. Ulene Ex-Officio Members

Dolly Harris Fatin Sako Steven B. Sample


today’s school of pharmacy

meeting needs with new

educational opportunities

Remember when USC only offered a simple pharmacy degree? Those days are gone. Today the School offers expanded degree opportunities, responding to pressing societal needs by preparing professionals for today’s work environments.

The USC School of Pharmacy announces its new translational degree: Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics. This degree transforms and integrates clinical and basic science, creating an academic home that nurtures and fosters translational medicine. By bringing together the clinical and basic disciplines, the program serves to train translational scientists to apply new scientific understanding and techniques at the patient bedside. You’re probably already familiar with the nationally-ranked PharmD program in the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy. Additionally, the school offers many dual and joint degree programs that PharmD students are able to pursue at the School of Pharmacy.

Inter-disciplinary PharmD degrees include: • PharmD/MBA • PharmD/JD • PharmD/MPH

• PharmD/MS in Regulatory Science • PharmD/MS in Gerontology • PharmD/PhD

http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/pharmd/programs/dual/

The School’s Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences has long been an international leader in the area of pharmaceutical research, particularly in the areas of molecular mechanisms of disease and drug design, development, targeting and delivery. The department offers graduate programs leading to the following degrees: • MS in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology • MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences • PhD in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology • PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/pharmacopharmsci/

The School of Pharmacy is home to the only Regulatory Science Doctorate Program in the nation, and was one of the first to offer a master’s program in this field. The regulatory science degrees focus on regulatory affairs, clinical research and quality systems, and degrees offered include: • MS in Regulatory Science • DRSc (Doctor in Regulatory Science) http://regulatory.usc.edu/

USC was also the first in the nation to offer a program focusing exclusively on pharmacoeconomics, and currently has the largest alumni network in this field. The program is a collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Economics, and degrees offered include: • MS in Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy • PhD in Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy

dean’s message

Schools in this 21st Century are complicated places. In many ways, it is the complicated challenge of running a school that makes me love my job. I find it intriguing to start every day knowing it will be different from yesterday and recognizing I may have to think like a CEO, clinician, academic, scientist, politician and student at various points of the day to get the job done. When I first came to USC, one of my early decisions involved bridge funding for Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton as she waited to hear from the NIH. I considered the potential impact of her project on research and at the patient bedside in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. I reviewed her prospects for the pending NIH grant and decided to provide the funding necessary to keep her lab going until the NIH decision was made. The investment paid off and since then Dr. Brinton has garnered millions of dollars in funding to support her work developing therapies to prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer’s disease, including a grant just awarded by the National Institute of Aging to conduct a clinical trial in humans on a new compound to fight the disease. Likewise, during my first year at USC, I had to weigh the value of expanding and continuing various clinical programs at the school. I looked at the impact of the projects — where our faculty, residents and students provide clinical services to some of the area’s most vulnerable patients and at the immeasurable learning this environment provides to our students — and I supported the program expansion. Today, data show that the School’s services not only positively impact the health outcomes of these patients but do this while saving health-care dollars. Last year, I decided to commit school dollars to establish the Schaeffer Center and the recruitment of three new faculty members focusing on health economics and policy. I considered the Schaeffer Center’s potential to propel the school to national prominence while informing decision makers on health policy. In fact, it already has while also complementing our existing pharmacoeconomics faculty. A paper just released by one of our new faculty, Dr. Neeraj Sood, and co-authored by Dr. David Cutler of Harvard, informs policy makers on the impact of proposed health reform on national job formation. Each of these examples illustrates the need for a dean to have sound counsel. For me, this has been greatly met through the input of my administrative team, particularly Drs. Sarah Hamm-Alvarez and Kathleen Johnson. Further, I have relied on the advice and expertise of our Board of Councilors, as well as the QSAD and Pharmacy Alumni boards, whose life experience and professional acumen have offered invaluable guidance and insight. I have also counted on the perspectives that faculty, staff, students and alumni have brought to my office. These stakeholders have allowed me to make decisions on the very broad nature of running a 21st century school of pharmacy with a wide range of thoughtful input and consideration. I neglected to mention another hat that a dean must wear — CFO. The generous gifts from our alumni and friends, and from foundations, greatly impact the quality of our programs, facilities and the scholarships that we provide while balancing our budget. It is a new year and as our academic enterprise becomes ever more complicated, I am heartened by each of you who have stretched to help the School in so many ways. It is with the help of so many divergent voices that we together get the job done to create this 21st Century USC School of Pharmacy. I thank each of you.

http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/clinicalpharmpep/pep/

For more information on any of the exciting and innovative degree programs the School has to offer, visit http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/.

2 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

R. Pete Vanderveen, PhD, RPh Dean John Stauffer Decanal Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

3


today’s school of pharmacy

meeting needs with new

educational opportunities

Remember when USC only offered a simple pharmacy degree? Those days are gone. Today the School offers expanded degree opportunities, responding to pressing societal needs by preparing professionals for today’s work environments.

The USC School of Pharmacy announces its new translational degree: Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics. This degree transforms and integrates clinical and basic science, creating an academic home that nurtures and fosters translational medicine. By bringing together the clinical and basic disciplines, the program serves to train translational scientists to apply new scientific understanding and techniques at the patient bedside. You’re probably already familiar with the nationally-ranked PharmD program in the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy. Additionally, the school offers many dual and joint degree programs that PharmD students are able to pursue at the School of Pharmacy.

Inter-disciplinary PharmD degrees include: • PharmD/MBA • PharmD/JD • PharmD/MPH

• PharmD/MS in Regulatory Science • PharmD/MS in Gerontology • PharmD/PhD

http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/pharmd/programs/dual/

The School’s Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences has long been an international leader in the area of pharmaceutical research, particularly in the areas of molecular mechanisms of disease and drug design, development, targeting and delivery. The department offers graduate programs leading to the following degrees: • MS in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology • MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences • PhD in Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology • PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/pharmacopharmsci/

The School of Pharmacy is home to the only Regulatory Science Doctorate Program in the nation, and was one of the first to offer a master’s program in this field. The regulatory science degrees focus on regulatory affairs, clinical research and quality systems, and degrees offered include: • MS in Regulatory Science • DRSc (Doctor in Regulatory Science) http://regulatory.usc.edu/

USC was also the first in the nation to offer a program focusing exclusively on pharmacoeconomics, and currently has the largest alumni network in this field. The program is a collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Economics, and degrees offered include: • MS in Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy • PhD in Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy

dean’s message

Schools in this 21st Century are complicated places. In many ways, it is the complicated challenge of running a school that makes me love my job. I find it intriguing to start every day knowing it will be different from yesterday and recognizing I may have to think like a CEO, clinician, academic, scientist, politician and student at various points of the day to get the job done. When I first came to USC, one of my early decisions involved bridge funding for Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton as she waited to hear from the NIH. I considered the potential impact of her project on research and at the patient bedside in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. I reviewed her prospects for the pending NIH grant and decided to provide the funding necessary to keep her lab going until the NIH decision was made. The investment paid off and since then Dr. Brinton has garnered millions of dollars in funding to support her work developing therapies to prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer’s disease, including a grant just awarded by the National Institute of Aging to conduct a clinical trial in humans on a new compound to fight the disease. Likewise, during my first year at USC, I had to weigh the value of expanding and continuing various clinical programs at the school. I looked at the impact of the projects — where our faculty, residents and students provide clinical services to some of the area’s most vulnerable patients and at the immeasurable learning this environment provides to our students — and I supported the program expansion. Today, data show that the School’s services not only positively impact the health outcomes of these patients but do this while saving health-care dollars. Last year, I decided to commit school dollars to establish the Schaeffer Center and the recruitment of three new faculty members focusing on health economics and policy. I considered the Schaeffer Center’s potential to propel the school to national prominence while informing decision makers on health policy. In fact, it already has while also complementing our existing pharmacoeconomics faculty. A paper just released by one of our new faculty, Dr. Neeraj Sood, and co-authored by Dr. David Cutler of Harvard, informs policy makers on the impact of proposed health reform on national job formation. Each of these examples illustrates the need for a dean to have sound counsel. For me, this has been greatly met through the input of my administrative team, particularly Drs. Sarah Hamm-Alvarez and Kathleen Johnson. Further, I have relied on the advice and expertise of our Board of Councilors, as well as the QSAD and Pharmacy Alumni boards, whose life experience and professional acumen have offered invaluable guidance and insight. I have also counted on the perspectives that faculty, staff, students and alumni have brought to my office. These stakeholders have allowed me to make decisions on the very broad nature of running a 21st century school of pharmacy with a wide range of thoughtful input and consideration. I neglected to mention another hat that a dean must wear — CFO. The generous gifts from our alumni and friends, and from foundations, greatly impact the quality of our programs, facilities and the scholarships that we provide while balancing our budget. It is a new year and as our academic enterprise becomes ever more complicated, I am heartened by each of you who have stretched to help the School in so many ways. It is with the help of so many divergent voices that we together get the job done to create this 21st Century USC School of Pharmacy. I thank each of you.

http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/clinicalpharmpep/pep/

For more information on any of the exciting and innovative degree programs the School has to offer, visit http://www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy/.

2 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

R. Pete Vanderveen, PhD, RPh Dean John Stauffer Decanal Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

3


cover feature Innovative ideas propel the School of Pharmacy into the future.

New Faces...

new perspectives by Gabrielle Olya and Kukla Vera

I

nnovation and transformation are hot words in today’s vernacular. Corporations, academia and governments are all claiming the right to use these two buzz words, citing developments in their respective environments. So what does it really mean to be innovative and transformative? At the School of Pharmacy, new faces have brought with them fresh outlooks and original perspectives, breathing new life into these overused terms. Who are these individuals? One is a physician who has been amazed at the patient outcomes that have resulted from the incorporation of clinical pharmacy services in her private practice. Another is a national business leader who is remaking the patient pharmacy experience at one of the country’s largest chains. Then there’s the trio of economists who have recently joined the School and are sure to influence the nation’s health-care policies. And, finally, there’s the assistant professor whose novel way of delivering old drugs has made them “new” as they treat cancer. Each of these new faces brings a transformative potential and influence to the School of Pharmacy. Perhaps the terms innovation and transformation are justified when telling their stories.

School of Pharmacy pharmacist Alison Reta works with patient Delfino Ruiz at Botica del Sol Pharmacy, owned by Board of Councilor Raymond Poon, PharmD (‘72). Working with the School, Dr. Poon has initiated a project in his pharmacy to provide clinical pharmacy services to the medical practice of Dr. Dianne Domingo-Foraste.

Dr. Foraste believes the addition of clinical pharmacy services in her medical practice “enhances patient outcomes and the overall care your practice can provide”.

4 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

TRANSFORMING PRIVATE PRACTICE Pharmacists providing medication therapy management out of a private pharmacy that’s working in concert with a private medical practice are yielding extraordinary outcomes. When Dianne Domingo-Foraste, MD, was approached by her old friend and colleague, Raymond Poon, PharmD (’72), owner of Botica del Sol Pharmacy and also a member of the School’s Board of Councilors, about incorporating clinical pharmacists into her private practice, she was a bit skeptical. “I was a little worried about having pharmacists working with my patients,” she said. “I had no idea what to expect.” Dr. Foraste is the physician at P. Domingo-Foraste, MD, Inc., known as Inter-American Medical Group, which was founded by her father in 1954. It is a private practice that primarily treats MediCal, Medicare and uninsured patients. After meeting with associate professor Steven Chen in September, Dr. Foraste decided to implement a program that would bring in pharmacists and residents from USC to work as medication therapy managers, understanding that this would be a great opportunity for these individuals to gain experience. “It all started as an informal arrangement. I’ve been at this clinic for so many years, and I do my work out of love,” she said. “If I can give back to the new generation of professionals in the form of training — I thought why not.”

Dr. Foraste has been amazed by the results. “I had no idea how much the addition of clinical pharmacists would enhance my practice. Just imagine, you’re one physician seeing maybe 40 patients a day, who are on as many as eight medicines each, and sometimes more. The clinical pharmacist is the physician complement who takes care of the patient’s medication therapy management — which is a key element of care.” The clinical pharmacists work primarily with patients who are on medications for diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, asthma and anticoagulation. Dr. Foraste has already seen positive changes in her patients, noting that many of her diabetic patients are now more compliant and more controlled. “The pharmacists have been well-received by my patients, too. They take time to work with them, and this translates to improved outcomes,” she said. Just as this is Dr. Foraste’s first experience working with clinical pharmacists, her involvement is a first for the School of Pharmacy as well. Though the School has worked with physician groups in the past, these partnerships have mainly been with public safety-net clinics. Dr. Foraste has opened the door to having clinical pharmacists in the private sector, a concept that will likely have positive outcomes for the future of health care. “Implementing clinical pharmacy care could decrease hospitalizations. How many people are in hospital beds because

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

5


cover feature Innovative ideas propel the School of Pharmacy into the future.

New Faces...

new perspectives by Gabrielle Olya and Kukla Vera

I

nnovation and transformation are hot words in today’s vernacular. Corporations, academia and governments are all claiming the right to use these two buzz words, citing developments in their respective environments. So what does it really mean to be innovative and transformative? At the School of Pharmacy, new faces have brought with them fresh outlooks and original perspectives, breathing new life into these overused terms. Who are these individuals? One is a physician who has been amazed at the patient outcomes that have resulted from the incorporation of clinical pharmacy services in her private practice. Another is a national business leader who is remaking the patient pharmacy experience at one of the country’s largest chains. Then there’s the trio of economists who have recently joined the School and are sure to influence the nation’s health-care policies. And, finally, there’s the assistant professor whose novel way of delivering old drugs has made them “new” as they treat cancer. Each of these new faces brings a transformative potential and influence to the School of Pharmacy. Perhaps the terms innovation and transformation are justified when telling their stories.

School of Pharmacy pharmacist Alison Reta works with patient Delfino Ruiz at Botica del Sol Pharmacy, owned by Board of Councilor Raymond Poon, PharmD (‘72). Working with the School, Dr. Poon has initiated a project in his pharmacy to provide clinical pharmacy services to the medical practice of Dr. Dianne Domingo-Foraste.

Dr. Foraste believes the addition of clinical pharmacy services in her medical practice “enhances patient outcomes and the overall care your practice can provide”.

4 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

TRANSFORMING PRIVATE PRACTICE Pharmacists providing medication therapy management out of a private pharmacy that’s working in concert with a private medical practice are yielding extraordinary outcomes. When Dianne Domingo-Foraste, MD, was approached by her old friend and colleague, Raymond Poon, PharmD (’72), owner of Botica del Sol Pharmacy and also a member of the School’s Board of Councilors, about incorporating clinical pharmacists into her private practice, she was a bit skeptical. “I was a little worried about having pharmacists working with my patients,” she said. “I had no idea what to expect.” Dr. Foraste is the physician at P. Domingo-Foraste, MD, Inc., known as Inter-American Medical Group, which was founded by her father in 1954. It is a private practice that primarily treats MediCal, Medicare and uninsured patients. After meeting with associate professor Steven Chen in September, Dr. Foraste decided to implement a program that would bring in pharmacists and residents from USC to work as medication therapy managers, understanding that this would be a great opportunity for these individuals to gain experience. “It all started as an informal arrangement. I’ve been at this clinic for so many years, and I do my work out of love,” she said. “If I can give back to the new generation of professionals in the form of training — I thought why not.”

Dr. Foraste has been amazed by the results. “I had no idea how much the addition of clinical pharmacists would enhance my practice. Just imagine, you’re one physician seeing maybe 40 patients a day, who are on as many as eight medicines each, and sometimes more. The clinical pharmacist is the physician complement who takes care of the patient’s medication therapy management — which is a key element of care.” The clinical pharmacists work primarily with patients who are on medications for diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, asthma and anticoagulation. Dr. Foraste has already seen positive changes in her patients, noting that many of her diabetic patients are now more compliant and more controlled. “The pharmacists have been well-received by my patients, too. They take time to work with them, and this translates to improved outcomes,” she said. Just as this is Dr. Foraste’s first experience working with clinical pharmacists, her involvement is a first for the School of Pharmacy as well. Though the School has worked with physician groups in the past, these partnerships have mainly been with public safety-net clinics. Dr. Foraste has opened the door to having clinical pharmacists in the private sector, a concept that will likely have positive outcomes for the future of health care. “Implementing clinical pharmacy care could decrease hospitalizations. How many people are in hospital beds because

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

5


cover feature their diabetes and blood pressure are out of control? I think this practice can make a big difference,” she explained. “I hope my physician colleagues will consider doing this too. Having a clinical pharmacist complement your practice enhances patient outcomes and the overall care your practice can provide,” said Dr. Foraste. “I hope my work with USC and with Dr. Poon can serve as a bridge for other physicians in the community. This is the wave of the future.”

on a nanoscale, have successfully led to tumor regression. MacKay’s biomedical engineering expertise has enabled him to create a genetically engineered drug carrier, the CP molecule, which targets specific proteins and delivers therapeutics through controlled release, a process that actually makes old drugs behave like new drugs. “During and after chemotherapy, cancer cells acquire resistance to certain drugs. We developed a new strategy to induce these drugs to assemble sub-microscopic particles. These particles deliver more drug into the tumor than free drug, and reverse drug resistance,” explained MacKay. His pioneering techniques are a rational approach to overcoming problems with chemotherapy. The targeting prevents the drug from entering healthy tissue, decreasing the amount of toxicity in healthy tissue while effectively treating the tumor.

INNOVATING CANCER TREATMENTS Nanoscale developments have macro potential for the treatment of cancer. The future of cancer treatment might be microscopic in size, at least according to School of Pharmacy assistant professor Andrew MacKay’s groundbreaking research. MacKay, who joined the School’s faculty in December 2008, has a background in chemical bioengineering, providing him with a unique perspective on the world of pharmaceutical sciences. After earning his BS in chemical engineering and biology at MIT, MacKay entered the Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering at the University of California at San Francisco and Berkeley, where he earned a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellowship and received his PhD. Using his knowledge of these fields, MacKay has developed new strategies that, when executed

A national business leader is working to remake the pharmacy experience at one of the country’s largest chains. When Kermit Crawford, a new member of the USC School of Pharmacy Board of Councilors and senior vice president of pharmacy services for Walgreens, was growing up in the small town of Alvin, Texas, the local pharmacist was an influential person in his life. Crawford remembers the trust and respect that the pharmacist, whom his father called “Doc,” held in the community. “My dad talked with him and got great advice from him,” he said. “It impressed me and eventually got me thinking about the pharmacy profession as a career.” Crawford decided to pursue a degree in pharmacy, with the goal of either opening his own drugstore or going on to

“During and after chemotherapy, cancer cells acquire resistance to graphic, far left: Stephanie A. Williams created this graphic presentation of Dr. MacKay’s genetically engineered delivery of cancer drugs. The DNA helix portrays the genetically engineered polypeptides that produce a purified polypeptide (lightning) that MacKay links to the drug (red mist). Polypeptides are driven together into nanoparticles (red core) that circulate in the body and are taken up in cells (tan). The drug is released and moves into the cell nucleus, causing them to die (ruptured membrane). picture: Assistant professor Andrew MacKay is engineering novel ways to deliver cancer drugs, making old drugs behave like new ones.

6 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

TRANSFORMING THE PHARMACY EXPERIENCE

certain drugs. We developed a new strategy to induce these drugs to assemble sub-microscopic particles. These particles deliver more drug into the tumor than free drug, and reverse drug resistance.” In the lab, the nanomedicines were used to deliver chemotherapeutics to tumors in mice. Not only did drug tolerance increase fourfold, but the use of these novel chemotherapeutics led to nearly complete tumor regression after only a single dose. While the tumor used in the laboratory was associated with colon cancer in mice, this approach could possibly be used to treat a variety of cancers, and could mark a new direction in cancer treatment. “While we used these particles to cure drug-resistant tumors in mice, translating this approach to people is naturally the goal,” said MacKay. Although MacKay’s innovative developments are on a very small scale, their impact has huge potential. MacKay’s work with the CP molecule and nanomedicines was featured in Nature Materials last November.

medical school. “While completing my pharmacy degree, I found I loved the practice, especially the interaction with patients,” he said. “I was hoping to eventually open my own store, but first I wanted to work for a big chain to learn the business side, so I went to Walgreens.” He started out as a pharmacy intern, and worked his way up to his current position where he is now enhancing the pharmacy experience — making it more patient-centric. “We don’t need pharmacists to fill little bottles — the value of the pharmacist is interacting with the patient,” he said. “Pharmacists can play a greater role in communities across our country by helping patients understand that taking their medication helps improve their overall health and well being,” said Crawford. “They should work with patients to change behaviors — engaging them to be more compliant and to make healthier lifestyle choices.”

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

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cover feature their diabetes and blood pressure are out of control? I think this practice can make a big difference,” she explained. “I hope my physician colleagues will consider doing this too. Having a clinical pharmacist complement your practice enhances patient outcomes and the overall care your practice can provide,” said Dr. Foraste. “I hope my work with USC and with Dr. Poon can serve as a bridge for other physicians in the community. This is the wave of the future.”

on a nanoscale, have successfully led to tumor regression. MacKay’s biomedical engineering expertise has enabled him to create a genetically engineered drug carrier, the CP molecule, which targets specific proteins and delivers therapeutics through controlled release, a process that actually makes old drugs behave like new drugs. “During and after chemotherapy, cancer cells acquire resistance to certain drugs. We developed a new strategy to induce these drugs to assemble sub-microscopic particles. These particles deliver more drug into the tumor than free drug, and reverse drug resistance,” explained MacKay. His pioneering techniques are a rational approach to overcoming problems with chemotherapy. The targeting prevents the drug from entering healthy tissue, decreasing the amount of toxicity in healthy tissue while effectively treating the tumor.

INNOVATING CANCER TREATMENTS Nanoscale developments have macro potential for the treatment of cancer. The future of cancer treatment might be microscopic in size, at least according to School of Pharmacy assistant professor Andrew MacKay’s groundbreaking research. MacKay, who joined the School’s faculty in December 2008, has a background in chemical bioengineering, providing him with a unique perspective on the world of pharmaceutical sciences. After earning his BS in chemical engineering and biology at MIT, MacKay entered the Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering at the University of California at San Francisco and Berkeley, where he earned a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellowship and received his PhD. Using his knowledge of these fields, MacKay has developed new strategies that, when executed

A national business leader is working to remake the pharmacy experience at one of the country’s largest chains. When Kermit Crawford, a new member of the USC School of Pharmacy Board of Councilors and senior vice president of pharmacy services for Walgreens, was growing up in the small town of Alvin, Texas, the local pharmacist was an influential person in his life. Crawford remembers the trust and respect that the pharmacist, whom his father called “Doc,” held in the community. “My dad talked with him and got great advice from him,” he said. “It impressed me and eventually got me thinking about the pharmacy profession as a career.” Crawford decided to pursue a degree in pharmacy, with the goal of either opening his own drugstore or going on to

“During and after chemotherapy, cancer cells acquire resistance to graphic, far left: Stephanie A. Williams created this graphic presentation of Dr. MacKay’s genetically engineered delivery of cancer drugs. The DNA helix portrays the genetically engineered polypeptides that produce a purified polypeptide (lightning) that MacKay links to the drug (red mist). Polypeptides are driven together into nanoparticles (red core) that circulate in the body and are taken up in cells (tan). The drug is released and moves into the cell nucleus, causing them to die (ruptured membrane). picture: Assistant professor Andrew MacKay is engineering novel ways to deliver cancer drugs, making old drugs behave like new ones.

6 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

TRANSFORMING THE PHARMACY EXPERIENCE

certain drugs. We developed a new strategy to induce these drugs to assemble sub-microscopic particles. These particles deliver more drug into the tumor than free drug, and reverse drug resistance.” In the lab, the nanomedicines were used to deliver chemotherapeutics to tumors in mice. Not only did drug tolerance increase fourfold, but the use of these novel chemotherapeutics led to nearly complete tumor regression after only a single dose. While the tumor used in the laboratory was associated with colon cancer in mice, this approach could possibly be used to treat a variety of cancers, and could mark a new direction in cancer treatment. “While we used these particles to cure drug-resistant tumors in mice, translating this approach to people is naturally the goal,” said MacKay. Although MacKay’s innovative developments are on a very small scale, their impact has huge potential. MacKay’s work with the CP molecule and nanomedicines was featured in Nature Materials last November.

medical school. “While completing my pharmacy degree, I found I loved the practice, especially the interaction with patients,” he said. “I was hoping to eventually open my own store, but first I wanted to work for a big chain to learn the business side, so I went to Walgreens.” He started out as a pharmacy intern, and worked his way up to his current position where he is now enhancing the pharmacy experience — making it more patient-centric. “We don’t need pharmacists to fill little bottles — the value of the pharmacist is interacting with the patient,” he said. “Pharmacists can play a greater role in communities across our country by helping patients understand that taking their medication helps improve their overall health and well being,” said Crawford. “They should work with patients to change behaviors — engaging them to be more compliant and to make healthier lifestyle choices.”

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cover feature

Kermit Crawford is the newest member of the School of Pharmacy Board of Councilors. “Having Kermit join the Board provides us with a great new perspective whose vision for our profession closely aligns with the vision of the School,” notes Dean Vanderveen. 

In addition to changing the way pharmacists interact with patients, Crawford thinks changes need to be made in the way pharmacies regard medications. “The product side of the business has become a commodity. We must now talk about the value of medication — not the price,” he said. The value, of course, is the clinical outcomes that result from proper medication use, something that can be improved with more pharmacist-patient interaction. Looking forward, Crawford believes that pharmacists will play a more pivotal role, as more health care costs shift to the patient. “Patients will have to be more engaged, and the pharmacist is the most accessible of all health-care professionals,” explained Crawford. “Patients don’t call insurance companies with health questions, they call physicians, but they see pharmacists. This opens up a great opportunity and an expansive role for the profession, where interactions with the pharmacist become more valuable to the patient.” Crawford sees a future where face-to-face interactions between patients and pharmacists increase in both frequency and value, and where pharmacists are depended on and trusted much like his father counted on “Doc”.

8 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Joyce, an associate professor, also brings his insightful perspectives to the School of Pharmacy. An op-ed of his that appeared in the LA Times revealed some interesting figures related to employer-provided drug benefits: “Our three-year study of 75 large employers shows that changing drug benefits can result in a dramatic drop in total drug spending by insurers and employees. For example, doubling co-payments cut overall drug spending by 20% to 40% depending on the class of drug.” However, Joyce notes that the increase in co-pays results in reduction in medication use and this raises concerns about adverse health outcomes, particularly among those with chronic diseases such as diabetes. Sood, also an associate professor, recently conducted a study that was published in the U.S. News & World Report, which demonstrated a correlation between how much health care coverage industries provide to their workers and industries’ level of growth. “Industries which provide health care to a large fraction of workers didn’t grow as fast as industries

offering health insurance to a small fraction of workers,” concluded Sood. Goldman, Joyce and Sood are bringing their provocative ideas to USC, where they will continue to foster rich developments in health economics research along with their new colleagues in the School’s pharmacoeconomics group. This in turn will be used to inform policy, as their views and voices are among those called upon to be part of the national conversation — in Congressional hearings and other venues — where research is translated into policy change. Through this trio of new faces, USC will make its mark on governmental policy in ways that may both innovate and transform the provision of health care across the country. See page 15 for an article about the new Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and page 18 for an article about Professor Goldman’s appointment to the Institute of Medicine.

IMPACTING NATIONAL POLICY Economic perspectives informing policy makers and reshaping America’s health care. With the new USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics comes the addition of three School of Pharmacy faculty members, whose provocative ideas have the potential to impact policy on a national and international scale. Joining the School from the RAND Corporation are Dana Goldman, PhD, Geoffrey Joyce, PhD, and Neeraj Sood, PhD, well known experts in the field. Goldman, the director of the Schaeffer Center, is a widely quoted expert in health economics, with op-eds in the pages of publications including the New York Times and the LA Times. His most recent op-ed in the New York Times criticized Congress for its unwillingness to pass a bill that would decrease health care spending by limiting access to certain treatments, using startling figures to back up his case: “Among health economists there is near universal agreement that about 30 percent of health care spending — more than $700 billion a year — does no good,” he stated.

Joining the School of Pharmacy from the RAND Corporation are professor Dana Goldman (center) and associate professors Neeraj Sood (left) and Geoffrey Joyce (right). The three health policy experts are recognized leaders in the field whose provocative ideas and research inform decision makers on national policy.

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cover feature

Kermit Crawford is the newest member of the School of Pharmacy Board of Councilors. “Having Kermit join the Board provides us with a great new perspective whose vision for our profession closely aligns with the vision of the School,” notes Dean Vanderveen. 

In addition to changing the way pharmacists interact with patients, Crawford thinks changes need to be made in the way pharmacies regard medications. “The product side of the business has become a commodity. We must now talk about the value of medication — not the price,” he said. The value, of course, is the clinical outcomes that result from proper medication use, something that can be improved with more pharmacist-patient interaction. Looking forward, Crawford believes that pharmacists will play a more pivotal role, as more health care costs shift to the patient. “Patients will have to be more engaged, and the pharmacist is the most accessible of all health-care professionals,” explained Crawford. “Patients don’t call insurance companies with health questions, they call physicians, but they see pharmacists. This opens up a great opportunity and an expansive role for the profession, where interactions with the pharmacist become more valuable to the patient.” Crawford sees a future where face-to-face interactions between patients and pharmacists increase in both frequency and value, and where pharmacists are depended on and trusted much like his father counted on “Doc”.

8 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Joyce, an associate professor, also brings his insightful perspectives to the School of Pharmacy. An op-ed of his that appeared in the LA Times revealed some interesting figures related to employer-provided drug benefits: “Our three-year study of 75 large employers shows that changing drug benefits can result in a dramatic drop in total drug spending by insurers and employees. For example, doubling co-payments cut overall drug spending by 20% to 40% depending on the class of drug.” However, Joyce notes that the increase in co-pays results in reduction in medication use and this raises concerns about adverse health outcomes, particularly among those with chronic diseases such as diabetes. Sood, also an associate professor, recently conducted a study that was published in the U.S. News & World Report, which demonstrated a correlation between how much health care coverage industries provide to their workers and industries’ level of growth. “Industries which provide health care to a large fraction of workers didn’t grow as fast as industries

offering health insurance to a small fraction of workers,” concluded Sood. Goldman, Joyce and Sood are bringing their provocative ideas to USC, where they will continue to foster rich developments in health economics research along with their new colleagues in the School’s pharmacoeconomics group. This in turn will be used to inform policy, as their views and voices are among those called upon to be part of the national conversation — in Congressional hearings and other venues — where research is translated into policy change. Through this trio of new faces, USC will make its mark on governmental policy in ways that may both innovate and transform the provision of health care across the country. See page 15 for an article about the new Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and page 18 for an article about Professor Goldman’s appointment to the Institute of Medicine.

IMPACTING NATIONAL POLICY Economic perspectives informing policy makers and reshaping America’s health care. With the new USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics comes the addition of three School of Pharmacy faculty members, whose provocative ideas have the potential to impact policy on a national and international scale. Joining the School from the RAND Corporation are Dana Goldman, PhD, Geoffrey Joyce, PhD, and Neeraj Sood, PhD, well known experts in the field. Goldman, the director of the Schaeffer Center, is a widely quoted expert in health economics, with op-eds in the pages of publications including the New York Times and the LA Times. His most recent op-ed in the New York Times criticized Congress for its unwillingness to pass a bill that would decrease health care spending by limiting access to certain treatments, using startling figures to back up his case: “Among health economists there is near universal agreement that about 30 percent of health care spending — more than $700 billion a year — does no good,” he stated.

Joining the School of Pharmacy from the RAND Corporation are professor Dana Goldman (center) and associate professors Neeraj Sood (left) and Geoffrey Joyce (right). The three health policy experts are recognized leaders in the field whose provocative ideas and research inform decision makers on national policy.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

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alumni

snap

[

]

2009 Alumni & Friends Golf Outing School of Pharmacy alumni teed off at the 5th Annual Alumni & Friends golf outing at the Angeles National Golf Club in Sunland. Sponsors for the event included: Cardinal Sponsor—Rite Aid Corporation Gold Sponsors—Albertsons/Sav-on, CVS Caremark and Good Neighbor Pharmacy Trojan Sponsors—UPNI and Safeway/Vons Partnership Sponsor—Walgreens (back row, left to right) Tom McCarthy, PharmD (’70), Bob Dion, PharmD (’52), John Sang, PharmD (’92), Steve Litsey, PharmD (’72), Kim McCarthy and (front row) Tim Black, PharmD (’73), gather for the 5th annual golf outing.

Homecoming Weekend 2009 Nearly 400 people attended the School of Pharmacy Homecoming pre-game picnic buffet, where alumni, current students, friends and family got ready for the USC–Stanford football game. The picnic included a champagne toast by the dean and raffles for over 40 prizes.

left: Michael Wu, PharmD candidate, and Gary Leach, PharmD (’80), proudly display their Trojan spirit. right: Board of Councilors member Louis Wong, PharmD (’75), Dianne Jung, PharmD (’74), and Larry Jung, PharmD (’72), gear up for the big game.

left: Dean Vanderveen toasts the classes of 2004, 1999, 1994, 1989, 1984, 1979, 1974, 1969 and 1964, who celebrated reunions at the Homecoming celebration. center: School of Pharmacy alumni enjoy the pre-game picnic buffet. right: Vice president of the Alumni Board of Directors and School of Pharmacy volunteer photographer Glen Tao, PharmD (‘84), is caught on camera winning a raffle prize.

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left: Members of the PharmD class of 1973 Paul Richmond, Tim Black, Bob Kazebee, Ted Kessler and Jerry Garich reconnect at the picnic. right: Stella Min and Michelle Chang, both level four PharmD candidates, have Trojan pride all over their faces at their last Homecoming as students.

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alumni

snap

[

]

2009 Alumni & Friends Golf Outing School of Pharmacy alumni teed off at the 5th Annual Alumni & Friends golf outing at the Angeles National Golf Club in Sunland. Sponsors for the event included: Cardinal Sponsor—Rite Aid Corporation Gold Sponsors—Albertsons/Sav-on, CVS Caremark and Good Neighbor Pharmacy Trojan Sponsors—UPNI and Safeway/Vons Partnership Sponsor—Walgreens (back row, left to right) Tom McCarthy, PharmD (’70), Bob Dion, PharmD (’52), John Sang, PharmD (’92), Steve Litsey, PharmD (’72), Kim McCarthy and (front row) Tim Black, PharmD (’73), gather for the 5th annual golf outing.

Homecoming Weekend 2009 Nearly 400 people attended the School of Pharmacy Homecoming pre-game picnic buffet, where alumni, current students, friends and family got ready for the USC–Stanford football game. The picnic included a champagne toast by the dean and raffles for over 40 prizes.

left: Michael Wu, PharmD candidate, and Gary Leach, PharmD (’80), proudly display their Trojan spirit. right: Board of Councilors member Louis Wong, PharmD (’75), Dianne Jung, PharmD (’74), and Larry Jung, PharmD (’72), gear up for the big game.

left: Dean Vanderveen toasts the classes of 2004, 1999, 1994, 1989, 1984, 1979, 1974, 1969 and 1964, who celebrated reunions at the Homecoming celebration. center: School of Pharmacy alumni enjoy the pre-game picnic buffet. right: Vice president of the Alumni Board of Directors and School of Pharmacy volunteer photographer Glen Tao, PharmD (‘84), is caught on camera winning a raffle prize.

10 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

left: Members of the PharmD class of 1973 Paul Richmond, Tim Black, Bob Kazebee, Ted Kessler and Jerry Garich reconnect at the picnic. right: Stella Min and Michelle Chang, both level four PharmD candidates, have Trojan pride all over their faces at their last Homecoming as students.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

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school news

Dean Vanderveen

left to right: Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, Michael Wincor, Kathleen Johnson and Joel Hay

New appointments announced at school Dean Vanderveen has announced a series of appointments and promotions at the School of Pharmacy. Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, PhD, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has been appointed the new associate dean for research affairs. Hamm-Alvarez is also the chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Michael Wincor, PharmD, has been appointed the new associate dean of globalization and continuing professional development. Wincor is an associate professor of clinical pharmacy in the Titus Family Department.

Two faculty members have been promoted to professor. Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Professor in Community Pharmacy, has been promoted to professor of clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical economics. Joel Hay, PhD, has been promoted to professor of pharmaceutical economics and policy. Both Hay and Johnson are in the Titus Family Department. Jason Doctor, PhD, Tien Ng, PharmD, and Clay Wang, PhD, have each been promoted to associate professor. Doctor and Ng are in the Titus Family Department while Wang is in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

School Of Pharmacy gets stamp of approval Dean R. Pete Vanderveen announced the actions of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) pertaining to the accreditation of School’s PharmD program. “I’m pleased to report that we have received the full six-year term of accreditation from the ACPE. This full accreditation status was based on a formal review of our school, after an exhaustive self study and a three-day site visit last January,” said Vanderveen. “These results are excellent and attest to the exemplary quality of our program.”  The ACPE is recognized by the US Department of Education as the accrediting body for pharmacy schools nationwide. The USC School of Pharmacy received full accreditation with a term that extends through June 30, 2015.

12 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

In preparation for the review by the ACPE, associate dean for academic and clinical affairs Fred Weissman prepared thousands of pages of materials to address each of the 30 rigorous standards that were reviewed by the ACPE accreditation team.   “We are very grateful to the leadership and tireless work that associate dean Weissman provided for this review,” said Vanderveen. “And, of course, his efforts and the efforts of the entire faculty were critical factors in the exemplary ranking received from the accreditors.”  The school successfully met all 30 standards that the evaluation team uses to review PharmD programs.

appointed to second 5-year term

University administration finds strong support for Dean’s leadership among school stakeholders. As the end of R. Pete Vanderveen’s fourth year as dean neared, President Steven Sample and Provost C. L. Max Nikias announced Vanderveen’s appointment to an additional five-year term beginning in 2010. Faculty, staff and students at the School of Pharmacy showed strong support for Vanderveen’s reappointment, noting his accessibility, participation in and support of student activities, beneficial reorganization of the departments from four to two, public relations efforts to improve the School’s profile and participation and leadership in national pharmaceutical associations. Vanderveen has worked to enlarge the role of clinical pharmacy services in various practice settings, a decision that benefits not only the School, but also the surrounding community. Vanderveen has overseen the expansion of partnerships with the JWCH Clinic at the Weingart Center and QueensCare clinics, where faculty, students and residents provide medication therapy management to patients.

This commitment to community outreach has led the School to win some of the most prestigious national awards in pharmacy practice over the last few years. These include the American Pharmacists Association Foundation Pinnacle Award, the American Society of Health System Pharmacists Best Practices Award and the AACP Inaugural Award for Transformative Community Service. Vanderveen has also supported the School’s research units by providing bridge funding when scientists await grant dollars and by enhancing core facilities. He has also successfully promoted interdisciplinary hires and collaborations with other USC schools. In addition, the dean launched the Diversity Initiative to increase diversity in the School’s student body. This program proactively recruits high-school students to join the School’s Pharmacy Explorers Program (PEP), a track of MEDCOR which introduces LAUSD students to the health professions through a Saturday enrichment program and mentoring activities.

USC School Of Pharmacy

hosts AACP Summit

Among the summit’s distinguished attendees were Dean Bob Blouin, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Ken Miller, senior vice president of the AACP, and Dean R. Pete Vanderveen.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

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school news

Dean Vanderveen

left to right: Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, Michael Wincor, Kathleen Johnson and Joel Hay

New appointments announced at school Dean Vanderveen has announced a series of appointments and promotions at the School of Pharmacy. Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, PhD, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has been appointed the new associate dean for research affairs. Hamm-Alvarez is also the chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Michael Wincor, PharmD, has been appointed the new associate dean of globalization and continuing professional development. Wincor is an associate professor of clinical pharmacy in the Titus Family Department.

Two faculty members have been promoted to professor. Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Professor in Community Pharmacy, has been promoted to professor of clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical economics. Joel Hay, PhD, has been promoted to professor of pharmaceutical economics and policy. Both Hay and Johnson are in the Titus Family Department. Jason Doctor, PhD, Tien Ng, PharmD, and Clay Wang, PhD, have each been promoted to associate professor. Doctor and Ng are in the Titus Family Department while Wang is in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

School Of Pharmacy gets stamp of approval Dean R. Pete Vanderveen announced the actions of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) pertaining to the accreditation of School’s PharmD program. “I’m pleased to report that we have received the full six-year term of accreditation from the ACPE. This full accreditation status was based on a formal review of our school, after an exhaustive self study and a three-day site visit last January,” said Vanderveen. “These results are excellent and attest to the exemplary quality of our program.”  The ACPE is recognized by the US Department of Education as the accrediting body for pharmacy schools nationwide. The USC School of Pharmacy received full accreditation with a term that extends through June 30, 2015.

12 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

In preparation for the review by the ACPE, associate dean for academic and clinical affairs Fred Weissman prepared thousands of pages of materials to address each of the 30 rigorous standards that were reviewed by the ACPE accreditation team.   “We are very grateful to the leadership and tireless work that associate dean Weissman provided for this review,” said Vanderveen. “And, of course, his efforts and the efforts of the entire faculty were critical factors in the exemplary ranking received from the accreditors.”  The school successfully met all 30 standards that the evaluation team uses to review PharmD programs.

appointed to second 5-year term

University administration finds strong support for Dean’s leadership among school stakeholders. As the end of R. Pete Vanderveen’s fourth year as dean neared, President Steven Sample and Provost C. L. Max Nikias announced Vanderveen’s appointment to an additional five-year term beginning in 2010. Faculty, staff and students at the School of Pharmacy showed strong support for Vanderveen’s reappointment, noting his accessibility, participation in and support of student activities, beneficial reorganization of the departments from four to two, public relations efforts to improve the School’s profile and participation and leadership in national pharmaceutical associations. Vanderveen has worked to enlarge the role of clinical pharmacy services in various practice settings, a decision that benefits not only the School, but also the surrounding community. Vanderveen has overseen the expansion of partnerships with the JWCH Clinic at the Weingart Center and QueensCare clinics, where faculty, students and residents provide medication therapy management to patients.

This commitment to community outreach has led the School to win some of the most prestigious national awards in pharmacy practice over the last few years. These include the American Pharmacists Association Foundation Pinnacle Award, the American Society of Health System Pharmacists Best Practices Award and the AACP Inaugural Award for Transformative Community Service. Vanderveen has also supported the School’s research units by providing bridge funding when scientists await grant dollars and by enhancing core facilities. He has also successfully promoted interdisciplinary hires and collaborations with other USC schools. In addition, the dean launched the Diversity Initiative to increase diversity in the School’s student body. This program proactively recruits high-school students to join the School’s Pharmacy Explorers Program (PEP), a track of MEDCOR which introduces LAUSD students to the health professions through a Saturday enrichment program and mentoring activities.

USC School Of Pharmacy

hosts AACP Summit

Among the summit’s distinguished attendees were Dean Bob Blouin, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Ken Miller, senior vice president of the AACP, and Dean R. Pete Vanderveen.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

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school news Dean Vanderveen with Dana Goldman, Leonard D. Schaeffer and Pamela Schaeffer.

Stimulus grants boost new pharmacy developments ARRA grants allow USC researchers to go forth with their ground-breaking research. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has provided eight grants supplementing support for current research at the USC School of Pharmacy. Recipients of the grants include Nouri Neamati, an associate professor working on HIV therapies; Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences; Roberta Diaz Brinton, holder of the R. Pete Vanderveen Endowed Chair in

The grants awarded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to the USC School of Pharmacy, totaling $2,009,962, include: Neamati’s grant for $442,259 to enhance his lab’s work to find inhibitors that selectively block the interaction between HIV-1 integrase and a cellular protein for the treatment of AIDS.

Hamm-Alvarez was awarded $408,692 to further research

efforts designed to find ways to best deliver medications to the eye. Co-investigator of the Hamm-Alvarez grant is Andrew MacKay, an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Brinton has received a $310,222 grant to continue her research in therapeutic development for the treatment of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

Grant recipient Jennifer-Ann Bayan, PhD candidate, with her mentor, assistant professor Bangyan Stiles, PhD.

Therapeutic Discovery and Development; associate professor Clay Wang; Ron Alkana, professor and associate dean of graduate studies and curricular development; and Daryl Davies, associate professor in the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy. Two students also received ARRA grants: Tino Sanchez, a PhD student working in the Neamati lab, and doctoral student Jennifer-Ann Bayan, who works in the laboratory of assistant professor Bangyan Stiles. In addition to these grants, the Student Affairs Department received the ARRA Scholarship for Disadvantaged Students in the amount of $289,717. The money was awarded to 38 level four students.

14 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Wang’s $589,613 grant will be shared with his collaborator, Berl Oakley, the Irving S. Johnson Distinguished Professor of Molecular Biology at the University of Kansas. Wang’s work focuses on searching for natural compounds that have the potential for use as novel chemotherapies and antimicrobials. Alkana has been awarded a $58,859 supplement to support PhD student Letisha Wyatt as a graduate assistant in his lab. Davies’ award of $45,325 provides an opportunity for a secondary-school science teacher and two undergraduates to spend hands-on time in the laboratory setting. Sanchez was awarded a two-year fellowship totaling $82,352. This support allows him to mine molecular databases for novel compounds that are able to disrupt replication of the HIV virus. Bayan won a $77,702 grant for her research on diabetes.

The Leonard D. Schaeffer Center pushes USC to a new level of prominence in the field of health policy and economics.

New health policy and economics center established at USC The newly established Leonard D. Schaeffer Center is a collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Policy, Planning, and Development and is housed on the University Park Campus. The mission of the Schaeffer Center is to promote health and value in health care delivery through innovative research and policy in the United States and internationally. The Center’s unique interdisciplinary approach sets USC at the very top tier in health economics and policy expertise, especially relevant at a time when health-care reform tops the nation’s domestic agenda. The Center’s research will focus on five key areas: reducing unnecessary spending, improving insurance design, understanding how public policy affects medical innovation, identifying the macroeconomic consequences of U.S. health-care costs and improving comparative effectiveness and outcomes research. Anticipated research projects include a study on how coverage gaps in certain federally funded programs impact patient health and how insurance designs affect physician-prescribing behavior. Dean R. Pete Vanderveen said the Schaeffer Center will provide many opportunities for additional collaborations across campus. “The center promises to be a vibrant, proactive voice impacting the future direction of health care,” he said. The opening of the Center has been made possible by a $1.2 million operating gift from Leonard D. Schaeffer and his wife, Pamela Schaeffer. Leonard Schaeffer was the founding chairman and chief executive officer of WellPoint, the nation’s largest health insurance company, and a recognized expert in health policy and health economics. Schaeffer’s gift will assist the new center in its first four years of operation. “I am pleased to help the university establish a research center at a time when we must set biases aside and challenge assumptions if we are to succeed in transforming health care,” Schaeffer

said. “Using a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach, this new center is uniquely positioned to produce innovative research, reliable data and independent analysis that can lead to more effective health policy solutions.” Significant additional support for the start-up has also been committed by the provost and the deans of the two schools. With the opening of the center comes the inclusion of three new faculty members at the School of Pharmacy, joining USC from the RAND Corporation. Their expertise will serve as a welcome addition to the seasoned pharmacoeconomics team that already exists at the School. These new faculty members are Dana Goldman, PhD, who serves as the director of the Schaeffer Center, Geoffrey Joyce, PhD, and Neeraj Sood, PhD. Joyce and Sood have been appointed associate professors at the School of Pharmacy. Goldman is a professor at the School of Pharmacy and the SPPD, where he holds the Norman Topping Chair in Medicine and Public Policy. Dana Goldman is an internationally known health economist who previously served as director of the RAND Corporation’s program in Health Economics, Finance and Organization, as well as director of the Bing Center for Health Economics, the Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation and the RAND Summer Institute. In the past 10 years, he has published 70 peer-reviewed articles and received more than $10 million in externally funded research grants. He is on the editorial board of Health Affairs, is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves on numerous advisory panels with the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging and the Institute of Medicine. Geoffrey Joyce is an expert in insurance design, demand for pharmaceuticals, Medicare and smoking cessation. Neeraj Sood’s work focuses on the economics of innovation, economic epidemiology, health-care financing and HIV/AIDS policy.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

15


school news Dean Vanderveen with Dana Goldman, Leonard D. Schaeffer and Pamela Schaeffer.

Stimulus grants boost new pharmacy developments ARRA grants allow USC researchers to go forth with their ground-breaking research. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has provided eight grants supplementing support for current research at the USC School of Pharmacy. Recipients of the grants include Nouri Neamati, an associate professor working on HIV therapies; Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences; Roberta Diaz Brinton, holder of the R. Pete Vanderveen Endowed Chair in

The grants awarded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to the USC School of Pharmacy, totaling $2,009,962, include: Neamati’s grant for $442,259 to enhance his lab’s work to find inhibitors that selectively block the interaction between HIV-1 integrase and a cellular protein for the treatment of AIDS.

Hamm-Alvarez was awarded $408,692 to further research

efforts designed to find ways to best deliver medications to the eye. Co-investigator of the Hamm-Alvarez grant is Andrew MacKay, an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Brinton has received a $310,222 grant to continue her research in therapeutic development for the treatment of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

Grant recipient Jennifer-Ann Bayan, PhD candidate, with her mentor, assistant professor Bangyan Stiles, PhD.

Therapeutic Discovery and Development; associate professor Clay Wang; Ron Alkana, professor and associate dean of graduate studies and curricular development; and Daryl Davies, associate professor in the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy. Two students also received ARRA grants: Tino Sanchez, a PhD student working in the Neamati lab, and doctoral student Jennifer-Ann Bayan, who works in the laboratory of assistant professor Bangyan Stiles. In addition to these grants, the Student Affairs Department received the ARRA Scholarship for Disadvantaged Students in the amount of $289,717. The money was awarded to 38 level four students.

14 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Wang’s $589,613 grant will be shared with his collaborator, Berl Oakley, the Irving S. Johnson Distinguished Professor of Molecular Biology at the University of Kansas. Wang’s work focuses on searching for natural compounds that have the potential for use as novel chemotherapies and antimicrobials. Alkana has been awarded a $58,859 supplement to support PhD student Letisha Wyatt as a graduate assistant in his lab. Davies’ award of $45,325 provides an opportunity for a secondary-school science teacher and two undergraduates to spend hands-on time in the laboratory setting. Sanchez was awarded a two-year fellowship totaling $82,352. This support allows him to mine molecular databases for novel compounds that are able to disrupt replication of the HIV virus. Bayan won a $77,702 grant for her research on diabetes.

The Leonard D. Schaeffer Center pushes USC to a new level of prominence in the field of health policy and economics.

New health policy and economics center established at USC The newly established Leonard D. Schaeffer Center is a collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Policy, Planning, and Development and is housed on the University Park Campus. The mission of the Schaeffer Center is to promote health and value in health care delivery through innovative research and policy in the United States and internationally. The Center’s unique interdisciplinary approach sets USC at the very top tier in health economics and policy expertise, especially relevant at a time when health-care reform tops the nation’s domestic agenda. The Center’s research will focus on five key areas: reducing unnecessary spending, improving insurance design, understanding how public policy affects medical innovation, identifying the macroeconomic consequences of U.S. health-care costs and improving comparative effectiveness and outcomes research. Anticipated research projects include a study on how coverage gaps in certain federally funded programs impact patient health and how insurance designs affect physician-prescribing behavior. Dean R. Pete Vanderveen said the Schaeffer Center will provide many opportunities for additional collaborations across campus. “The center promises to be a vibrant, proactive voice impacting the future direction of health care,” he said. The opening of the Center has been made possible by a $1.2 million operating gift from Leonard D. Schaeffer and his wife, Pamela Schaeffer. Leonard Schaeffer was the founding chairman and chief executive officer of WellPoint, the nation’s largest health insurance company, and a recognized expert in health policy and health economics. Schaeffer’s gift will assist the new center in its first four years of operation. “I am pleased to help the university establish a research center at a time when we must set biases aside and challenge assumptions if we are to succeed in transforming health care,” Schaeffer

said. “Using a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach, this new center is uniquely positioned to produce innovative research, reliable data and independent analysis that can lead to more effective health policy solutions.” Significant additional support for the start-up has also been committed by the provost and the deans of the two schools. With the opening of the center comes the inclusion of three new faculty members at the School of Pharmacy, joining USC from the RAND Corporation. Their expertise will serve as a welcome addition to the seasoned pharmacoeconomics team that already exists at the School. These new faculty members are Dana Goldman, PhD, who serves as the director of the Schaeffer Center, Geoffrey Joyce, PhD, and Neeraj Sood, PhD. Joyce and Sood have been appointed associate professors at the School of Pharmacy. Goldman is a professor at the School of Pharmacy and the SPPD, where he holds the Norman Topping Chair in Medicine and Public Policy. Dana Goldman is an internationally known health economist who previously served as director of the RAND Corporation’s program in Health Economics, Finance and Organization, as well as director of the Bing Center for Health Economics, the Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation and the RAND Summer Institute. In the past 10 years, he has published 70 peer-reviewed articles and received more than $10 million in externally funded research grants. He is on the editorial board of Health Affairs, is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves on numerous advisory panels with the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging and the Institute of Medicine. Geoffrey Joyce is an expert in insurance design, demand for pharmaceuticals, Medicare and smoking cessation. Neeraj Sood’s work focuses on the economics of innovation, economic epidemiology, health-care financing and HIV/AIDS policy.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

15


giving

Unexpected generosity…

Alum awards

uniquely comes to the School of Pharmacy

new scholarship

A few months ago, Ron and Susan Kathren came to the USC School of Pharmacy to present a $100,000 check to establish the Ray Kathren Memorial Faculty Development Endowment Fund, providing support for junior faculty to attend professional meetings throughout the world.

Back in the late 1940s, Ray Kathren, Ron’s older brother, was a student at the School of Pharmacy. Ray had found his way to USC through a rather circuitous route. He was born in Detroit and then moved with his family to Canada, his mother’s native country. Quickly, it became apparent that Ray was quite brilliant. Ray graduated from high school at 15 at the top of his class and started college a year later in Detroit. He came to Los Angeles, attended college and then enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps. “Ray was always very proud of his service in the military,” says Ron, noting that every year at tax time Ray would travel to the Long Beach VA Hospital to volunteer his time and expertise by helping fellow veterans with their taxes. After his military stint, Ray came to the USC School of Pharmacy, having become interested in the profession through an uncle who was a pharmacist. A bug to get moving and “start doing things” prevented Ray from finishing pharmacy school. Instead, he started his own business and was able to retire at the age of 39. While quite successful, Ray always lived a simple life. Unlike his brother, Ron followed a conventional path, enjoying an academic career as a professor of pharmaceutical sciences and director of a research program. While the two brothers pursued different routes, they remained close throughout their lives. Today, as executor of his brother’s estate, Ron is carrying out Ray’s last wishes.

16 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Mayank Shah, PharmD (‘05), congratulates Sam Ho, PharmD candidate, the first recipient of the Rebecca and Mayank Shah Scholarship.

Check, please! Tina Patel, PharmD candidate, presents a check to Dean Vanderveen on behalf of the Indian Pharmacists Association. The donation supports an endowed scholarship. Tina’s father, I. R. Patel, is a former president of the group.

Ron and Susan Kathren with Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences chair Sarah Hamm-Alvarez (left) and Dean Vanderveen.

“I always think that unconventional people lead us into new pathways. So, I think my brother Ray has led us to direct his gift in this way…helping junior faculty who might not have an opportunity to attend an important meeting without access to this gift,” says Ron. “It’s not flashy, it’s not usual, but it’s a quiet way to help deserving young faculty embarking on their careers.” Asked why Ray remembered USC in his estate, Ron recalls that “his brother had fond memories of his time at USC and he felt the school genuinely provided a great education. He was always very positive about USC.”

Teeing off for a cause David Breslow, PharmD (‘71), CEO of the Institute for Community Pharmacy, presents a check for $50,000 for GNP/ICP Scholarships. The annual GNP/ICP Scholarship Golf Classic raises funds that support this scholarship benefitting students interested in independent community pharmacy practice.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

17


giving

Unexpected generosity…

Alum awards

uniquely comes to the School of Pharmacy

new scholarship

A few months ago, Ron and Susan Kathren came to the USC School of Pharmacy to present a $100,000 check to establish the Ray Kathren Memorial Faculty Development Endowment Fund, providing support for junior faculty to attend professional meetings throughout the world.

Back in the late 1940s, Ray Kathren, Ron’s older brother, was a student at the School of Pharmacy. Ray had found his way to USC through a rather circuitous route. He was born in Detroit and then moved with his family to Canada, his mother’s native country. Quickly, it became apparent that Ray was quite brilliant. Ray graduated from high school at 15 at the top of his class and started college a year later in Detroit. He came to Los Angeles, attended college and then enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps. “Ray was always very proud of his service in the military,” says Ron, noting that every year at tax time Ray would travel to the Long Beach VA Hospital to volunteer his time and expertise by helping fellow veterans with their taxes. After his military stint, Ray came to the USC School of Pharmacy, having become interested in the profession through an uncle who was a pharmacist. A bug to get moving and “start doing things” prevented Ray from finishing pharmacy school. Instead, he started his own business and was able to retire at the age of 39. While quite successful, Ray always lived a simple life. Unlike his brother, Ron followed a conventional path, enjoying an academic career as a professor of pharmaceutical sciences and director of a research program. While the two brothers pursued different routes, they remained close throughout their lives. Today, as executor of his brother’s estate, Ron is carrying out Ray’s last wishes.

16 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Mayank Shah, PharmD (‘05), congratulates Sam Ho, PharmD candidate, the first recipient of the Rebecca and Mayank Shah Scholarship.

Check, please! Tina Patel, PharmD candidate, presents a check to Dean Vanderveen on behalf of the Indian Pharmacists Association. The donation supports an endowed scholarship. Tina’s father, I. R. Patel, is a former president of the group.

Ron and Susan Kathren with Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences chair Sarah Hamm-Alvarez (left) and Dean Vanderveen.

“I always think that unconventional people lead us into new pathways. So, I think my brother Ray has led us to direct his gift in this way…helping junior faculty who might not have an opportunity to attend an important meeting without access to this gift,” says Ron. “It’s not flashy, it’s not usual, but it’s a quiet way to help deserving young faculty embarking on their careers.” Asked why Ray remembered USC in his estate, Ron recalls that “his brother had fond memories of his time at USC and he felt the school genuinely provided a great education. He was always very positive about USC.”

Teeing off for a cause David Breslow, PharmD (‘71), CEO of the Institute for Community Pharmacy, presents a check for $50,000 for GNP/ICP Scholarships. The annual GNP/ICP Scholarship Golf Classic raises funds that support this scholarship benefitting students interested in independent community pharmacy practice.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

17


titus family department

Steven Chen takes on the role of co-chair of a national collaborative that aims to get pharmacy services into the clinics that need them the most. Professor Dana Goldman has been named to the prestigious Institute of Medicine.

Dana Goldman is named

to the Institute of Medicine

Leading the initiative for clinical pharmacy service integration

Goldman directs the USC-based Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics. Dana Goldman, a professor at the School of Pharmacy and the School of Policy, Planning and Development, has been named to the Institute of Medicine — one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. Goldman, who is best known for his contributions to health economics and policy, came to USC from the RAND Corporation, where he was director of the RAND Health Economics, Finance and Organization division. Goldman oversees the newly created Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics at the University of Southern California. The Schaeffer Center is a collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Policy, Planning and Development, where Goldman holds the Norman Topping Chair in Medicine and Public Policy. In the past 10 years, Goldman has published 70 peerreviewed articles and received more than $10 million in externally funded research grants. He is on the editorial board of Health Affairs, is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and serves on numerous advisory panels with the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging and now, the Institute of Medicine as well. Lifetime appointments to the Institute are elected by current active members through a highly selective process that recognizes

18 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care and public health. “The Institute of Medicine provides an opportunity to engage in research with some of the nation’s top health experts, and I am honored to represent the University of Southern California as part of this tradition,” said Goldman. “I look forward to collaborating with the other institute members in our shared mission to find ways to improve the health-care system.” Goldman is one of two USC faculty members recently named to the Institute. The other is Mark Humayun, a professor of ophthalmology, cell and neurobiology and biomedical engineering at the Keck School of Medicine, the Doheny Eye Institute and the Viterbi School of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine, established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, functions as both an honorific membership organization and an advisory organization providing independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on health issues. The addition of recently elected members bring the Institute of Medicine’s total active membership to 1,610 and the number of foreign associates to 93. An additional 75 members hold emeritus status.

Associate professor Steven Chen has been appointed cochair of the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative 2.0, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Chen, a strong proponent for clinical pharmacy services in clinics that serve high-risk and chronically-ill patients, hopes that his new Associate professor Steven Chen role will provide an opportunity to help new and existing medical teams across the country develop or advance their clinical pharmacy services and produce documented improvements in health outcomes. Chen has worked with the JWCH Medical Clinic at the Weingart Center in Downtown Los Angeles, one of the largest safety-net clinics in the area, and consults with other local clinics, including the QueensCare Family Clinics and the South Central Family Health Center.

Chen’s experience with these clinics and the dramatic improvements in patient-health outcomes, along with his involvement in last year’s Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative, made him a top contender for his new post. As co-chair of the collaborative, he will provide leadership to the faculty involved, ensuring that the collaborative develops strategies that will assure its success. Chen has high hopes for the future of integrated clinical pharmacy services in medical homes throughout the nation. “This collaborative is showing that clinical pharmacy services clearly save lives and improve health outcomes,” he said. One of the areas that Chen plans to focus on is the collection and analysis of data relative to the impact of clinical pharmacy services. “The data tells the story of how clinical pharmacy services dramatically improve patient outcomes while saving health-care dollars,” said Chen. In its second year, the Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative increased site participation by almost 50 percent, adding nearly 80 new teams to this year’s roster. The collaborative seeks to improve patient outcomes and safety by integrating evidence-based, clinical pharmacy services into clinical care and management.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

19


titus family department

Steven Chen takes on the role of co-chair of a national collaborative that aims to get pharmacy services into the clinics that need them the most. Professor Dana Goldman has been named to the prestigious Institute of Medicine.

Dana Goldman is named

to the Institute of Medicine

Leading the initiative for clinical pharmacy service integration

Goldman directs the USC-based Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics. Dana Goldman, a professor at the School of Pharmacy and the School of Policy, Planning and Development, has been named to the Institute of Medicine — one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. Goldman, who is best known for his contributions to health economics and policy, came to USC from the RAND Corporation, where he was director of the RAND Health Economics, Finance and Organization division. Goldman oversees the newly created Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics at the University of Southern California. The Schaeffer Center is a collaboration between the School of Pharmacy and the School of Policy, Planning and Development, where Goldman holds the Norman Topping Chair in Medicine and Public Policy. In the past 10 years, Goldman has published 70 peerreviewed articles and received more than $10 million in externally funded research grants. He is on the editorial board of Health Affairs, is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and serves on numerous advisory panels with the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging and now, the Institute of Medicine as well. Lifetime appointments to the Institute are elected by current active members through a highly selective process that recognizes

18 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care and public health. “The Institute of Medicine provides an opportunity to engage in research with some of the nation’s top health experts, and I am honored to represent the University of Southern California as part of this tradition,” said Goldman. “I look forward to collaborating with the other institute members in our shared mission to find ways to improve the health-care system.” Goldman is one of two USC faculty members recently named to the Institute. The other is Mark Humayun, a professor of ophthalmology, cell and neurobiology and biomedical engineering at the Keck School of Medicine, the Doheny Eye Institute and the Viterbi School of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine, established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, functions as both an honorific membership organization and an advisory organization providing independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on health issues. The addition of recently elected members bring the Institute of Medicine’s total active membership to 1,610 and the number of foreign associates to 93. An additional 75 members hold emeritus status.

Associate professor Steven Chen has been appointed cochair of the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative 2.0, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Chen, a strong proponent for clinical pharmacy services in clinics that serve high-risk and chronically-ill patients, hopes that his new Associate professor Steven Chen role will provide an opportunity to help new and existing medical teams across the country develop or advance their clinical pharmacy services and produce documented improvements in health outcomes. Chen has worked with the JWCH Medical Clinic at the Weingart Center in Downtown Los Angeles, one of the largest safety-net clinics in the area, and consults with other local clinics, including the QueensCare Family Clinics and the South Central Family Health Center.

Chen’s experience with these clinics and the dramatic improvements in patient-health outcomes, along with his involvement in last year’s Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative, made him a top contender for his new post. As co-chair of the collaborative, he will provide leadership to the faculty involved, ensuring that the collaborative develops strategies that will assure its success. Chen has high hopes for the future of integrated clinical pharmacy services in medical homes throughout the nation. “This collaborative is showing that clinical pharmacy services clearly save lives and improve health outcomes,” he said. One of the areas that Chen plans to focus on is the collection and analysis of data relative to the impact of clinical pharmacy services. “The data tells the story of how clinical pharmacy services dramatically improve patient outcomes while saving health-care dollars,” said Chen. In its second year, the Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative increased site participation by almost 50 percent, adding nearly 80 new teams to this year’s roster. The collaborative seeks to improve patient outcomes and safety by integrating evidence-based, clinical pharmacy services into clinical care and management.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

19


titus family department

Titus Family Department of Clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical economics & policy faculty updates Mel Baron, PharmD, MPA, was the white coat speaker for the

Therapeutic Controversies in ADHD in the Pediatric/Adolescent

Gladys Mitani, PharmD, awarded first place for her poster titled

tory health insurance; awarded the 2009 Garfield Economic Impact

Touro University School of Pharmacy; presented “Wonder Drugs”

Population,” at the ACCP 30th Annual Meeting in Anaheim in Octo-

“Influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 Genotypes on Warfarin Dosage

Award for his work on the publication titled “U.S. Pharmaceutical

at the Opera for Educators program in Downtown LA in September;

ber; invited to attend the National Institutes of Health conference on

Requirements in a Predominantly Hispanic Population,” at the

Policy in a Global Marketplace”.

fotonovelas which he produces were featured in the fall isse of

Best Pharmaceuticals for Children in Bethesda, MD, in November.

California Society of Health-System Pharmacists seminar in

Intersections, a publication of the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists.

Melissa Durham, PharmD, passed the Certificate of Knowledge in

October; joined the editorial staff for the Journal of Cardiovascular

Glen Stimmel, PharmD, presented “Drug-Induced Sexual Dysfunc-

Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

tion and Counseling Patients on Sexual Issues,” at the California Society of Health-System Pharmacists meeting in October.

Travel Health Exam from the International Society of Travel Medicine.

Paul Beringer, PharmD, awarded $45,600 grant for project

Tien Ng, PharmD, promoted to associate professor; appointed

titled “Predictors of Response to Azithromycin in Patients

Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, quoted in the Ventura County Star about

with Cystic Fibrosis”.

the U.S. Food and Drug Administration weighing methods to control

to the editorial board of the World Journal of Cardiology.

Bradley Williams, PharmD, presented “Keeping Grandma Healthy: The Challenge of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy,” at the AAPS meeting

acetaminophen overuse; quoted in the LA Times about how the days

Michael Nichol, PhD, presented “Association of Noncompliance

in Los Angeles in November; appointed to the Regional Chapters

Steven Chen, PharmD, quoted in the LA Times about the lack of

in which “pharmacists wouldn’t even tell patients what was in their

with Clinical Treatment Guidelines and Disease Burden in a Cali-

Council of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists for the

clinical trials of different diabetes treatments that show long-term

medications are gone”; quoted in the AARP Bulletin about Medicare

fornia Medicaid Cardiovascular Disease Population”, “Comparison

coming year; principal investigator on a grant for $99,968, from the

safety and efficacy in October; featured in the LA Times about his

Part D; named director of Student Outreach for Community Health

between the EQ-5D and the Seven Derived Health Utilities in Visual

SCAN Foundation, supporting his project, “Pills and Spills: Helping

work with patients as a clinical pharmacist in November.

at the School of Pharmacy.

Impairment in a U.S. National Representative Sample”, and “The

Direct-Care Workers Reduce Falls through Medication and Environ-

Impact of Multiple Cardiovascular Medications Use on Medication

mental Interventions”. Kathleen Besinque, PharmD, is co-investigator along with Jon Pynoos, PhD, School of Gerontology.

Daryl Davies, PhD, awarded $46,325 NIH Grant funded by the

Dana Goldman, PhD, presented “Socioeconomic Gradients in

Adherence in a California Medicaid Population with Cardiovascular

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which provides

Health: The Role of Patient Self-Management,” at the Multidisci-

Disease,” at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical

an opportunity for a secondary-school science teacher and two

plinary Research Colloquium Series in Aging in September; quoted

Decision Making in Hollywood in October.

undergraduates to spend hands-on time in the laboratory setting;

in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal about the need

mentioned in Chemical Engineering News for his use of mutated

to address medical malpractice to alleviate health-care costs in

Susie Park, PharmD, awarded a $20,000 grant from the

Principles of Good Sleep Hygiene” in September/ October 2009

receptors to identify ethanol-sensitive targets in protein.

September; quoted in The Washington Post for his study that showed

California Korean American Pharmacists Association to support

issue of Student Pharmacist Magazine.

and Continuing Professional Development; published article “The

that employers pass health-care savings onto employees in October;

her research project focusing on antidepressant response in the

Jason Doctor, PhD, presented “The Development of a Utility Basis

inducted into the Institute of Medicine; awarded the 2009 Garfield

Korean population.

for the Person Tradeoff (PTO) Measure and a Test of PTO Valid-

Economic Impact Award for his work on the publication titled “U.S.

ity,” at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical Decision

Pharmaceutical Policy in a Global Marketplace”.

Making in Hollywood in October; presented “Comparison of Direct-

Michael Wincor, PharmD, named associate dean of Globalization

Annie Wong-Beringer, PharmD, presented poster titled “Contribution and Associated Outcomes of Community MRSA Strains in

Frances Richmond, PhD, quoted in The Scientist about the lack of

Bloodstream Infections” and platform talk entitled “Factors Predic-

recognition given to the field of regulatory science in September.

tive of Treatment Failure of MRSA Bloodstream Infections,” at the

Exchange vs. Two-Stage Revision for the Infected THA: A Markov

Joel Hay, PhD, interviewed on CBS Radio’s San Francisco affili-

Expected-Value Decision Analysis,” at the 22nd Annual Congress of

ate KCBS-AM about medical data mining; quoted in The Ventura

Neeraj Sood, PhD, quoted on the Wall Street Journal’s “Market

and Chemotherapy in San Francisco in September; presented

the International Society for Technology in Arthroplasty, in Hawaii,

Star about health-care reform efforts targeting Medicare fraud in

Watch” site about how health-care reform would affect the aero-

“Concepts in Antimicrobial Stewardship” at the UCLA Adult and

in October.

September; quoted in The Daily Breeze about “managed care” in

space industry in September; quoted in The Washington Post for his

Pediatrics Infectious Diseases Grand Rounds in October; invited to

September.

study that showed that employers pass health-care savings onto

lead a roundtable panel discussion on antimicrobial stewardship

employees in October; interviewed on Fox News about what man-

at the Infectious Diseases Society of America Annual Meeting in

datory car insurance can tell us about the likely success of manda-

Philadelphia, PA, in October; appointed to serve a 3-year term on

Julie Dopheide, PharmD, presented a talk on diagnosing and

49th Annual Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents

treating ADHD in children and adults for the California Society of

Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, the William A. and

Health-System Pharmacists in October; presented “Strategies and

Josephine A. Heeres Professor in Community Pharmacy, promoted

the Infectious Diseases Society of America–Standards and Practice

to professor.

Guidelines Committee beginning in October.

20 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

21


titus family department

Titus Family Department of Clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical economics & policy faculty updates Mel Baron, PharmD, MPA, was the white coat speaker for the

Therapeutic Controversies in ADHD in the Pediatric/Adolescent

Gladys Mitani, PharmD, awarded first place for her poster titled

tory health insurance; awarded the 2009 Garfield Economic Impact

Touro University School of Pharmacy; presented “Wonder Drugs”

Population,” at the ACCP 30th Annual Meeting in Anaheim in Octo-

“Influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 Genotypes on Warfarin Dosage

Award for his work on the publication titled “U.S. Pharmaceutical

at the Opera for Educators program in Downtown LA in September;

ber; invited to attend the National Institutes of Health conference on

Requirements in a Predominantly Hispanic Population,” at the

Policy in a Global Marketplace”.

fotonovelas which he produces were featured in the fall isse of

Best Pharmaceuticals for Children in Bethesda, MD, in November.

California Society of Health-System Pharmacists seminar in

Intersections, a publication of the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists.

Melissa Durham, PharmD, passed the Certificate of Knowledge in

October; joined the editorial staff for the Journal of Cardiovascular

Glen Stimmel, PharmD, presented “Drug-Induced Sexual Dysfunc-

Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

tion and Counseling Patients on Sexual Issues,” at the California Society of Health-System Pharmacists meeting in October.

Travel Health Exam from the International Society of Travel Medicine.

Paul Beringer, PharmD, awarded $45,600 grant for project

Tien Ng, PharmD, promoted to associate professor; appointed

titled “Predictors of Response to Azithromycin in Patients

Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, quoted in the Ventura County Star about

with Cystic Fibrosis”.

the U.S. Food and Drug Administration weighing methods to control

to the editorial board of the World Journal of Cardiology.

Bradley Williams, PharmD, presented “Keeping Grandma Healthy: The Challenge of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy,” at the AAPS meeting

acetaminophen overuse; quoted in the LA Times about how the days

Michael Nichol, PhD, presented “Association of Noncompliance

in Los Angeles in November; appointed to the Regional Chapters

Steven Chen, PharmD, quoted in the LA Times about the lack of

in which “pharmacists wouldn’t even tell patients what was in their

with Clinical Treatment Guidelines and Disease Burden in a Cali-

Council of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists for the

clinical trials of different diabetes treatments that show long-term

medications are gone”; quoted in the AARP Bulletin about Medicare

fornia Medicaid Cardiovascular Disease Population”, “Comparison

coming year; principal investigator on a grant for $99,968, from the

safety and efficacy in October; featured in the LA Times about his

Part D; named director of Student Outreach for Community Health

between the EQ-5D and the Seven Derived Health Utilities in Visual

SCAN Foundation, supporting his project, “Pills and Spills: Helping

work with patients as a clinical pharmacist in November.

at the School of Pharmacy.

Impairment in a U.S. National Representative Sample”, and “The

Direct-Care Workers Reduce Falls through Medication and Environ-

Impact of Multiple Cardiovascular Medications Use on Medication

mental Interventions”. Kathleen Besinque, PharmD, is co-investigator along with Jon Pynoos, PhD, School of Gerontology.

Daryl Davies, PhD, awarded $46,325 NIH Grant funded by the

Dana Goldman, PhD, presented “Socioeconomic Gradients in

Adherence in a California Medicaid Population with Cardiovascular

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which provides

Health: The Role of Patient Self-Management,” at the Multidisci-

Disease,” at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical

an opportunity for a secondary-school science teacher and two

plinary Research Colloquium Series in Aging in September; quoted

Decision Making in Hollywood in October.

undergraduates to spend hands-on time in the laboratory setting;

in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal about the need

mentioned in Chemical Engineering News for his use of mutated

to address medical malpractice to alleviate health-care costs in

Susie Park, PharmD, awarded a $20,000 grant from the

Principles of Good Sleep Hygiene” in September/ October 2009

receptors to identify ethanol-sensitive targets in protein.

September; quoted in The Washington Post for his study that showed

California Korean American Pharmacists Association to support

issue of Student Pharmacist Magazine.

and Continuing Professional Development; published article “The

that employers pass health-care savings onto employees in October;

her research project focusing on antidepressant response in the

Jason Doctor, PhD, presented “The Development of a Utility Basis

inducted into the Institute of Medicine; awarded the 2009 Garfield

Korean population.

for the Person Tradeoff (PTO) Measure and a Test of PTO Valid-

Economic Impact Award for his work on the publication titled “U.S.

ity,” at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical Decision

Pharmaceutical Policy in a Global Marketplace”.

Making in Hollywood in October; presented “Comparison of Direct-

Michael Wincor, PharmD, named associate dean of Globalization

Annie Wong-Beringer, PharmD, presented poster titled “Contribution and Associated Outcomes of Community MRSA Strains in

Frances Richmond, PhD, quoted in The Scientist about the lack of

Bloodstream Infections” and platform talk entitled “Factors Predic-

recognition given to the field of regulatory science in September.

tive of Treatment Failure of MRSA Bloodstream Infections,” at the

Exchange vs. Two-Stage Revision for the Infected THA: A Markov

Joel Hay, PhD, interviewed on CBS Radio’s San Francisco affili-

Expected-Value Decision Analysis,” at the 22nd Annual Congress of

ate KCBS-AM about medical data mining; quoted in The Ventura

Neeraj Sood, PhD, quoted on the Wall Street Journal’s “Market

and Chemotherapy in San Francisco in September; presented

the International Society for Technology in Arthroplasty, in Hawaii,

Star about health-care reform efforts targeting Medicare fraud in

Watch” site about how health-care reform would affect the aero-

“Concepts in Antimicrobial Stewardship” at the UCLA Adult and

in October.

September; quoted in The Daily Breeze about “managed care” in

space industry in September; quoted in The Washington Post for his

Pediatrics Infectious Diseases Grand Rounds in October; invited to

September.

study that showed that employers pass health-care savings onto

lead a roundtable panel discussion on antimicrobial stewardship

employees in October; interviewed on Fox News about what man-

at the Infectious Diseases Society of America Annual Meeting in

datory car insurance can tell us about the likely success of manda-

Philadelphia, PA, in October; appointed to serve a 3-year term on

Julie Dopheide, PharmD, presented a talk on diagnosing and

49th Annual Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents

treating ADHD in children and adults for the California Society of

Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, the William A. and

Health-System Pharmacists in October; presented “Strategies and

Josephine A. Heeres Professor in Community Pharmacy, promoted

the Infectious Diseases Society of America–Standards and Practice

to professor.

Guidelines Committee beginning in October.

20 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

21


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences Professor Wolf in his lab during the 1960s.

School of Pharmacy hosts dinner honoring Distinguished Professor Walter Wolf.

Marking half a century... and counting...at USC While many things have changed at USC over the last fifty years, Professor Walter Wolf has remained a consistent force at the university. Wolf, one of only twenty faculty members to hold the title of Distinguished Professor, started his USC career in the department of chemistry in 1959, moving to the School of Pharmacy in 1962. Since then, he has shepherded hundreds of students through the School’s degree programs — a fact illustrated by the nearly onehundred people who gathered at the Edmondson Faculty Center on November 7 to celebrate this milestone in his USC career. “And to think I came to USC for a one-year research appointment,” says Wolf. During his tenure at the School, Wolf developed the USC radiopharmacy program, pioneering the field worldwide and making great strides in the use of radioactive materials for cancer treatment. “…You helped place the USC School of Pharmacy ahead of the curve. With skill and devotion, with insight and great talent, you advanced pharmaceutical studies and the training of newer generations of pharmacists and scientists,” said a letter from President Sample read by Dean R. Pete Vanderveen at the event. “You’ve brought great luster to USC.” That luster was evident during the celebration as generations of former students and colleagues mingled and remembered their experiences with Dr. Wolf. The night’s sentiment was captured by Randy Manaka, a Wolf lab alum, who said, “Dr. Wolf was a mentor and professor times three” Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences chair Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences also spoke, remarking, “Walter, you are always very engaged. And you are one of the reasons that I decided to come to USC.”

22 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

In spite of her busy schedule, Dr. Brinton always finds time for budding scientists. Here she is pictured with STAR students, high schoolers who work in her lab as well as other labs throughout USC. Pictured here are Yureli Lopez, Esosa Agbonwaneten, Jia Yao, Syeda Ahmed, postdoc Ryan Hamilton, Tiffany Lam, Julian Lemus and STAR director Roberta Diaz Brinton.

Professor earns support

for Alzheimer’s research Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton wins NAMS Award.

Dr. Wolf has a moment with Chioma Ikonte who received her doctorate under his mentorship in 2001. She is now a research scientist at Herbalife.

Wolf currently chairs the Provost’s Biomedical Imaging Science Initiative, and is the founding chair of the international Multidisciplinary Advisory Council on Noninvasive Imaging Studies. He is a past president of the Correlative Imaging Council and Educational Research Foundation of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and recipient of the Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award. In addition, Wolf has served as a past president of the Academic Senate, on the Council of Past Presidents of the Academic Senate and as chair of the Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry. A letter from Provost Max Nikias read at the event concluded, “USC’s current standing is part of your stellar legacy, Walter. We warmly commend you as we celebrate your golden anniversary at USC.” To honor the work of Professor Wolf, the School of Pharmacy has established the Gladys and Walter Wolf Endowment Fund to support future research fellows at the School. To make a donation, please contact Jennifer Watson at 323.442.1382 or freeh@usc.edu.

Roberta Diaz Brinton, the R. Pete Vanderveen Endowed Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, has been awarded the 2009 North American Menopause Society/Wyeth Pharmaceuticals SERM Research Award. The award, presented at the Menopause Society’s 20th annual meeting in San Diego, recognizes Brinton’s research to develop brain-selective estrogen-receptor modulators for menopausal women. Her research has advanced at an accelerated pace thanks to support from the National Institute on Aging, the Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation, the L.K. Whittier Family Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Association and the Jane and Gale Bensussen Gift for Translational Research. “The support has made it possible for us to make quantum leaps in our research, which have resulted in the discovery of factors that lead to Alzheimer’s disease and the development of therapeutics to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s,” said Brinton. Brinton and her team are generating alternatives to estrogen hormone replacement therapy. The molecules are designed to prevent a decline in cognitive function in postmenopausal women, without increasing the risk of cancer. Brinton’s research and therapeutic development is particularly important as 68 percent of those living with Alzheimer’s disease are women. “If no effective preventive therapeutics are developed, projections indicate that within 42 years, one in 45 Americans will be afflicted with Alzheimer’s,” she said. “Our goal

is to translate our scientific understanding of how the brain generates cognitive function and protects itself against Alzheimer’s into therapeutics that prevent and treat the disease.” Her research already has unlocked the potential of Allopregnanolone, a naturally occurring neurosteroid, to generate new neurons in mice with Alzheimer’s, reversing learning and memory deficits. She has developed a transdermal gel and is now working on developing a nasal spray. All of this is in preparation for the ultimate test for a new compound that requires clinical trials and review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Brinton recently became a member of the National Institute of Mental Health Board of Scientific Counselors and the Society for Neuroscience. She has published more than 100 scientific reports and serves on advisory boards for Alzforum and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation.

JUST IN… Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton and research assistant professor Liqin Zhao are co-primary investigators on a new 3-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute on Aging. The grant takes a compound developed through the basic science research in the Brinton lab to clinical trial. The principal investigator on the grant is Lon Schneider, Keck School of Medicine at USC. The grant is entitled “Estrogen Receptor-beta PhytoSERMs for Management of Menopause and Age-Associated Memory Decline”.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

23


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences Professor Wolf in his lab during the 1960s.

School of Pharmacy hosts dinner honoring Distinguished Professor Walter Wolf.

Marking half a century... and counting...at USC While many things have changed at USC over the last fifty years, Professor Walter Wolf has remained a consistent force at the university. Wolf, one of only twenty faculty members to hold the title of Distinguished Professor, started his USC career in the department of chemistry in 1959, moving to the School of Pharmacy in 1962. Since then, he has shepherded hundreds of students through the School’s degree programs — a fact illustrated by the nearly onehundred people who gathered at the Edmondson Faculty Center on November 7 to celebrate this milestone in his USC career. “And to think I came to USC for a one-year research appointment,” says Wolf. During his tenure at the School, Wolf developed the USC radiopharmacy program, pioneering the field worldwide and making great strides in the use of radioactive materials for cancer treatment. “…You helped place the USC School of Pharmacy ahead of the curve. With skill and devotion, with insight and great talent, you advanced pharmaceutical studies and the training of newer generations of pharmacists and scientists,” said a letter from President Sample read by Dean R. Pete Vanderveen at the event. “You’ve brought great luster to USC.” That luster was evident during the celebration as generations of former students and colleagues mingled and remembered their experiences with Dr. Wolf. The night’s sentiment was captured by Randy Manaka, a Wolf lab alum, who said, “Dr. Wolf was a mentor and professor times three” Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences chair Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences also spoke, remarking, “Walter, you are always very engaged. And you are one of the reasons that I decided to come to USC.”

22 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

In spite of her busy schedule, Dr. Brinton always finds time for budding scientists. Here she is pictured with STAR students, high schoolers who work in her lab as well as other labs throughout USC. Pictured here are Yureli Lopez, Esosa Agbonwaneten, Jia Yao, Syeda Ahmed, postdoc Ryan Hamilton, Tiffany Lam, Julian Lemus and STAR director Roberta Diaz Brinton.

Professor earns support

for Alzheimer’s research Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton wins NAMS Award.

Dr. Wolf has a moment with Chioma Ikonte who received her doctorate under his mentorship in 2001. She is now a research scientist at Herbalife.

Wolf currently chairs the Provost’s Biomedical Imaging Science Initiative, and is the founding chair of the international Multidisciplinary Advisory Council on Noninvasive Imaging Studies. He is a past president of the Correlative Imaging Council and Educational Research Foundation of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and recipient of the Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award. In addition, Wolf has served as a past president of the Academic Senate, on the Council of Past Presidents of the Academic Senate and as chair of the Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry. A letter from Provost Max Nikias read at the event concluded, “USC’s current standing is part of your stellar legacy, Walter. We warmly commend you as we celebrate your golden anniversary at USC.” To honor the work of Professor Wolf, the School of Pharmacy has established the Gladys and Walter Wolf Endowment Fund to support future research fellows at the School. To make a donation, please contact Jennifer Watson at 323.442.1382 or freeh@usc.edu.

Roberta Diaz Brinton, the R. Pete Vanderveen Endowed Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, has been awarded the 2009 North American Menopause Society/Wyeth Pharmaceuticals SERM Research Award. The award, presented at the Menopause Society’s 20th annual meeting in San Diego, recognizes Brinton’s research to develop brain-selective estrogen-receptor modulators for menopausal women. Her research has advanced at an accelerated pace thanks to support from the National Institute on Aging, the Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation, the L.K. Whittier Family Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Association and the Jane and Gale Bensussen Gift for Translational Research. “The support has made it possible for us to make quantum leaps in our research, which have resulted in the discovery of factors that lead to Alzheimer’s disease and the development of therapeutics to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s,” said Brinton. Brinton and her team are generating alternatives to estrogen hormone replacement therapy. The molecules are designed to prevent a decline in cognitive function in postmenopausal women, without increasing the risk of cancer. Brinton’s research and therapeutic development is particularly important as 68 percent of those living with Alzheimer’s disease are women. “If no effective preventive therapeutics are developed, projections indicate that within 42 years, one in 45 Americans will be afflicted with Alzheimer’s,” she said. “Our goal

is to translate our scientific understanding of how the brain generates cognitive function and protects itself against Alzheimer’s into therapeutics that prevent and treat the disease.” Her research already has unlocked the potential of Allopregnanolone, a naturally occurring neurosteroid, to generate new neurons in mice with Alzheimer’s, reversing learning and memory deficits. She has developed a transdermal gel and is now working on developing a nasal spray. All of this is in preparation for the ultimate test for a new compound that requires clinical trials and review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Brinton recently became a member of the National Institute of Mental Health Board of Scientific Counselors and the Society for Neuroscience. She has published more than 100 scientific reports and serves on advisory boards for Alzforum and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation.

JUST IN… Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton and research assistant professor Liqin Zhao are co-primary investigators on a new 3-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute on Aging. The grant takes a compound developed through the basic science research in the Brinton lab to clinical trial. The principal investigator on the grant is Lon Schneider, Keck School of Medicine at USC. The grant is entitled “Estrogen Receptor-beta PhytoSERMs for Management of Menopause and Age-Associated Memory Decline”.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

23


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences

Scientist wins “big idea” award Julio Camarero receives transformative research grant from the NIH.

faculty updates James Adams, PhD, mentioned in the Ventura

Roger Clemens, DrPH, quoted in the LA Times

County Star for his book about Chumash healing; participated in a radio interview on KPFA Radio Berkeley about healing with Chumash medical plants; interviewed by ATVN.org about medical marijuana in Los Angeles; presented “Chumash Healing” at Pitzer College in November.

about efforts by a vegan group to get a cancer-risk warning label placed on processed meats; quoted in the Contra Costa Times about a new study showing that organic food is no more nutritious than non-organic food; quoted on KNBC-TV about new drinks that claim health benefits but haven’t been evaluated by the FDA in September; cited in the LA Times regarding drawbacks of getting too much L-carnitine in November.

Ronald Alkana, PhD, awarded $58,869 NIH Grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, R. Pete Vanderveen

The first winners of the Transformative Research Program Award from the National Institutes of Health include Julio Camarero, a scientist working independently to mine the proteome — the universe of proteins and protein-like molecules — for important new compounds.

Associate professor Julio Camarero

Associate professor Camarero received a five-year, $1.25 million research grant to support his work at the School of Pharmacy. According to the NIH, the grants are “intended to support research that has the potential to transform the way we think about and conduct science” and are given to an “elite few with truly bold ideas.” Only 42 scientists nationwide received the award. Camarero’s research aims to discover a viable antibody substitute. Antibodies are used for diagnostic purposes as biomarkers, and, to a lesser extent, as pharmaceuticals. The problem with antibodies is that they are large, hard to create and unstable.

24 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Camarero plans to use a naturally occurring peptide — the name for a class of small, protein-like compounds — as the basis for a stable antibody substitute. He is also developing a new technology that mimics the immune system and can rapidly locate peptides related to particular diseases, such as breast and prostate cancers. What differentiates his technology from other approaches is that selection is made in vivo rather than in vitro. The process occurs within the cell itself, and this allows potential candidates to be screened efficiently. This technology in effect allows him to accelerate molecular evolution. “We’re creating a library of a thousand million compounds and out of that library, we may get 50 to 100 candidates to take to the next step,” Camarero explained. This innovative research could eventually be translated to help detect cancers, toxins and other specific targets, and in the long run, it could be used toward developing new, more biologically based therapeutic drugs. The drug pipeline is currently empty in this category, so his research holds great promise for the future of therapeutics. Camarero joined USC in 2007 as an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences as part of the Provost’s Biomedical Nanoscience Initiative. Previously, he held a fellowship at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

JUST IN… Julio Camarero has been awarded a new 3-year, $400,000 grant from the Department of Defense PCRP of the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs. The award will support Camarero’s project entitled, “Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction,” and focuses on identification of new therapies for prostate cancer. He will be collaborating with Dr. Geoff Wahl from the Salk Institute.

Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, awarded a therapeutic development grant of $1.6 million for Alzheimer’s disease research from the NIH; installed as a member of the Society of Neuroscience and on the Scientific Council for the National Institute of Mental Health; awarded a $44,000 grant to support her Alzheimer’s disease research and a $25,000 grant to support STAR students from the Kenneth T. Eileen L. Norris Foundation.

Enrique Cadenas, MD, PhD, Charles Krown/

Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, PhD, Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, with Andrew MacKay, PhD, awarded $408,692 grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to further research to find ways to best deliver medications to the eye; promoted to associate dean for research affairs; attended a collaborative research meeting at the UC Berkeley School of Optometry in July; attended the GCMB Retreat in July; attended the Governing Board Meeting and Planning Session of the Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society in Florence, Italy, in September.

Pharmacy Alumni Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, presented “Metabolic Pathways and Oxidative Stress on Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration,” at a dinner for Luc Montagnier, 2008 Noble Prize Winner in Rome, Italy, in August; presented on the metabolic targets in a model of Alzheimer’s disease, “Effects of Lipoic Acid,” at the 7th Annual COSTAM/ SFRR International Workshop on Chemoprevention and Translational Research in Langkawi, Malaysia, in July.

Curtis Okamoto, PhD, appointed vice chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences; chaired the symposium at the International Union of Physiological Sciences in Kyoto, Japan, summer 2009.

Julio Camarero, PhD, received $1,250,000 NIH

Igor Rebrin, PhD, presented “Tryptophan Nitra-

Transformative R01 Award for his research on antibody alternatives; awarded $400,000 grant from the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program for his project “Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction”; presented on the biosynthesis of cyclotides in bacterial cells for the creation of geneticallyencoded libraries to be used in drug discovery at the 11th International Congress on Amino Acids in Vienna, Austria, in August; presented on the use of cyclotides as molecular scaffolds for the design of new microbial antivirulence agents at the 238th American Chemical Society National Meeting in Washington, DC, in August; edited Volume 61, Issue 11, of Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews; published in Tagg 44’s monthly journal for his article about the development of a novel class of non-antibody based protein-capture reagents in October.

tion in Mitochondrial Enzyme Succinyl-CoAKetoacid Transferase During Aging and Effects of Caloric Restriction,” at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX, and University of North Texas Health Center, Forth Worth, TX, in May.

Nouri Neamati, PhD, awarded $442,259

American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists The School of Pharmacy hosted a reception at the annual meeting of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists held in Los Angeles in November. Hundreds of faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends stopped by the event, including (pictured) Curtis Okamoto, PhD, co-chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Dennis Atkinson, research advancement director in the Office of the Provost at USC.

grant by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to enhance his lab’s efforts to inhibit the HIV-integrase protein.

Jean Shih, PhD, University Professor, Boyd and Elsie Welin Professor, awarded an additional $933,788 from the National Institute of Mental Health for her ongoing project, “Two Types of Monoamine Oxidase”. Rajindar Sohal, PhD, Timothy M. Chan Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, featured on CBS News Canada for his studies on caloric restriction, which showed that restriction was only effective on obese mice and that it shortens the life spans of older mice.

in memoriam Glenn Hamor, PhD, professor emeritus,

passed away in November. Hamor taught at the School of Pharmacy from 1952-1988, and was the first USC professor to receive a four-year grant from the National Institute of Health for his study on anti-epileptic drugs. He received a Pfieffer Memorial Research professorship at the University of Trieste (Italy) School of Pharmacy where he taught for one year. He was also a visiting professor at the Trinity College School of Pharmacy in Dublin (Ireland). He was interested in literature in addition to science, and led the USC Retired Faculty Book Club for most of the last two decades along with his wife of 62 years, Eileen Deegan Hamor. In addition to his wife, Dr. Hamor leaves four children and seven grandchildren.

Walter Wolf, PhD, Distinguished Professor, awarded a grant from the James H. Zumberge Research and Innovation Fund for activities related to the project “Development of Health Information Technology”; participated in a study section for the National Cancer Institute last summer.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

25


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences

Scientist wins “big idea” award Julio Camarero receives transformative research grant from the NIH.

faculty updates James Adams, PhD, mentioned in the Ventura

Roger Clemens, DrPH, quoted in the LA Times

County Star for his book about Chumash healing; participated in a radio interview on KPFA Radio Berkeley about healing with Chumash medical plants; interviewed by ATVN.org about medical marijuana in Los Angeles; presented “Chumash Healing” at Pitzer College in November.

about efforts by a vegan group to get a cancer-risk warning label placed on processed meats; quoted in the Contra Costa Times about a new study showing that organic food is no more nutritious than non-organic food; quoted on KNBC-TV about new drinks that claim health benefits but haven’t been evaluated by the FDA in September; cited in the LA Times regarding drawbacks of getting too much L-carnitine in November.

Ronald Alkana, PhD, awarded $58,869 NIH Grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, R. Pete Vanderveen

The first winners of the Transformative Research Program Award from the National Institutes of Health include Julio Camarero, a scientist working independently to mine the proteome — the universe of proteins and protein-like molecules — for important new compounds.

Associate professor Julio Camarero

Associate professor Camarero received a five-year, $1.25 million research grant to support his work at the School of Pharmacy. According to the NIH, the grants are “intended to support research that has the potential to transform the way we think about and conduct science” and are given to an “elite few with truly bold ideas.” Only 42 scientists nationwide received the award. Camarero’s research aims to discover a viable antibody substitute. Antibodies are used for diagnostic purposes as biomarkers, and, to a lesser extent, as pharmaceuticals. The problem with antibodies is that they are large, hard to create and unstable.

24 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Camarero plans to use a naturally occurring peptide — the name for a class of small, protein-like compounds — as the basis for a stable antibody substitute. He is also developing a new technology that mimics the immune system and can rapidly locate peptides related to particular diseases, such as breast and prostate cancers. What differentiates his technology from other approaches is that selection is made in vivo rather than in vitro. The process occurs within the cell itself, and this allows potential candidates to be screened efficiently. This technology in effect allows him to accelerate molecular evolution. “We’re creating a library of a thousand million compounds and out of that library, we may get 50 to 100 candidates to take to the next step,” Camarero explained. This innovative research could eventually be translated to help detect cancers, toxins and other specific targets, and in the long run, it could be used toward developing new, more biologically based therapeutic drugs. The drug pipeline is currently empty in this category, so his research holds great promise for the future of therapeutics. Camarero joined USC in 2007 as an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences as part of the Provost’s Biomedical Nanoscience Initiative. Previously, he held a fellowship at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

JUST IN… Julio Camarero has been awarded a new 3-year, $400,000 grant from the Department of Defense PCRP of the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs. The award will support Camarero’s project entitled, “Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction,” and focuses on identification of new therapies for prostate cancer. He will be collaborating with Dr. Geoff Wahl from the Salk Institute.

Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, awarded a therapeutic development grant of $1.6 million for Alzheimer’s disease research from the NIH; installed as a member of the Society of Neuroscience and on the Scientific Council for the National Institute of Mental Health; awarded a $44,000 grant to support her Alzheimer’s disease research and a $25,000 grant to support STAR students from the Kenneth T. Eileen L. Norris Foundation.

Enrique Cadenas, MD, PhD, Charles Krown/

Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, PhD, Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, with Andrew MacKay, PhD, awarded $408,692 grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to further research to find ways to best deliver medications to the eye; promoted to associate dean for research affairs; attended a collaborative research meeting at the UC Berkeley School of Optometry in July; attended the GCMB Retreat in July; attended the Governing Board Meeting and Planning Session of the Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society in Florence, Italy, in September.

Pharmacy Alumni Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, presented “Metabolic Pathways and Oxidative Stress on Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration,” at a dinner for Luc Montagnier, 2008 Noble Prize Winner in Rome, Italy, in August; presented on the metabolic targets in a model of Alzheimer’s disease, “Effects of Lipoic Acid,” at the 7th Annual COSTAM/ SFRR International Workshop on Chemoprevention and Translational Research in Langkawi, Malaysia, in July.

Curtis Okamoto, PhD, appointed vice chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences; chaired the symposium at the International Union of Physiological Sciences in Kyoto, Japan, summer 2009.

Julio Camarero, PhD, received $1,250,000 NIH

Igor Rebrin, PhD, presented “Tryptophan Nitra-

Transformative R01 Award for his research on antibody alternatives; awarded $400,000 grant from the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program for his project “Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction”; presented on the biosynthesis of cyclotides in bacterial cells for the creation of geneticallyencoded libraries to be used in drug discovery at the 11th International Congress on Amino Acids in Vienna, Austria, in August; presented on the use of cyclotides as molecular scaffolds for the design of new microbial antivirulence agents at the 238th American Chemical Society National Meeting in Washington, DC, in August; edited Volume 61, Issue 11, of Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews; published in Tagg 44’s monthly journal for his article about the development of a novel class of non-antibody based protein-capture reagents in October.

tion in Mitochondrial Enzyme Succinyl-CoAKetoacid Transferase During Aging and Effects of Caloric Restriction,” at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX, and University of North Texas Health Center, Forth Worth, TX, in May.

Nouri Neamati, PhD, awarded $442,259

American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists The School of Pharmacy hosted a reception at the annual meeting of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists held in Los Angeles in November. Hundreds of faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends stopped by the event, including (pictured) Curtis Okamoto, PhD, co-chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Dennis Atkinson, research advancement director in the Office of the Provost at USC.

grant by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to enhance his lab’s efforts to inhibit the HIV-integrase protein.

Jean Shih, PhD, University Professor, Boyd and Elsie Welin Professor, awarded an additional $933,788 from the National Institute of Mental Health for her ongoing project, “Two Types of Monoamine Oxidase”. Rajindar Sohal, PhD, Timothy M. Chan Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, featured on CBS News Canada for his studies on caloric restriction, which showed that restriction was only effective on obese mice and that it shortens the life spans of older mice.

in memoriam Glenn Hamor, PhD, professor emeritus,

passed away in November. Hamor taught at the School of Pharmacy from 1952-1988, and was the first USC professor to receive a four-year grant from the National Institute of Health for his study on anti-epileptic drugs. He received a Pfieffer Memorial Research professorship at the University of Trieste (Italy) School of Pharmacy where he taught for one year. He was also a visiting professor at the Trinity College School of Pharmacy in Dublin (Ireland). He was interested in literature in addition to science, and led the USC Retired Faculty Book Club for most of the last two decades along with his wife of 62 years, Eileen Deegan Hamor. In addition to his wife, Dr. Hamor leaves four children and seven grandchildren.

Walter Wolf, PhD, Distinguished Professor, awarded a grant from the James H. Zumberge Research and Innovation Fund for activities related to the project “Development of Health Information Technology”; participated in a study section for the National Cancer Institute last summer.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

25


students

(left to right) Victor Law from UPNI, Dean Vanderveen, student organizers Tanaz Kohan and Parth D. Shah, both PharmD candidates, and associate professor Geoffrey Joyce.

Pharmacy Students Talk Politics

Annual event brings together elected officials, faculty and students to discuss the legislative agenda and process.

USC School of Pharmacy students and faculty had the opportunity to discuss the timely subject of health-care reform with elected officials at the School’s annual Legislative Day, held on November 6 at the University Park Campus. The event included presentations from California assemblymembers, health economists, student leaders, faculty and association representatives, all speaking about the hot national topic of health-care reform. Elected officials speaking at the event included California State Assemblymembers Mike Eng, Ted Lieu and Anthony Portantino, as well as State Senator Curren Price. The elected officials challenged the students to get involved and stay involved in the political process, noting the importance of letting representatives know your perspective and helping them to be better informed as they cast votes in Sacramento. Other speakers included associate professors Geoffrey Joyce and Jeffery Goad and Victor Law. School of Pharmacy

Dean R. Pete Vanderveen welcomed participants to the event. Vanderveen congratulated PharmD students Parth D. Shah and Tanaz Kohan, the two student organizers of Legislative Day, noting the “innumerable hours they have spent making this event happen.” After the presentations, students staged a formal discussion on health-care reform and its impact on the pharmacy profession. The morning event was followed by a health fair, where students offered the Legislative Day attendees, the USC community and local residents an opportunity to be checked for diabetes, cholesterol, hypertension and osteoporosis. The breakfast was attended by nearly 200 people. The event is presented by the American Pharmacy Student Alliance and the National Community Pharmacists Association of the USC School of Pharmacy. Sponsors include the United Pharmacists Network Inc and Albertsons/Sav-On.

An innovative approach to the treatment of cystic fibrosis Tim Bensman earns research award from national pharmacy group. Graduate student Tim Bensman’s work in the lab of professor Paul Beringer may prove to be an integral step toward the treatment of inflammation caused by cystic fibrosis.

ACCP award recipient Tim Bensman, PharmD/PhD candidate, (right) with mentor, associate professor Paul Beringer.

Bensman’s innovative work with the antibiotic doxycycline was performed over this past summer through a fellowship program awarded to him by the USC School of Pharmacy. An abstract based on this work earned him the 2009 M. Kelli Jordan

travel award to attend the American College of Clinical Pharmacy’s annual meeting. At the meeting, Bensman won the best student poster award over six other student finalists from schools across the country. “While everyone’s work had great potential, what differentiates your research is having the opportunity to actively engage in a project and take responsibility and ownership for conducting its experiments,” said Bensman. “Providing a level of evidence and rationale for real-world implications further enhances your work.” Bensman’s research focuses on the immunomodulatory effects of doxycycline, commonly used as an antibiotic for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, a disease that affects 30,000 people in the United States and 70,000 worldwide. The disease is caused by a dis-regulated chloride channel (the CFTR), which results in reduced airway surface liquid, predisposing the patient to chronic infection and inflammation. Bensman, who is pursuing a joint PharmD/PhD in clinical and experimental therapeutics, has been working under the guidance of Beringer, whose lab focuses on ways to use pharmacologic therapies to preserve lung function and quality of life for individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis.

School of Pharmacy hits a bullseye with moving targets This year’s “Moving Targets” symposium, hosted by the USC School of Pharmacy and held on November 9 in midtown Los Angeles, focused on the cutting-edge therapeutics involved in the tumor microenvironment. “Moving Targets” aims to promote the interaction of students in the pharmaceutical, biomedical and biological sciences with one another, as well as with academic leaders and members of the pharmaceutical industry. The event attracted some 250 students, faculty, clinicians and industry representatives.  The program is organized completely by students, led this year by Jennifer-Ann Bayan, chair of the USC chapter of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. Faculty

26 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

advisors are professor Wei-Chiang Shen, John A. Biles Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, and assistant professor Andrew MacKay. The global roster of presenters provided an exceptional panel of leaders involved in cancer research. Hiroshi Maeda, MD, PhD, from Sojo University in Japan, who discovered the EPR effect for tumor-targeted delivery of drugs, offered the morning keynote address. Neil Gibson, PhD, chief scientific officer of research oncology at Pfizer, delivered the afternoon keynote. Other presenters included Napoleone Ferrara, PhD, one of the creators of Avastin, the main targeted drug used in the treat-

ment of lung cancer, Dai Fukumura, MD, PhD, Jindrich Kopecek, PhD, DSc, and Francis C. Szoka, PhD. School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen welcomed the crowd, starting his presentation with a rocking USC version of the “I Love LA” song featuring Randy Newman. Walter Wolf, Distinguished Professor and chair of the USC Biomedical Imaging Science Initiative, also spoke. The lecture portion of the program was followed by the “Moving Targets Student Poster Competition” and a reception at Lucky Strike Lanes at L.A. Live. Support for “Moving Targets” was provided by the USC School of Pharmacy and the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

Faculty advisors Wei-Chiang Shen, John A. Biles Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Andrew MacKay, assistant professor, with USC AAPS chair Jennifer-Ann Bayan.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

27


students

(left to right) Victor Law from UPNI, Dean Vanderveen, student organizers Tanaz Kohan and Parth D. Shah, both PharmD candidates, and associate professor Geoffrey Joyce.

Pharmacy Students Talk Politics

Annual event brings together elected officials, faculty and students to discuss the legislative agenda and process.

USC School of Pharmacy students and faculty had the opportunity to discuss the timely subject of health-care reform with elected officials at the School’s annual Legislative Day, held on November 6 at the University Park Campus. The event included presentations from California assemblymembers, health economists, student leaders, faculty and association representatives, all speaking about the hot national topic of health-care reform. Elected officials speaking at the event included California State Assemblymembers Mike Eng, Ted Lieu and Anthony Portantino, as well as State Senator Curren Price. The elected officials challenged the students to get involved and stay involved in the political process, noting the importance of letting representatives know your perspective and helping them to be better informed as they cast votes in Sacramento. Other speakers included associate professors Geoffrey Joyce and Jeffery Goad and Victor Law. School of Pharmacy

Dean R. Pete Vanderveen welcomed participants to the event. Vanderveen congratulated PharmD students Parth D. Shah and Tanaz Kohan, the two student organizers of Legislative Day, noting the “innumerable hours they have spent making this event happen.” After the presentations, students staged a formal discussion on health-care reform and its impact on the pharmacy profession. The morning event was followed by a health fair, where students offered the Legislative Day attendees, the USC community and local residents an opportunity to be checked for diabetes, cholesterol, hypertension and osteoporosis. The breakfast was attended by nearly 200 people. The event is presented by the American Pharmacy Student Alliance and the National Community Pharmacists Association of the USC School of Pharmacy. Sponsors include the United Pharmacists Network Inc and Albertsons/Sav-On.

An innovative approach to the treatment of cystic fibrosis Tim Bensman earns research award from national pharmacy group. Graduate student Tim Bensman’s work in the lab of professor Paul Beringer may prove to be an integral step toward the treatment of inflammation caused by cystic fibrosis.

ACCP award recipient Tim Bensman, PharmD/PhD candidate, (right) with mentor, associate professor Paul Beringer.

Bensman’s innovative work with the antibiotic doxycycline was performed over this past summer through a fellowship program awarded to him by the USC School of Pharmacy. An abstract based on this work earned him the 2009 M. Kelli Jordan

travel award to attend the American College of Clinical Pharmacy’s annual meeting. At the meeting, Bensman won the best student poster award over six other student finalists from schools across the country. “While everyone’s work had great potential, what differentiates your research is having the opportunity to actively engage in a project and take responsibility and ownership for conducting its experiments,” said Bensman. “Providing a level of evidence and rationale for real-world implications further enhances your work.” Bensman’s research focuses on the immunomodulatory effects of doxycycline, commonly used as an antibiotic for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, a disease that affects 30,000 people in the United States and 70,000 worldwide. The disease is caused by a dis-regulated chloride channel (the CFTR), which results in reduced airway surface liquid, predisposing the patient to chronic infection and inflammation. Bensman, who is pursuing a joint PharmD/PhD in clinical and experimental therapeutics, has been working under the guidance of Beringer, whose lab focuses on ways to use pharmacologic therapies to preserve lung function and quality of life for individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis.

School of Pharmacy hits a bullseye with moving targets This year’s “Moving Targets” symposium, hosted by the USC School of Pharmacy and held on November 9 in midtown Los Angeles, focused on the cutting-edge therapeutics involved in the tumor microenvironment. “Moving Targets” aims to promote the interaction of students in the pharmaceutical, biomedical and biological sciences with one another, as well as with academic leaders and members of the pharmaceutical industry. The event attracted some 250 students, faculty, clinicians and industry representatives.  The program is organized completely by students, led this year by Jennifer-Ann Bayan, chair of the USC chapter of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. Faculty

26 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

advisors are professor Wei-Chiang Shen, John A. Biles Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, and assistant professor Andrew MacKay. The global roster of presenters provided an exceptional panel of leaders involved in cancer research. Hiroshi Maeda, MD, PhD, from Sojo University in Japan, who discovered the EPR effect for tumor-targeted delivery of drugs, offered the morning keynote address. Neil Gibson, PhD, chief scientific officer of research oncology at Pfizer, delivered the afternoon keynote. Other presenters included Napoleone Ferrara, PhD, one of the creators of Avastin, the main targeted drug used in the treat-

ment of lung cancer, Dai Fukumura, MD, PhD, Jindrich Kopecek, PhD, DSc, and Francis C. Szoka, PhD. School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen welcomed the crowd, starting his presentation with a rocking USC version of the “I Love LA” song featuring Randy Newman. Walter Wolf, Distinguished Professor and chair of the USC Biomedical Imaging Science Initiative, also spoke. The lecture portion of the program was followed by the “Moving Targets Student Poster Competition” and a reception at Lucky Strike Lanes at L.A. Live. Support for “Moving Targets” was provided by the USC School of Pharmacy and the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

Faculty advisors Wei-Chiang Shen, John A. Biles Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Andrew MacKay, assistant professor, with USC AAPS chair Jennifer-Ann Bayan.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

27


students

globalization

Breaking barriers

The Alpha Iota Pi Health Fair, held in November at St. Thomas of Aquinas Church in Monterey Park, provided student pharmacists an opportunity to screen or immunize approximately 300 area residents. The main patient populations in the area are Latino and Chinese, and students were prepared to meet the challenges of language barriers with translators and speakers at every station.

Global ties Associate Dean Michael Wincor headed to Malaysia to expand the School of Pharmacy’s worldwide influence.

Edward Thanasombat, PharmD student, is immunized by a fellow student at the fair.

PHARMACY STUDENTS PREPARE FOR FUTURE CAREERS The annual 2009 School of Pharmacy Career Showcase was held on October 13 in the lobby of Hoffman Hall. The event offers students an opportunity to network with representatives from a diverse cross section of future employers, including community pharmacies, hospitals, managed care and industry. Many students attending the event learn about employment opportunities while still in school. Tamara Palagashvili, a second-year PharmD student, was hoping to find out about possible externships. “I want to talk to the different representatives and see what they have available. It’s very helpful,” she said. Representatives discussed a range of available positions, including internships, externships and full-time hires. Blake

Taylor, who represented Asereth Medical Services, said she was looking for students to fill full-time positions upon graduation. “I’m hoping to meet new students and continue to develop relationships with continuing students,” explained Taylor. Other students were there to learn more about the different career fields available to pharmacy students. “We’re used to focusing on in-patient and out-patient care,” said Ernest Suh, a first-year PharmD student. “This is a good way to get more information about other options.” Binh Nguyen, PharmD (‘99), a representative from the U.S. Public Health Commissioned Corps, also felt that informing students about their options is an important aspect of the career showcase. “We want to educate students about public health, and let them know that there are opportunities out there aside from traditional pharmacy jobs,” he said. This year’s showcase had 22 exhibitors on hand to discuss opportunities with the hundreds of students who attended.

making the difference

Board of Councilor member Rosemarie Christopher coordinates an annual interview prep day that provides students an opportunity to refine their resumes and gain interview tips from working professionals. Here Michael Blasco, MS in regulatory science (’07), Abbott Vascular, advises regulatory science student Aminat Adebiyi on her resume.

28 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

In Malaysia, Professor Michael Wincor established a formal academic exchange agreement with Cyberjaya University, opening doors for students and faculty on both sides of the Pacific to experience pharmacy practice in a different environment. Wincor’s other activities in Malaysia included serving as an external reviewer for the final stages of accreditation of the Bachelor of Pharmacy program at Cyberjaya Univeristy where he also presented a symposium on pharmacy education and practice in the US to faculty, government pharmacists and students. Wincor also facilitated an interactive psychiatric pharmacy workshop for thirty pharmacists from Kuala Lumpur and other parts of Malaysia. “Our agreement with Cyberjaya University is our first formal exchange agreement with faculty of pharmacy in Malaysia,” said Wincor. In a meeting with the Deputy Director of the Ministry of Health in Malaysia, Wincor had an opportunity to present ways of extending training programs to the country’s work-

Associate dean of globalization and continuing professional development Michael Wincor (left) with colleagues from Cyberjaya University in Malaysia: Dr. Mohd Salmi bin Mohd Sohod, provost; Dr. Tan Sri Datuk Johari b. Mat, president; and Dr. Shaharuddin Mohd Amn, dean.

B. Mat, received a PhD in Public Administration from USC in 1978, and the Dean, Dr. Shaharuddin Mohd Amn, received his MS in Nuclear Pharmacy in 1982 and PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences in 1987, both from the USC School of Pharmacy.

In a meeting with the Deputy Director of the Ministry of Health in Malaysia, Wincor had an opportunity to present ways of extending training programs to the country’s working pharmacists. ing pharmacists. Further, he worked with colleagues there in the preparation of a proposal for a two-year post-baccalaureate PharmD program at Cyberjaya to be submitted to the Ministry of Health in the near future. In Malaysia, Wincor encountered a strong cardinal and gold presence. The president of Cyberjaya University, Dr. Johari

Wincor is an associate professor in the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy and the associate dean of globalization and continuing professional development at the School. For over 25 years, the School of Pharmacy has engaged in international collaborations, working with other institutions in Asia, Europe, Australia, South America and Africa.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

29


students

globalization

Breaking barriers

The Alpha Iota Pi Health Fair, held in November at St. Thomas of Aquinas Church in Monterey Park, provided student pharmacists an opportunity to screen or immunize approximately 300 area residents. The main patient populations in the area are Latino and Chinese, and students were prepared to meet the challenges of language barriers with translators and speakers at every station.

Global ties Associate Dean Michael Wincor headed to Malaysia to expand the School of Pharmacy’s worldwide influence.

Edward Thanasombat, PharmD student, is immunized by a fellow student at the fair.

PHARMACY STUDENTS PREPARE FOR FUTURE CAREERS The annual 2009 School of Pharmacy Career Showcase was held on October 13 in the lobby of Hoffman Hall. The event offers students an opportunity to network with representatives from a diverse cross section of future employers, including community pharmacies, hospitals, managed care and industry. Many students attending the event learn about employment opportunities while still in school. Tamara Palagashvili, a second-year PharmD student, was hoping to find out about possible externships. “I want to talk to the different representatives and see what they have available. It’s very helpful,” she said. Representatives discussed a range of available positions, including internships, externships and full-time hires. Blake

Taylor, who represented Asereth Medical Services, said she was looking for students to fill full-time positions upon graduation. “I’m hoping to meet new students and continue to develop relationships with continuing students,” explained Taylor. Other students were there to learn more about the different career fields available to pharmacy students. “We’re used to focusing on in-patient and out-patient care,” said Ernest Suh, a first-year PharmD student. “This is a good way to get more information about other options.” Binh Nguyen, PharmD (‘99), a representative from the U.S. Public Health Commissioned Corps, also felt that informing students about their options is an important aspect of the career showcase. “We want to educate students about public health, and let them know that there are opportunities out there aside from traditional pharmacy jobs,” he said. This year’s showcase had 22 exhibitors on hand to discuss opportunities with the hundreds of students who attended.

making the difference

Board of Councilor member Rosemarie Christopher coordinates an annual interview prep day that provides students an opportunity to refine their resumes and gain interview tips from working professionals. Here Michael Blasco, MS in regulatory science (’07), Abbott Vascular, advises regulatory science student Aminat Adebiyi on her resume.

28 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

In Malaysia, Professor Michael Wincor established a formal academic exchange agreement with Cyberjaya University, opening doors for students and faculty on both sides of the Pacific to experience pharmacy practice in a different environment. Wincor’s other activities in Malaysia included serving as an external reviewer for the final stages of accreditation of the Bachelor of Pharmacy program at Cyberjaya Univeristy where he also presented a symposium on pharmacy education and practice in the US to faculty, government pharmacists and students. Wincor also facilitated an interactive psychiatric pharmacy workshop for thirty pharmacists from Kuala Lumpur and other parts of Malaysia. “Our agreement with Cyberjaya University is our first formal exchange agreement with faculty of pharmacy in Malaysia,” said Wincor. In a meeting with the Deputy Director of the Ministry of Health in Malaysia, Wincor had an opportunity to present ways of extending training programs to the country’s work-

Associate dean of globalization and continuing professional development Michael Wincor (left) with colleagues from Cyberjaya University in Malaysia: Dr. Mohd Salmi bin Mohd Sohod, provost; Dr. Tan Sri Datuk Johari b. Mat, president; and Dr. Shaharuddin Mohd Amn, dean.

B. Mat, received a PhD in Public Administration from USC in 1978, and the Dean, Dr. Shaharuddin Mohd Amn, received his MS in Nuclear Pharmacy in 1982 and PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences in 1987, both from the USC School of Pharmacy.

In a meeting with the Deputy Director of the Ministry of Health in Malaysia, Wincor had an opportunity to present ways of extending training programs to the country’s working pharmacists. ing pharmacists. Further, he worked with colleagues there in the preparation of a proposal for a two-year post-baccalaureate PharmD program at Cyberjaya to be submitted to the Ministry of Health in the near future. In Malaysia, Wincor encountered a strong cardinal and gold presence. The president of Cyberjaya University, Dr. Johari

Wincor is an associate professor in the Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy and the associate dean of globalization and continuing professional development at the School. For over 25 years, the School of Pharmacy has engaged in international collaborations, working with other institutions in Asia, Europe, Australia, South America and Africa.

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

29


alumni & friends keeping track of

Board of directors officially dedicate qsad centurion executive plaza At the dedication of the plaza in the School’s Centennial Park, Oscar Pallares, PharmD ('55), was recognized for his 50-years of support of QSAD Centurion. Pictured (left to right): Fatin Sako, PharmD, president of QSAD Centurion Board of Directors, Dean Vanderveen, Oscar Pallares and Mary Pallares.

classmates

Steven Baskin, PharmD (’66), is the chair of pharmacology at Spartan Medical School in St. Lucia, West Indies.

California Pharmacists Association 2010 elections included several USC School of Pharmacy alumni: on the Board of Trustees, Region 6 Trustee Sylvia Moore, PharmD (’61), Region 8 Trustee Steven Gray, PharmD (’75); in the Academy of Directors, Academy of Long Term Care Elizabeth Gross, PharmD (‘83), Academy of Managed Care Chris Chan, PharmD (‘01), and Steven Gray, PharmD (’75), Academy of Pharmacy Owners Garrett Ow, PharmD (’08), and Ken Thai, PharmD (’02).

Suzana Giffin, PharmD (‘98), is the head of the MedInfo Department at Amgen.

Lauren J. Lee, MS (’06), published in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice and Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics. Peter Lee, PharmD (’04), received the Spirit of Volunteerism

Welcoming the class of 2013

The USC School of Pharmacy welcomed 187 students to the PharmD program at the annual White Coat Ceremony sponsored by QSAD Centurion and supported by Albertsons/Sav-on. Two students were coated by their fathers: (left) Board of Councilor member Buzzy Klevens, PharmD (‘74), “coats” his daughter, Rebecca Klevens, and (right) Mari Kaneko is coated by her father, Kevin Kaneko, PharmD, assistant professor and manager of ambulatory care pharmacy services at the USC Norris Cancer Hospital.

Award at the 2009 Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy’s Educational Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.

Bimal Patel, MS (’02), presented at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Educational Conference in San Antonio, Texas, in October; presented at the North American Menopause Society Meeting in San Diego, fall 2009.

Pankaj Patel, MS (’02), published in the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, The Journal of Rheumatology, Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Current Medical Research and Opinion

and the ISME Journal; participated in the AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Meeting in April; participated in the Academy of Health annual meeting in June; participated in the European ISPOR meeting in October.

Michael Rigas, PharmD (‘81), published in the Journal of Clinical Neuromuscular Disease and Infusion.

Jim Roache, PharmD ('70), hosted a Dean's Roundtable in Laguna Hills.

Mayank (Mike) Shah, PharmD (’05), and his wife Rebecca have established the Rebecca and Mayank Shah Scholarship, directed to students with an interest in independent community pharmacy practice.

Gary Suess, PharmD (’64), retired after 40 years at the CBC Rose Professional Pharmacy, located in Covina.

Ken Thai, PharmD (’02), has established the Khanh-Long Thai Endowed Scholarship.

Frank L. Tornatore, PharmD (’77), PhD, has completed his dissertation entitled “Towards the development of cognitive/health belief model to improve medication adherence in the patient with schizophrenia” and has earned his PhD in psychology from California Coast University; appointed clinical professor of psychiatry at the Western University School of Pharmacy.

remembrances

Don Bakos, PharmD (’79), passed away in August. Yeiki Matsui, BS (’42), passed away in September. Efrem Melnick, BS (’45), passed away in October. He worked for 25 years at Schwab’s Pharmacy in Beverly Hills. Marian Elvira Moore, PharmD ('49), passed away in September 2008. During World War II, she served as a Pharmacist's Mate in the Navy WAVES. She retired from Coast Drugstore in Hermosa Beach a number of years ago. Ronald Gary Sarkesian, PharmD (’73), passed away in March 2008. As a pharmacist, he spent his last years working for Network Pharmacy in Apple Valley. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; his son, Paul and wife, Amy; his daughter, Deborah Deitz and husband, Dean; his grandchildren, Luke and Logan Sarkesian and Talan Deitz; his mother, Marjie; and his sister, Lynda Dest.

30 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

31


alumni & friends keeping track of

Board of directors officially dedicate qsad centurion executive plaza At the dedication of the plaza in the School’s Centennial Park, Oscar Pallares, PharmD ('55), was recognized for his 50-years of support of QSAD Centurion. Pictured (left to right): Fatin Sako, PharmD, president of QSAD Centurion Board of Directors, Dean Vanderveen, Oscar Pallares and Mary Pallares.

classmates

Steven Baskin, PharmD (’66), is the chair of pharmacology at Spartan Medical School in St. Lucia, West Indies.

California Pharmacists Association 2010 elections included several USC School of Pharmacy alumni: on the Board of Trustees, Region 6 Trustee Sylvia Moore, PharmD (’61), Region 8 Trustee Steven Gray, PharmD (’75); in the Academy of Directors, Academy of Long Term Care Elizabeth Gross, PharmD (‘83), Academy of Managed Care Chris Chan, PharmD (‘01), and Steven Gray, PharmD (’75), Academy of Pharmacy Owners Garrett Ow, PharmD (’08), and Ken Thai, PharmD (’02).

Suzana Giffin, PharmD (‘98), is the head of the MedInfo Department at Amgen.

Lauren J. Lee, MS (’06), published in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice and Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics. Peter Lee, PharmD (’04), received the Spirit of Volunteerism

Welcoming the class of 2013

The USC School of Pharmacy welcomed 187 students to the PharmD program at the annual White Coat Ceremony sponsored by QSAD Centurion and supported by Albertsons/Sav-on. Two students were coated by their fathers: (left) Board of Councilor member Buzzy Klevens, PharmD (‘74), “coats” his daughter, Rebecca Klevens, and (right) Mari Kaneko is coated by her father, Kevin Kaneko, PharmD, assistant professor and manager of ambulatory care pharmacy services at the USC Norris Cancer Hospital.

Award at the 2009 Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy’s Educational Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.

Bimal Patel, MS (’02), presented at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Educational Conference in San Antonio, Texas, in October; presented at the North American Menopause Society Meeting in San Diego, fall 2009.

Pankaj Patel, MS (’02), published in the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, The Journal of Rheumatology, Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Current Medical Research and Opinion

and the ISME Journal; participated in the AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Meeting in April; participated in the Academy of Health annual meeting in June; participated in the European ISPOR meeting in October.

Michael Rigas, PharmD (‘81), published in the Journal of Clinical Neuromuscular Disease and Infusion.

Jim Roache, PharmD ('70), hosted a Dean's Roundtable in Laguna Hills.

Mayank (Mike) Shah, PharmD (’05), and his wife Rebecca have established the Rebecca and Mayank Shah Scholarship, directed to students with an interest in independent community pharmacy practice.

Gary Suess, PharmD (’64), retired after 40 years at the CBC Rose Professional Pharmacy, located in Covina.

Ken Thai, PharmD (’02), has established the Khanh-Long Thai Endowed Scholarship.

Frank L. Tornatore, PharmD (’77), PhD, has completed his dissertation entitled “Towards the development of cognitive/health belief model to improve medication adherence in the patient with schizophrenia” and has earned his PhD in psychology from California Coast University; appointed clinical professor of psychiatry at the Western University School of Pharmacy.

remembrances

Don Bakos, PharmD (’79), passed away in August. Yeiki Matsui, BS (’42), passed away in September. Efrem Melnick, BS (’45), passed away in October. He worked for 25 years at Schwab’s Pharmacy in Beverly Hills. Marian Elvira Moore, PharmD ('49), passed away in September 2008. During World War II, she served as a Pharmacist's Mate in the Navy WAVES. She retired from Coast Drugstore in Hermosa Beach a number of years ago. Ronald Gary Sarkesian, PharmD (’73), passed away in March 2008. As a pharmacist, he spent his last years working for Network Pharmacy in Apple Valley. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; his son, Paul and wife, Amy; his daughter, Deborah Deitz and husband, Dean; his grandchildren, Luke and Logan Sarkesian and Talan Deitz; his mother, Marjie; and his sister, Lynda Dest.

30 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

31


students Student Updates Doctoral students Lilian Chang, Divya Pathania, Kavya Ramkumar, James Sanchez and Shili Xu were named Best Teaching and Research Assistants at the School of Pharmacy.

Jason Wu, PhD candidate, represented his faculty mentor, University Professor Jean Shih, the Boyd P. & Elsie D. Welin Professor in

Pharmacy Benefits and American Journal of Hypertension.

Pharmaceutical Sciences, and presented the poster, “Monoamine Oxidase A, a Novel Neutral Target Gene for SRY,” at the 2009 Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America International Symposium in Taipei, Taiwan, in June.

Bonnie Hui, PharmD candidate, published in the September/ October 2009 issue of Student Pharmacist Magazine.

Letisha Wyatt, PhD candidate, received a 2009-2010 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship.

Tanaz Kohan, PharmD candidate, awarded 2009 Presidential Schol-

Jia Yao, PhD candidate, awarded $10,000 Charles and Charlotte

arship from the National Community Pharmacists Association.

Krown Fellowship.

Robert Mo, PhD candidate, received a 2009-2010 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship.

Liya Xu, PhD candidate, presented the poster “Study of the Intracel-

Ning Gu, PhD candidate, published in The American Journal of

James Sanchez, PhD candidate, received a 2009-2010 American

lular Loop Linking Transmembrane Domain 6 and 7 of the Dipeptide Transporter hPepT1 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis,” at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists meeting.

Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship.

USC School of Pharmacy students organized the Western ManParth Shah, PharmD candidate, elected Region 8 Member-at-Large

aged Care Program at the USC Orange County Center last summer.

for the American Pharmacy Student Alliance.

Caring for the elderly  ichelle Vu, PharmD candidate, (left) accepts the state award M for fostering the goals and vision of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists at the annual meeting in Anaheim. Vu is the USC School of Pharmacy student director of geriatric care. She is joined by Tim Merritt, PharmD (‘07), membership director of the state ASCP chapter. Professor Brad Williams is the advisor to the students.

scholarships change lives

‘‘

As a financially struggling pharmacy student, I sometimes wondered, ‘Is this worth it?’. And then a scholarship helped me through my last year. As my career progressed, it became clear that my USC pharmacy degree opened many doors. When I became financially able, I wanted to give back and open doors for others. So, I funded an endowed scholarship. By giving back, I’m making a payment on a debt that I owe to the future of our profession. If you benefited from your School of Pharmacy experience, consider making a payment on your debt by supporting students today.”

Joel Hoffman, PharmD (’61)

Trojan 2009 Parents Weekend

This year's Trojan Parents Weekend featured a tented area manned by School of Pharmacy students offering blood pressure, osteoporosis, diabetes and cholesterol screening plus information on other health issues. Directing the School of Pharmacy student efforts were Cynthia Chan and Jonathan Jazayeri. Hundreds of Trojan parents were screened during the course of the day.

32 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

‘‘

I became part of the Trojan Family when I received this scholarship. Like a parent, it took care of me financially, paying for housing, professional clothes to wear, even gas used to attend conferences. It not only helped me survive, but it solidified my decision to continue the tradition of giving back to my Trojan Family, as Dr. Hoffman has generously done for me. Thank you.” Jan Riego, PharmD candidate (’10)

To learn how you can change a life, contact Mary Wackerman at 323.442.1360 or mwacker@usc.edu. www.usc.edu/pharmacy


students Student Updates Doctoral students Lilian Chang, Divya Pathania, Kavya Ramkumar, James Sanchez and Shili Xu were named Best Teaching and Research Assistants at the School of Pharmacy.

Jason Wu, PhD candidate, represented his faculty mentor, University Professor Jean Shih, the Boyd P. & Elsie D. Welin Professor in

Pharmacy Benefits and American Journal of Hypertension.

Pharmaceutical Sciences, and presented the poster, “Monoamine Oxidase A, a Novel Neutral Target Gene for SRY,” at the 2009 Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America International Symposium in Taipei, Taiwan, in June.

Bonnie Hui, PharmD candidate, published in the September/ October 2009 issue of Student Pharmacist Magazine.

Letisha Wyatt, PhD candidate, received a 2009-2010 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship.

Tanaz Kohan, PharmD candidate, awarded 2009 Presidential Schol-

Jia Yao, PhD candidate, awarded $10,000 Charles and Charlotte

arship from the National Community Pharmacists Association.

Krown Fellowship.

Robert Mo, PhD candidate, received a 2009-2010 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship.

Liya Xu, PhD candidate, presented the poster “Study of the Intracel-

Ning Gu, PhD candidate, published in The American Journal of

James Sanchez, PhD candidate, received a 2009-2010 American

lular Loop Linking Transmembrane Domain 6 and 7 of the Dipeptide Transporter hPepT1 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis,” at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists meeting.

Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship.

USC School of Pharmacy students organized the Western ManParth Shah, PharmD candidate, elected Region 8 Member-at-Large

aged Care Program at the USC Orange County Center last summer.

for the American Pharmacy Student Alliance.

Caring for the elderly  ichelle Vu, PharmD candidate, (left) accepts the state award M for fostering the goals and vision of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists at the annual meeting in Anaheim. Vu is the USC School of Pharmacy student director of geriatric care. She is joined by Tim Merritt, PharmD (‘07), membership director of the state ASCP chapter. Professor Brad Williams is the advisor to the students.

scholarships change lives

‘‘

As a financially struggling pharmacy student, I sometimes wondered, ‘Is this worth it?’. And then a scholarship helped me through my last year. As my career progressed, it became clear that my USC pharmacy degree opened many doors. When I became financially able, I wanted to give back and open doors for others. So, I funded an endowed scholarship. By giving back, I’m making a payment on a debt that I owe to the future of our profession. If you benefited from your School of Pharmacy experience, consider making a payment on your debt by supporting students today.”

Joel Hoffman, PharmD (’61)

Trojan 2009 Parents Weekend

This year's Trojan Parents Weekend featured a tented area manned by School of Pharmacy students offering blood pressure, osteoporosis, diabetes and cholesterol screening plus information on other health issues. Directing the School of Pharmacy student efforts were Cynthia Chan and Jonathan Jazayeri. Hundreds of Trojan parents were screened during the course of the day.

32 winter 2010 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

‘‘

I became part of the Trojan Family when I received this scholarship. Like a parent, it took care of me financially, paying for housing, professional clothes to wear, even gas used to attend conferences. It not only helped me survive, but it solidified my decision to continue the tradition of giving back to my Trojan Family, as Dr. Hoffman has generously done for me. Thank you.” Jan Riego, PharmD candidate (’10)

To learn how you can change a life, contact Mary Wackerman at 323.442.1360 or mwacker@usc.edu. www.usc.edu/pharmacy


Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage Paid University of Southern California USC School of Pharmacy | Health Sciences Campus University of Southern California 1985 Zonal Avenue | Los Angeles CA 90089-9121 Address Service Requested

save the date… January 29-31, Friday-Sunday

May 2, Sunday

February 20, Saturday

May 14, Friday

February 27-28, Saturday-Sunday

June 9, Wednesday

March 25, Thursday

August 2-6, Monday-Friday

15th Annual Winter Retreat Ojai Resort and Spa Information: 323-442-1360 or mwacker@usc.edu Interview Day HSC – School of Pharmacy Information: 323-442-1738 or stanovic@usc.edu

23rd Annual Las Vegas Continuing Education Program Caesars Palace Information: 323-442-2403 or pharmce@usc.edu Scholarship Lunch USC School of Pharmacy Centennial Park Information: 323-442-1381 or carr@usc.edu

Alumni/Senior Awards Banquet Langham Huntington Hotel Information: 323-442-1381 or carr@usc.edu School of Pharmacy Satellite Commencement HSC Quad GNP/ICP Scholarship Golf Classic Robinson Ranch Golf Club Information: 323-442-1738 or stanovic@usc.edu 53rd Annual Postgraduate Refresher Course Maui, Hawaii Information: 323-442-2403 or pharmce@usc.edu

USC Pharmacy Magazine Winter 2010  

USC Pharmacy Magazine, published semi-annually, highlights some of the USC School of Pharmacy’s latest advances and achievements, as well as...

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