Page 1

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

AACP Picks USC for Community Service Honor Dual Awards for University Professor Shih Professor Sohal on Caloric Restriction and Aging

pharmacy Volume 1, Issue 5, Summer 2009

The Class of 2009

Stepping Out in Changing Times


KEEPING UP

KUDOS SENIOR EDITOR

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu CONTRIBUTORS

Olabisi Carr

Associate Director of Alumni Relations

carr@usc.edu

Mary Wackerman

Director of Major Gifts

mwacker@usc.edu

FEATURES

EDITOR

Jennifer Watson

Executive Director of Development

freeh@usc.edu WRITERs

Elizabeth S. Chapin Carl Marziali design

Leslie Baker Graphic Design Key DESIGNer

Alexis Mercurio PHOTOGRAPHY

Mark Berndt Steve Cohn Jennifer Emery Jon Nalick Lee Salem Glen Tao

4 Leading the Nation

School of Pharmacy hosts national conference on how schools can partner with safety-net clinics.

USC taps School of Pharmacy’s David Breslow as Outstanding Alumnus.

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

USC School of Pharmacy 1985 Zonal Avenue— PSC 700 Los Angeles, CA 90089-9121

phone: 323.442.3497 email: kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy

Honoring the Classes of 2009 and 1959.

2 6 Scholarship Luncheon

Students express gratitude and share insights with donors.

6 Class of 2009

…of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy

Ronald Belville

Pharmacology…

16 Awards Banquet

Stepping out to their professional lives in changing times.

2 8 Snapshots

Professor Raj Sohal weighs in on caloric restriction as an anti-aging strategy.

3 0 Community Outreach

…and Pharmaceutical Sciences

2 9 Alumni

Staying connected.

3 2 Students

On the road to success.

Glimpses of alumni, friends and students.

2 3 In the Press

Students give back.

2 2 Two Thumbs University Professor Jean Shih awarded NIH grant and Lifetime Achievement Award.

2 4 Research Promise

Three PhD students gain funding for innovative work.

USC–UCLA GAME RAFFLE

dean

Board of Councilors

2 2 Department of

IN PICTURES

R. Pete Vanderveen

School of Pharmacy meets with legislators in the nation’s capitol.

1 8 Titus Family Department…

School wins inaugural Transformative Community Service Award for work in safety-net clinics.

1 5 Trojan Spirit

New scholarships to support bright futures.

15 Taking the Hill

5 AACP Picks USC

Up for Shih

Please address your comments, opinions and questions to:

Students win local, state and national distinctions, marking another banner year for Southern California’s oldest pharmacy school.

ILLUSTRATION

Frank Harris

12 Giving

3 Hats Off

You could win great seats!

You can win Dean Vanderveen’s excellent seats for the USC-UCLA football game and be in the center of the action at one of the most celebrated college rivalry games of the season. The School of Pharmacy wants your E-Mail address to keep you posted on school happenings. So, Dean Vanderveen has donated his tickets for this raffle—a way to encourage you to send us your E-Mail address. To enter online, simply go to http://pharmweb2.usc.edu/raffle. Or, enter by completing and mailing the envelope in this magazine. Do it today…and you might find yourself cheering on the Trojans at the November 28th game.

Denis Portaro Chairman

Chairman Elect

Theresa Agboh-Taylor Melvin F. Baron Gale Bensussen David Breslow Rosemarie Christopher Judy Flesh Rosenberg Eileen Goodis K. Robert Hahn William A. Heeres Kathleen Hurtado Lee “Buzzy” Klevens Keith LaFond Kiran Majmudar Karl Meehan Oscar Pallares Raymond T. Poon Wanda L. Sawyers Wayne T. Seltzer Richard Shinar Tim K. Siu Martin Solberg Holly A. Strom DeWight Titus Brad Trom Louis T.W. Wong Associate Members

Gavin S. Herbert Gerhard Renner Arthur M. Ulene Ex-Officio Members

Dolly Harris Fatin Sako Steven B. Sample


KEEPING UP

KUDOS SENIOR EDITOR

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu CONTRIBUTORS

Olabisi Carr

Associate Director of Alumni Relations

carr@usc.edu

Mary Wackerman

Director of Major Gifts

mwacker@usc.edu

FEATURES

EDITOR

Jennifer Watson

Executive Director of Development

freeh@usc.edu WRITERs

Elizabeth S. Chapin Carl Marziali design

Leslie Baker Graphic Design Key DESIGNer

Alexis Mercurio PHOTOGRAPHY

Mark Berndt Steve Cohn Jennifer Emery Jon Nalick Lee Salem Glen Tao

4 Leading the Nation

School of Pharmacy hosts national conference on how schools can partner with safety-net clinics.

USC taps School of Pharmacy’s David Breslow as Outstanding Alumnus.

Kukla Vera

Director of Public Relations

USC School of Pharmacy 1985 Zonal Avenue— PSC 700 Los Angeles, CA 90089-9121

phone: 323.442.3497 email: kvera@pharmacy.usc.edu www.usc.edu/schools/pharmacy

Honoring the Classes of 2009 and 1959.

2 6 Scholarship Luncheon

Students express gratitude and share insights with donors.

6 Class of 2009

…of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy

Ronald Belville

Pharmacology…

16 Awards Banquet

Stepping out to their professional lives in changing times.

2 8 Snapshots

Professor Raj Sohal weighs in on caloric restriction as an anti-aging strategy.

3 0 Community Outreach

…and Pharmaceutical Sciences

2 9 Alumni

Staying connected.

3 2 Students

On the road to success.

Glimpses of alumni, friends and students.

2 3 In the Press

Students give back.

2 2 Two Thumbs University Professor Jean Shih awarded NIH grant and Lifetime Achievement Award.

2 4 Research Promise

Three PhD students gain funding for innovative work.

USC–UCLA GAME RAFFLE

dean

Board of Councilors

2 2 Department of

IN PICTURES

R. Pete Vanderveen

School of Pharmacy meets with legislators in the nation’s capitol.

1 8 Titus Family Department…

School wins inaugural Transformative Community Service Award for work in safety-net clinics.

1 5 Trojan Spirit

New scholarships to support bright futures.

15 Taking the Hill

5 AACP Picks USC

Up for Shih

Please address your comments, opinions and questions to:

Students win local, state and national distinctions, marking another banner year for Southern California’s oldest pharmacy school.

ILLUSTRATION

Frank Harris

12 Giving

3 Hats Off

You could win great seats!

You can win Dean Vanderveen’s excellent seats for the USC-UCLA football game and be in the center of the action at one of the most celebrated college rivalry games of the season. The School of Pharmacy wants your E-Mail address to keep you posted on school happenings. So, Dean Vanderveen has donated his tickets for this raffle—a way to encourage you to send us your E-Mail address. To enter online, simply go to http://pharmweb2.usc.edu/raffle. Or, enter by completing and mailing the envelope in this magazine. Do it today…and you might find yourself cheering on the Trojans at the November 28th game.

Denis Portaro Chairman

Chairman Elect

Theresa Agboh-Taylor Melvin F. Baron Gale Bensussen David Breslow Rosemarie Christopher Judy Flesh Rosenberg Eileen Goodis K. Robert Hahn William A. Heeres Kathleen Hurtado Lee “Buzzy” Klevens Keith LaFond Kiran Majmudar Karl Meehan Oscar Pallares Raymond T. Poon Wanda L. Sawyers Wayne T. Seltzer Richard Shinar Tim K. Siu Martin Solberg Holly A. Strom DeWight Titus Brad Trom Louis T.W. Wong Associate Members

Gavin S. Herbert Gerhard Renner Arthur M. Ulene Ex-Officio Members

Dolly Harris Fatin Sako Steven B. Sample


dean’s message

‘‘ The Class of 2009

has now joined the ranks of Trojan alumni.

They have distinguished themselves while at the School of Pharmacy—winning local, state and national awards. And in that uniquely Trojan spirit, they have reached out to the community through health fairs and other volunteer efforts to serve those less fortunate in our community. I am confident of the fine contributions that these talented and dedicated new graduates will bring.”

Professor Frances Richmond hoods Kevin Potgieter as he receives his MS in regulatory science.

The spoils of victory...a few of the awards won this year.

Brandi Chock flashes the Trojan Victory sign as she accepts the APhA Division A Chapter of the Year award on behalf of the USC chapter.

USC SCHOOL OF PHARMACY STUDENT AWARDS

APhA-ASP chapter faculty advisor Michael Wincor with students Bonnie Hui, winner of the APhA-Academy of Student Pharmacists Student Leadership Award, and Elina Baskina, co-chair of Operation Diabetes.

— Dean R. Pete Vanderveen AMERICAN PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION — ACADEMY OF STUDENT PHARMACISTS CHAPTER OF THE YEAR — DIVISION A

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PHARMACOECONOMICS AND OUTCOMES RESEARCH OUTSTANDING STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE YEAR

STUDENT LEADERSHIP AWARD Bonnie Hui

BEST STUDENT PODIUM PRESENTATION Hae Sun Suh

PROJECT CHANCE AWARD Phuong Ho

BEST STUDENT POSTER PRESENTATION Ning Yan Gu Aniket Kawatkar

REGION 8 HEARTBURN AWARENESS CHALLENGE Connie Nguyen REGION 8 OPERATION DIABETES AWARD Elina Baskina and Gina Gornov AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEALTH-SYSTEM PHARMACISTS ANNUAL LEADERSHIP AWARD Paulin Heng US PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE AWARD Carla Blieden

School of Pharmacy staff member Jovan Del Valle with his daughter and new Doctor of Pharmacy, Joi Del Valle. Del Valle, facilities manager at the School, has worked at the School of Pharmacy for 29 years.

Dean Vanderveen congratulates PharmD graduate, Angela Adler.

Class president Krystle Cher Purificacion is ready for the dean’s toast at the commencement ceremony.

CALIFORNIA PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION PROJECT HYPERTENSION AWARD Nicole Cho and Joyce Choi QUIZ BOWL COMPETITION FIRST PLACE

NATIONAL COMMUNITY PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER OF THE YEAR PHARMACY FOUNDATION OF CALIFORNIA FILM FESTIVAL FIRST PLACE — BEST PARODY OF A TV COMMERCIAL RHO CHI CHAPTER PROJECT PROPOSAL AWARD “Mental Health and Sleep Disorders Screening/Education/Patient Seminar” Ian Amazan and Margie Patel USC STUDENT RECOGNITION AWARD Carla Blieden Brandi Chock Todd Okamoto Daya Perkins USC DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS “TOMMY” AWARDS AMERICAN PHARMACY STUDENT ALLIANCE — OUTSTANDING STUDENT ORGANIZATION OF THE YEAR

2 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

3


dean’s message

‘‘ The Class of 2009

has now joined the ranks of Trojan alumni.

They have distinguished themselves while at the School of Pharmacy—winning local, state and national awards. And in that uniquely Trojan spirit, they have reached out to the community through health fairs and other volunteer efforts to serve those less fortunate in our community. I am confident of the fine contributions that these talented and dedicated new graduates will bring.”

Professor Frances Richmond hoods Kevin Potgieter as he receives his MS in regulatory science.

The spoils of victory...a few of the awards won this year.

Brandi Chock flashes the Trojan Victory sign as she accepts the APhA Division A Chapter of the Year award on behalf of the USC chapter.

USC SCHOOL OF PHARMACY STUDENT AWARDS

APhA-ASP chapter faculty advisor Michael Wincor with students Bonnie Hui, winner of the APhA-Academy of Student Pharmacists Student Leadership Award, and Elina Baskina, co-chair of Operation Diabetes.

— Dean R. Pete Vanderveen AMERICAN PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION — ACADEMY OF STUDENT PHARMACISTS CHAPTER OF THE YEAR — DIVISION A

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PHARMACOECONOMICS AND OUTCOMES RESEARCH OUTSTANDING STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE YEAR

STUDENT LEADERSHIP AWARD Bonnie Hui

BEST STUDENT PODIUM PRESENTATION Hae Sun Suh

PROJECT CHANCE AWARD Phuong Ho

BEST STUDENT POSTER PRESENTATION Ning Yan Gu Aniket Kawatkar

REGION 8 HEARTBURN AWARENESS CHALLENGE Connie Nguyen REGION 8 OPERATION DIABETES AWARD Elina Baskina and Gina Gornov AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEALTH-SYSTEM PHARMACISTS ANNUAL LEADERSHIP AWARD Paulin Heng US PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE AWARD Carla Blieden

School of Pharmacy staff member Jovan Del Valle with his daughter and new Doctor of Pharmacy, Joi Del Valle. Del Valle, facilities manager at the School, has worked at the School of Pharmacy for 29 years.

Dean Vanderveen congratulates PharmD graduate, Angela Adler.

Class president Krystle Cher Purificacion is ready for the dean’s toast at the commencement ceremony.

CALIFORNIA PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION PROJECT HYPERTENSION AWARD Nicole Cho and Joyce Choi QUIZ BOWL COMPETITION FIRST PLACE

NATIONAL COMMUNITY PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER OF THE YEAR PHARMACY FOUNDATION OF CALIFORNIA FILM FESTIVAL FIRST PLACE — BEST PARODY OF A TV COMMERCIAL RHO CHI CHAPTER PROJECT PROPOSAL AWARD “Mental Health and Sleep Disorders Screening/Education/Patient Seminar” Ian Amazan and Margie Patel USC STUDENT RECOGNITION AWARD Carla Blieden Brandi Chock Todd Okamoto Daya Perkins USC DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS “TOMMY” AWARDS AMERICAN PHARMACY STUDENT ALLIANCE — OUTSTANDING STUDENT ORGANIZATION OF THE YEAR

2 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

3


leading the nation Pharmacy schools, clinics, government and associations come together to expand clinical pharmacy services in clinics nationwide.

School of Pharmacy Hosts Inaugural Conference on Building Partnerships with Safety-Net Clinics The USC School of Pharmacy hosted 90 professionals at a two-day national conference, “Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy and Safety-Net Clinics”, on February 12 and 13 in Los Angeles. The intent of the conference was to provide pharmacy schools and clinics from around the country with real-world expertise on establishing partnerships and, for those who already

have partnerships, expanding their reach and impact in their communities. Safety-net clinics, the proposed sites for most of the partnerships, deliver health care services to low income, homeless and other vulnerable populations. The conference was moderated by School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen and was presented in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative. USC School of Pharmacy faculty who presented at the conference include Mel Baron, PharmD (’57); Kathleen Johnson, PhD, MPH, PharmD (’78), the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Professor in Community Pharmacy; and Steven Chen,

4 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

PharmD (’89). Chen along with his partner at the JWCH Medical Clinic, Paul Gregerson, MD, MBA, chief medical officer at JWCH, described how clinical pharmacy services have worked to improve patient outcomes at the clinic. Also from USC, Kavita Munjal, executive director of foundation relations at the Keck School of Medicine, led a break-out session on grant writing.

In addition to the School of Pharmacy, USC Civic and Community Relations, The Merck Company Foundation and the AACP Transformative Community Service Award supported the conference. Over 30 schools attended along with representatives from eight clinical facilities. left: Will Lang, vice president of policy and advocacy at the AACP, comments on policy issues during a conference break-out session discussing funding options. Looking on is Amy Tiemier, PharmD, a conference participant from St. Louis College of Pharmacy. center: Michael Jann, PharmD (’79), chair of pharmacy practice at Mercer University College of Pharmacy, and Mitch Lestico, PharmD, Austin Travis Community Health Center, listen to opening presentations at the conference. right: Dean R. Pete Vanderveen with conference speaker Sandy Chiang, program officer at The California Endowment.

Accepting the AACP award are Steven Chen, Mel Baron and Kathleen Johnson, all on the Titus Family Department faculty.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY HONORED for Transformative Community Service

Award recognizes school’s work in seven safety-net clinics serving uninsured, low-income and homeless persons. The USC School of Pharmacy received the 2008-09 AACP Inaugural Award for Transformative Community Service on February 23 at the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Interim Meeting Awards Ceremony in Arlington, Virginia. The award notes the school’s institutional commitment to addressing unmet community needs through education, practice and research. Highlighting community service as an important element of the academic mission, this award singles out institutions that serve as examples of social responsiveness on the part of the academic medical community. “The key word in selecting the recipient of this new award is ‘transformative’,” said Lucinda L. Maine, executive vice president and CEO of the AACP. “The lives of a broad and diverse population of people have been changed positively because of USC’s mission-driven commitment to invest faculty and student resources on such projects.” The School of Pharmacy works with community partners to integrate clinical pharmacy services into their medical services, including hiring pharmacists on staff at safety-net clinics. At the clinics, the USC group has shown that pharmacist intervention improves health outcomes. Supporters of the school’s safety-net work include the QueensCare Family Clinics, UniHealth Foundation, the Merck Company Foundation, JWCH Institute and the South Central Family Health Center. The initial grant that started the project in

2002 was from the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. “At USC, we’re committed to giving back to our community. The School of Pharmacy’s work in these clinics, as well as our health literacy projects, make it possible for us to directly impact the health of some of LA’s most at-risk residents,” said School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen. “We’ve seen first hand how our pharmacists have improved patient outcomes while saving precious healthcare dollars. To be honored for this commitment makes it even more rewarding.” On hand to receive the award were Kathleen Johnson, the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy and the chair of the School’s Titus Family Department, and Mel Baron and Steven Chen, both associate professors. At the ceremony, Dean Vanderveen spoke about the tremendous dedication of the community pharmacy group. Unable to attend but mentioned as award recipients were Elizabeth Cervantes, Stephanie Iniguez and Cecilia Wu, clinical staff pharmacists at QueensCare Family Clinics. Also part of the team are faculty members Jeff Goad, Edith Mirzaian and Mike Rudolph. Previously, the school’s work in safety-net clinics garnered the 2007 Pinnacle Award of the American Pharmacists Association Foundation and the 2008 Best Practices Award of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

5


leading the nation Pharmacy schools, clinics, government and associations come together to expand clinical pharmacy services in clinics nationwide.

School of Pharmacy Hosts Inaugural Conference on Building Partnerships with Safety-Net Clinics The USC School of Pharmacy hosted 90 professionals at a two-day national conference, “Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy and Safety-Net Clinics”, on February 12 and 13 in Los Angeles. The intent of the conference was to provide pharmacy schools and clinics from around the country with real-world expertise on establishing partnerships and, for those who already

have partnerships, expanding their reach and impact in their communities. Safety-net clinics, the proposed sites for most of the partnerships, deliver health care services to low income, homeless and other vulnerable populations. The conference was moderated by School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen and was presented in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative. USC School of Pharmacy faculty who presented at the conference include Mel Baron, PharmD (’57); Kathleen Johnson, PhD, MPH, PharmD (’78), the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Professor in Community Pharmacy; and Steven Chen,

4 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

PharmD (’89). Chen along with his partner at the JWCH Medical Clinic, Paul Gregerson, MD, MBA, chief medical officer at JWCH, described how clinical pharmacy services have worked to improve patient outcomes at the clinic. Also from USC, Kavita Munjal, executive director of foundation relations at the Keck School of Medicine, led a break-out session on grant writing.

In addition to the School of Pharmacy, USC Civic and Community Relations, The Merck Company Foundation and the AACP Transformative Community Service Award supported the conference. Over 30 schools attended along with representatives from eight clinical facilities. left: Will Lang, vice president of policy and advocacy at the AACP, comments on policy issues during a conference break-out session discussing funding options. Looking on is Amy Tiemier, PharmD, a conference participant from St. Louis College of Pharmacy. center: Michael Jann, PharmD (’79), chair of pharmacy practice at Mercer University College of Pharmacy, and Mitch Lestico, PharmD, Austin Travis Community Health Center, listen to opening presentations at the conference. right: Dean R. Pete Vanderveen with conference speaker Sandy Chiang, program officer at The California Endowment.

Accepting the AACP award are Steven Chen, Mel Baron and Kathleen Johnson, all on the Titus Family Department faculty.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY HONORED for Transformative Community Service

Award recognizes school’s work in seven safety-net clinics serving uninsured, low-income and homeless persons. The USC School of Pharmacy received the 2008-09 AACP Inaugural Award for Transformative Community Service on February 23 at the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Interim Meeting Awards Ceremony in Arlington, Virginia. The award notes the school’s institutional commitment to addressing unmet community needs through education, practice and research. Highlighting community service as an important element of the academic mission, this award singles out institutions that serve as examples of social responsiveness on the part of the academic medical community. “The key word in selecting the recipient of this new award is ‘transformative’,” said Lucinda L. Maine, executive vice president and CEO of the AACP. “The lives of a broad and diverse population of people have been changed positively because of USC’s mission-driven commitment to invest faculty and student resources on such projects.” The School of Pharmacy works with community partners to integrate clinical pharmacy services into their medical services, including hiring pharmacists on staff at safety-net clinics. At the clinics, the USC group has shown that pharmacist intervention improves health outcomes. Supporters of the school’s safety-net work include the QueensCare Family Clinics, UniHealth Foundation, the Merck Company Foundation, JWCH Institute and the South Central Family Health Center. The initial grant that started the project in

2002 was from the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. “At USC, we’re committed to giving back to our community. The School of Pharmacy’s work in these clinics, as well as our health literacy projects, make it possible for us to directly impact the health of some of LA’s most at-risk residents,” said School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen. “We’ve seen first hand how our pharmacists have improved patient outcomes while saving precious healthcare dollars. To be honored for this commitment makes it even more rewarding.” On hand to receive the award were Kathleen Johnson, the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy and the chair of the School’s Titus Family Department, and Mel Baron and Steven Chen, both associate professors. At the ceremony, Dean Vanderveen spoke about the tremendous dedication of the community pharmacy group. Unable to attend but mentioned as award recipients were Elizabeth Cervantes, Stephanie Iniguez and Cecilia Wu, clinical staff pharmacists at QueensCare Family Clinics. Also part of the team are faculty members Jeff Goad, Edith Mirzaian and Mike Rudolph. Previously, the school’s work in safety-net clinics garnered the 2007 Pinnacle Award of the American Pharmacists Association Foundation and the 2008 Best Practices Award of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

5


cover feature

Stepping out class of 2009

{to their professional lives} Washington is all abuzz about health-care reform presumably to rein in costs, improve quality and safety and provide coverage for all population groups. What form this will ultimately take and the timeframe in which it will be pursued is anyone’s guess given the menagerie of players and today’s overall economic uncertainty. One thing most corners agree on is that something needs to be done and that it is likely that something will be done during the Obama years.

in changing times Given that the School of Pharmacy just graduated 176 new PharmD’s, 8 PhD’s and 29 MS’s, the questions surface: What will the Class of 2009 confront during the next few years as they embark on their new careers? What will these shifting economic times and loud cries for health reform bring to these bright, new faces on the professional team? What impact will stimulus spending and realigned federal priorities have on their career outlooks? To gain some perspective on this, USCpharmacy asked a few of the School’s experts to share their thoughts. Here, in their own words, is what they had to say. R. PETE VANDERVEEN, PhD, RPh John Stauffer Decanal Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences Dean, USC School of Pharmacy “There’s great talk and anger about the government’s bail outs of Wall Street, the auto industry, irresponsible home buyers, among others - in its many forms and various abuses—and how all this will ultimately shake out and hopefully put the nation’s economy back on track. However, our economy will clearly never get back on track without curing the spiraling health-care costs that have been plaguing the nation for decades. One facet of these costs—a very important and integral one —has to do with medication usage and its effect on the patient and on the budget. My hope is that the Class of 2009 recognizes this challenge and becomes an integral part of the solution. A recent Consumer Reports Poll indicates that 66% of Americans say they are blindsided by the cost of drugs, resulting in many not taking needed medications. Half of Latino patients neglect to follow through on their doctors’ prescriptions and nearly three in 10 don’t even fill prescriptions for cost reasons. By one estimate, annual costs associated with failure to take medications as prescribed totals over $177 billion. That’s 1,000 times more than the $170 million AIG bonus money. And the

6 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

medication budget toll is an expense that we face year after year after year. Appropriate use of medications should be a major health initiative of the Obama administration. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that appropriate use of medications keeps people healthier while saving enormous amounts of money. Some enlightened companies, like General Mills, have discovered an effective way to ensure appropriate medication use among employees is to have pharmacists work one-on-one with them. Here’s what Kendall Powell, Chairman and CEO of General Mills, said at the White House Forum on Health Reform held in March: ‘We have white collar, professional, highly educated people at General Mills who do not know how to follow their meds. And so what we’re doing now-again on this prevention tact-is we’re sitting them down with a pharmacist. For as long as they need to, to understand what they’re taking, why, the consequences of withdrawal, all the interactions. And again it makes a huge difference in the management of chronic disease.’ Mr. Powell understands that involving a pharmacist in the regular management of people with chronic diseases is good medicine and good business. Unless our nation takes steps to ensure appropriate medication use, we will never gain control of today’s spiraling health-care costs. The seven most common chronic diseases are estimated to inflict a $1.3 trillion annual drag on the economy. It is in the control of these diseases where we can make an impact in both keeping people healthier and in controlling costs. We have a proven workforce ready to make this solution a reality—pharmacists—medication experts accessible on almost any corner in any town in the US. If the nation takes the example of General Mills, we may end up healthier, happier and a little richer… and our Class of 2009 may be among the leaders of this change.”

DEAN R. PETE VANDERVEEN, John Stauffer Decanal Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has led the USC School of Pharmacy since September 2005. Vanderveen believes appropriate use of medications should be a major health initiative of the Obama administration. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that appropriate use of medications keeps people healthier while saving enormous amounts of money. Further, pharmacists are a proven workforce ready to make this solution a reality.

opposite page: Flag bearers Se Kwon Song and Todd Okamoto lead the processional at the School’s Commencement. While times might be uncertain, the ceremony marked a great celebration of graduate accomplishments and excitement at the prospect of new challenges. PharmD graduate Se Kwon Song (left) is headed for a residency position in managed care at Prescription Solutions while Todd Okamoto (right) has been awarded a Rutgers University industry fellowship at BristolMyers Squibb Company.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

7


cover feature

Stepping out class of 2009

{to their professional lives} Washington is all abuzz about health-care reform presumably to rein in costs, improve quality and safety and provide coverage for all population groups. What form this will ultimately take and the timeframe in which it will be pursued is anyone’s guess given the menagerie of players and today’s overall economic uncertainty. One thing most corners agree on is that something needs to be done and that it is likely that something will be done during the Obama years.

in changing times Given that the School of Pharmacy just graduated 176 new PharmD’s, 8 PhD’s and 29 MS’s, the questions surface: What will the Class of 2009 confront during the next few years as they embark on their new careers? What will these shifting economic times and loud cries for health reform bring to these bright, new faces on the professional team? What impact will stimulus spending and realigned federal priorities have on their career outlooks? To gain some perspective on this, USCpharmacy asked a few of the School’s experts to share their thoughts. Here, in their own words, is what they had to say. R. PETE VANDERVEEN, PhD, RPh John Stauffer Decanal Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences Dean, USC School of Pharmacy “There’s great talk and anger about the government’s bail outs of Wall Street, the auto industry, irresponsible home buyers, among others - in its many forms and various abuses—and how all this will ultimately shake out and hopefully put the nation’s economy back on track. However, our economy will clearly never get back on track without curing the spiraling health-care costs that have been plaguing the nation for decades. One facet of these costs—a very important and integral one —has to do with medication usage and its effect on the patient and on the budget. My hope is that the Class of 2009 recognizes this challenge and becomes an integral part of the solution. A recent Consumer Reports Poll indicates that 66% of Americans say they are blindsided by the cost of drugs, resulting in many not taking needed medications. Half of Latino patients neglect to follow through on their doctors’ prescriptions and nearly three in 10 don’t even fill prescriptions for cost reasons. By one estimate, annual costs associated with failure to take medications as prescribed totals over $177 billion. That’s 1,000 times more than the $170 million AIG bonus money. And the

6 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

medication budget toll is an expense that we face year after year after year. Appropriate use of medications should be a major health initiative of the Obama administration. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that appropriate use of medications keeps people healthier while saving enormous amounts of money. Some enlightened companies, like General Mills, have discovered an effective way to ensure appropriate medication use among employees is to have pharmacists work one-on-one with them. Here’s what Kendall Powell, Chairman and CEO of General Mills, said at the White House Forum on Health Reform held in March: ‘We have white collar, professional, highly educated people at General Mills who do not know how to follow their meds. And so what we’re doing now-again on this prevention tact-is we’re sitting them down with a pharmacist. For as long as they need to, to understand what they’re taking, why, the consequences of withdrawal, all the interactions. And again it makes a huge difference in the management of chronic disease.’ Mr. Powell understands that involving a pharmacist in the regular management of people with chronic diseases is good medicine and good business. Unless our nation takes steps to ensure appropriate medication use, we will never gain control of today’s spiraling health-care costs. The seven most common chronic diseases are estimated to inflict a $1.3 trillion annual drag on the economy. It is in the control of these diseases where we can make an impact in both keeping people healthier and in controlling costs. We have a proven workforce ready to make this solution a reality—pharmacists—medication experts accessible on almost any corner in any town in the US. If the nation takes the example of General Mills, we may end up healthier, happier and a little richer… and our Class of 2009 may be among the leaders of this change.”

DEAN R. PETE VANDERVEEN, John Stauffer Decanal Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has led the USC School of Pharmacy since September 2005. Vanderveen believes appropriate use of medications should be a major health initiative of the Obama administration. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that appropriate use of medications keeps people healthier while saving enormous amounts of money. Further, pharmacists are a proven workforce ready to make this solution a reality.

opposite page: Flag bearers Se Kwon Song and Todd Okamoto lead the processional at the School’s Commencement. While times might be uncertain, the ceremony marked a great celebration of graduate accomplishments and excitement at the prospect of new challenges. PharmD graduate Se Kwon Song (left) is headed for a residency position in managed care at Prescription Solutions while Todd Okamoto (right) has been awarded a Rutgers University industry fellowship at BristolMyers Squibb Company.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

7


cover feature

Professor Kathleen Johnson takes change to the next level when she discusses how 2009 PharmD graduates, especially those working as clinical pharmacists, are capable agents of change.

TITUS FAMILY DEPARTMENT CHAIR KATHLEEN JOHNSON, William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy, has recently co-authored a study on the positive impact of pharmacist intervention on patients with diabetes. Johnson advises the Class of 2009 to seize the opportunity created in this era of health reform, using their expertise to improve medication safety and quality of care while controlling cost.

KATHLEEN JOHNSON, PharmD, MPH, PhD William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy Chair, Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy “I believe that there are three main areas of contribution for pharmacists in the Class of 2009 and that they will need to push health care forward by serving as leaders of change. These three areas are: medication safety; efficiency in health care by lowering cost while maintaining quality; and team work to provide the best care including continuity to and from all practice settings. Pharmacists play a vital role in the medication component of these areas. Medication safety is on the mind of all of us. Pharmacists play a critical role in not just filling prescription orders as written, but talking with patients and providers about medications utilized, assuring that the medication is not only the correct one, but that the dose and patient factors such as adherence, side effects, disease contraindications, self-medication and drug interactions are considered. Pharmacists in this new era will need to take a more proactive stance as patient advocate because even though a prescription is technically correct as written and there is no legal obligation to initiate a change, the medication prescribed may not be optimal for the patient. Pharmacists have tremendous skills in medication therapy management of chronic disease and these skills have been proven to be cost-effective and of high quality. As the population ages and more therapeutic choices are available at ever increasing cost, pharmacists can focus on the highest risk patients to assure these individuals receive the best care possible and maintain a good quality of life and functioning. Working in concert with others on the health-care team to focus on those patients with medication and disease-control issues will allow other providers to see new patients and expand patient enrolment. With electronic health records, pharmacists will have access to more patient clinical data, and thus will have the opportunity to assure medications are doing what they are prescribed to do, that is, to improve patient outcomes or prevent disease sequelae. As part of the team, pharmacists will also have the ability to share information on both prescription and non-prescription medications with other health-care providers and to follow patients from setting to setting—for example, from hospital to home—to assure quality of care standards are practiced in the use of medications and monitoring of medication effects. These clinical and prevention activities, currently the standard of care in many health maintenance organizations and governmental programs such as the Veterans Administration health-care system, will need to occur in all health-care settings, from hospitals to community pharmacies. Additionally, pharmacists have

8 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

So what’s next for these graduates as they embark on their new careers. (left to right) Carla Blieden, who earned both a PharmD and MPH, hopes to land a position in public health; Paul Chung is vying for a position in the biotech or pharmaceutical industry; Sergio Gonzalez has accepted a post at Arcadia Methodist Hospital as an inpatient clinical pharmacist.

an important role to play in prevention and health education—assuring patients understand the use of the medication, and other instructions that intend to prevent complications. Further, pharmacists play a pivotal role in today’s growing trend of self-medication safety, especially as more products are available either behind the counter or over the counter. Today’s pharmacist is prepared to meet these challenges, having completed a stringent four-year, post-graduate program that includes significant clinical experience. For the Class of 2009, the time is here to seize the opportunity created in this era of health reform to use their

Professor Joel Hay, who is often quoted on health economics and policy issues in the national press, takes a look at today’s health-care trends and their impact on the Class of 2009. JOEL HAY, PhD Professor of Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy “The good news for new pharmacists and other health-care workers is that health care will remain one of the strongest employment sectors for the foreseeable future. Jobs will be

“The good news for new pharmacists and other health-care

workers is that health care will remain one of the strongest employment sectors for the foreseeable future. Jobs will be plentiful and wages will stay high...” expertise to improve medication safety and to improve quality of care while maintaining controls on cost. It is a time for the pharmacist to emerge as the responsible medication expert on the health-care team in all practice settings.”

plentiful and wages will stay high regardless of the success of any health-care reform measures. If Obama’s health-care reform plan does pass Congress, we could actually see some serious shortages of health-care manpower, particularly for primary-care physicians. Prescription demand could also rise substantially.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

9


cover feature

Professor Kathleen Johnson takes change to the next level when she discusses how 2009 PharmD graduates, especially those working as clinical pharmacists, are capable agents of change.

TITUS FAMILY DEPARTMENT CHAIR KATHLEEN JOHNSON, William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy, has recently co-authored a study on the positive impact of pharmacist intervention on patients with diabetes. Johnson advises the Class of 2009 to seize the opportunity created in this era of health reform, using their expertise to improve medication safety and quality of care while controlling cost.

KATHLEEN JOHNSON, PharmD, MPH, PhD William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy Chair, Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy “I believe that there are three main areas of contribution for pharmacists in the Class of 2009 and that they will need to push health care forward by serving as leaders of change. These three areas are: medication safety; efficiency in health care by lowering cost while maintaining quality; and team work to provide the best care including continuity to and from all practice settings. Pharmacists play a vital role in the medication component of these areas. Medication safety is on the mind of all of us. Pharmacists play a critical role in not just filling prescription orders as written, but talking with patients and providers about medications utilized, assuring that the medication is not only the correct one, but that the dose and patient factors such as adherence, side effects, disease contraindications, self-medication and drug interactions are considered. Pharmacists in this new era will need to take a more proactive stance as patient advocate because even though a prescription is technically correct as written and there is no legal obligation to initiate a change, the medication prescribed may not be optimal for the patient. Pharmacists have tremendous skills in medication therapy management of chronic disease and these skills have been proven to be cost-effective and of high quality. As the population ages and more therapeutic choices are available at ever increasing cost, pharmacists can focus on the highest risk patients to assure these individuals receive the best care possible and maintain a good quality of life and functioning. Working in concert with others on the health-care team to focus on those patients with medication and disease-control issues will allow other providers to see new patients and expand patient enrolment. With electronic health records, pharmacists will have access to more patient clinical data, and thus will have the opportunity to assure medications are doing what they are prescribed to do, that is, to improve patient outcomes or prevent disease sequelae. As part of the team, pharmacists will also have the ability to share information on both prescription and non-prescription medications with other health-care providers and to follow patients from setting to setting—for example, from hospital to home—to assure quality of care standards are practiced in the use of medications and monitoring of medication effects. These clinical and prevention activities, currently the standard of care in many health maintenance organizations and governmental programs such as the Veterans Administration health-care system, will need to occur in all health-care settings, from hospitals to community pharmacies. Additionally, pharmacists have

8 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

So what’s next for these graduates as they embark on their new careers. (left to right) Carla Blieden, who earned both a PharmD and MPH, hopes to land a position in public health; Paul Chung is vying for a position in the biotech or pharmaceutical industry; Sergio Gonzalez has accepted a post at Arcadia Methodist Hospital as an inpatient clinical pharmacist.

an important role to play in prevention and health education—assuring patients understand the use of the medication, and other instructions that intend to prevent complications. Further, pharmacists play a pivotal role in today’s growing trend of self-medication safety, especially as more products are available either behind the counter or over the counter. Today’s pharmacist is prepared to meet these challenges, having completed a stringent four-year, post-graduate program that includes significant clinical experience. For the Class of 2009, the time is here to seize the opportunity created in this era of health reform to use their

Professor Joel Hay, who is often quoted on health economics and policy issues in the national press, takes a look at today’s health-care trends and their impact on the Class of 2009. JOEL HAY, PhD Professor of Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy Titus Family Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy “The good news for new pharmacists and other health-care workers is that health care will remain one of the strongest employment sectors for the foreseeable future. Jobs will be

“The good news for new pharmacists and other health-care

workers is that health care will remain one of the strongest employment sectors for the foreseeable future. Jobs will be plentiful and wages will stay high...” expertise to improve medication safety and to improve quality of care while maintaining controls on cost. It is a time for the pharmacist to emerge as the responsible medication expert on the health-care team in all practice settings.”

plentiful and wages will stay high regardless of the success of any health-care reform measures. If Obama’s health-care reform plan does pass Congress, we could actually see some serious shortages of health-care manpower, particularly for primary-care physicians. Prescription demand could also rise substantially.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

9


cover feature

PROFESSOR JOEL HAY, an internationally known expert on health economics, health insurance reform and cost/benefit analysis, has authored or co-authored over 135 peer-reviewed scientific articles in leading health journals and opinion pieces in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times. Hay believes health care will continue as one of the strongest employment sectors for the foreseeable future.

Another positive development is the tangible commitment that the federal government has made to ensuring electronic medical records and high standards of health information technology (IT). These developments will provide pharmacists with unprecedented opportunities for improving health outcomes through medication therapy management. For the first time, all inpatient and ambulatory pharmacists will have access to the complete medical and drug histories of their patients, allowing them to more accurately evaluate the benefits and risks of continuing or changing medication therapy. Until now, such real-time capabilities for pharmacist oversight and intervention have only existed at a few organizations like Kaiser and the VA system. Pharmacists will need to be proactive to learn how to use these new IT capabilities to optimize patient care and will have to demonstrate that such pharmacy services deserve reimbursement. Health IT will also dramatically enhance the feasibility of real world comparative effectiveness research. Currently, less than 20% of all medical interventions are backed up by high-quality scientific evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials of head-to-head comparator therapies). Health-care researchers have estimated that about 1/3 of all US health care is either unnecessary or actually harmful. If we can take advantage of better patient outcomes surveillance through improved health IT, we can conduct real world comparative effectiveness research with a potential to save nearly $1 trillion per year in unnecessary medical care. This would be excellent news for federal deficits and future taxpayers. Finally, in an increasingly globalized world, with instantaneous twittering from every corner, it is important that Americans confront the enormous basic health-care shortages that exist around the world. In many African countries, children and mothers giving birth die from easily preventable conditions, there are only a handful of physicians per million population and no trained pharmacists at all. Economists make a persuasive case that lack of basic health care can be a major cause of economic and social stagnation. Those of us who are fortunate to have such bountiful standards of living should think about how we might contribute something to health care for the global community.

10 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Daya Perkins, a new PhD and MS in regulatory science, is hooded by mentor Ron Alkana, PharmD, PhD, and Darryl Davies, PhD. Perkins plans to continue her alcohol research in the lab of Dr. Alkana while also working with the regulatory science program.

The vast improvements in global communications will make such contributions more feasible and harder to ignore. If we can fly unmanned warplanes over Afghanistan from an airbase in Nevada, maybe we can figure out how to deliver simple medication advice to mothers giving birth in Ghana from a pharmacy school in Los Angeles. Professor Sarah Hamm-Alvarez takes a look at the effects of today’s environment on research funding to schools and on job prospects for graduates. SARAH HAMM-ALVAREZ, PhD Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences Chair, Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences “A number of new opportunities in research are likely to emerge during the Obama administration. This administration has already significantly impacted the nation’s research agenda by working with Congress to allocate a significant amount, $8.2 billion, for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. These one-time funds that are intended to boost jobs through investment in science by funding projects and infrastructure are still making their way through the

system, but they have resulted in an unprecedented number of proposals submitted to the National Institutes of Health in the past two months. As a part of the 2010 budget, President Obama has proposed a modestly increased NIH budget (1.4%) but has also vowed to increase the languishing National Science Foundation budgets more significantly by over 8%. The proposed allocations within the NIH budget, however, represent a significant difference from the Bush administration, with the President’s more significant focus on serving underserved populations, improving the general quality and access to care and improving public health. Two notable areas highlighted by the President within the NIH budget that are getting proportionally more money are the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. In particular, the President has vowed to double funding in cancer research within the next eight years. Notably, the President has removed the limitations put in place by the Bush administration on stem cell research, promising a significant increase in funding for this area. With the focus on serving human populations, it appears that increasing opportunities will continue to be available for scientists wishing to translate the application of basic science discoveries to the clinic.

“The Obama agenda emphasizes most of

the areas that greatly impact human populations by focusing on cancer, infectious diseases and environmental exposure...” The Obama agenda emphasizes most of the areas that greatly impact human populations by focusing on cancer, infectious diseases and environmental exposure, so it would appear that opportunities in these areas will increase. With the increased emphasis on funding for hard science and technology, there will be increasing opportunities as well in applied sciences at the interface of biology and engineering, although the major influx of funds into the hard sciences by the Obama administration is dedicated to energy research. With the School’s focus on applied and translational research, as well as basic research in development and delivery of new therapeutics, the Obama administration promises to be friendly to the USC School of Pharmacy. This will likely translate into additional funding in many of our labs, allowing us to offer post-doctoral positions to some of our newly minted 2009 PhD’s. Additionally, while industry growth may still look sluggish, venture dollars will ultimately begin to fund new research projects in both pharmaceutical and medical device companies that meet goals that the administration sets. Once these dollars are unleashed, many of our graduates whose research experience well suits them to the administration’s priorities and projects, should find their opportunity outlook bright in both industry and academia. In research, uncertainty sometimes breeds great creativity. I am confident that in this new era, our new scientists will find a creative path on which to make their marks.

PHARMACOLOGY AND PHARMaCEUTICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT CHAIR SARAH HAMMALVAREZ, Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has had consecutive NIH funding since 1994 supporting her research in “drug trafficking”, specifically seeking efficient ways to deliver therapies to the tear gland as a way to treat diseases of the eye. HammAlvarez predicts the Obama years may prove supportive of the work underway in School of Pharmacy labs.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

11


cover feature

PROFESSOR JOEL HAY, an internationally known expert on health economics, health insurance reform and cost/benefit analysis, has authored or co-authored over 135 peer-reviewed scientific articles in leading health journals and opinion pieces in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times. Hay believes health care will continue as one of the strongest employment sectors for the foreseeable future.

Another positive development is the tangible commitment that the federal government has made to ensuring electronic medical records and high standards of health information technology (IT). These developments will provide pharmacists with unprecedented opportunities for improving health outcomes through medication therapy management. For the first time, all inpatient and ambulatory pharmacists will have access to the complete medical and drug histories of their patients, allowing them to more accurately evaluate the benefits and risks of continuing or changing medication therapy. Until now, such real-time capabilities for pharmacist oversight and intervention have only existed at a few organizations like Kaiser and the VA system. Pharmacists will need to be proactive to learn how to use these new IT capabilities to optimize patient care and will have to demonstrate that such pharmacy services deserve reimbursement. Health IT will also dramatically enhance the feasibility of real world comparative effectiveness research. Currently, less than 20% of all medical interventions are backed up by high-quality scientific evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials of head-to-head comparator therapies). Health-care researchers have estimated that about 1/3 of all US health care is either unnecessary or actually harmful. If we can take advantage of better patient outcomes surveillance through improved health IT, we can conduct real world comparative effectiveness research with a potential to save nearly $1 trillion per year in unnecessary medical care. This would be excellent news for federal deficits and future taxpayers. Finally, in an increasingly globalized world, with instantaneous twittering from every corner, it is important that Americans confront the enormous basic health-care shortages that exist around the world. In many African countries, children and mothers giving birth die from easily preventable conditions, there are only a handful of physicians per million population and no trained pharmacists at all. Economists make a persuasive case that lack of basic health care can be a major cause of economic and social stagnation. Those of us who are fortunate to have such bountiful standards of living should think about how we might contribute something to health care for the global community.

10 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Daya Perkins, a new PhD and MS in regulatory science, is hooded by mentor Ron Alkana, PharmD, PhD, and Darryl Davies, PhD. Perkins plans to continue her alcohol research in the lab of Dr. Alkana while also working with the regulatory science program.

The vast improvements in global communications will make such contributions more feasible and harder to ignore. If we can fly unmanned warplanes over Afghanistan from an airbase in Nevada, maybe we can figure out how to deliver simple medication advice to mothers giving birth in Ghana from a pharmacy school in Los Angeles. Professor Sarah Hamm-Alvarez takes a look at the effects of today’s environment on research funding to schools and on job prospects for graduates. SARAH HAMM-ALVAREZ, PhD Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences Chair, Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences “A number of new opportunities in research are likely to emerge during the Obama administration. This administration has already significantly impacted the nation’s research agenda by working with Congress to allocate a significant amount, $8.2 billion, for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. These one-time funds that are intended to boost jobs through investment in science by funding projects and infrastructure are still making their way through the

system, but they have resulted in an unprecedented number of proposals submitted to the National Institutes of Health in the past two months. As a part of the 2010 budget, President Obama has proposed a modestly increased NIH budget (1.4%) but has also vowed to increase the languishing National Science Foundation budgets more significantly by over 8%. The proposed allocations within the NIH budget, however, represent a significant difference from the Bush administration, with the President’s more significant focus on serving underserved populations, improving the general quality and access to care and improving public health. Two notable areas highlighted by the President within the NIH budget that are getting proportionally more money are the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. In particular, the President has vowed to double funding in cancer research within the next eight years. Notably, the President has removed the limitations put in place by the Bush administration on stem cell research, promising a significant increase in funding for this area. With the focus on serving human populations, it appears that increasing opportunities will continue to be available for scientists wishing to translate the application of basic science discoveries to the clinic.

“The Obama agenda emphasizes most of

the areas that greatly impact human populations by focusing on cancer, infectious diseases and environmental exposure...” The Obama agenda emphasizes most of the areas that greatly impact human populations by focusing on cancer, infectious diseases and environmental exposure, so it would appear that opportunities in these areas will increase. With the increased emphasis on funding for hard science and technology, there will be increasing opportunities as well in applied sciences at the interface of biology and engineering, although the major influx of funds into the hard sciences by the Obama administration is dedicated to energy research. With the School’s focus on applied and translational research, as well as basic research in development and delivery of new therapeutics, the Obama administration promises to be friendly to the USC School of Pharmacy. This will likely translate into additional funding in many of our labs, allowing us to offer post-doctoral positions to some of our newly minted 2009 PhD’s. Additionally, while industry growth may still look sluggish, venture dollars will ultimately begin to fund new research projects in both pharmaceutical and medical device companies that meet goals that the administration sets. Once these dollars are unleashed, many of our graduates whose research experience well suits them to the administration’s priorities and projects, should find their opportunity outlook bright in both industry and academia. In research, uncertainty sometimes breeds great creativity. I am confident that in this new era, our new scientists will find a creative path on which to make their marks.

PHARMACOLOGY AND PHARMaCEUTICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT CHAIR SARAH HAMMALVAREZ, Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has had consecutive NIH funding since 1994 supporting her research in “drug trafficking”, specifically seeking efficient ways to deliver therapies to the tear gland as a way to treat diseases of the eye. HammAlvarez predicts the Obama years may prove supportive of the work underway in School of Pharmacy labs.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

11


giving

OUR TIME TO GIVE

Just Arrived

Joanne and Scott Evans are young alums already giving back. In pharmacy school, Joanne Apodaca was class president while her eventual husband, Scott Evans, served as president of APhA-ASP and of Phi Lambda Sigma. Those leadership posts were precursors to the future careers each would pursue. Today, Joanne Evans owns and runs the Phillips Ranch Pharmacy in Pomona. She built the store from scratch, opening her doors to customers in August 2005. “When I was in school, I always knew I wanted to do community pharmacy. Being my own boss really allows me to focus on what I like best about my profession—my patients. Here I’m invested in my patients’ lives and that’s what I really wanted.” Scott’s career took him in a little different direction with most of his experience in hospital pharmacy. He quickly found that management was a good fit for him as he took over as director of pharmacy at University Hospital in 2004. Two years later, his director of pharmacy role was expanded to also include the Norris Cancer Hospital. Administration appealed to him and in 2007, he was named Chief Operating Officer of both University Hospital and Norris Cancer Center, the position he continues to hold today. “My clinical training in pharmacy is a real plus for me in my position. It really provides me with insights that a nonclinical person rarely has. In fact, it was a strong factor in my favor when I was competing for the position,” says Scott. Both are graduates of the School of Pharmacy Class of 1998, and now only 11 years since completing pharmacy school themselves, they have set up the Joanne and Scott

Evans Endowed Scholarship to support the next generation of pharmacists. “We’ve been helped by so many alums during our careers, now it’s nice to be able to give something back,” notes Joanne.

To most people, the idea of setting up a $25,000 scholarship is a big commitment and quite a big deal. But Joanne and Scott have taken on this commitment in a rather matter-of-fact way, as if it is a natural next step to make this kind of contribution. As Scott puts it, “We just finished paying off our student loans. We’ve enjoyed a great deal of help, advice and mentoring from the school and other alums, now it’s our turn.” top left: Scott Evans, PharmD (’98), is chief operating officer of University Hospital and Norris Cancer Hospital. above: Joanne Evans, PharmD (’98), consults with a patient at her pharmacy, Phillips Ranch Pharmacy in Pomona.

To find out more about scholarship support opportunities, contact Ola Carr at 323.442.1381 or carr@usc.edu. 12 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

“Usc Gave Me Excellence” Roslyn Blake returns to the School of Pharmacy eager to give to today’s students. When Roslyn Blake was growing up, she worked at her father’s store, Ellison’s Record Shop, quietly adopting his work ethic and entrepreneurial spirit that ultimately formed the bedrock on which she pursued a successful career. “I’m nothing special, but always strive,” she humbly describes herself. Roslyn Blake, PharmD (’92), came to pharmacy school years after graduating from Compton High. After high school, she went to UCSD but did not complete her degree, “I didn’t do well in the science courses, so I decided to go to work for the Social Security Administration.” While working at Social Security, she ran into a high school classmate who was in her last semester at the USC School of Pharmacy. This fortuitous meeting ignited Roslyn’s interest in a career in pharmacy. The timing was especially good as Roslyn was already questioning her major in public administration at Cal State-Dominguez Hills where she was pursuing her undergraduate degree while holding down a full-time position at Social Security. Roslyn made an appointment to learn about the prerequisites that she would have to complete to gain admission to pharmacy school. The science requirements were daunting and may have seemed beyond reach to many in Roslyn’s situation. “In spite of all this, on a prayer, I quit my job after 10 years of employment and enrolled at Long Beach City College for a year of science. I was ready to do it and I did.” Roslyn got the grades she needed and was accepted to the USC School of Pharmacy. Somehow, Roslyn and her husband, Bob, kept their household — which included two young sons — going while she attended pharmacy school. “I was very grateful for the scholarships I received. They made all the difference in the world.” During her fourth year of pharmacy school, Roslyn did a rotation at GranCare, a long-term care company that also operated closed-door pharmacies to serve their facilities. They offered her a position upon graduation which she took. From GranCare, Roslyn went to Covenant Care, another operator of long-term

care facilities, where she oversaw the company’s consultant pharmacy division for their three pharmacies in California. In 2000, Roslyn left her position at Covenant to do something she had never done—take time off for herself. Her break ended in three weeks when she went into her husband’s company for a “short

Dean Vanderveen with Roslyn Blake, PharmD (’92), and Bob Blake.

stint”. That short stint is still happening, as Bob Blake & Associates Inc., a financial services company, enjoyed exponential growth and the couple added a second company headed by Roslyn called MB Ellison, Inc., rightfully named after her father. “Our lives have always been so full and time so tight. But now we’re making time to give back,” says Roslyn. True to form, Roslyn and Bob Blake have moved into action with the establishment of the Roslyn Ellison Blake Diversity Scholarship at the School of Pharmacy. “USC gave me excellence. I remember being one of only a few African Americans while in pharmacy school—it all came together for me. This is a place where my story and our support can really help someone else,” says Roslyn.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

13


giving

OUR TIME TO GIVE

Just Arrived

Joanne and Scott Evans are young alums already giving back. In pharmacy school, Joanne Apodaca was class president while her eventual husband, Scott Evans, served as president of APhA-ASP and of Phi Lambda Sigma. Those leadership posts were precursors to the future careers each would pursue. Today, Joanne Evans owns and runs the Phillips Ranch Pharmacy in Pomona. She built the store from scratch, opening her doors to customers in August 2005. “When I was in school, I always knew I wanted to do community pharmacy. Being my own boss really allows me to focus on what I like best about my profession—my patients. Here I’m invested in my patients’ lives and that’s what I really wanted.” Scott’s career took him in a little different direction with most of his experience in hospital pharmacy. He quickly found that management was a good fit for him as he took over as director of pharmacy at University Hospital in 2004. Two years later, his director of pharmacy role was expanded to also include the Norris Cancer Hospital. Administration appealed to him and in 2007, he was named Chief Operating Officer of both University Hospital and Norris Cancer Center, the position he continues to hold today. “My clinical training in pharmacy is a real plus for me in my position. It really provides me with insights that a nonclinical person rarely has. In fact, it was a strong factor in my favor when I was competing for the position,” says Scott. Both are graduates of the School of Pharmacy Class of 1998, and now only 11 years since completing pharmacy school themselves, they have set up the Joanne and Scott

Evans Endowed Scholarship to support the next generation of pharmacists. “We’ve been helped by so many alums during our careers, now it’s nice to be able to give something back,” notes Joanne.

To most people, the idea of setting up a $25,000 scholarship is a big commitment and quite a big deal. But Joanne and Scott have taken on this commitment in a rather matter-of-fact way, as if it is a natural next step to make this kind of contribution. As Scott puts it, “We just finished paying off our student loans. We’ve enjoyed a great deal of help, advice and mentoring from the school and other alums, now it’s our turn.” top left: Scott Evans, PharmD (’98), is chief operating officer of University Hospital and Norris Cancer Hospital. above: Joanne Evans, PharmD (’98), consults with a patient at her pharmacy, Phillips Ranch Pharmacy in Pomona.

To find out more about scholarship support opportunities, contact Ola Carr at 323.442.1381 or carr@usc.edu. 12 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

“Usc Gave Me Excellence” Roslyn Blake returns to the School of Pharmacy eager to give to today’s students. When Roslyn Blake was growing up, she worked at her father’s store, Ellison’s Record Shop, quietly adopting his work ethic and entrepreneurial spirit that ultimately formed the bedrock on which she pursued a successful career. “I’m nothing special, but always strive,” she humbly describes herself. Roslyn Blake, PharmD (’92), came to pharmacy school years after graduating from Compton High. After high school, she went to UCSD but did not complete her degree, “I didn’t do well in the science courses, so I decided to go to work for the Social Security Administration.” While working at Social Security, she ran into a high school classmate who was in her last semester at the USC School of Pharmacy. This fortuitous meeting ignited Roslyn’s interest in a career in pharmacy. The timing was especially good as Roslyn was already questioning her major in public administration at Cal State-Dominguez Hills where she was pursuing her undergraduate degree while holding down a full-time position at Social Security. Roslyn made an appointment to learn about the prerequisites that she would have to complete to gain admission to pharmacy school. The science requirements were daunting and may have seemed beyond reach to many in Roslyn’s situation. “In spite of all this, on a prayer, I quit my job after 10 years of employment and enrolled at Long Beach City College for a year of science. I was ready to do it and I did.” Roslyn got the grades she needed and was accepted to the USC School of Pharmacy. Somehow, Roslyn and her husband, Bob, kept their household — which included two young sons — going while she attended pharmacy school. “I was very grateful for the scholarships I received. They made all the difference in the world.” During her fourth year of pharmacy school, Roslyn did a rotation at GranCare, a long-term care company that also operated closed-door pharmacies to serve their facilities. They offered her a position upon graduation which she took. From GranCare, Roslyn went to Covenant Care, another operator of long-term

care facilities, where she oversaw the company’s consultant pharmacy division for their three pharmacies in California. In 2000, Roslyn left her position at Covenant to do something she had never done—take time off for herself. Her break ended in three weeks when she went into her husband’s company for a “short

Dean Vanderveen with Roslyn Blake, PharmD (’92), and Bob Blake.

stint”. That short stint is still happening, as Bob Blake & Associates Inc., a financial services company, enjoyed exponential growth and the couple added a second company headed by Roslyn called MB Ellison, Inc., rightfully named after her father. “Our lives have always been so full and time so tight. But now we’re making time to give back,” says Roslyn. True to form, Roslyn and Bob Blake have moved into action with the establishment of the Roslyn Ellison Blake Diversity Scholarship at the School of Pharmacy. “USC gave me excellence. I remember being one of only a few African Americans while in pharmacy school—it all came together for me. This is a place where my story and our support can really help someone else,” says Roslyn.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

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school news

Patient Mike Metcalfe spoke during the broadcast.

Usc Is Site for National Hrsa Satellite Broadcast The School of Pharmacy presented outcomes data and a patient’s perspective as part of a satellite broadcast bringing together nearly 500 health professionals nationwide. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), part of the US Department of Health and Human Services, presented a national learning session of the Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Collaborative (PSPC) on May 6. The PSPC strives to improve the quality of health care nationwide by integrating evidence-based, clinical pharmacy services into the care and management of patients with chronic diseases. While the main site for the learning session was in Washington, DC, the broadcast brought together another dozen sites nationwide. USC and University of Minnesota were the only satellite sites that transmitted part of the national program.

On hand in Washington for the HRSA satellite conference were Dennis Wagner, School of Pharmacy Professor Steve Chen, Denise Geolot, JWCH medical director Paul Gregerson and Jimmy Mitchell. Wagner, Geolot and Mitchell are all employed by HRSA; Chen and Gregerson are faculty members for the HRSA initiative promoting clinical pharmacy services in clinics nationwide.

14 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Steven Chen, associate professor at the USC School of Pharmacy, was online from Washington as a HRSA faculty member along with his co-faculty member, Paul Gregerson, chief medical officer at the JWCH Institute. Chen and Gregerson work collaboratively in caring for patients at the JWCH Clinic at the Weingart Center in downtown Los Angeles. Gregerson discussed the important role that clinical pharmacy services play at the clinic, improving patient outcomes while saving health-care dollars. Chen discussed the advantages these partnerships offer, providing a fertile environment for educating students and residents as well as offering faculty research opportunities. Chen introduced his patient Mike Metcalfe, at the USC site, who shared his personal story with the national audience, explaining how Dr. Chen played a pivotal role in bringing him back to life—helping him take control of his health to where he is today—“having fallen in love with his new healthy lifestyle”. Also from the USC site, Kathleen Johnson, the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy, presented outcomes data from the school’s work in seven safety-net clinics. Johnson’s presentation showed how pharmacist intervention produced better results for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol while also enhancing patient medication compliance and safety.

Meeting with Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (right) in the nation’s capitol are Dean Vanderveen (left) and (back row) Professors Steven Chen, Mel Baron and Kathleen Johnson.

Usc Takes Pharmacy Initiatives To Capitol Hill School of Pharmacy representatives meet with officials in Washington, putting pharmacy on the legislative agenda. Dean R. Pete Vanderveen along with Professors Mel Baron, Steve Chen, Kathleen Johnson and Kathleen Besinque met with elected officials and their staffs in the nation’s capitol in February. California Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard met with the group at her Capitol Hill office to discuss the impact of clinical pharmacy services on underserved populations in her district. Representing the 34th Congressional District, Roybal-Allard is on the House Appropriations Committee and a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. The congresswoman has been a strong supporter of the School’s work in safety-net clinics. The USC contingent covered a variety of topics during their Hill visits. They explained the expanded role of the pharmacist in preventive medicine and the importance of recognizing the phar-

macist as a provider in the federal health-care code. Furthermore, the group presented data from a new USC study showing the positive patient outcomes resulting from pharmacist intervention in the safety-net environment. Other topics covered in meetings included current healthcare reform issues such as transitioning to electronic medical records. The group also stressed the importance of NIH funding for clinical and translational research conducted at the School and throughout the USC campus. In addition to meeting with Congresswoman Roybal-Allard, School of Pharmacy representatives met with staff members from the offices of Senator Barbara Boxer, Senator Dianne Feinstein and Congressman Henry Waxman.

Usc Alumni Association Honors School Of Pharmacy Alumnus David M. Breslow Breslow and Seven Other Prominent USC Alumni Feted at 76th Annual USC Alumni Awards Gala David M. Breslow, PharmD (’71), CEO of the Institute for Community Pharmacy (ICP), received the Alumni Service Award from the University of Southern California at the 76th Annual USC Alumni Awards Gala on May 2, at the Westin Bonaventure in downtown Los Angeles. The university’s Alumni Service Awards “recognize outstanding volunteer efforts on behalf of the university.” Breslow has served as director and president of both the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association and the QSAD Centurion groups. Currently, he is a member of the school’s Board of Councilors where he chairs the innovative practice models committee. Over the course of his 37-year career in pharmacy, Breslow has practiced in a variety of venues, including long-term care,

home health care, corporate management, hospital pharmacy and management consulting. In his current position at ICP, Breslow carries out the organization’s mission to advance the profession of community pharmacy and its role in improving quality care to patients. Breslow’s enthusiastic approach to the profession, the School of Pharmacy and to its students has brought other awards his way. In 2006, he was named Pharmacist of the Year by the California Pharmacists Association where he had previously served as senior vice president. In 2001, the USC School of Pharmacy honored Breslow as Outstanding Alumnus. above: Award recipient David Breslow with President Steven Sample at the Annual Alumni Awards Gala.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

15


school news

Patient Mike Metcalfe spoke during the broadcast.

Usc Is Site for National Hrsa Satellite Broadcast The School of Pharmacy presented outcomes data and a patient’s perspective as part of a satellite broadcast bringing together nearly 500 health professionals nationwide. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), part of the US Department of Health and Human Services, presented a national learning session of the Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Collaborative (PSPC) on May 6. The PSPC strives to improve the quality of health care nationwide by integrating evidence-based, clinical pharmacy services into the care and management of patients with chronic diseases. While the main site for the learning session was in Washington, DC, the broadcast brought together another dozen sites nationwide. USC and University of Minnesota were the only satellite sites that transmitted part of the national program.

On hand in Washington for the HRSA satellite conference were Dennis Wagner, School of Pharmacy Professor Steve Chen, Denise Geolot, JWCH medical director Paul Gregerson and Jimmy Mitchell. Wagner, Geolot and Mitchell are all employed by HRSA; Chen and Gregerson are faculty members for the HRSA initiative promoting clinical pharmacy services in clinics nationwide.

14 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Steven Chen, associate professor at the USC School of Pharmacy, was online from Washington as a HRSA faculty member along with his co-faculty member, Paul Gregerson, chief medical officer at the JWCH Institute. Chen and Gregerson work collaboratively in caring for patients at the JWCH Clinic at the Weingart Center in downtown Los Angeles. Gregerson discussed the important role that clinical pharmacy services play at the clinic, improving patient outcomes while saving health-care dollars. Chen discussed the advantages these partnerships offer, providing a fertile environment for educating students and residents as well as offering faculty research opportunities. Chen introduced his patient Mike Metcalfe, at the USC site, who shared his personal story with the national audience, explaining how Dr. Chen played a pivotal role in bringing him back to life—helping him take control of his health to where he is today—“having fallen in love with his new healthy lifestyle”. Also from the USC site, Kathleen Johnson, the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy, presented outcomes data from the school’s work in seven safety-net clinics. Johnson’s presentation showed how pharmacist intervention produced better results for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol while also enhancing patient medication compliance and safety.

Meeting with Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (right) in the nation’s capitol are Dean Vanderveen (left) and (back row) Professors Steven Chen, Mel Baron and Kathleen Johnson.

Usc Takes Pharmacy Initiatives To Capitol Hill School of Pharmacy representatives meet with officials in Washington, putting pharmacy on the legislative agenda. Dean R. Pete Vanderveen along with Professors Mel Baron, Steve Chen, Kathleen Johnson and Kathleen Besinque met with elected officials and their staffs in the nation’s capitol in February. California Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard met with the group at her Capitol Hill office to discuss the impact of clinical pharmacy services on underserved populations in her district. Representing the 34th Congressional District, Roybal-Allard is on the House Appropriations Committee and a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. The congresswoman has been a strong supporter of the School’s work in safety-net clinics. The USC contingent covered a variety of topics during their Hill visits. They explained the expanded role of the pharmacist in preventive medicine and the importance of recognizing the phar-

macist as a provider in the federal health-care code. Furthermore, the group presented data from a new USC study showing the positive patient outcomes resulting from pharmacist intervention in the safety-net environment. Other topics covered in meetings included current healthcare reform issues such as transitioning to electronic medical records. The group also stressed the importance of NIH funding for clinical and translational research conducted at the School and throughout the USC campus. In addition to meeting with Congresswoman Roybal-Allard, School of Pharmacy representatives met with staff members from the offices of Senator Barbara Boxer, Senator Dianne Feinstein and Congressman Henry Waxman.

Usc Alumni Association Honors School Of Pharmacy Alumnus David M. Breslow Breslow and Seven Other Prominent USC Alumni Feted at 76th Annual USC Alumni Awards Gala David M. Breslow, PharmD (’71), CEO of the Institute for Community Pharmacy (ICP), received the Alumni Service Award from the University of Southern California at the 76th Annual USC Alumni Awards Gala on May 2, at the Westin Bonaventure in downtown Los Angeles. The university’s Alumni Service Awards “recognize outstanding volunteer efforts on behalf of the university.” Breslow has served as director and president of both the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association and the QSAD Centurion groups. Currently, he is a member of the school’s Board of Councilors where he chairs the innovative practice models committee. Over the course of his 37-year career in pharmacy, Breslow has practiced in a variety of venues, including long-term care,

home health care, corporate management, hospital pharmacy and management consulting. In his current position at ICP, Breslow carries out the organization’s mission to advance the profession of community pharmacy and its role in improving quality care to patients. Breslow’s enthusiastic approach to the profession, the School of Pharmacy and to its students has brought other awards his way. In 2006, he was named Pharmacist of the Year by the California Pharmacists Association where he had previously served as senior vice president. In 2001, the USC School of Pharmacy honored Breslow as Outstanding Alumnus. above: Award recipient David Breslow with President Steven Sample at the Annual Alumni Awards Gala.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

15


awards The School of Pharmacy Alumni Association hosted the 2009 Alumni/Senior Awards Banquet on May 3 at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Pasadena. Over 400 people attended the annual event honoring the Class of 2009 and the Class of 1959’s 50th year in the pharmacy profession. The Outstanding Alumnus Award was presented to Walter Cathey, PharmD (’62), recognizing his professional achievements and distinguished contributions to the School.

Paying tribute to Alumni... the Class of 2009

Honorary alumni award winners (left) Terry Bonecutter, president and CEO of QueensCare, and (right) Paul Gregerson md, MBA, chief medical officer of the JWCH Institute.

16 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Outstanding Alumnus of the Year Walter Cathey, PharmD (’62), with Dean Vanderveen.

School of Pharmacy Alumni Association board members attending included: (top row) Wayman Lee, PharmD (’93), Dharmesh Patel, PharmD (’00), Michael Wincor, PharmD (’78), Kellee Lindauer, PharmD (’06), Jesse Hong, PharmD (’93), Willie Quan, PharmD (’76), Glen Tao, PharmD (’84); (bottom row) Caroline Oak, PharmD (’03), Dorothy Wong, PharmD (’86), Dolly Harris, PharmD (’77), Carolyn Lem, PharmD (’76), Kathy Besinque, PharmD (’82), and Susie Park, PharmD (’00).

Kathy Besinque, PharmD (’82), MSEd, presented Preceptor of the Year to Matt Moran, senior director of the Allergan Global Regulatory Affairs Group.

Honorary Alumni awards were given to Terry Bonecutter, CEO and president of QueensCare, and Paul Gregerson, MD, MBA, chief medical officer of the JWCH Institute, for their dedicated support of the School. Matt Moran, senior director of the Allergan Global Regulatory Affairs Group, received the Roche Preceptor of the Year Award.

Graduates of the Class of 1959 attending the event included: (top row) Marvin Sugarman, Lloyd Hitt, Dean Vanderveen, Vernon Mah and Ronald Miller; (bottom row) Robert Adams, William Adams, Carol Cigliano and Harvey Kupferberg.

Carla Blieden, PharmD (’09), MPH (’09), won the US Public Health Service Award for development and implementation of public health programs presented by Lieutenant Commander Binh Nguyen, PharmD (’99), and Lieutenant Commander Larry Howell. Blieden was also awarded the Margaret and John Biles Leadership Award and the PharmD/MPH Award.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

17


awards The School of Pharmacy Alumni Association hosted the 2009 Alumni/Senior Awards Banquet on May 3 at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Pasadena. Over 400 people attended the annual event honoring the Class of 2009 and the Class of 1959’s 50th year in the pharmacy profession. The Outstanding Alumnus Award was presented to Walter Cathey, PharmD (’62), recognizing his professional achievements and distinguished contributions to the School.

Paying tribute to Alumni... the Class of 2009

Honorary alumni award winners (left) Terry Bonecutter, president and CEO of QueensCare, and (right) Paul Gregerson md, MBA, chief medical officer of the JWCH Institute.

16 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Outstanding Alumnus of the Year Walter Cathey, PharmD (’62), with Dean Vanderveen.

School of Pharmacy Alumni Association board members attending included: (top row) Wayman Lee, PharmD (’93), Dharmesh Patel, PharmD (’00), Michael Wincor, PharmD (’78), Kellee Lindauer, PharmD (’06), Jesse Hong, PharmD (’93), Willie Quan, PharmD (’76), Glen Tao, PharmD (’84); (bottom row) Caroline Oak, PharmD (’03), Dorothy Wong, PharmD (’86), Dolly Harris, PharmD (’77), Carolyn Lem, PharmD (’76), Kathy Besinque, PharmD (’82), and Susie Park, PharmD (’00).

Kathy Besinque, PharmD (’82), MSEd, presented Preceptor of the Year to Matt Moran, senior director of the Allergan Global Regulatory Affairs Group.

Honorary Alumni awards were given to Terry Bonecutter, CEO and president of QueensCare, and Paul Gregerson, MD, MBA, chief medical officer of the JWCH Institute, for their dedicated support of the School. Matt Moran, senior director of the Allergan Global Regulatory Affairs Group, received the Roche Preceptor of the Year Award.

Graduates of the Class of 1959 attending the event included: (top row) Marvin Sugarman, Lloyd Hitt, Dean Vanderveen, Vernon Mah and Ronald Miller; (bottom row) Robert Adams, William Adams, Carol Cigliano and Harvey Kupferberg.

Carla Blieden, PharmD (’09), MPH (’09), won the US Public Health Service Award for development and implementation of public health programs presented by Lieutenant Commander Binh Nguyen, PharmD (’99), and Lieutenant Commander Larry Howell. Blieden was also awarded the Margaret and John Biles Leadership Award and the PharmD/MPH Award.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

17


titus family department

Titus Family Department of Clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical economics & policy faculty updates Mel Baron, PharmD, MPA, recognized as a Fellow of the American Pharmacists Association at the APhA Annual Meeting in San Antonio in April; presented at the School of Pharmacy’s Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy & Safety-Net Clinics conference in February; presented “Transforming Research Into Practice: Development of a Depression Fotonovela for Low-literate Latinos” with Greg Molina at the Critical Issues in Latino Mental Health 2009 Conference, in New Brunswick, NJ, in June; awarded $30,600 USC Neighborhood Outreach grant to produce a fotonovela on obesity; featured on the website of California Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard with Dean R. Pete Vanderveen, PhD, RPh, Steven Chen, PharmD, and Kathy Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, in honor of the AACP Inaugural Award for Transformative Community Service in February.

munity Clinic Association of Los Angeles County in Anaheim in January; presented “Safe and Coordinated Care of Schizophrenia,” at the APhA Annual Meeting in San Antonio in April; presented talks on insomnia, antidepressants and suicide risk at the 13th Annual Practical Use of Psychiatric Medications Conference, Billings, MT, in May; installed as chair of residency and post-graduate training committee and vice chair of business development for the College of Psychiatric & Neurologic Pharmacists at the CPNP Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, FL, in April.

Kathy Besinque, PharmD, interviewed by Prevention magazine

Melissa Durham, PharmD, and Jeff Goad, PharmD, presented “A Comparison of Pharmacist Travel-Health Specialists’ vs. Non-Specialist Clinicians’ Use of Travel-Related Medications, Vaccinations, and Patient Compliance with these Recommendations in a College Health Setting,” at the Conference of the International Society of Travel Medicine in Budapest in May.

about the potential dangers of the contents in home medicine cabinets in January.

Scott Evans, PharmD, chief operating officer of the USC Univer-

Steven Chen, PharmD, faculty member for the HRSA Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Collaborative; spoke at School’s Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy and Safety-Net Clinics conference in February; presented “Net Forward Energy: Instructional Lessons Learned from a National Clinical Practice Change Collaborative” for USC Center for Excellence in Teaching in March; presented at the QSAD Centurion 14th Annual Winter Retreat in January; featured on the LA Department of Aging’s Aging in LA with Brad Williams, PharmD, aired on LA CityView and PAX in February.

Daryl Davies, PhD, obtained a $6,600 Undergraduate Research Associate Program award and a $1,000 USC College SOAR Program award in support of undergraduate researchers in his lab. Jason Doctor, PhD, promoted to associate professor in May. Julie Dopheide, PharmD, presented “Got Prozac?” with psychiatric

sity Hospital and the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, was awarded the Phi Delta Chi fraternity’s Albert B. Prescott/Glaxo SmithKline Pharmacy Leadership Award in recognition of his leadership qualities at the APhA annual meeting in April.

Kevin Forrester, PharmD, visiting professor at Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, in June. Jeff Goad, PharmD, received the Community Pharmacy Residency Excellence in Precepting Award, led the California Delegation for the APhA House of Delegates, and participated in the Residency Roundtable on Resitrak at the APhA Annual Meeting in April; presented on pharmacy-based immunizations as part of expert panel for California Assembly Committee on Immunizations in Sacramento in March; quoted in Newsweek, The Press-Enterprise and the Los Angeles Times about vaccinations and medications for the swine flu and interviewed on the subject by CBS Radio San Francisco affiliate KCBS-AM in April.

Joel Hay, PhD, promoted to professor of pharmaceutical economics and policy in March; presented pharmacoeconomic modeling techniques to the Mexican Chapter of International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research in Mexico City in December; quoted in Time about the effects of marijuana use and the potential societal impact of its legalization in March; presented “Drugs and Outcomes Research: Where are the Comparative Effectiveness Goalposts Moving To?” at the USC School of Pharmacy in April; presented “Unintended Consequences of Current Antidepressant Use In A Geriatric Population: Drug-Drug Interactions and Their Implications for Adherence” and “Cost Effective for HPV Vaccine” at the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando in May; quoted in Investor’s Business Daily on financial success in drug marketing in April; quoted in the Economist blog on the economic impact of marijuana legalization in May; quoted in Investor’s Business Daily about Pfizer’s program to provide free medications to people who have lost their jobs in May; wrote New York Times op-ed about the legalization of marijuana in May.

Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Endowed Chair in Community Pharmacy and chair of the Titus Family Department, named to the Rho Chi Honor Society alumni honor roll in April; presented “Payers Perspective on the Value of MTM” at the MTM Hot Topics Seminar at the APhA Annual Meeting, in San Antonio in April; presented “The Impact of Pharmacist Interventions on Outcomes of Diabetic Patients Compared to Usual Care” with Steven Chen, PharmD, I-Ning Cheng, PharmD, Jeffrey McCombs, PhD, and Mimi Lou, PharmD, at the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando in May; with Jason Doctor, PhD, and Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, awarded $7,500 USC Neighborhood Outreach grant to support Fuente Initiative projects. Stan Louie, PharmD, and Enrique Cadenas, MD, PhD, Charles Krown/Pharmacy Alumni Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences and associate dean for research affairs, are among authors of a study on

green tea’s ability to block the effects of certain anti-cancer drugs, featured in publications including MSNBC News, Japan Times, ScienceDaily, the National Cancer Institute Bulletin and Medical News Today.

Jeffrey McCombs, PhD, presented “Impact of Treatment History on Compliance and Health Care Cost in Commercially Insured Patients with Bipolar Disorders”, “Prognostic Propensity Scores: A New Method for Determining ‘What Works Best’”, “An Application in Patients Treated for Bipolar Disorder”, and “Impact of Treatment History on Compliance and Health Care Cost in Commercially Insured Patients with Schizophrenia” at the 9th Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry: Quality and Outcomes in Mental Health Policy and Economics in Venice, Italy, in March; presented “Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Primer for the Medical Communications Professional” at the Drug Information Association 45th Annual Meeting in San Diego in June. Edith Mirzaian, PharmD, presented poster “Community Pharmacy Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience—Students Mentoring Students in a Year 2 Self-Care Course: An Evaluation of Peer-to-Peer Mentoring in a School of Pharmacy” with Melissa Durham, PharmD, Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, and Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, at the APhA annual meeting in San Antonio in April. Tien Ng, PharmD, presented “Making Sense of Oral Antiplatelet Therapy in Coronary Artery Disease”, “On the Pulse: A Cardiovascular Therapeutics Series”, and “Hyponatremia-Clinical Challenges for the Hospital Pharmacist” at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists monthly meeting in December; with resident Erica Konopka, PharmD, awarded resident practice-based research grant from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation for project titled “Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Refractory Diuretic Regimens in Acute Heart Failure”.

pharmacy specialty resident Bosun Chung, PharmD, at the Com-

18 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

19


titus family department

Titus Family Department of Clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical economics & policy faculty updates Mel Baron, PharmD, MPA, recognized as a Fellow of the American Pharmacists Association at the APhA Annual Meeting in San Antonio in April; presented at the School of Pharmacy’s Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy & Safety-Net Clinics conference in February; presented “Transforming Research Into Practice: Development of a Depression Fotonovela for Low-literate Latinos” with Greg Molina at the Critical Issues in Latino Mental Health 2009 Conference, in New Brunswick, NJ, in June; awarded $30,600 USC Neighborhood Outreach grant to produce a fotonovela on obesity; featured on the website of California Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard with Dean R. Pete Vanderveen, PhD, RPh, Steven Chen, PharmD, and Kathy Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, in honor of the AACP Inaugural Award for Transformative Community Service in February.

munity Clinic Association of Los Angeles County in Anaheim in January; presented “Safe and Coordinated Care of Schizophrenia,” at the APhA Annual Meeting in San Antonio in April; presented talks on insomnia, antidepressants and suicide risk at the 13th Annual Practical Use of Psychiatric Medications Conference, Billings, MT, in May; installed as chair of residency and post-graduate training committee and vice chair of business development for the College of Psychiatric & Neurologic Pharmacists at the CPNP Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, FL, in April.

Kathy Besinque, PharmD, interviewed by Prevention magazine

Melissa Durham, PharmD, and Jeff Goad, PharmD, presented “A Comparison of Pharmacist Travel-Health Specialists’ vs. Non-Specialist Clinicians’ Use of Travel-Related Medications, Vaccinations, and Patient Compliance with these Recommendations in a College Health Setting,” at the Conference of the International Society of Travel Medicine in Budapest in May.

about the potential dangers of the contents in home medicine cabinets in January.

Scott Evans, PharmD, chief operating officer of the USC Univer-

Steven Chen, PharmD, faculty member for the HRSA Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Collaborative; spoke at School’s Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy and Safety-Net Clinics conference in February; presented “Net Forward Energy: Instructional Lessons Learned from a National Clinical Practice Change Collaborative” for USC Center for Excellence in Teaching in March; presented at the QSAD Centurion 14th Annual Winter Retreat in January; featured on the LA Department of Aging’s Aging in LA with Brad Williams, PharmD, aired on LA CityView and PAX in February.

Daryl Davies, PhD, obtained a $6,600 Undergraduate Research Associate Program award and a $1,000 USC College SOAR Program award in support of undergraduate researchers in his lab. Jason Doctor, PhD, promoted to associate professor in May. Julie Dopheide, PharmD, presented “Got Prozac?” with psychiatric

sity Hospital and the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, was awarded the Phi Delta Chi fraternity’s Albert B. Prescott/Glaxo SmithKline Pharmacy Leadership Award in recognition of his leadership qualities at the APhA annual meeting in April.

Kevin Forrester, PharmD, visiting professor at Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, in June. Jeff Goad, PharmD, received the Community Pharmacy Residency Excellence in Precepting Award, led the California Delegation for the APhA House of Delegates, and participated in the Residency Roundtable on Resitrak at the APhA Annual Meeting in April; presented on pharmacy-based immunizations as part of expert panel for California Assembly Committee on Immunizations in Sacramento in March; quoted in Newsweek, The Press-Enterprise and the Los Angeles Times about vaccinations and medications for the swine flu and interviewed on the subject by CBS Radio San Francisco affiliate KCBS-AM in April.

Joel Hay, PhD, promoted to professor of pharmaceutical economics and policy in March; presented pharmacoeconomic modeling techniques to the Mexican Chapter of International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research in Mexico City in December; quoted in Time about the effects of marijuana use and the potential societal impact of its legalization in March; presented “Drugs and Outcomes Research: Where are the Comparative Effectiveness Goalposts Moving To?” at the USC School of Pharmacy in April; presented “Unintended Consequences of Current Antidepressant Use In A Geriatric Population: Drug-Drug Interactions and Their Implications for Adherence” and “Cost Effective for HPV Vaccine” at the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando in May; quoted in Investor’s Business Daily on financial success in drug marketing in April; quoted in the Economist blog on the economic impact of marijuana legalization in May; quoted in Investor’s Business Daily about Pfizer’s program to provide free medications to people who have lost their jobs in May; wrote New York Times op-ed about the legalization of marijuana in May.

Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Endowed Chair in Community Pharmacy and chair of the Titus Family Department, named to the Rho Chi Honor Society alumni honor roll in April; presented “Payers Perspective on the Value of MTM” at the MTM Hot Topics Seminar at the APhA Annual Meeting, in San Antonio in April; presented “The Impact of Pharmacist Interventions on Outcomes of Diabetic Patients Compared to Usual Care” with Steven Chen, PharmD, I-Ning Cheng, PharmD, Jeffrey McCombs, PhD, and Mimi Lou, PharmD, at the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando in May; with Jason Doctor, PhD, and Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, awarded $7,500 USC Neighborhood Outreach grant to support Fuente Initiative projects. Stan Louie, PharmD, and Enrique Cadenas, MD, PhD, Charles Krown/Pharmacy Alumni Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences and associate dean for research affairs, are among authors of a study on

green tea’s ability to block the effects of certain anti-cancer drugs, featured in publications including MSNBC News, Japan Times, ScienceDaily, the National Cancer Institute Bulletin and Medical News Today.

Jeffrey McCombs, PhD, presented “Impact of Treatment History on Compliance and Health Care Cost in Commercially Insured Patients with Bipolar Disorders”, “Prognostic Propensity Scores: A New Method for Determining ‘What Works Best’”, “An Application in Patients Treated for Bipolar Disorder”, and “Impact of Treatment History on Compliance and Health Care Cost in Commercially Insured Patients with Schizophrenia” at the 9th Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry: Quality and Outcomes in Mental Health Policy and Economics in Venice, Italy, in March; presented “Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Primer for the Medical Communications Professional” at the Drug Information Association 45th Annual Meeting in San Diego in June. Edith Mirzaian, PharmD, presented poster “Community Pharmacy Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience—Students Mentoring Students in a Year 2 Self-Care Course: An Evaluation of Peer-to-Peer Mentoring in a School of Pharmacy” with Melissa Durham, PharmD, Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, and Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, at the APhA annual meeting in San Antonio in April. Tien Ng, PharmD, presented “Making Sense of Oral Antiplatelet Therapy in Coronary Artery Disease”, “On the Pulse: A Cardiovascular Therapeutics Series”, and “Hyponatremia-Clinical Challenges for the Hospital Pharmacist” at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists monthly meeting in December; with resident Erica Konopka, PharmD, awarded resident practice-based research grant from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation for project titled “Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Refractory Diuretic Regimens in Acute Heart Failure”.

pharmacy specialty resident Bosun Chung, PharmD, at the Com-

18 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

19


titus family department

Faculty Recognized By National Organizations

faculty updates continued Michael Nichol, PhD, QSAD Centurion Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, presented “Nonadherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Multiple Disease Conditions in a California Medicaid Population”, “Comparison Between the EQ-5D and the Seven Derived Health Utilities in Stroke Patients Using a National Representative Sample in the United States”, “Medication Non-adherence and Non-persistence in a Managed Care Diabetes Mellitus Population”, and “The Impact of Demographics and Insurance on Quality of Care in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder in a California Medicaid Program” at the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando in May; interviewed by National Public Radio’s Morning Edition about the merger between drug companies Merck and Schering-Plough in March.

Susie Park, PharmD, presented poster on fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder with Bosun Chung, PharmD, at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists 12th Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, FL in April.

Glen Stimmel, PharmD, and Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, represent-

Global

Thumbs Up

Outstanding Student Chapter of the Year went to USC at the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 14th Annual Meeting held in Orlando in May. Celebrating the win are Danielle Colayco, Takeda MS Fellow, Nhu Tran, Amylin MS Fellow; Phil Wiegand, Abbott Labs MS Fellow; Jae Kyung Suh, doctoral student from Korea; faculty members Mike Nichol, PhD, and Jeff McCombs, PhD; Sara Zolfaghari, doctoral student from Iran; Jiat Ling Poon, doctoral student from Sinapore; Jaejin An, doctoral student from Korea; Hae Sun Suh, a recent doctoral graduate from Korea; and Jerry Chang, PharmD, doctoral student and Dean’s Fellow. For other prizes won at the meeting, see the student awards grid on page 3.

ed USC Pharmacy along with 10 students at the California Pharmacy Student Leadership Conference in Palm Springs in February.

Irving Steinberg, PharmD, presented “Black Box Warnings and Adverse Drug Reactions”, “Hyperlipidemia in Children: Is It Time to Consider Medication?”, and “What’s the Most Appropriate Antibiotic for this Pediatric UTI?” at the 30th Annual Meeting of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in March.

At the YMCA

20 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Taking It On The Road

Each year students do a rehearsal of their health-education presentations for faculty prior to taking their message to the public. Among this year’s new displays was a look at steroids and their inappropriate and dangerous uses. This exhibit will be presented to students at the East Los Angeles Skills Center, the East Los Angeles Occupational Center and Bravo High School. PharmD students with their exhibit are (kneeling) Trevor Millington and Brandon Hockaday; (left to right) Oscar Gallegos, Ryan Anderson, Aubrey Moreau and Brian Kim.

School of Pharmacy Once Again Validated by ACPE

Michael Wincor, PharmD, consulting on the evolving clinical pharmacy program and potential post baccalaureate PharmD program at Cyberjaya University, Malaysia, this summer.

partment, presented at the QSAD Centurion 14th Annual Winter Retreat in January; awarded $115,625.00 grant from Trius Therapeutics for study “Effect of TR701 on susceptibility and virulence profiles of MRSA strains causing complicated skin and soft tissue infections”.

Precepting Award. Both Baron and Goad are associate professors in the school’s Titus Family Department. Scott Evans, PharmD, chief operating officer of the USC University Hospital and the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, was awarded the Phi Delta Chi fraternity’s Albert B. Prescott/Glaxo SmithKline Pharmacy Leadership Award in recognition of his leadership qualities. The Rho Chi Honor Society named Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy and chair of the Titus Family Department, to the Rho Chi Alumni Honor Roll. For a full list of student winners at the national meetings, see the Student Awards grid on page 3.

Making the Grade

Brad Williams, PharmD, to participate in a conference sponsored by UCLA’s Geriatric Education Center on teaching evidence-based health promotion for older adults.

Annie Wong-Beringer, PharmD, vice chair of Titus Family De-

The American Pharmacists Association, the Rho Chi Society, the Phi Delta Chi national fraternity and the American Pharmacy Student Alliance recognized USC faculty and students at annual meetings held from April 9-13 in San Antonio. “Once again, our students and faculty have had an extraordinary showing on the national stage,” said R. Pete Vanderveen, the School of Pharmacy dean. “I am inspired by the very fine work they are doing and proud of the recognition they have received.” Mel Baron, PharmD, MPA, was named an American Pharmacists Association fellow and Jeff Goad was awarded the association’s Community Pharmacy Residency Excellence in

In April, the School of Pharmacy was honored by the Alhambra City Council for “participation, dedication, hard work and spirit of volunteerism in making the YMCA Health Fair such a huge success”. Receiving recognition from the Council are PharmD student Bonnie Hui, Board of Councilor members Tim Siu, MD, and Raymond Poon, PharmD (’71), and YMCA CEO Valerie Gomez. Drs. Siu and Poon worked with USC students in organizing the event. Faculty member Cynthia Lieu, PharmD, supervised students at the event.

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, the national agency for the accreditation of professional degree programs in pharmacy, has once again deemed the USC School of Pharmacy an accredited institution. Representatives from the ACPE, along with site visit team members from peer institutions, visited the School on January 27–29 as the culminating activity of the long process. The accreditation process requires the school to conduct an extensive self study that covers all aspects of the school and

involves faculty, staff, students, preceptors and alumni. Associate Dean Fred G. Weissman oversaw the preparation of the self-study document along with thousands of pages of supporting materials made available to the accrediting committee. While the School has not received a final report from the ACPE, preliminary communications indicate that the school met all 30 standards required for accreditation. The ACPE has advised that a final, formal report will be sent to the School later in the summer.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

21


titus family department

Faculty Recognized By National Organizations

faculty updates continued Michael Nichol, PhD, QSAD Centurion Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, presented “Nonadherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Multiple Disease Conditions in a California Medicaid Population”, “Comparison Between the EQ-5D and the Seven Derived Health Utilities in Stroke Patients Using a National Representative Sample in the United States”, “Medication Non-adherence and Non-persistence in a Managed Care Diabetes Mellitus Population”, and “The Impact of Demographics and Insurance on Quality of Care in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder in a California Medicaid Program” at the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in Orlando in May; interviewed by National Public Radio’s Morning Edition about the merger between drug companies Merck and Schering-Plough in March.

Susie Park, PharmD, presented poster on fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder with Bosun Chung, PharmD, at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists 12th Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, FL in April.

Glen Stimmel, PharmD, and Jeff Goad, PharmD, MPH, represent-

Global

Thumbs Up

Outstanding Student Chapter of the Year went to USC at the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 14th Annual Meeting held in Orlando in May. Celebrating the win are Danielle Colayco, Takeda MS Fellow, Nhu Tran, Amylin MS Fellow; Phil Wiegand, Abbott Labs MS Fellow; Jae Kyung Suh, doctoral student from Korea; faculty members Mike Nichol, PhD, and Jeff McCombs, PhD; Sara Zolfaghari, doctoral student from Iran; Jiat Ling Poon, doctoral student from Sinapore; Jaejin An, doctoral student from Korea; Hae Sun Suh, a recent doctoral graduate from Korea; and Jerry Chang, PharmD, doctoral student and Dean’s Fellow. For other prizes won at the meeting, see the student awards grid on page 3.

ed USC Pharmacy along with 10 students at the California Pharmacy Student Leadership Conference in Palm Springs in February.

Irving Steinberg, PharmD, presented “Black Box Warnings and Adverse Drug Reactions”, “Hyperlipidemia in Children: Is It Time to Consider Medication?”, and “What’s the Most Appropriate Antibiotic for this Pediatric UTI?” at the 30th Annual Meeting of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in March.

At the YMCA

20 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Taking It On The Road

Each year students do a rehearsal of their health-education presentations for faculty prior to taking their message to the public. Among this year’s new displays was a look at steroids and their inappropriate and dangerous uses. This exhibit will be presented to students at the East Los Angeles Skills Center, the East Los Angeles Occupational Center and Bravo High School. PharmD students with their exhibit are (kneeling) Trevor Millington and Brandon Hockaday; (left to right) Oscar Gallegos, Ryan Anderson, Aubrey Moreau and Brian Kim.

School of Pharmacy Once Again Validated by ACPE

Michael Wincor, PharmD, consulting on the evolving clinical pharmacy program and potential post baccalaureate PharmD program at Cyberjaya University, Malaysia, this summer.

partment, presented at the QSAD Centurion 14th Annual Winter Retreat in January; awarded $115,625.00 grant from Trius Therapeutics for study “Effect of TR701 on susceptibility and virulence profiles of MRSA strains causing complicated skin and soft tissue infections”.

Precepting Award. Both Baron and Goad are associate professors in the school’s Titus Family Department. Scott Evans, PharmD, chief operating officer of the USC University Hospital and the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, was awarded the Phi Delta Chi fraternity’s Albert B. Prescott/Glaxo SmithKline Pharmacy Leadership Award in recognition of his leadership qualities. The Rho Chi Honor Society named Kathleen Johnson, PharmD, MPH, PhD, the William A. and Josephine A. Heeres Chair in Community Pharmacy and chair of the Titus Family Department, to the Rho Chi Alumni Honor Roll. For a full list of student winners at the national meetings, see the Student Awards grid on page 3.

Making the Grade

Brad Williams, PharmD, to participate in a conference sponsored by UCLA’s Geriatric Education Center on teaching evidence-based health promotion for older adults.

Annie Wong-Beringer, PharmD, vice chair of Titus Family De-

The American Pharmacists Association, the Rho Chi Society, the Phi Delta Chi national fraternity and the American Pharmacy Student Alliance recognized USC faculty and students at annual meetings held from April 9-13 in San Antonio. “Once again, our students and faculty have had an extraordinary showing on the national stage,” said R. Pete Vanderveen, the School of Pharmacy dean. “I am inspired by the very fine work they are doing and proud of the recognition they have received.” Mel Baron, PharmD, MPA, was named an American Pharmacists Association fellow and Jeff Goad was awarded the association’s Community Pharmacy Residency Excellence in

In April, the School of Pharmacy was honored by the Alhambra City Council for “participation, dedication, hard work and spirit of volunteerism in making the YMCA Health Fair such a huge success”. Receiving recognition from the Council are PharmD student Bonnie Hui, Board of Councilor members Tim Siu, MD, and Raymond Poon, PharmD (’71), and YMCA CEO Valerie Gomez. Drs. Siu and Poon worked with USC students in organizing the event. Faculty member Cynthia Lieu, PharmD, supervised students at the event.

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, the national agency for the accreditation of professional degree programs in pharmacy, has once again deemed the USC School of Pharmacy an accredited institution. Representatives from the ACPE, along with site visit team members from peer institutions, visited the School on January 27–29 as the culminating activity of the long process. The accreditation process requires the school to conduct an extensive self study that covers all aspects of the school and

involves faculty, staff, students, preceptors and alumni. Associate Dean Fred G. Weissman oversaw the preparation of the self-study document along with thousands of pages of supporting materials made available to the accrediting committee. While the School has not received a final report from the ACPE, preliminary communications indicate that the school met all 30 standards required for accreditation. The ACPE has advised that a final, formal report will be sent to the School later in the summer.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

21


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences The School of Pharmacy scientist wins NIH grant topping $1 million and will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America.

University Professor Jean Shih Receives Double Honors

“This work is an important building block in the development of therapeutics for aggression, anxiety and depression...Ultimately, this will help us better identify and understand the most critical periods for prevention and treatment of these brain disorders.”

22 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

May Be Pointless Eating less only benefits obese mice, according to a study by Professor Raj Sohal in the Journal of Nutrition. by Carl Marziali

Jean C. Shih, the Boyd P. and Elsie D. Welin Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has been awarded a grant of $1,096,775, continuing her research support from the National Institute of Mental Health for the next five years. Shih’s work focuses on monoamine oxidase, also known as MAO, an enzyme that regulates known brain chemicals—serotonin, dopamine and norpinephrine. These brain chemicals help cells communicate, affecting brain functions related to mood and behavior. Shih’s MAO findings have garnered international attention as her lab was the first ever to clone human MAO-A and MAO-B genes and to unravel their structures, functions and regulations. This work is an important building block in the development of therapeutics for aggression, anxiety and depression.

“The continuing support of the NIMH will allow us to study the developmental and environmental factors that impact brain function and behaviors. Ultimately, this will help us better identify and understand the most critical periods for prevention and treatment of these brain disorders,” says Shih whose work has been at the forefront of neuroscience research with 32 years of consecutive NIH funding. The good news of the NIH award was complemented by the announcement that Shih will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America. This

Anti-aging Strategy

award will be presented at the society’s Biennial International Symposium this summer in Taipei. Shih is a founding member of the society. Among Shih’s numerous awards are two MERIT awards from the National Institutes of Health, recognizing her distinguished scientific achievement in the research community. In 2007, she was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Shih is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the School of Pharmacy and in the Department of Cell and Neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine.

If you are a mouse on the chubby side, then eating less may help you live longer. For lean mice—and possibly for lean humans, the authors of a new study predict—the anti-aging strategy known as caloric restriction may be a pointless, frustrating and even dangerous exercise. “Today there are a lot of very healthy people who look like skeletons because they bought into this,” said Raj Sohal, the Timothy M. Chan Professor in Complementary Therapeutics. He and Michael Forster, of the University of North Texas Health Science Center, compared the life span and caloric intake of two genetically engineered strains of mice. The “fat” strain, known as C57BL/6, roughly doubles in weight over its adult life. That strain benefited from caloric restriction, Sohal said. The “lean” strain, DBA/2, does not become obese. Caloric restriction did not extend the life of these mice, confirming previous work by Forster and Sohal. The results appeared online in The Journal of Nutrition. “Our study questions the paradigm that caloric restriction is universally beneficial,” Sohal said. “Contrary to what is widely believed, caloric restriction does not extend (the) life span of all strains of mice.” By measuring the animals’ metabolic rate, Sohal and his colleagues came to a deceptively simple conclusion: Caloric restriction is only useful when, as in the case of the obese mice, an animal eats more than it can burn off. “Your energy expenditure and your energy intake should be in balance,” Sohal said. “It’s as simple as that. And how do you know that? By gain or loss of weight. “The whole thing is very commonsensical.” For humans of normal weight, Sohal strongly cautions against caloric restriction. In a 2003 study, he and Forster found that caloric restriction begun in older mice —both in DBA and leaner C57 individuals—actually shortened life span.

However, Sohal said that obese individuals are probably better off cutting calories than increasing their exercise to make up for overeating. Overly vigorous exercise can lead to injuries and longterm wear and tear. In other words, it is better to skip the double cheeseburger than to turn up the treadmill after binging at Carl’s Jr.

Sohal’s study is not the first to question the allegedly universal benefits of caloric restriction. A study by Ross et al. published in Nature in 1976 (“Dietary practices and growth responses as predictors of longevity”) found that caloric restriction works best in mice that gain weight rapidly in early adulthood, Sohal said. Studies of caloric restriction in wild types of mouse strains have shown minimal life span extension, he added. Next, the researchers want to understand why the obese mice have a lower metabolic rate that promotes weight gain. The other members of the research team were Melissa Ferguson and Barbara Sohal of the USC School of Pharmacy. Funding for the study came from the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

23


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences The School of Pharmacy scientist wins NIH grant topping $1 million and will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America.

University Professor Jean Shih Receives Double Honors

“This work is an important building block in the development of therapeutics for aggression, anxiety and depression...Ultimately, this will help us better identify and understand the most critical periods for prevention and treatment of these brain disorders.”

22 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

May Be Pointless Eating less only benefits obese mice, according to a study by Professor Raj Sohal in the Journal of Nutrition. by Carl Marziali

Jean C. Shih, the Boyd P. and Elsie D. Welin Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, has been awarded a grant of $1,096,775, continuing her research support from the National Institute of Mental Health for the next five years. Shih’s work focuses on monoamine oxidase, also known as MAO, an enzyme that regulates known brain chemicals—serotonin, dopamine and norpinephrine. These brain chemicals help cells communicate, affecting brain functions related to mood and behavior. Shih’s MAO findings have garnered international attention as her lab was the first ever to clone human MAO-A and MAO-B genes and to unravel their structures, functions and regulations. This work is an important building block in the development of therapeutics for aggression, anxiety and depression.

“The continuing support of the NIMH will allow us to study the developmental and environmental factors that impact brain function and behaviors. Ultimately, this will help us better identify and understand the most critical periods for prevention and treatment of these brain disorders,” says Shih whose work has been at the forefront of neuroscience research with 32 years of consecutive NIH funding. The good news of the NIH award was complemented by the announcement that Shih will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America. This

Anti-aging Strategy

award will be presented at the society’s Biennial International Symposium this summer in Taipei. Shih is a founding member of the society. Among Shih’s numerous awards are two MERIT awards from the National Institutes of Health, recognizing her distinguished scientific achievement in the research community. In 2007, she was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Shih is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the School of Pharmacy and in the Department of Cell and Neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine.

If you are a mouse on the chubby side, then eating less may help you live longer. For lean mice—and possibly for lean humans, the authors of a new study predict—the anti-aging strategy known as caloric restriction may be a pointless, frustrating and even dangerous exercise. “Today there are a lot of very healthy people who look like skeletons because they bought into this,” said Raj Sohal, the Timothy M. Chan Professor in Complementary Therapeutics. He and Michael Forster, of the University of North Texas Health Science Center, compared the life span and caloric intake of two genetically engineered strains of mice. The “fat” strain, known as C57BL/6, roughly doubles in weight over its adult life. That strain benefited from caloric restriction, Sohal said. The “lean” strain, DBA/2, does not become obese. Caloric restriction did not extend the life of these mice, confirming previous work by Forster and Sohal. The results appeared online in The Journal of Nutrition. “Our study questions the paradigm that caloric restriction is universally beneficial,” Sohal said. “Contrary to what is widely believed, caloric restriction does not extend (the) life span of all strains of mice.” By measuring the animals’ metabolic rate, Sohal and his colleagues came to a deceptively simple conclusion: Caloric restriction is only useful when, as in the case of the obese mice, an animal eats more than it can burn off. “Your energy expenditure and your energy intake should be in balance,” Sohal said. “It’s as simple as that. And how do you know that? By gain or loss of weight. “The whole thing is very commonsensical.” For humans of normal weight, Sohal strongly cautions against caloric restriction. In a 2003 study, he and Forster found that caloric restriction begun in older mice —both in DBA and leaner C57 individuals—actually shortened life span.

However, Sohal said that obese individuals are probably better off cutting calories than increasing their exercise to make up for overeating. Overly vigorous exercise can lead to injuries and longterm wear and tear. In other words, it is better to skip the double cheeseburger than to turn up the treadmill after binging at Carl’s Jr.

Sohal’s study is not the first to question the allegedly universal benefits of caloric restriction. A study by Ross et al. published in Nature in 1976 (“Dietary practices and growth responses as predictors of longevity”) found that caloric restriction works best in mice that gain weight rapidly in early adulthood, Sohal said. Studies of caloric restriction in wild types of mouse strains have shown minimal life span extension, he added. Next, the researchers want to understand why the obese mice have a lower metabolic rate that promotes weight gain. The other members of the research team were Melissa Ferguson and Barbara Sohal of the USC School of Pharmacy. Funding for the study came from the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

23


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences

Funding Key to Drug   Development Projects for PhD Students

PhD candidates Erik Serrao, Tino Sanchez and Ben Xu were granted fellowships that will help support their studies on HIV and Sjögren’s syndrome.

Erik Serrao and Tino Sanchez

Tino Sanchez received a two-year $50,000 dissertation fellowship from the California HIV/AIDS Research Program to support research on the disease. Sanchez hopes his study may lead to drug development for patients suffering with HIV. The disease works by invading an immune cell and replicating by using three key enzymes: protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase. Sanchez plans to target the integrase enzyme as it is key in allowing viral DNA to integrate into host cells. Among HIV therapies, only one integrase inhibitor is FDA-approved. “HIV is the most unique and devastating virus known thus far with all sorts of tricks to evade eradication,” Sanchez

24 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

says, “My work will target the most influential HIV enzyme, integrase, and give AIDS patients more hope at stemming the virus and evading the emergence of drug resistant strains.” On a computer, Sanchez designs replicas of compounds which he later recreates in the lab. This process increases the likelihood that the new compounds will be effective. Erik Serrao also received a fellowship for HIV/AIDS research. Serrao was granted a $19,000 Oakley Fellowship, a part of the USC Graduate School Endowed Fellowship Competition. The competitive Oakley Fellowship is available to PhD candidates in any field. Like Sanchez, Serrao’s research will also target the integrase enzyme. Serrao will work on the development of new compounds that can inhibit HIV integrase from incorporating the virus into chromosomes. Both Serrao and Sanchez work in the lab of Nouri Neamati, associate professor of pharmacology and pharmaceutical sciences. PhD candidate Ben Xu was awarded a Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation student fellowship, which will help support his research project on Sjögren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease that is characterized by tear gland inflammation and dry eye. Xu hopes this research will eventually aid in therapeutic development for those suffering with Sjögren’s syndrome. He will use the $3,000 award to study how antibodies are transported from the blood through the tear gland and into tears. “This award will encourage me to do a deeper study on cell biology and protein trafficking, which may be involved in the delivery of drugs,” Xu says. Xu’s research will take place in the lab of his mentor, Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences and chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Brinton Breaking Barrier between Bench and Bedside In her lab, Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton, the R. Pete Vanderveen Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, transitions basic science discoveries made at the bench to the bedside. The process is called phase 1 translational research, and was the subject of a discussion led by Brinton at a National Center for Research Resources workshop at the National Institutes of Health in February. Brinton discussed the consistent barrier across many universities is the translation of discovery to the business sector, and was able to draw light on the issue with other researchers. Attendees included

top officials from the National Institute on Aging and the Food and Drug Administration, staffers from other NIH institutes and representatives from over 200 universities. “I was surprised at how ubiquitous this barrier is across almost every university that was represented at the workshop,” Brinton says, “This is clearly an opportunity for the USC Stevens Institute to take a lead position—but it must be in the biomedical arena for relevance to NIH investment in biomedical research.” —usc Chronicle

faculty updates James Adams, PhD, quoted in the Los Angeles Times about a cyanide poisoning situation occurring in an episode of CBS drama “The Mentalist”, in December 2008; interviewed on Sirius/XM radio’s Doctor Radio with Samantha Heller about mercury exposure and health risks in January; attended meeting of the National Center for Complimentary and Alternative Medicine NIH basic science study section in March; led a medicinal plant hike in the Deukmejian Wilderness Park in Glendale in May.

Roberta Diaz-Brinton, PhD, R. Pete Vanderveen Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, presented “Alzheimer’s Disease and the Starving Brain,” at the 14th Annual QSAD Winter Retreat in January; received USC Neighborhood Outreach grant of $23,850 in support of STAR program. Enrique Cadenas, MD, PhD, Charles Krown/Pharmacy Alumni Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences and associate dean for research affairs, and Stan Louie, PharmD, are among authors of a study on green

tea’s ability to block the effects of certain anti-cancer drugs that was featured in the media including MSNBC News, Japan Times, ScienceDaily, the National Cancer Institute Bulletin and Medical News Today.

Roger Clemens, DrPH, quoted in the LA Times about crystalline fructose sweetener in February.

Ian Haworth, PhD, teaching course on biomolecular structure and drug design as a visiting professor and working with faculty and students on thesis and manuscript submissions at the Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand, summer 2009.

Jean Shih, PhD, Boyd P. and Elsie D. Welin Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, received a $1,096,775 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health for project titled “Two Types of Monoamine Oxidase”; receiving the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America Lifetime Achievement Award at an international symposium at the Academia Sinica, Taipei, in July. Rajindar Sohal, PhD, Timothy M. Chan Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, lead author of study on calorie restriction in mice that was widely featured in the media, including Medical News Today, Foodconsumer. org and ScienceDaily.com.

J. Andrew MacKay, PhD, awarded $37,500

Clay Wang, PhD, promoted to associate

grant from the USC Research Center for Liver Disease to support project titled “Hepatrafficking and anti-tumor activity of genetically engineered glycol-celles” in March.

professor.

Nouri Neamati, PhD, presented “Where Do We Stand on Eradicating HIV?” at the 14th Annual QSAD Winter Retreat in January.

Walter Wolf, PhD, Distinguished Professor, awarded Tocagen grant for evaluation of ability to detect the conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil using noninvasive 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy; participated in the 2009 Imaging Biomarkers Roundtable in Chicago in March.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

25


department of pharmacology & pharmaceutical sciences

Funding Key to Drug   Development Projects for PhD Students

PhD candidates Erik Serrao, Tino Sanchez and Ben Xu were granted fellowships that will help support their studies on HIV and Sjögren’s syndrome.

Erik Serrao and Tino Sanchez

Tino Sanchez received a two-year $50,000 dissertation fellowship from the California HIV/AIDS Research Program to support research on the disease. Sanchez hopes his study may lead to drug development for patients suffering with HIV. The disease works by invading an immune cell and replicating by using three key enzymes: protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase. Sanchez plans to target the integrase enzyme as it is key in allowing viral DNA to integrate into host cells. Among HIV therapies, only one integrase inhibitor is FDA-approved. “HIV is the most unique and devastating virus known thus far with all sorts of tricks to evade eradication,” Sanchez

24 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

says, “My work will target the most influential HIV enzyme, integrase, and give AIDS patients more hope at stemming the virus and evading the emergence of drug resistant strains.” On a computer, Sanchez designs replicas of compounds which he later recreates in the lab. This process increases the likelihood that the new compounds will be effective. Erik Serrao also received a fellowship for HIV/AIDS research. Serrao was granted a $19,000 Oakley Fellowship, a part of the USC Graduate School Endowed Fellowship Competition. The competitive Oakley Fellowship is available to PhD candidates in any field. Like Sanchez, Serrao’s research will also target the integrase enzyme. Serrao will work on the development of new compounds that can inhibit HIV integrase from incorporating the virus into chromosomes. Both Serrao and Sanchez work in the lab of Nouri Neamati, associate professor of pharmacology and pharmaceutical sciences. PhD candidate Ben Xu was awarded a Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation student fellowship, which will help support his research project on Sjögren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease that is characterized by tear gland inflammation and dry eye. Xu hopes this research will eventually aid in therapeutic development for those suffering with Sjögren’s syndrome. He will use the $3,000 award to study how antibodies are transported from the blood through the tear gland and into tears. “This award will encourage me to do a deeper study on cell biology and protein trafficking, which may be involved in the delivery of drugs,” Xu says. Xu’s research will take place in the lab of his mentor, Sarah Hamm-Alvarez, the Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences and chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Brinton Breaking Barrier between Bench and Bedside In her lab, Professor Roberta Diaz Brinton, the R. Pete Vanderveen Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, transitions basic science discoveries made at the bench to the bedside. The process is called phase 1 translational research, and was the subject of a discussion led by Brinton at a National Center for Research Resources workshop at the National Institutes of Health in February. Brinton discussed the consistent barrier across many universities is the translation of discovery to the business sector, and was able to draw light on the issue with other researchers. Attendees included

top officials from the National Institute on Aging and the Food and Drug Administration, staffers from other NIH institutes and representatives from over 200 universities. “I was surprised at how ubiquitous this barrier is across almost every university that was represented at the workshop,” Brinton says, “This is clearly an opportunity for the USC Stevens Institute to take a lead position—but it must be in the biomedical arena for relevance to NIH investment in biomedical research.” —usc Chronicle

faculty updates James Adams, PhD, quoted in the Los Angeles Times about a cyanide poisoning situation occurring in an episode of CBS drama “The Mentalist”, in December 2008; interviewed on Sirius/XM radio’s Doctor Radio with Samantha Heller about mercury exposure and health risks in January; attended meeting of the National Center for Complimentary and Alternative Medicine NIH basic science study section in March; led a medicinal plant hike in the Deukmejian Wilderness Park in Glendale in May.

Roberta Diaz-Brinton, PhD, R. Pete Vanderveen Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development, presented “Alzheimer’s Disease and the Starving Brain,” at the 14th Annual QSAD Winter Retreat in January; received USC Neighborhood Outreach grant of $23,850 in support of STAR program. Enrique Cadenas, MD, PhD, Charles Krown/Pharmacy Alumni Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences and associate dean for research affairs, and Stan Louie, PharmD, are among authors of a study on green

tea’s ability to block the effects of certain anti-cancer drugs that was featured in the media including MSNBC News, Japan Times, ScienceDaily, the National Cancer Institute Bulletin and Medical News Today.

Roger Clemens, DrPH, quoted in the LA Times about crystalline fructose sweetener in February.

Ian Haworth, PhD, teaching course on biomolecular structure and drug design as a visiting professor and working with faculty and students on thesis and manuscript submissions at the Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand, summer 2009.

Jean Shih, PhD, Boyd P. and Elsie D. Welin Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, received a $1,096,775 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health for project titled “Two Types of Monoamine Oxidase”; receiving the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America Lifetime Achievement Award at an international symposium at the Academia Sinica, Taipei, in July. Rajindar Sohal, PhD, Timothy M. Chan Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, lead author of study on calorie restriction in mice that was widely featured in the media, including Medical News Today, Foodconsumer. org and ScienceDaily.com.

J. Andrew MacKay, PhD, awarded $37,500

Clay Wang, PhD, promoted to associate

grant from the USC Research Center for Liver Disease to support project titled “Hepatrafficking and anti-tumor activity of genetically engineered glycol-celles” in March.

professor.

Nouri Neamati, PhD, presented “Where Do We Stand on Eradicating HIV?” at the 14th Annual QSAD Winter Retreat in January.

Walter Wolf, PhD, Distinguished Professor, awarded Tocagen grant for evaluation of ability to detect the conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil using noninvasive 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy; participated in the 2009 Imaging Biomarkers Roundtable in Chicago in March.

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

25


scholarships Over 90 donors and recipients attended the School of Pharmacy’s Annual Scholarship Luncheon, which took place in Centennial Park on April 16. The event provided a unique opportunity for students to connect with the benefactors who have played an important role in making their educations possible.

left: Alumnus Ken Thai, PharmD (’03), meets with Carol Chen, PharmD (’09), the recipient of his scholarship. center: Minh Dang, RPh, manager of professional and college relations at CVS/pharmacy, chats with Edward Ou-Young, PharmD (’09), and Elizabeth Nadukwe, PharmD (’09).

School of Pharmacy

right: School of Pharmacy Dean Emeritus Timothy Chan, PhD, and Jerry Chang, PharmD (’08), a current PhD candidate in the pharmaceutical economics and policy program.

annual scholarship luncheon Dean R. Pete Vanderveen announced the following

new scholarships

at the event: Comprehensive Pharmacy Services Scholarship Joanne and Scott Evans Endowed Scholarship Barbara Gee Endowed Scholarship Mission Road Pharmacy Scholarship Urmila Patel Endowed Scholarship

Walter Cathey, PharmD (’62), and Mike Quick, vice president sales, West Region, AmerisourceBergen, congratulate the recipients of the GNP/ICP Scholarship (top row) PharmD candidates Kalsang Dorji, Harutyun Kagoyan, Yousuf Rahyab, (bottom row) Linh Le, and Elly Sarabi.

26 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Mayank and Rebecca Shah Scholarship

left: PharmD/MBA candidate Eddie Wong offered a student’s perspective at the event, “I’ve seen firsthand the enormous support that comes with being part of the Trojan Family.”

Roslyn Ellison Blake Endowed Diversity Scholarship

center: Alumna Danielle Pembroke, PharmD (’97), pharmacy supervisor, Walgreens Pharmacy, (center) lunches with Lynn Shiraishi, PharmD (’09), and PharmD candidate Nadine Ozdemir.

School of Pharmacy Diversity Scholarship with

right: Sisters Bonnie and Susan Brady enjoyed meeting PharmD candidates Kai Young and Stella Amranyan.

support from Target, Cardinal Health and Walgreens

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

27


scholarships Over 90 donors and recipients attended the School of Pharmacy’s Annual Scholarship Luncheon, which took place in Centennial Park on April 16. The event provided a unique opportunity for students to connect with the benefactors who have played an important role in making their educations possible.

left: Alumnus Ken Thai, PharmD (’03), meets with Carol Chen, PharmD (’09), the recipient of his scholarship. center: Minh Dang, RPh, manager of professional and college relations at CVS/pharmacy, chats with Edward Ou-Young, PharmD (’09), and Elizabeth Nadukwe, PharmD (’09).

School of Pharmacy

right: School of Pharmacy Dean Emeritus Timothy Chan, PhD, and Jerry Chang, PharmD (’08), a current PhD candidate in the pharmaceutical economics and policy program.

annual scholarship luncheon Dean R. Pete Vanderveen announced the following

new scholarships

at the event: Comprehensive Pharmacy Services Scholarship Joanne and Scott Evans Endowed Scholarship Barbara Gee Endowed Scholarship Mission Road Pharmacy Scholarship Urmila Patel Endowed Scholarship

Walter Cathey, PharmD (’62), and Mike Quick, vice president sales, West Region, AmerisourceBergen, congratulate the recipients of the GNP/ICP Scholarship (top row) PharmD candidates Kalsang Dorji, Harutyun Kagoyan, Yousuf Rahyab, (bottom row) Linh Le, and Elly Sarabi.

26 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

Mayank and Rebecca Shah Scholarship

left: PharmD/MBA candidate Eddie Wong offered a student’s perspective at the event, “I’ve seen firsthand the enormous support that comes with being part of the Trojan Family.”

Roslyn Ellison Blake Endowed Diversity Scholarship

center: Alumna Danielle Pembroke, PharmD (’97), pharmacy supervisor, Walgreens Pharmacy, (center) lunches with Lynn Shiraishi, PharmD (’09), and PharmD candidate Nadine Ozdemir.

School of Pharmacy Diversity Scholarship with

right: Sisters Bonnie and Susan Brady enjoyed meeting PharmD candidates Kai Young and Stella Amranyan.

support from Target, Cardinal Health and Walgreens

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

27


snapshots

snap

[shots]

especially

for ladies

Alumnae and friends gathered at the USC Orange County Center for a midday tea punctuated with some frank talk about the aging brain presented by Professsor Roberta Diaz Brinton.

Winter Breather The 14th Annual Winter Retreat presented by QSAD was held in January at La Costa Resort & Spa. Sponsored by AmerisourceBergen Good Neighbor Pharmacy, the program offered continuing education accented with the amenities of the resort. For information about next year’s Winter Retreat, slated for January 29-31 at the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa, contact Mary Wackerman at 323.442.1360 or mwacker@usc.edu. Pictured are attendees at this year’s event Herbert Weinberg, PharmD (’56), JD, and his wife Polly Weinberg. According to Weinberg, “QSAD’s Winter Retreat gives you the opportunity to meet with old friends, make new friends and listen to interesting speakers about matters pharmaceutical, in a beautiful resort setting. It doesn’t get any better than that.”

28 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

William T. Econome, PharmD (’57), given honorary California Pharmacists Association life membership at the CPhA annual meeting in Anaheim in February; recognized by the California Board of Pharmacy for 50 years of service.

Scott Evans, PharmD (’98), awarded the Phi Delta Chi Albert B. Prescott/Glaxo SmithKline Pharmacy Leadership Award at the American Pharmacists Association annual meeting in San Antonio in April.

Andrew Rosenthal, PharmD (‘67), is the director of pharmacy,

Classmates Ken Thai, PharmD (’02), and Brian Garner,

Kindred Hospital, San Antonio, Texas.

PharmD (’02), opened Bella Vista Pharmacy in Monterey Park. Brian Thai, PharmD (’08), will manage the new pharmacy.

Hawaii State Board of Pharmacy; writes board exams for the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy; served as guest lecturer in Law and Ethics at the University of Hawaii College of Pharmacy.

George Yasutake, PharmD (’78), named Pharmacist of the Year at the California Pharmacists Association annual meeting in Anaheim in February.

David Fong, PharmD (’82), named executive director of United Pharmacists Network, Inc. in January. Mark R. Henschke, PharmD (’83), recognized by MDx Medical, Inc. with the national Patients’ Choice Award in April. Francesca Venturini, MS (’97), L. Shi, PhD (’01), B.V. Patel, MS (’02), and L.J. Lee, MS (’06), presented at the 2009 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Annual meeting in Orlando in May.

remembrances

Rolling the Dice left: Dean Vanderveen joins speaker Mary Gutierrez, PharmD, professor at Loma Linda School of Pharmacy. For information on the 2010 Las Vegas Seminar, contact pharmce@usc.edu or call 323.442.2403.

classmates

Elwin Goo, PharmD (’72), completing second term as chair of the

right: Tea attendees Susie Titus and Linda Blinkenberg with Dean Vanderveen.

In March, alumni and friends took their chances at the 22nd Annual USC Las Vegas Seminar held at Caesars Palace. Topics covered included atrial fibrillation and counseling patients about sexual dysfunction.

keeping track of

David Breslow, PharmD (’71), is the CEO of the Institute for Community Pharmacy; received the 2009 Alumni Service Award at the USC 76th Annual Alumni Awards Gala in May.

Pharmacist of the Year George Yasutake, PharmD (’78), accepts the Pharmacist of the Year honor at the California Pharmacists Association annual meeting in Anaheim in February. Yasutake is a well-known leader in the profession having previously served as CPhA president and speaker of the house, APhA chairman of the Academy of Pharmacy Practice & Management, and president of the HollywoodWilshire Pharmacists Association.

alumni

Adrienne R. Matthews, PharmD (’03), MA, named WellPoint Pharmacist Program manager/pharmacy director for Californiabased employers that are clients of Anthem Blue Cross.

Rebecca A. Rottman, PharmD (’03), BCPS, CGP, is currently working as a geriatric clinical pharmacy specialist at South Texas Veteran’s Healthcare System, Audie L. Murphy Division, in San Antonio, Texas. Gustavus Aranda, PharmD (’04), MS (‘06), named senior manager, Clinical Science and Outcomes at Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.. Sue-Ann Nouchi, PharmD (’05), currently practicing at Torrance Memorial Medical Center and recently featured in the hospital’s magazine, Vigor.

Lou Colella, PharmD (’60), passed away in February.

James Robert Turner, BS (’49), passed away on December

Edward Hirschman, PharmD (’68), passed away from com-

31, 2008. Mr. Turner opened Turner’s Pharmacy in Glendora in 1951. In the 1960’s, the pharmacy was relocated in Glendora and renamed Sierra Pharmacy. Turner is survived by his wife, Shirley.

plications due to lung cancer on April 12 at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, California. He founded several companies including Pacific View Pharmacy Corp. in 1978 and Comprehensive Pharmacy Services, Inc. in 1980. Hirschman is survived by his wife, Anne.

Masao Kanai, BS (’54), passed away on January 1.

(’70), chairman elect of the School’s Board of Councilors, chats with GNP/ICP scholarship recipient Harutyun Kagoyan at the GNP/ICP Scholarship Golf Classic held on June 10. The annual event garners $55,000 in scholarships for USC students who are interested in independent community pharmacy and hope to ultimately own a pharmacy.

assistant professor of clinical and administrative sciences and chair of admissions committee at California Northstate College of Pharmacy.

Frank Sei Takeuchi, BS (’38), passed away in February.

Logan Lewis Fox, BS (’51), passed away on April 20.

Just before tee time Ron Belville, PharmD

Sona Frausto, PharmD (’03), MA, is currently working as

Charles “Chuck” Beeman, PharmD (’56), passed away on February 25. Dr. Beeman opened Beeman’s Pharmacy at St. Bernardine Medical Center in 1963 and a second Beeman’s Pharmacy in 1971. He was appointed to the San Bernardino Community College District Board in 1983 and served as a Trustee for 25 years.

Richard Oksas, PharmD (’70), passed away in January. Oksas is survived by his wife, Carol.

Dale Ann Ross, PharmD (’71), passed away on January 27. Hugo Bustamante, PharmD (’93), passed away in April. He worked as a pharmacy supervisor at the Long Beach Memorial Hospital. He is survived by his wife, Jane Alison Guentherman, PharmD (’92).

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

29


snapshots

snap

[shots]

especially

for ladies

Alumnae and friends gathered at the USC Orange County Center for a midday tea punctuated with some frank talk about the aging brain presented by Professsor Roberta Diaz Brinton.

Winter Breather The 14th Annual Winter Retreat presented by QSAD was held in January at La Costa Resort & Spa. Sponsored by AmerisourceBergen Good Neighbor Pharmacy, the program offered continuing education accented with the amenities of the resort. For information about next year’s Winter Retreat, slated for January 29-31 at the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa, contact Mary Wackerman at 323.442.1360 or mwacker@usc.edu. Pictured are attendees at this year’s event Herbert Weinberg, PharmD (’56), JD, and his wife Polly Weinberg. According to Weinberg, “QSAD’s Winter Retreat gives you the opportunity to meet with old friends, make new friends and listen to interesting speakers about matters pharmaceutical, in a beautiful resort setting. It doesn’t get any better than that.”

28 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

William T. Econome, PharmD (’57), given honorary California Pharmacists Association life membership at the CPhA annual meeting in Anaheim in February; recognized by the California Board of Pharmacy for 50 years of service.

Scott Evans, PharmD (’98), awarded the Phi Delta Chi Albert B. Prescott/Glaxo SmithKline Pharmacy Leadership Award at the American Pharmacists Association annual meeting in San Antonio in April.

Andrew Rosenthal, PharmD (‘67), is the director of pharmacy,

Classmates Ken Thai, PharmD (’02), and Brian Garner,

Kindred Hospital, San Antonio, Texas.

PharmD (’02), opened Bella Vista Pharmacy in Monterey Park. Brian Thai, PharmD (’08), will manage the new pharmacy.

Hawaii State Board of Pharmacy; writes board exams for the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy; served as guest lecturer in Law and Ethics at the University of Hawaii College of Pharmacy.

George Yasutake, PharmD (’78), named Pharmacist of the Year at the California Pharmacists Association annual meeting in Anaheim in February.

David Fong, PharmD (’82), named executive director of United Pharmacists Network, Inc. in January. Mark R. Henschke, PharmD (’83), recognized by MDx Medical, Inc. with the national Patients’ Choice Award in April. Francesca Venturini, MS (’97), L. Shi, PhD (’01), B.V. Patel, MS (’02), and L.J. Lee, MS (’06), presented at the 2009 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Annual meeting in Orlando in May.

remembrances

Rolling the Dice left: Dean Vanderveen joins speaker Mary Gutierrez, PharmD, professor at Loma Linda School of Pharmacy. For information on the 2010 Las Vegas Seminar, contact pharmce@usc.edu or call 323.442.2403.

classmates

Elwin Goo, PharmD (’72), completing second term as chair of the

right: Tea attendees Susie Titus and Linda Blinkenberg with Dean Vanderveen.

In March, alumni and friends took their chances at the 22nd Annual USC Las Vegas Seminar held at Caesars Palace. Topics covered included atrial fibrillation and counseling patients about sexual dysfunction.

keeping track of

David Breslow, PharmD (’71), is the CEO of the Institute for Community Pharmacy; received the 2009 Alumni Service Award at the USC 76th Annual Alumni Awards Gala in May.

Pharmacist of the Year George Yasutake, PharmD (’78), accepts the Pharmacist of the Year honor at the California Pharmacists Association annual meeting in Anaheim in February. Yasutake is a well-known leader in the profession having previously served as CPhA president and speaker of the house, APhA chairman of the Academy of Pharmacy Practice & Management, and president of the HollywoodWilshire Pharmacists Association.

alumni

Adrienne R. Matthews, PharmD (’03), MA, named WellPoint Pharmacist Program manager/pharmacy director for Californiabased employers that are clients of Anthem Blue Cross.

Rebecca A. Rottman, PharmD (’03), BCPS, CGP, is currently working as a geriatric clinical pharmacy specialist at South Texas Veteran’s Healthcare System, Audie L. Murphy Division, in San Antonio, Texas. Gustavus Aranda, PharmD (’04), MS (‘06), named senior manager, Clinical Science and Outcomes at Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.. Sue-Ann Nouchi, PharmD (’05), currently practicing at Torrance Memorial Medical Center and recently featured in the hospital’s magazine, Vigor.

Lou Colella, PharmD (’60), passed away in February.

James Robert Turner, BS (’49), passed away on December

Edward Hirschman, PharmD (’68), passed away from com-

31, 2008. Mr. Turner opened Turner’s Pharmacy in Glendora in 1951. In the 1960’s, the pharmacy was relocated in Glendora and renamed Sierra Pharmacy. Turner is survived by his wife, Shirley.

plications due to lung cancer on April 12 at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, California. He founded several companies including Pacific View Pharmacy Corp. in 1978 and Comprehensive Pharmacy Services, Inc. in 1980. Hirschman is survived by his wife, Anne.

Masao Kanai, BS (’54), passed away on January 1.

(’70), chairman elect of the School’s Board of Councilors, chats with GNP/ICP scholarship recipient Harutyun Kagoyan at the GNP/ICP Scholarship Golf Classic held on June 10. The annual event garners $55,000 in scholarships for USC students who are interested in independent community pharmacy and hope to ultimately own a pharmacy.

assistant professor of clinical and administrative sciences and chair of admissions committee at California Northstate College of Pharmacy.

Frank Sei Takeuchi, BS (’38), passed away in February.

Logan Lewis Fox, BS (’51), passed away on April 20.

Just before tee time Ron Belville, PharmD

Sona Frausto, PharmD (’03), MA, is currently working as

Charles “Chuck” Beeman, PharmD (’56), passed away on February 25. Dr. Beeman opened Beeman’s Pharmacy at St. Bernardine Medical Center in 1963 and a second Beeman’s Pharmacy in 1971. He was appointed to the San Bernardino Community College District Board in 1983 and served as a Trustee for 25 years.

Richard Oksas, PharmD (’70), passed away in January. Oksas is survived by his wife, Carol.

Dale Ann Ross, PharmD (’71), passed away on January 27. Hugo Bustamante, PharmD (’93), passed away in April. He worked as a pharmacy supervisor at the Long Beach Memorial Hospital. He is survived by his wife, Jane Alison Guentherman, PharmD (’92).

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

29


community outreach

pharmacy students

HOOPS

Expand Care Throughout Community

Senior Prom

partners pharmacy students with senior citizens for an afternoon of education, screenings…and fun.

Pharmacy students and seniors at the St. Barnabas Senior Center in Los Angeles took part in the “Senior Prom”, an annual event hosted by the School’s Skull and Mortar Pharmacy Service Fraternity. The prom is a combination dance and health fair providing screenings and education “with a beat”. The screening and educational booths addressed a wide variety of health issues affecting seniors such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heartburn and proper medication use. Throughout the afternoon, seniors and students danced to nostalgic tunes from the Temple City High School jazz band.

4 CHARITY...

...is a new event that allows the winner to name the beneficiary of all funds raised through the activity. PharmD student Dan Trinh topped the basket total and announced that the $1,000 donation generated by the event would be donated to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure, which supports breast cancer research.

Giving Middle Schoolers an Rx for Success Merriam Cabardo, Michael Wu, Andy Thai and Billie Gomes speak to an eighth grade science class during “Career Day” at Granger Junior High School in San Diego. The PharmD candidates educated students about the pharmacy profession and filled them in on what it’s like to be a USC pharmacy student.

left: Event organizer Michael Wu acts as the event announcer as Erin Matsushita reacts to missing a shot during the free throw competition held on April 9 and sponsored by the Alpha Iota Pi fraternity. Wu and Matshushita are both PharmD students.

Aubrey Moreau, a PharmD candidate, takes a break from his screening booth post to dance with a partner at the senior prom.

Skull and Mortar

pharmacy

Stars

Honorary Service Fraternity holds Student pharmacists played a starring role at the Fox Interactive Health Fair held on March 25 in Beverly Hills. USC students offered a slate of screening tests to employees of the entertainment firm. left: PharmD candidate Cynthia Gong screens Jake Levine for diabetes at the Fox Interactive Health Fair in March. right: PharmD candidates Sarah Horng and Nicole Cho measure Cortland Connell’s blood pressure.

Annual Kids’ Day

The School of Pharmacy hosted middle schoolers from La Merced Intermediate School at the 12th annual Kids’ Day on March 6. This year’s theme was “Out of this World”, as pharmacy students put together an action-packed day that gave the kids a look into careers in health care. The visiting students were also given educational information on making good life choices, staying out of gangs and substance abuse prevention. The eventful day was complemented by a talent competition and a series of dance performances put together by pharmacy students.

top: Pharmacy students highlighted the afternoon with their unique lively dance performances on the HSC Quad. bottom: Middle schoolers Ana Pena and Ana Padillo received the award for best poster from Victor Law, United Pharmacists Network, and Sandy Song, Kids’ Day coordinator. The students’ winning poster illustrated the theme, “what it means to live a life without gangs”. United Pharmacists Network is a sponsor of the event.

30 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

31


community outreach

pharmacy students

HOOPS

Expand Care Throughout Community

Senior Prom

partners pharmacy students with senior citizens for an afternoon of education, screenings…and fun.

Pharmacy students and seniors at the St. Barnabas Senior Center in Los Angeles took part in the “Senior Prom”, an annual event hosted by the School’s Skull and Mortar Pharmacy Service Fraternity. The prom is a combination dance and health fair providing screenings and education “with a beat”. The screening and educational booths addressed a wide variety of health issues affecting seniors such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heartburn and proper medication use. Throughout the afternoon, seniors and students danced to nostalgic tunes from the Temple City High School jazz band.

4 CHARITY...

...is a new event that allows the winner to name the beneficiary of all funds raised through the activity. PharmD student Dan Trinh topped the basket total and announced that the $1,000 donation generated by the event would be donated to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure, which supports breast cancer research.

Giving Middle Schoolers an Rx for Success Merriam Cabardo, Michael Wu, Andy Thai and Billie Gomes speak to an eighth grade science class during “Career Day” at Granger Junior High School in San Diego. The PharmD candidates educated students about the pharmacy profession and filled them in on what it’s like to be a USC pharmacy student.

left: Event organizer Michael Wu acts as the event announcer as Erin Matsushita reacts to missing a shot during the free throw competition held on April 9 and sponsored by the Alpha Iota Pi fraternity. Wu and Matshushita are both PharmD students.

Aubrey Moreau, a PharmD candidate, takes a break from his screening booth post to dance with a partner at the senior prom.

Skull and Mortar

pharmacy

Stars

Honorary Service Fraternity holds Student pharmacists played a starring role at the Fox Interactive Health Fair held on March 25 in Beverly Hills. USC students offered a slate of screening tests to employees of the entertainment firm. left: PharmD candidate Cynthia Gong screens Jake Levine for diabetes at the Fox Interactive Health Fair in March. right: PharmD candidates Sarah Horng and Nicole Cho measure Cortland Connell’s blood pressure.

Annual Kids’ Day

The School of Pharmacy hosted middle schoolers from La Merced Intermediate School at the 12th annual Kids’ Day on March 6. This year’s theme was “Out of this World”, as pharmacy students put together an action-packed day that gave the kids a look into careers in health care. The visiting students were also given educational information on making good life choices, staying out of gangs and substance abuse prevention. The eventful day was complemented by a talent competition and a series of dance performances put together by pharmacy students.

top: Pharmacy students highlighted the afternoon with their unique lively dance performances on the HSC Quad. bottom: Middle schoolers Ana Pena and Ana Padillo received the award for best poster from Victor Law, United Pharmacists Network, and Sandy Song, Kids’ Day coordinator. The students’ winning poster illustrated the theme, “what it means to live a life without gangs”. United Pharmacists Network is a sponsor of the event.

30 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

31


students Student Updates Pharmaceutical economics & policy students Jae-Jin An, Jerry Chang, Flavia Ejzykowicz, Ning Yan Gu, Aniket Kawatkar, Quang Le, Hae Sun Suh, Zheng Yi-Zhou and Sara Zolfaghari presented posters at the 2009 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Annual Meeting in Orlando in May.

James Sanchez, PhD candidate, awarded a $6,000 fellowship from

Emily Delkhah, PharmD candidate, named outstanding student

Erik Serrao, PhD candidate working with Professor Nouri Neamati, awarded a USC Graduate School Oakley Fellowship, supporting research on HIV/AIDS drug development.

member of the year by the USC National Community Pharmacists Association.

Bonnie Hui, PharmD candidate, awarded Robert C. Johnson Scholarship from the California Pharmacists Association; awarded American Pharmacists Association–Academy of Student Pharmacists Student Leadership Award; elected as a member-at-large to the National Executive Committee of the Academy of Student Pharmacists. Pamela Lincoln, PharmD candidate, recipient of AACP/Wal-Mart

the American Foundation of Pharmaceutical Education.

Tino Sanchez, PhD candidate working with Professor Nouri Neamati, awarded a California HIV/AIDS Research Program Fellowship, supporting drug development research.

Letisha Wyatt, PhD candidate, recipient of a $6,000 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship. Ben Xu, PhD candidate working with Professor Sarah HammAlvarez, Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, awarded a Sjörgens Syndrome Foundation Student Fellowship.

Scholars Program, which provides a $1,000 travel scholarship to attend the AACP Annual Meeting in Boston in July.

Resident Updates Bosun Chung, PharmD, research award finalist for the Innovative

Indriani Wang, PharmD, awarded the PharmD Student/Resident

Practice Award at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists 2009 Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, Florida in April.

Award at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists 2009 Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, Florida in April.

Davalyn Tidwell, PharmD (’08), recipient of AACP/Wal-Mart Scholars Program, which provides a $1,000 travel scholarship to attend the AACP Annual Meeting in Boston in July.

opportunity knocks

scholarships change lives

‘‘

at Interview Day

PharmD students, Paulin Heng and Tien Nguyen join Conrad Bio, Pharm.D., director, college relations and professional recruitment, Rite Aid Corporation at the School of Pharmacy’s annual Interview Day.

The Alumni Association includes many of us who had the support of scholarships when we were students at the School of Pharmacy.  As alumni, we know and understand how ‘Scholarships Change Lives.’ Working as a group, we take pleasure in supporting students through the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association Endowed Scholarship. While we contribute to many activities and projects as a group, none compares to the satisfaction we receive supporting the next generation of pharmacists.” Dolly Harris, PharmD (’77), President, Alumni Association, USC School of Pharmacy

‘‘

The generous scholarship I received has assisted me significantly during my educational career. It is through not only the emotional support of families, but also through the financial support provided by alumni and friends such as the Alumni Association that have made my journey as a Trojan an enjoyable and rewarding experience.” Derenik Ghabirian, PharmD (’09), Recipient of the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association Scholarship

Opening Doors for Clinical Experiences

The intern fair held on the HSC Quad gives students a chance to talk to preceptors about rotations. Here PharmD candidate Sebrin Siraj talks with Dr. Kevin Forrester about student experiences at University Hospital.

32 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

To learn how you can change a life, contact Mary Wackerman at 323.442.1360 or mwacker@usc.edu. www.usc.edu/pharmacy


students Student Updates Pharmaceutical economics & policy students Jae-Jin An, Jerry Chang, Flavia Ejzykowicz, Ning Yan Gu, Aniket Kawatkar, Quang Le, Hae Sun Suh, Zheng Yi-Zhou and Sara Zolfaghari presented posters at the 2009 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Annual Meeting in Orlando in May.

James Sanchez, PhD candidate, awarded a $6,000 fellowship from

Emily Delkhah, PharmD candidate, named outstanding student

Erik Serrao, PhD candidate working with Professor Nouri Neamati, awarded a USC Graduate School Oakley Fellowship, supporting research on HIV/AIDS drug development.

member of the year by the USC National Community Pharmacists Association.

Bonnie Hui, PharmD candidate, awarded Robert C. Johnson Scholarship from the California Pharmacists Association; awarded American Pharmacists Association–Academy of Student Pharmacists Student Leadership Award; elected as a member-at-large to the National Executive Committee of the Academy of Student Pharmacists. Pamela Lincoln, PharmD candidate, recipient of AACP/Wal-Mart

the American Foundation of Pharmaceutical Education.

Tino Sanchez, PhD candidate working with Professor Nouri Neamati, awarded a California HIV/AIDS Research Program Fellowship, supporting drug development research.

Letisha Wyatt, PhD candidate, recipient of a $6,000 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship. Ben Xu, PhD candidate working with Professor Sarah HammAlvarez, Gavin S. Herbert Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, awarded a Sjörgens Syndrome Foundation Student Fellowship.

Scholars Program, which provides a $1,000 travel scholarship to attend the AACP Annual Meeting in Boston in July.

Resident Updates Bosun Chung, PharmD, research award finalist for the Innovative

Indriani Wang, PharmD, awarded the PharmD Student/Resident

Practice Award at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists 2009 Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, Florida in April.

Award at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists 2009 Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, Florida in April.

Davalyn Tidwell, PharmD (’08), recipient of AACP/Wal-Mart Scholars Program, which provides a $1,000 travel scholarship to attend the AACP Annual Meeting in Boston in July.

opportunity knocks

scholarships change lives

‘‘

at Interview Day

PharmD students, Paulin Heng and Tien Nguyen join Conrad Bio, Pharm.D., director, college relations and professional recruitment, Rite Aid Corporation at the School of Pharmacy’s annual Interview Day.

The Alumni Association includes many of us who had the support of scholarships when we were students at the School of Pharmacy.  As alumni, we know and understand how ‘Scholarships Change Lives.’ Working as a group, we take pleasure in supporting students through the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association Endowed Scholarship. While we contribute to many activities and projects as a group, none compares to the satisfaction we receive supporting the next generation of pharmacists.” Dolly Harris, PharmD (’77), President, Alumni Association, USC School of Pharmacy

‘‘

The generous scholarship I received has assisted me significantly during my educational career. It is through not only the emotional support of families, but also through the financial support provided by alumni and friends such as the Alumni Association that have made my journey as a Trojan an enjoyable and rewarding experience.” Derenik Ghabirian, PharmD (’09), Recipient of the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association Scholarship

Opening Doors for Clinical Experiences

The intern fair held on the HSC Quad gives students a chance to talk to preceptors about rotations. Here PharmD candidate Sebrin Siraj talks with Dr. Kevin Forrester about student experiences at University Hospital.

32 summer 2009 | USC PHARMACY MAGAZINE

To learn how you can change a life, contact Mary Wackerman at 323.442.1360 or mwacker@usc.edu. www.usc.edu/pharmacy


Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage Paid University of Southern California USC School of Pharmacy | Health Sciences Campus University of Southern California 1985 Zonal Avenue | Los Angeles CA 90089-9121 Address Service Requested

save the date… August 3-7, Monday–Friday

November 14, Saturday

August 20, Thursday

January 29-31 (2010), Friday–Sunday

October 13, Tuesday

February 20 (2010), Saturday

November 13, Friday

February 27-28 (2010), Saturday–Sunday

52nd Annual Postgraduate Refresher Course Hyatt Regency, Maui, Hawaii Information: 323-442-2403 or pharmce@usc.edu White Coat Ceremony HSC Quad Information: 323-442-1360 or mwacker@usc.edu 2009 Career Day Showcase USC–HSC Quad Information: 323-442-1738 or stanovic@usc.edu 5th Annual Alumni & Friends Golf Outing Angeles National Golf Course Information: 323-442-1738 or stanovic@usc.edu

Homecoming and Class Reunions University Park Campus Information: 323-442-1381 or carr@usc.edu 15th Annual Winter Retreat Ojai Resort and Spa Information: 323-442-1360 or mwacker@usc.edu Interview Day 2010 HSC–USC School of Pharmacy Information: 323-442-1738 or stanovic@usc.edu 23rd Annual Las Vegas Seminar Caesars Palace Information: 323-442-2403 or pharmce@usc.edu

USC Pharmacy Magazine Summer 2009  

USC Pharmacy Magazine, published semi-annually, highlights some of the USC School of Pharmacy’s latest advances and achievements, as well as...

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