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ALYSSA OH 2018 JR. PAN AMERICAN TRAMPOLINE GOLD MEDAL SHANNON XIAO 2018 JR. PAN AMERICAN RHYTHMIC ALL-AROUND GOLD MEDAL

BRANDON BRIONES 2018 JR. PAN AMERICAN MEN’S ALL-AROUND GOLD MEDAL

NEW FEDERAL LAWS EXPLAINED SAILING THE STORM AS A BUSINESS OWNER HEROIC LEADERSHIP INCREASING REVENUE

...AND MORE! SUMMER 2018 — VOL. 38 – #3


EVENTS E V E N T S

S C H E D U L E

2 018 OCTOBER

JULY 3–7

USA Gymnastics Championships (A/R/TT) . . . . . . . . Greensboro, NC

5–7

World Cup (TT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loule, Portugal

6

Hopes Classic (W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salt Lake City, UT

6–18

Youth Olympic Games (M/R/TT) . . . . . . . . . Buenos Aires, Argentina

7

American Classic (W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salt Lake City, UT

10-13

World Team Selection Camp (W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBD

25–Nov. 3 World Championships (M/W) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doha, Qatar

14-15

National Qualifier (M) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado Springs, CO

20-22

Stars & Stripes Championships (TT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reno, Nev.

27–28

U.S. Classic/Hopes Championships (W). . . . . . . . . . . Columbus, OH

NOVEMBER

AUGUST

7–10

World Championships (TT). . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Petersburg, Russia

8-11

Future Stars National Championships (M). . . . . . Colorado Springs, CO

4–5

World Cup (TT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maebashi, Japan

8-11

National Coaches Workshop (M). . . . . . . . . . . Colorado Springs, CO

9-11

National Congress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Providence, RI

15-18

World Age Group Competition (TT). . . . . . . . . St. Petersburg, Russia

16–19

U.S. Gymnastics Championships (M/W). . . . . . . . . . . . Boston, MA

22–25

World Cup (M) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cottbus, Germany

24–26

World Challenge Cup (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kazan, Russia

SEPTEMBER 4-10

Senior Pan Am Championships (TT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lima, Peru

10–16

World Championships (R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sofia, Bulgaria

10-17

Senior Pan Am Championships (M/W). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lima, Peru

26-30

Senior Pan Am Championships (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lima, Peru

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS

To post an online classified ad, go to www.usagym.org/classifieds.

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GFA = Gymnastics for All, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling NOTE: Dates and events are subject to change or cancellation.

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TECHNIQUE • SUMMER 2018


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF USA

GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY

S U M M E R 2 0 1 8 • V O L U M E 3 8 • #3

22

PUBLISHER

Kerry J. Perry

USA GYMNASTICS BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR Karen Golz

22

ADDITIONAL PROFIT CENTERS – ICING ON THE CAKE By Diane Barron

36

HOW TO INCREASE DAYTIME REVENUES By Patti Komara

41

KEEPING SCORE By Randy Sikora

45

THE BENEFITS A GYMNASTICS EDUCATION PROVIDES CHILDREN By Jeff Lulla

INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS Lois Elizabeth Bingham Kathryn Carson Brent Lang David Rudd Staci Slaughter Julie Springwater Kimberly Till

DEPARTMENTS

2

EVENT SCHEDULE

4

INSIDE USA GYMNASTICS: MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

5

BANNED MEMBERS .LIST UPDATE

HEROIC LEADERSHIP By Lynn Ledford

32

ATHLETE DIRECTORS Ivana Hong, women’s gymnastics Steven Legendre, men’s gymnastics Dylan Maurer, combined

Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author, and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

WHAT DOES THE NEW FEDERAL LAW, “PROTECTING YOUNG VICTIMS FROM SEXUAL ABUSE AND SAFE SPORT AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017," MEAN FOR YOU?

SAILING THE STORM FROM A BUSINESS OWNER’S PERSPECTIVE By Tina Ferriola

ADVISORY COUNCIL DIRECTOR Kevin White

TECHNIQUE is now published quarterly by USA Gymnastics, 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-237-5050) or visit online at www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.—$25 per year; Canada/Mexico—$48 per year; all other foreign countries—$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2018 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. ­All rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719.

10

18

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORS Kittia Carpenter, women’s gymnastics Stefanie Korepin, combined Justin Spring, men’s gymnastics

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 .

FEATURES & UPDATES

14

MEMBER SERVICES UPDATE: 2018-19 MEMBERSHIP SEASON PREVIEW

30

WOMEN’S JUNIOR OLYMPIC UPDATE

34

.2018 WOMEN’S PROGRAM UPDATES

47

CLASSIFIEDS

45

ON THE COVER: The USA will compete in men’s and rhythmic gymnastics and trampoline at the 2018 Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires, Argentina, later this year. The performances of Brandon Briones (men’s gymnastics), Alyssa Oh (trampoline), and Shannon Xiao (rhythmic gymnastics) at their respective Junior Pan American Championships qualified the USA for a Youth Olympic Games berth, and the athletes in those disciplines who will compete in the Youth Olympic Games will be chosen this summer in accordance with the respective selection procedures. The performances of Jordan Bowers (women’s gymnastics) and mixed pair Jordan Gruendler and Tim Massa (acrobatic gymnastics) also qualified the USA for a Youth Olympic Games berth, but the USA is not participating in those two disciplines. Photos by ??

SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

3


M E S S A G E

A

s we go to press, I believe it is important to discuss not only the changes that have taken place in the past several months to strengthen our organization and our commitment to creating a highly empowered culture, but also to reinforce the really positive things that USA Gymnastics members do each and every day to contribute to this incredible sport. Our athletes have and will always be the heart and soul of USA Gymnastics. Our athletes strive every day to reach their personal goals, whether it is to master a forward roll or win a medal. For our athletes who have competed in the past, will compete in the future or are currently competing, we, as the gymnastics community, have a responsibility to all of our athletes to support, empower and encourage them each and every day. I understand that change can be difficult, and 2018 has certainly been a year of change for USA Gymnastics. Transforming our organization is not easy, but it is imperative that we continue down this path to demonstrate our dedication to creating a positive and encouraging environment that prioritizes the safety and well-being of all of our athletes and members. Here are just a few of the changes we have made in the last several months: • Incorporating new leadership throughout the organization to include reconfiguration of the board with new members, amending bylaws to focus on athlete safety and establishing a Programs Council; • Reorganizing and restructuring to better fit the mission and culture of the organization; • Expanding and decentralizing the safe sport department by adding seven positions, five of which will live and work within the regions they serve;

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TECHNIQUE • SUMMER 2018

F R O M

T H E

• Creating an Athlete Assistance Fund, through the National Gymnastics Foundation, that provides financial resources to athletes who have suffered abuse; • Creating an Athlete Task Force, representing all five disciplines with a mission to help guide the organization on critical strategic decisions moving forward; • Initiating the process for developing a new, permanent high-performance training and wellness facility for all of our disciplines; • Hiring Tom Forster as the women’s high-performance team coordinator; • Implementing a new online membership registration process to better communicate and support our membership. Along with these actions taken over the past seven months, it is important to note that 82 percent of the Deborah Daniels recommendations have been implemented or are in progress year-to-date, which further demonstrates USA Gymnastics’ commitment to transforming our culture. To better serve our membership, usagym.org will be revamped in the coming months, and Technique will be transformed into a dedicated area on the website that is focused on professional member education and information. By going digital only, Technique will provide articles, tips and other materials in a timely fashion, and current and past articles, updates and educational materials will be searchable and easy to reference We appreciate all that our membership does to support our athletes as they compete at our upcoming premier events. In July and August, many of our gymnasts will follow, and maybe fulfill, their dreams of competing on the national, and

P R E S I D E N T possibly the international, stage, including the USA Gymnastics Championships, the nationals for rhythmic and acrobatic gymnastics and trampoline and tumbling; the Men’s National Qualifier and U.S. Classic, which are the final opportunities for artistic gymnasts to advance to the nationals; and the U.S. Championships, the national championships for men’s and women’s gymnastics. We are just two years from the 2020 Olympic Games. Many of our athletes who are competing today on the local, state, regional and national levels hope to someday have the chance to represent the United States. This fall, the respective World Championships offer countries the first opportunity to qualify for Tokyo in 2020 in men’s, women’s and rhythmic group gymnastics. Each and every day we are shaping the future for our athletes and our organization. I truly believe with a commitment to the necessary, and sometimes difficult, tasks of transforming our culture that USA Gymnastics will become the standard-bearer for positive change. We hope you will join with us in this important effort because together not only can we protect our athletes, but we can also have a positive impact on building character, self-esteem and confidence that will serve our athletes for the rest of their lives. Thank you and best wishes for a successful summer and start to the new membership season. Thank you, Kerry Perry President and CEO USA Gymnastics


WHAT’S NEW

WHAT’S NEW

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The following Membership Statement has been adopted by the Board of Directors of USA Gymnastics: Membership in USA Gymnastics is a privilege granted by USA Gymnastics. That privilege can be withdrawn by USA Gymnastics at any time where a member’s conduct is determined to be inconsistent with the best interest of the sport of gymnastics and of the athletes we are servicing. Name

Ray Adams

State Violation Name

FL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Nicholas Aliucci

GA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Julian Amaro

CA

Kenneth "Andy" Arnold

IN

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Charles Theodore Bates MN James Bell

WA

Morgan Bennett

TX

Kristopher Berry

SC

Jeffrey Bettman

OR

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Steve Biondo

LA

Code of Ethical Conduct II.F./II.H.

Phillip Bishop

MI

Patrick Bogan

MD

Douglas Boger

CA

Paul Bollinger

MD

Joseph Bowers

OH

Shawn Bowlden

IL

Matthew Brinker

OH

Vince Brown

SC

Bryan Brown

IL

Christopher A. Brown Thomas Burdash Keith Callen

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H, and II.I

PA

William M. Permenter

FL

Brent Trottier

WA

Thad Cypher

MI

Milos Hroch

CA

Don Peters

CA

Bruce Unger

TX

Vannie Edwards

AR

Steven L. Infante

CT

Timothy Picquelle

CA

Jon Valdez

IL

Cynthia Posmoga

PA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Dwight Van Dale

WI

Vincent Pozzuoli

CT

Bylaw 9.2 (a)

David Pyles

AZ

Debbie Van Horn

TX

Sandro Ramos

OK

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Anthony Van Kirk

CA

David Reiakvam

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Joel Velasquez

OR

Jeffrey Richards

FL

Jose Vilchis

Il

Rudy Rodriguez

CA

David Paul Waage

OR

Chris Wagoner

TX

Jeremy Waldridge

OR

Russell Wallace

CT

Brooklyn Walters

IN

Steve Waples

TX

Derek Waskowski

OH

Donald Watts

KY

Patrick Wehrung

CA

Mike West

WA

Jonathan White

CA MN

Bylaw 9.1 (c)

Steven Elliott

TX

Alexander Katchalov

FL

Anthony Engelke

PA

PA

Daniel Erb

PA

Faye Lorraine aka Heather Kristian King

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b) Code of Ethical Conduct II.D./II.F.

Matthew H. Erichsen

WA

James Kivisto

Wi

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Nolan Knuckles

AZ

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Dana Koppendrayer

FL

Zac Lawson

IL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Jeffrey LeFevre

MI

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Ronnie Lewis

AR

Jung Min Lim

PA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Johnathan Mackie

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Parker Madison

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William McCabe

GA

Dean McCollum

CO

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Scott McFarlane

CAN.

afeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Joel Mertes

TX

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H.

Jason Miguel Mesa

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Troy Miller

PA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Robert Mollock

OR

John S. Moore

WV

Rick Feuerstein

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

CA NE/KS

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Christopher Ford

VA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William Foster

AL

Joseph Fountain

MD

Neil Frederick

MD

Roy Larry Gallagher

PA

Todd Gardiner

IL

Robert Allen (Bob) Garner

TN

Sean Gilham

CA

Russell "Rusty" Glanton

NM

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Timothy Glas

NE

IL/CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Ricardo “Chico” Goddard

NY

KY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Nathaniel Goodale

VT

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (i)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H, and II.I

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Marcelo Guimaraes

TX

Jesus "Jesse" Camargo TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Vernor Gumila

IL

Michael Cardamone

IL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Richard Gustafson

OR

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Joseph Catrambone

NJ

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.2.

Johnny Gutierrez

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Darin Caviness

OH

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (i)

Paul Hagan

MI

NJ

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Joseph Hannon

IL

UT

Code of Ethical Conduct II.D.

Kendale Coats

IL

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Edward Trey Coniff

TX

William Copp

FL

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Lyndsey Wesley Cox

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

State Violation

Frank Hohman, Jr.

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Charity Christensen

State Violation Name

CO

PA

Ronald Charles

State Violation Name

James Craig III

James Fogg

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

State Violation Name

The following former members are permanently ineligible for membership within USA Gymnastics. Based on an amendment of Article 10.16 to the USA Gymnastics Bylaws, effective January 1, 2012, any individual who is declared ineligible will have the USA Gymnastics’ Bylaw, rule, regulation or policy that was violated and resulted in his/her expulsion listed next to his/her name.

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b) SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Jorge Rodriguez

NJ/MA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Miguel Rosario

NY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

John H. Rowaka John Howardaka

DE

Gabriel Salazar

TX

Adam Savignano

NJ

Mark Schiefelbein

TN

gymnasticszone.com Row

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

David Schneider

MO

Jason Scofield

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Christopher Scott

UT/CA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Robert Shawler

CA

Lyf Christian Wildenberg

Steve Shirley

MO

Keith Willette

CA

Steven Todd Siegel

CO

Bill Witthar

MO

Ronald Smith

TX

Joel Woodruff

TX

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b) SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.2.

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Kristoffer Morton

CA

Gregory Muller

ID

Blake Steven Starr

UT

James Woollums

AZ

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William Munsinger

MN

Paul Summers

OK

Daniel Zera

NY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Larry Nassar

MI

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Mark Swift

FL

Daniel Zmrzel

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William Newcom

GA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Freddie Eugene Tafoya, Jr.

CA

Brian Nguyen

VA

SafeSport Code for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement, III.A.4, Bylaw 10.14(b)

Thomas Tellez

NY

Jeena Nilson

UT

Jon Oliver Kenneth Thomas Jay Thomas

VA LA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Ronald Hartsfield

FL

Robert Dean Head

KY

Ted Hicks

TN

Michael Hinton

TN

Paul O’Neill

CA

Phillip Thompson

NC

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Nicholas Hitchcock

MI

Patrick Okopinski

WI

Brian Townsend

LA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

FL

Marian Penev

NY

Robert Hoefer

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H.

SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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Sam Mikulak

2018 Winter Cup All-Around Champion

South Point Hotel, Casino & Spa

February 14-18, 2019 • South Point Hotel, Casino & Spa ENTER BLACKJACK ONLINE • Send roster and deposit right away to reserve space! • Online entries at DustyRitter.com • Final entry fees $125 per gymnast — $50 per team (3 or more per session) due by Dec. 1, 2018 • Gymnasts entered in the Technical Sequence session must submit an additional $25 6 Twith E C H N their I Q U E •entry. SUMMER 2018

ENTRY FOR THE BLACKJACK MUST BE MADE IN ADVANCE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. THE MEET IS EXPECTED TO BE FULL VERY EARLY. DON’T WAIT TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT! • Entry deadline is December 1, 2018. Please enter early as the sessions fill up quickly and lastminute entries necessitate last-minute changes. • Registration forms can be filled out and submitted online. • Please read the Entry Guidelines. • Entries submitted for 2019 should include a $100 deposit and a tentative roster of athletes and coaches. ACCOMODATIONS • Book rooms through DustyRitter.com and make your reservations as early as possible. • Book early for South Point Hotel rooms specially discounted between Feb 13-20, 2019 for BlackJack Meet attendees. There is a limited number so don’t miss out on the discount.


SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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GYM UPDATE B Y

U S A

G Y M N A S T I C S

S A F E

S P O R T

D E P A R T M E N T

WHAT DOES THE NEW FEDERAL LAW, PROTECTING YOUNG VICTIMS FROM SEXUAL ABUSE AND SAFE SPORT AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017,

MEAN FOR YOU?

10

TECHNIQUE • SUMMER 2018


U

nderstanding the new federal law, “Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017” (referred to as the “Safe Sport Authorization Act”), and what it means to the gymnastics community is important. This article is about educating USA Gymnastics adult members on how to be in compliance with the newly signed federal law. The new law not only places a heavy and broad responsibility for athlete protection on USA Gymnastics, its adult members, and those who interact with athletes, but also on any amateur sports organization with interstate or international competition and their adult members. All adult members should take the time to understand and operate within the framework of the new “Safe Sport Authorization Act.” What follows is an outline of the Act’s elements that impact USA Gymnastics, its members, and those who interact with athletes. USA Gymnastics is updating the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy to incorporate the Act’s mandates. The updated Safe Sport Policy is expected to reach members in July, and if members comply with the updated Safe Sport Policy, they will also be in compliance with the federal law. The USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy already contains many of the new law’s mandates, but there are four main additions. • Who falls under the “Safe Sport Authorization Act’s” jurisdiction. • New reporting requirements to law enforcement. • New reporting requirements to the U.S. Center for SafeSport. • Federal mandate to implement the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy or its equivalent. Who falls under the “Safe Sport Authorization Act’s” jurisdiction? In addition to the “covered individuals” identified in the current USA

of child abuse (physical and sexual) to law enforcement within 24 hours.

NEW REPORTING REQUIREMENTS TO THE U.S. CENTER FOR SAFESPORT

Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy, the new law also includes the following. “An adult who is authorized by a National Governing Body or amateur sports organization that participates in interstate or international amateur athletic competition to interact with a minor or amateur athlete at: • an amateur sports organization facility or • at any event sanctioned by the NGB, member of the NGB, or such amateur sports organization.” (Event includes “travel, lodging, practice, competition, health/medical treatment.”) Here’s what this means. 1. Any gymnastics club in the United States that participates in interstate or international amateur athletic competitions falls under the law, whether it is a USA Gymnastics member or not. 2. Any adult who is a member of USA Gymnastics, a member club, or any sports organization, or is authorized by those entities, to interact with a minor or adult athlete anywhere, at any time, must comply with the “Safe Sport Authorization Act.” (For example, all employees and volunteers.) Because the new law does not define “interact with,” it must be interpreted in the broadest sense. “Interact with” equals “have anything to do with gymnasts.”

NEW REPORTING REQUIREMENTS TO LAW ENFORCEMENT

The “Safe Sport Authorization Act” requires that: Any adult who falls within the law’s jurisdiction must report a reasonable suspicion or knowledge

The “Safe Sport Authorization Act” broadly expanded the role of the U.S. Center for SafeSport (the Center). The federal law now mandates that all “adult members of a NGB, paralympic sports organization, or a facility under the jurisdiction of a NGB or Paralympic sports organization, and all adults authorized by such members to interact with an amateur athlete” must report a reasonable suspicion or knowledge of child (sexual or physical) abuse to the Center.

HOW DOES THE USA GYMNASTICS SAFE SPORT POLICY FIT IN WITH THE NEW FEDERAL LAW?

Safe sport membership requirements outlined in the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy reflect the child abuse prevention mandates in the “Safe Sport Authorization Act.” Therefore, compliance with the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy is not just required for membership, it is now required for compliance with federal law.

HOW CAN USA GYMNASTICS ASSIST?

USA Gymnastics can help members and member clubs understand and comply with the new law. The mandates of the new federal law will be incorporated into the updated USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy that members will receive in July. Therefore, if members comply with the Safe Sport Policy, they are in compliance with the federal law. Additionally, USA Gymnastics will provide an extensive Member Club Toolkit, policy templates and additional resources. USA Gymnastics is committed to doing everything it can to prevent sexual abuse and create a culture that empowers and supports athletes at every level of the organization. SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE

2018-19 MEMBERSHIP SEASON PREVIEW With the arrival of the 2018-19 membership year, USA Gymnastics and the community can positively impact the sport of gymnastics by working together to build an environment that empowers, encourages and supports athletes and the entire membership. This membership year brings changes in many areas, some to comply with the new federal legislation, the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport Policy, the recommendations from the Deborah Daniels report, and/or refining policies and procedures. The opening of the new season is a good time to learn about important updates and reminders. We believe the modifications will enable USA Gymnastics to emerge as a stronger, better and more focused organization. 

Independent membership registration

Beginning with the upcoming season, all USA Gymnastics members will register themselves for USA Gymnastics membership. This important system enhancement will allow USA Gymnastics to strengthen its safe sport and education outreach to all members, including athletes and parents/guardians, while providing members with additional information about USA Gymnastics’ membership policies and agreements. So how does this actually work for athletes? The most substantial change in the membership process for athletes is transitioning the online payment process to the parent/guardian or the adult athlete. For the most part, club administrators will continue to use the same functionality that currently exists with the athlete roster. • Adding and removing athletes to club’s roster. • Assigning the athlete’s competitive level. • Reserving/Registering athletes into sanctioned competitions. Club administrators will continue to access the athlete roster information online. When they select the “renewal” button next to each gymnast’s name, the system will automatically generate an email to the parent/guardian of a minor athlete or directly to the adult athlete who is 18 years or older. The parent/guardian or adult athlete then receives the registration email that includes a link to the membership system. By clicking the link, the parent/guardian or adult athlete can either sign in or create a user profile that allows them to pay for the athlete’s membership. The entire process for the parent/guardian or adult athlete should take just a few minutes. For athletes new to USA Gymnastics, the process is essentially the same, except instead of selecting the “renew” button, the club administrator will click on the “invite new” button to generate the registration email. 14

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How does a club know if athletes are active? Once the parent/guardian or adult athlete has paid for the membership, the parent/guardian/adult athlete and the club administrator will receive an email confirming the membership payment. The athlete will also appear as active on the club’s athlete roster. If needed, club administrators may resend the registration email to a parent/guardian or adult athlete at any time by visiting the athlete roster page and clicking on the “renewal” or “invite new” button. How does a junior professional or instructor member under the age of 18 register? For instructor and junior professional members under the age of 18, the process is similar to the athlete process. The only difference is the club sends the renewal email to the parent or guardian via the club’s professional roster. How does a professional or instructor member register? The adult professional or instructor member is responsible for logging in to the USA Gymnastics website with his/her username and password to register/renew his/her membership. Clubs will no longer be able to renew memberships for professional or instructor members via the club’s professional roster page. This process is similar to how members currently access their profiles to submit their criminal background check or to access the USA Gymnastics U101: Safety/Risk Management Course or U110: Safe Sport course. What if paying by credit card is not an option? A paper application form is available for individuals who are unable to provide payment via a credit/debit card. For the 2018-19 season, an individual may mail in the completed membership application and payment by check or money order. Credit card payments will not be accepted for mail-in applications. Members should mailed forms.

allow

3-5-weeks

for

processing

What is communicated to parents/guardians and adult athletes? The new registration process allows USA Gymnastics to communicate directly with parents/guardians, adult athletes and professional/instructor members about important safe sport policy information and the membership agreement. The parent’s/guardian’s communication will be pertinent to his/her child’s USA Gymnastics membership and safe-sport-related education and resources.


2018-19 MEMBERSHIP SEASON PREVIEW Do you have questions about the new process? A complete step-by-step “How-to Guide for Club Administrators” has been developed to assist club administrators with this new process. The “How-to” Guide is available under “Club Resources” on the Member Club site.

2018-19 membership season pricing

• Introductory Athlete, $27 • Athlete, * $59 • Professional, $91 (includes 1 discipline-additional discipline $15/discipline) • Instructor, $15 • Junior professional, $91 (includes 1 discipline-additional discipline $15/discipline) • Member club, $225 • Domestic sanction, $140 *Those participating in the Women’s Xcel Division’s gold, platinum and diamond levels must register for an athlete membership ($59).

U110: Safe Sport Course Requirement

With the new membership season, the U110 Safe Sport Certificate will be valid for one year. As a reminder, anyone over the age of 18 who holds a professional or an instructor membership is required to have a current U110: Safe Sport Certificate to be a member in good standing. Starting August 1, 2018, members who fail to maintain current U110 status will have their membership marked pending, which means they are ineligible to participate in USA Gymnastics-sanctioned events or to obtain USA Gymnastics University certification until the U110: Safe Sport Certificate is current.

Member club registration requirements

Only member clubs may enter an athlete into USA Gymnastics-sanctioned events and/or host sanctioned events. As a reminder, all member clubs must have the mandatory requirements in place prior to applying for a member club membership. Also, the owner/managing director of a member club, must be a current professional member prior to renewing the member club’s membership. To prevent delays in the member club renewal process, the owner/managing director must first renew their professional membership. Please visit the home page for Member Services to review the requirements. USA Gymnastics reserves the right to “audit” a member club to affirm the membership requirements are being followed. Failure to adhere to member club requirements will result in the loss of member club status and all benefits associated with the membership. 

Member Services is Here to Help

USA Gymnastics recognizes that change can, at times, be difficult, but it is necessary to transform the organization to reflect its dedication to creating a highly empowered culture. If members or parents have questions, the Member Services Department is available via phone or email to assist. Member Services Department 800.345.4719 or membership@usagym.org. USA Gymnastics appreciates its members and their dedication to the sport, to their athletes and to keeping the best interests of the athletes at the heart of everything they do.

REGISTER TODAY FOR YOUR REGIONAL CONGRESS! REGION 1 – San Jose, CA • August 24–26 Double Tree by Hilton San Jose REGION 5 – Louisville, KY • September 14–16 Galt House

To register, visit usagymrc.org. SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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JULY 27 HOPES CHAMPIONSHIPS 2:30 PM JULY 28 JUNIOR WOMEN’S COMPETITION 1:30 PM SENIOR WOMEN’S COMPETITION 7:30 PM Venue Location:

Schottenstein Center Schedule subject to change. All times are Eastern. Past champions are not confirmed to compete in 2018. Field will be announced at a later date.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Groups: 614.246.7224

• USAGymClassic.com •

SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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ith the events surrounding USA Gymnastics, many topics may be difficult to address or discuss, but I would like to share some learning opportunities I have had over the last few months. I hope it will help you navigate the waters in your own program or business. As the owner/ CEO of NYC Elite, my top priority is to move forward in a positive direction and provide the ultimate protection to the athletes in our gymnastics clubs and industry.

1. COMMUNICATION IS KEY

I feel the number one priority you must have within your organization at this critical time is communication. Yes, I agree it is uncomfortable to bring up and discuss some aspects related to abuse in our industry, but it is absolutely essential. I have heard some club owners mention they have not heard anyone or very few in their club ask about the abuse related to our sport, but I can assure you that your customers are thinking about it even if they do not verbalize it. Our responsibility as owners, program managers and coaches is to bring light to the situation. Use this opportunity to acknowledge it, show your support to the survivors, and to assure parents their children are in a protected, safe environment. Take time to explain the safety measures you have in place for the well-being of their children, as well as the policies you have in place at your club to create a positive, safe training environment for your students.

2. GIVE PEOPLE THE MEANS TO HELP

During our communications with our families at NYC Elite, the re-

sponse and willingness to help and support the survivors is enormous. It is absolutely amazing to see the network of gymnasts, parents and coaches come together with such a desire to help and assist their fellow athletes. It certainly shows what a passionate sport we are part of and how by joining together we can make huge difference. As a member of the National Gymnastics Foundation Board, it has been an honor to chair the Athlete Assistance Fund to provide the financial means and guidance for gymnasts who have suffered sexual abuse in the sport of gymnastics to obtain counseling services. Use your creativity to develop different events and methods your families can be part of in supporting the survivors and overall safety in our sport. We are organizing a Fun Run for our athletes and local clubs to participate in support of the athletes by raising funds for the Athlete Assistance Fund. You will be astonished by the generosity and support the gymnastics industry has for one another.

3. USE YOUR RESOURCES!

As difficult a topic that abuse and child welfare will be to discuss in the beginning, you will be astonished at the resources and individuals that will come forward to help you continually raise the awareness and safety in your facilities. Many of your club parents may specialize in careers such as social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and child welfare workers, and they will want to provide assistance in continually providing the optimal safety and well-being to the gymnasts in your club. Another terrific resource to uti-

lize is your local Child Advocacy Center (CAC). I highly recommend hosting a safety forum within your organization to educate and enlighten the parents AND athletes about the safety policies in place at your club and of USA Gymnastics. The local CAC specializes in educating and knowing how to discuss sexual abuse and grooming processes to adults and children. Most often their visit will be complimentary or have a nominal fee per child (to cover the cost of a workbook) to educate your organization on safety and abuse. Your customers will be grateful for the opportunity to address this topic and know that you as an owner have their child’s safety and well-being as a top priority. It is essential for children to hear this information in front of their peers, parents and coaches. Make it a priority to continually review and improve your safety policies within your organization. Make an effort to talk to fellow club owners and program managers about what safety policies they implement within their facilities. We can only learn from each other and everyone is willing to share. If we can learn from the past to improve the future, we will all be in a better spot moving forward. And once again, do not be afraid to address the uncomfortable topics. Your customers will appreciate it and your athletes will be provided with the safe and positive training environment they deserve. SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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USA Gymnastics

National Congress Trade Show

Providence, Rhode Island

usagymcongress.org

REGISTRATION IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR THE 2018 NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW!

RHODE ISLAND CONVENTION CENTER & OMNI PROVIDENCE HOTEL

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

THURSDAY, AUG. 9 – SATURDAY, AUG. 11 WHAT TO EXPECT • Congress lectures will take place Thursday, Aug. 9 — Saturday, Aug. 11. • National Business Forum will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 8 — offered complimentary to National Congress registrants. • Additional add-on courses will be offered on Wednesday, Aug. 8.

• Each day will feature 15 full tracks of education from all six disciplines, and coaching, judging, business, preschool, school age/recreational, sports science, fitness, and more! • Designated Hands-On Spotting Lectures • National Trade Show Hall

Visit usagymcongress.org for registration information and more! SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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By Lynn Ledford

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e have never needed heroic leadership more than we need it today. We need honesty and fortitude. We need accountability. Vision. Compassion. We need heroic leadership—and it begins with me. It begins with all of us. A heroic leader has distinct super pow-

ers. Wonder Woman has super human speed, strength, durability and reflexes. Superman has X-ray vision, speed, resilience and the gift of flight. Sue Storm can manipulate light waves and make herself invisible. As business leaders, we can take some cues from the super heroes.

5 SUPER POWERS OF A HEROIC BUSINESS LEADER

1

SUPER VISION

The best leaders can see through walls. They see around corners. They know what is out there and they can see what is coming. In business, great vision is not a magical power. It is a been-there-donethat power. Great leaders have experience — good experiences, horrible experiences and important experiences. What distinguishes great leaders from the masses is that they

learn from their experiences and adapt. Great leaders take notes. They study. They change their patterns. When a parent tells me that we should convert part of our viewing area into a spin cycle area for parents, well, I can see through that wall. With clarity. My super vision reminds me that viewing area is prime real estate. I am able to see that I can sit 25 parents in the space of five spin cycles. My experience tells me that kids climb up on things. And parents fall off of things. And spin cycles have to be cleaned. And repaired. And insured. And no

tuition will be generated in a cycle area. Been-there-donethat super vision.

2 SUPER HEARING

There are two hearing skills that define a heroic leader. The first is the ability to hear things most people cannot. The second is the intuitive hearing that allows a leader to detect what is not being said. Wolverine has super hearing. His hearing is so refined Continued... SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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L E A D E R S H I P . . . C O N T I N U E D

that he can detect changes in a per- can temper that with the knowledge son’s heartbeat and determine if they that some people, even truthful, genuare lying. Super Girl and Gladiator are ine people, do not necessarily look you able to block out surrounding nois- in the eye and other more practiced es and zero in on certain sounds with speakers may exaggerate the hold of eye contact. Great listeners take the incredible focus. Heroic leaders in our industry are time to study and know their team. able to hear beyond the chaos, the They know that the gym’s accountant rambles when she is distractions, the random voices and the loud "LEADERS WHO happy, but when the team coach rambles, it voices and listen to what DON’T LISTEN means he is unsettled, is important. When two something is wrong and angry team parents WILL he is not saying what is demand a meeting, inEVENTUALLY BE really on his mind. sisting that that the Being able to hear move-up process is unSURROUNDED what is not being said fair and adamant that BY PEOPLE WHO requires an investment they are speaking for all of the parents, a leadHAVE NOTHING in your environment. We must be invested er with super hearing TO SAY." in the people around knows that the situation us, the work going on must be slowed and ANDY STANLEY around us, the customthat he/she must listen ers around us and the business taking to more voices. Heroic leadership does not fold to place around us. We need to spend time the loudest voice or the first voice but working along side our team. We need seeks out and focuses on the most im- to be at the table. We need to come out portant voice. The heroic leader knows of our office at lunch. We need to show the truth, whether good or bad, is the up. We need to stay until the end. Being invested is what allows a heroic leader most important voice in the room. Super hearing allows leaders to de- to determine that the customer sertect what is not being said. Astute vice leader, who says she loves her job, leaders are able to pick up the slight- does not mean it anymore. Being invested allows us to deterest of nuances in a conversation. They mine that the team athlete, who says are attentive to every detail and proactively intuitive toward what is not being that everything is fine, is not. Being said. They can get to the heart of a invested allows us to detect that the person’s desire or need or fear or per- Level 6 coach is ready for more resonal agenda to get to what that person sponsibility, and the part-time coach is really thinking or what they are not who just graduated would be perfect for a management position. Being insaying. How do we develop super hearing? vested gives us the power to hear what Practice. Great listening is honed when is not being said. we conscientiously engage with people and focus on what they are saying. It is "KRYPTONITE" TO THE a learned skill. Certainly we can look LISTENING SUPER POWER to the classic cues of voice tone, body Every hero has a weakness. Three language and frequent pauses. We behaviors are the "kryptonite" to lis24

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tening. A leader who engages these behaviors will never master the power of super hearing.

DISTRACTION

The Interrupter

Who interrupts? Ha! Everyone, right? Actually, no. Leaders who have mastered the super power of listening do not interrupt. They are disciplined, practiced and dedicated to their skill. Be wary of these three forces of weakness. • The One-Upper Interrupter “I was thinking of adding a few more preschool classes in the mornings so ------“ “Oh! We just built out a whole new preschool gym. We added 3,200 square feet and opened 18 new classes already! It was long overdue.” The One-Upper Interrupter highjacks conversations and “one-ups” the original speaker. Dialogues become monologues. "Leaders who don’t listen will eventually be surrounded by people who have nothing to say."

—Andy Stanley

• The Thinking-of-What-I-amGoing-to-Say-Next Interrupter This interrupter is so busy thinking of what they are going to say next that they just are not listening. They are more anxious to be heard than to hear, and they are afraid they are going to forget what they are thinking (as they are not listening) and they come in mid-sentence. All the time. They are really good at it. • The Finish-Your-Sentence Interrupter This can either be an innocent eagerness to agree and participate or it can be a manipulative speech pattern that allows the speaker to hijack the conversation. Neither


is acceptable. “I am excited to start looking at the new key performance indicators we set up last month and I can’t wait to ----“ “I know, I know, you can’t wait to look at the revenue growth compared to last quarter because you are thinking that…” If there is one thing worse than an interrupter, it is one who is a mind reader as well.

The Time Fighter

A time fighter is someone who rushes conversations. A coach knocks on the owner’s door and asks if she can have a few minutes. The owner walks toward the door and replies, “Sure, walk with me.” What kind of conversation can take place walking through the gym? The gym is noisy and full of distractions, and the gym offers no privacy, should the discussion be confidential. Rushing conversations is kryptonite to quality listening.

The Distracted Leader

The distracted leader simply does not listen. He/she is doing anything but listening. At the weekly managers’ meeting, the rec department manager has spent the last 3–4 minutes explaining the results of a recent survey. The leader is texting. The leader is looking at a paper on her desk. The leader is having a side bar conversation with the team director. The leader texts again. While the rec department manager is in the middle of a sentence about starting classes on time, the leader randomly asks, “Did we pay for repairs on the air conditioner yet? Don’t pay those guys until I get a chance to talk to them.” Crickets. The behaviors weaken leaders. Super listeners do not interrupt. Heroic leaders value communication and they respect their team. And they have impeccable communication manners. Continued on page 26...

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ceptional hiring and training systems. There is no getting around the importance of surrounding yourself with the right people. (2) THE RIGHT PEOPLE MUST BE WORKING IN THEIR SPACE OF HIGHEST COMPETENCE.

Heroic leaders do not promote an excellent coach to a sustained level of incompetence. Heroic leaders do not waste the talent of a potential manager by keeping her in the same entry-level position for eight years nor do they ask the newly hired 16-year-old summer camp coach to manage the chaotic weekend party program. (3) WHILE SURROUNDING THEMSELVES WITH THE RIGHT PEOPLE, LEADERS WITH THE POWER OF INVISIBILITY ARE WILLING TO PLAY THE BENCH.

3 INVISIBILITY

Heroic leaders know how to disappear. They are content to wait backstage and let the working team enjoy the applause. They know how to distribute responsibilities and they regularly delegate. We can’t confuse the absent leader with the leader who can disappear. The absent leader is not onsite, gone. The invisible leader is still there, still leading — just from the background. Being invisible is one of the most difficult and evasive powers to master. The five components to mastering the superpower of invisibility are listed below. The obvious starting point must be noted: THE INVISIBLE LEADER HAS THE RIGHT PEOPLE ON THE TEAM. The prerequisites to a strong team are ex(1)

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Future leaders are not developed by osmosis. Employees need opportunities to participate, to do the right thing, to make mistakes and to learn. There is value to the process of creating five new marketing campaigns, even if those campaigns do not turn out as perfect as you could have done them. Heroic leaders are doing something more visionary while the new marketing intern gets playtime. (4) INVISIBLE LEADERS ARE WILLING TO DEVOTE RESOURCES TO TRAIN AND PREPARE THEIR EMPLOYEES.

Knowledge, experience and expertise take time and resources. Training, shadowing, classes, clinics, congress, mentoring, workshops — all cost money. Covering classes so that staff members can pursue training costs money. Covering travel and meals during training costs money. Heroic leaders understand the value of developing staff and know the return on that investment will come back 10fold — one fold of which is being able to be invisible.

(5) LEADERS WITH THE POWER OF INVISIBILITY HAVE SYSTEMS FOR DELEGATING.

They have established job descriptions. They make intentional decisions about who is going to handle each responsibility in the gym. They calendar tasks and have meetings to discuss progress. They are methodical and predictable in delegating tasks, and employees know what is expected of them and they know they will be held accountable. Leaders who have mastered the power of invisibility are generous, confident and secure, and they take pride in helping their team achieve independent and collective success. They are motivated to fade into the background and effectively lead behind the scenes in support of their team.

4 EMPATHY

Empathy allows a leader to interpret and understand the feelings and emotions of others. Leaders who are empathetic care about other people and the circumstances of their lives. Catwoman, Captain Planet and Ravine have powers that allow them to relate to other beings in their environment. Empathy in business can be a formidable super power. Empathy can silently tear down walls, openly build up teams and unlock the floodgates of communication. People do their best work when they are working to please someone who cares about them. Empathy can be innate, learned or both. Some people seem to be born with a high level of compassion. They are the kindergartners who bring a hurt classmate to the school nurse and cry when the Bactine goes on the friend. Others have learned through experience and


FREE MONTHLY study to become empathetic. They are the ones who issued a pink slip upon the sixth absence in the spirit of policy and fairness only to learn that chemotherapy takes 12 rounds. Heroic leaders engage. They ask questions. They are present. Heroic leaders don’t decide to be empathetic. They don’t measure each individual situation to determine if empathy is warranted. They are empathetic. It becomes them. Every decision to promote progress, fairness and accountability is influenced by a desire to comprehend, understand and empathize with others. People do their best work when they are working to please someone who cares about them.

5 RESILIENCE

Hulk, Blue Marvel and Infinity are able to withstand almost any condition or force. They can take the heat. If they are down, they get back up again and come back, stronger. We have heard the expression that “The buck stops here” or “It’s lonely at the top.” Heroic leaders have to accept responsibility for their mistakes, as well as the mistakes of others. There is no room for the weak or thin skinned at the top. Leaders make difficult choices. We fire people. We close facilities. We cut payroll. We say "No" to expansions. We demote people. We handle labor board disputes. We handle tax issues. We handle lawsuits. Leaders who have not developed a protective armor shy away from the tough decisions. They tend to be indecisive. They are perceived as weak. A heroic leader has a protective armor of experience, fortitude and goodness that helps him/her take the heat and get back up again. And again. A heroic

leader gathers information, studies, contemplates, and then strikes with authority and fairness. A heroic leader looks for solutions in every crisis and finds lessons in every journey. Resilience has been an essential superpower in every generation in our industry. Nadia Comaneci’s resilience enabled her to score that 10 in Montreal. Kerry Strug’s resilience enabled her to land that vault in 1996. Shannon Miller’s resilience took her to the greatest heights of the sport and was called upon again as she fought for her life — at the age of 33. Patti Komara’s resilience led her to become one of the first women to pioneer a private gymnastics club and a curriculum and marketing business. Steve Greeley’s resilience forged the acceptance and accolades of creativity and imagination in the gymnastics industry. Jeff Lulla’s resilience ensured a place for fun and fitness in a growingly competitive industry. Jeff Metzger’s resilience led the industry to see gymnastics as a business as well as a sport, opening the doors for education, careers, expansions and growth, and catapulting the industry forward in the 1990s. David Holcomb’s resilience has shown us that a gym club can lead great athletes to great things with great honor. Which brings me back to the beginning. We have never needed heroic leadership more than we need it today. May we be visionary. May we listen. May we put our people forward and lead from quiet places. May we lead with empathy. And oh, may we continue to be resilient. It begins with me. It begins with us. Lynn Ledford, Cal Elite Kids Please join the top leaders in the industry at the 2018 SUMMIT in sunny California, December 4-6. www.calelitesummit.com.

WEBINARS USA GYMNASTICS BENEFIT FOR INSTRUCTOR, PROFESSIONAL AND/OR MEMBER CLUBS.

USA Gymnastics regularly hosts webinars that feature educational topics for clubs, coaches, judges, athletes and parents in the gymnastics community. Past topics have included coaching athletes in competition and life lessons; building an effective club staff; how to talk about child sexual abuse prevention and other safe sport topics; training and injury prevention; and disciplinespecific topics for coaching and development. The webinars feature industry and topic experts and typically run for an hour, including time for questions and answers. Interested members sign up via the website, and attendees participate by phone by following the directions sent to confirm registration. Recent webinars are archived to provide on-demand access for members who could not attend or who want to re-listen to a webinar. If you have any questions or need additional informaton, please contact membership@usagym.org.

Register today at usagym.org/webinars! SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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2018- 2019 USA GYMNASTICS JUNIOR O LY M P I C W O M E N ’ S P R O G R A M U P D AT E 2018 Women’s Junior Olympic National Program of the Year: Southeastern Gymnastics 2018 Regional Programs of the Year • Region 1 – SCEGA, Temecula, Calif. • Region 2 – Auburn Gymnastics, Auburn, Wash. • Region 3 – Texas Dreams Gymnastics, Coppell, Texas • Region 4 – Chow’s Gymnastics, West Des Moines, Iowa • Region 5 – Legacy Elite Gymnastics, Carol Stream, Ill.• Region 6 – Connecticut Gymnastics Academy, Wallingford, Conn. • Region 7 – World Class Gymnastics, Newport News, Va. • Region 8 – Southeastern Gymnastics, Weddington, N.C.

3.

4.

2018-19 USA Gymnastics Women’s Program national chairs Congratulations to the newly elected national chairs! • National Technical chair: Cheryl Hamilton • National Xcel chair: Claudia Kretschmer • National Junior Olympic chair: Tom Koll 2018 Regional Congress Schedule • Region 1 – August 24 – 26, 2018, San Jose, Calif. • Region 2 – June 30 – July 1, 2018, Beaverton, Ore. • Region 3 – June 16 – 17, 2018, Dallas• • Region 4 – June 15 – 17, 2018, St. Louis, Mo. • Region 5 – September 14 – 16, 2018, Louisville, Ky. • Region 8 – June 8 – 10, 2018, Winston, Salem, N.C. Additional info at www.usagymrc.com Women’s Program Election Procedures 1. State chairs are required to utilize the contact information listed in the USA Gymnastics database for state committee elections. 2. Junior professional members are NOT allowed to vote in state, regional, or national elections. Women’s Program Rules and Policies Updates – Effective August 1, 2018 1. State and Regional Programs of the Year are determined annually by RACs and SACs who set the criteria, including the following. a. Program exhibits excellence at multiple Junior Olympic levels with an emphasis at the highest level in current year. b. Displays good sportsmanship, team spirit and ethics. c. Contributes to regional efforts (camps, clinics, congresses, volunteer positions). 2. Amend the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 63, H.1., and page 99, H.1., to read: Only unaltered manufactured vaulting boards are approved for sanctioned USA Gymnastics competitions. The height of the board (22cm ± 1.5cm) is

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5.

6.

7.

measured from the floor to the highest point of the board, including the covering. All springboards meeting the stated specifications are allowed, however, it is required to provide a springboard with coil springs. An alternate skill cushion made of softer foam, minimum 4ft. X 6ft. and eight (8) inches high for bar releases ONLY (to be placed under the gymnast during the release and immediately removed) is allowed. – This is NOT allowed for dismounts or landings on any event. Amend Women’s Rules and Policies, pages 58 and 88, remove the bullet listed under IV.8., and update pages 80, G.3.c., and 117, H.3.c., to read: a. Exception to the 5-minute to submit inquiry rule: – If, after the completion of the last event, an athlete’s AA score is a maximum of 0.10 less than the qualifying score to the State (or Regional) Championships, the coach may submit an inquiry for the gymnast’s lowest scoring event in order that the athlete be considered for qualification purposes. Any change of score is official and is included in the final results. – If an athlete begins her fourth event, is injured during the routine and unable to complete her fourth event, she may petition to Regionals if her score from her first three (3) events is equal to or greater than 75% of the required petition score. EXAMPLE: Regional Qualifying Score = 34.00. Required Petition Score – 35.00. The athlete must achieve a three-event score totaling 26.25. EXAMPLE: Regional Qualifying Score = 35.00. Required Petition Score – 36.00. The athlete must achieve a three-event score totaling 27.00. – These processes listed in 1) and 2) above DO NOT APPLY: a. for mobility purposes, OR b. if qualification to the State or Regional meet is by percentage or designated number per age group. Amend Women’s Rules and Policies pages 81, G.6., and 117, H.6., to read: “At State Championships and above, a video review, if available, may be considered. All video must be reviewed in regular time. Slowmotion video WILL NOT be considered.” Amend Women’s Rules and Policies, pages 81, G5.a., Examples 4), and 117, H.5.a., Examples 4) to read: To verify if the gymnast lands on the bottom of the feet first on Vault, Uneven Bar/Beam Dismounts, Beam Acro elements that finish on top of the beam (foot/feet), and Floor Exercise saltos. Amend the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 27, D.4., page 81, K, and page 118, L., to read: The use of cell phones for

verbal conversation is PROHIBITED while on the field of play (competition area). Coaches are permitted to record their OWN gymnast’s exercise for personal use but should not in any way interfere with the competition. 8. Recommendation to add the following statement to the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 81, J., and 118 K.: J/K. Audience/Spectator Regulations. a. Drones are not permitted during the pre-meet warm-ups or competition, as this may endanger the performing athletes. 9. Amend the Rules and Policies, page 94, G.2.f.2), and page 97, H.2.g.2), to read: “All competitors and first alternates will receive a tank leotard from their region to be worn in the competition.”… a. Apparel will be ordered for the first alternate (and any ties for 1st alternate) from each region in each age division. The apparel will be distributed to only those first alternates in attendance. 10. For the 2018-2019 competitive season: Only Regional qualifiers (including petitioned gymnasts) who achieve the minimum qualifying score to Eastern/ Western Championships or Junior Olympic Nationals at the State Championships will be included in age determination. Individual Event Specialists will NOT be included. 11. Reminder to Coaches and Judges - refer to the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 27, IV.N., and page 28, V.H., regarding casual conversation between coaches and judges. a. Direct any inquiries regarding apparatus, judging or meet schedules through the Meet Referee or Meet Director. – Refrain from approaching a judge directly. b. Refrain from conversation with other judges and coaches during the competition. In addition, the judges’ responsibility does not involve the conduct of the gymnast(s) during warmup or training. Any conversation or comments with the athletes should be made only if requested by the coach or athlete. 12. Amend the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 34, B. – add the following: a. Exceeding the maximum allowable number of gymnasts in a session. (See pages 74 and 110) 13. Rules and Policies, page 35. Change E. to read: Meet Referee Penalties for Violations – A Meet Referee may receive a $100 fine for failure to report a sanction violation on the sanction report form. a. Change the current E. to F. and F. to G. 14. Amend the Women’s Rules and Policies page 35 E.1. – remove c. and change b. to read: A second-time violation results in a fine of $500 for one violation. For each additional violation associated with that same sanction, the fine is $500 EACH. In addition, a second-time violation


2018- 2019 USA GYMNASTICS JUNIOR O LY M P I C W O M E N ’ S P R O G R A M U P D AT E may result in possible suspension of sanctioning privileges for the next competitive season, to be determined by the National Administrative Committee. 15. Amend the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 70, E., and 107, F., to read: E/F. Entry Fees and Deadlines a. It is recommended that competition entries are received AND a competition schedule published at least 4-6 weeks prior to the first day of competition. Entries should include: – Competitor(s) name(s), USA Gymnastics Athlete Member number, birth date, citizenship and age division. – The name(s) and USA Gymnastics Professional number, Safety Certification expiration, Background Check expiration, U110 certification, and U100 certification of all participating coaches. – ALL FEES PAID IN FULL. – An athlete is considered registered/ entered in competition only when her name is listed on the club’s entry form and the Meet Director has received valid payment. b. Meet Directors may not refuse entries from competitors who wish to enter a competition that serves as a Sectional Meet or any competition that serves as a qualifier to State Championships and above if all registration procedures and entry fees are PAID IN FULL. – EXCEPTION: If the competition fills to maximum participant capacity, the Meet Director may consider accepting additional entries if/when space becomes available. c. Cancellation Policy – The Meet Director should make the best effort to refund all or part of the entry fee in the event that severe weather or a shortage of judges would cause a cancellation of a competition. Sanctioned Event Procedure Updates – Effective August 1, 2018: 1. Amend the Women’s Rules and Policies, page 112, D.10 and page 76, D.10 to read: To determine the competitive order when rotating to the next event, the number of places to be “dropped” must be applied uniformly per session and is based on the number of competitors in the largest squad in that session. 6 or less gymnasts in a squad – drop one (1) spot – Gymnast 1 – V – Gymnast 2 – UB – Gymnast 3 – BB – Gymnast 4 – FX 7-11 gymnasts in a squad – drop two (2) spots – Gymnast 1 – V – Gymnast 2 – Gymnast 3 – UB – Gymnast 4 – Gymnast 5 – BB – Gymnast 6 – Gymnast 7

12+ gymnasts in a squad – Drop three (3) spots – Gymnast 1 – V – Gymnast 2 – Gymnast 3 – Gymnast 4– UB – Gymnast 5 – Gymnast 6 – Gymnast 7 – BB – Gymnast 8 – Gymnast 9 – Gymnast 10 – FX – Gymnast 11 – Gymnast 12 Examples: In the case of a squad being reduced in numbers due to gymnasts scratching prior to the start of competition, it may be necessary to re-define the start order on each event for that squad only if the original number of dropped places is more than the number of gymnasts in that squad. 2. At all sanctioned USA Gymnastics State and Regional Championships, Individual Event Specialists (IES) shall be placed first on the event she is competing using the following steps: a. Organize gymnasts into squads b. Draw for starting events and flights. c. Place the IES first on the event she is competing within the squad. d. Vault – In all sanctioned USA Gymnastics events, the Vault warm-up time for Levels 6 and 7 shall be two minutes per athlete. e. Uneven Bars – In all USA Gymnastics sanctioned competitions, for Levels 9 and 10, the warmup time on bars shall be 2.5 minutes per athlete, including bar settings. f. Balance Beam – Timed warm-up on beam MAY NOT be staggered. TOUCH WARM-UP, on beam only, may be staggered. g. All State/Regional Championship meets MUST utilize the USA Meet Reservation System for registration (not payment) and use the pre-printed Coaches’ signin sheets during the competition. Judging Updates – Effective August 1, 2018: 1. In order to judge USA Gymnastics sanctioned Level 1-5 competition, the judge is required to have a level 4/5 rating. Professional Members and Junior Professional Members without a Level 4/5 rating will no longer be eligible to judge a Level 1-5 competition. 2. All FIG Brevet judges in the US who wish to judge Junior Olympic Optional Meets must: a. Attend a State, Regional, or National Clinic on the new Junior Olympic Rules. b. Submit an annual CPE report to their State CPE coordinator each may to be eligible for assignments the following Accreditation year.

3. For Eastern/Western Championships Increase the number of judges sent from each region from three (3) to four (4) and increase the fee for Regional Support from each region from $300 to $500. Junior Olympic Compulsory Updates – Effective August 1, 2018: 1. An additional entrance technique for compulsory Acro elements (balance beam and floor exercise) will be allowed. a. Allow the back leg to bend (mountain climber entrance), torso upright, hips tucked under, shoulder angle open, neutral head position and arms covering the ears. JO Code of Points Updates – Effective August 1, 2018: 1. Update the current Junior Olympic inquiry form and page 24 in the Junior Olympic Code of Points. Change 3. on the inquiry form to read: “Composition (Optional)” 2. Bars – Page 49, Beam – Page 38, Floor – Page 37, IV.A.3. a. Eligible for Additional Bonus + 0.10 (not included in Start Value). b. Must have 10.0 SV c. Total Bonus = +0.60 or more, and Minimum of one (“E”) Acro element (no fall/spot). 3. Beam – #2.201 Split Leap – value was raised to “B”. In order to receive “B” value, there must be a straight-leg brush entry (no stag-split action). If there is a developé, award “A” value. 4. New Elements VAULT a. Front handspring onto the board, ¼ to ½ (90° to 180°) on, back salto tuck with 1/1 (360°) turn. #3.405 – Zuhlke - Awarded 9.9 start value b. Front Handspring onto the board, front handspring onto the table, front salto pike with a ½ (180°) turn. #2.411 – Whitman - Awarded 10.0 + .1 start value UNEVEN BARS a. Piked Deltchev. #4.507 – Bardes - “E” value BALANCE BEAM a. Mount – From rear stand (back towards beam) flic-flac over beam to candle position ending in front support with or without backward hip circle. #1.413 – 6 athletes performed the skill successfully at JO Nationals, so it will not be named after an athlete. - “D” value b. Switch leg leap with ¾ turn. #2.505 – Salcedo - “E” value FLOOR EXERCISE a. Triple turn in tuck stand on one leg – free leg optional. #2.506 – 2 athletes performed the skill successfully at JO Nationals, so the skill will not be named after an athlete - “E” value

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FEATURE

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Y

ears ago, many gymnastics clubs started with a focus on team gymnastics. Recreational classes were offered to feed students into the team and to support the cost of running a competitive program. It was viewed as a coach’s hobby more than a business. With the advancement of USA Gymnastics and owners who were business savvy, gymnastics clubs started converting to a real business model with a strong focus on educationally based instructional classes. In some clubs, competitive teams were not even offered. Thanks to forward thinking owners, other profit centers were added, including birthday parties, field trips, open gyms, activity nights, performances, camps, clinics, competitions, gift shops, etc. Now today we see Kids Activity Centers, child-based schools that not only offer additional activities for their gymnastics students, but also independent businesses separate from the gymnastics. Karate, ninja, dance, aerial arts, educational pre-school, music and swimming are common businesses being offered. These businesses are held in large facilities, in some cases reaching over 100,000 square feet. In many instances, these very successful businesses are run by owners who started out with a very small program in rented space based on the hobby concept. Have you ever seen a child eat a piece of iced cake? The first thing they devour is the icing. Even though the cake is the main component, the icing is not to be forgotten. Our gymnastics classes are the cake of our business, but additional activities are the icing on that cake. They can sweeten the deal and make the entire business more profitable. There is 32

TECHNIQUE • SUMMER 2018

no doubt that offering additional income producing programs can add to the bottom line and sweeten the deal, but they should not be offered at the expense of losing focus on the largest return on your investment, the instructional classes. Gymnastics schools must be mature enough that adding programs brings value to the entire business. Learning the art of getting customers to buy something else along with your main product can be incredibly effective for increasing revenue. The percentage of profit for each activity could be small, but when you group numerous activities together as a special activities department, the percentage can be substantial. At Barron Gymnastics, in addition to our competitive programs and our instructional classes, we offer eight activities/ profit centers that bring in 6% of our total income. Our company depends on this revenue. Pricing of these programs and evaluating their value is a top concern. Here are some guidelines for pricing and evaluating programs.

1.

Does your business have the time, space and staff?

2. How often will they be offered?

3. Price vs. tuition — percentage of the price charged for the special activity vs. class tuition. 4. What are the anticipated expenses? 5. What are the number of students needed for your break-even point? 6. Staffing

d. Student-to-teacher ratio.

e. Will this be a profit sharing program?

7. Facility

a. Specific time and day offered.

Prime time vs. non-prime time.

b. What is the amount of space used?

c. Can it share the gym with

other activities?

8. Review other businesses and competitors.

9.

What is the current Consumer Pricing Index?

10. Perceived value of program.

11. Do you want to control numbers with an accelerated price?

12.

Do you want to encourage numbers with a low-price strategy?

13. What is the expected percentage of profit?

14. If this program has been offered in the past, run a three-year profit/ loss history. 15. Be attentive to your customers’

concerns and requests for activities and services.

It is far easier to sell additional products to existing customers than it is to acquire new customers. Choose activities and services that would genuinely interest your customers. Customers ap-

a. Payroll, including administra tion time.

preciate cross selling if it is relevant and

b. Experience of staff needed.

accommodate additional profit centers.

c. How many front office staff are needed?

Go ahead and bake that cake, ice it, and

makes life easier. Build your business to

eat it too.


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WHAT’S NEW

WO WOMEN

WHAT’S NEW

2018 WOMEN’S PROGRAM UPDATES ADMINISTRATIVE, JUNIOR OLYMPIC, TECHNICAL, AND XCEL COMMITTEES Cori Rizzo, Tom Koll, Cheryl Hamilton, Claudia Kretschmer

2018 is shaping up to be quite a busy year for the Women’s Program. Both the Junior Olympic, Technical and Xcel Committees are currently working on creating the materials needed for the next four-year cycle in order to provide

PROJECT/EVENT

great educational experiences for our professional members. Below is a timeline, as well as preliminary cost information for these future projects for our Junior Olympic and Xcel programs.

DATE OF RELEASE/EVENT

COST

2018-2022 Junior Olympic Code of Points

Orders currently accepted and fulfilled

2018-2022 Junior Olympic Code of Points DIGITAL

Available for order at Apple store

2018-2022 Junior Olympic Code of Points FLIP BOOK

Expected to be available prior to August 31, 2018

$25 + shipping

2018-2022 Xcel Code of Points

Pre-orders currently accepted Orders released: Mid-July (tentative)

$60 + shipping

2018-2022 Xcel Code of Points DIGITAL

Expected to be available for order at Apple store August 1, 2018

2018-2022 Xcel Code of Points FLIP BOOK

Expected to be available prior to August 31, 2018

2018 USA Brevet/National Judges’ Course Course is invitation only.

July 12-13 – Burlington, VT August 11-12 – Providence, RI August 24-26 – San Jose, CA September 15-16 – Louisville, KY

2018 Regional Congresses usagymRC.com

August 24-26 – R.1 – San Jose, CA September 14-16 – R.5 – Louisville, KY

2018 National Congress

August 9-11 – Providence, RI

usagymcongress.com/ registration

August 23-26 – Flip Fest Camp, Crossville, TN

usagym.com/w300 usagym.com/w400 $475 Coaches w/ athletes $550 Coaches without athletes $550 Athletes (must have coach to attend)

2018 Women’s Coaches Courses: W300/400

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TECHNIQUE • SUMMER 2018

$60 + shipping

$49.99

$49.99

$20 + shipping

$175.00

usagymrc.com/region1 usagymrc.com/region5


SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE

HOW TO IN¢REA$E DAY P A T T I

K O M A R A

T U M B L E B E A R

C O N N E C T I O N

HOW TO IN¢REA$E DAY

P

eople associate quality with a higher price. This is true or why wouldn’t everyone buy all of their clothes at a resale shop or the discount store? Evaluate your price strategy, as well as from other gyms in your area, to find out where you stack up. September (which is the beginning of our school year) or January is the time to change prices, not during the middle of the year. If you raise prices in line with inflation, your customers will generally understand.

I raise prices of my classes at least $2–$4/month every year. One year I didn’t raise prices, but I cut the class times. No one really asked about less time. We had more people say, “And the tuition this year is what?” And when we replied that it was remaining the same they said, “Really?” Keep consistent. Increase prices every year! It has been shown that parents are willing to pay more for educational programs than recreational programs. If your preschool gymnastics lessons have learning built

into them that contain letters, numbers, prepositional concepts, science, math, foreign languages and history, parents will notice the value of the lesson. There are many ways to increase revenue. Here are some ways. 1. Increase enrollment. 2. Increase tuition. 3. Encourage students to take more classes per week. 4. Upsell “extras,” such as merchandise, camps, mats, etc.

Professional instructors, fun classes, and exciting lessons will enable you to increase tuition. With this combination, you will naturally increase enrollment because both child and parent will tell their friends about your exciting program. We all know word-of-mouth is the best advertising. If you are the leader in the price category in your area, you should be the leader in all areas that make a top-notch gym school. Ask yourself these questions: • Do I have competent staff? • Do I educate them continually? • Do I have regular staff meetings?

• Do I evaluate, review, and retrain them on a regular basis?

• Do I pay them enough and keep their working environment enjoyable to keep the same people year after year on my staff? (You should pay them so they can sustain a living and therefore enjoy their job.) • Is my facility clean? • Does it smell good? • Does it have a fresh coat of paint and clean carpeting? • Are all of my mats clean and free of mushy spots and holes? • Are my restrooms and drinking fountains always clean and sanitized? • Do I put seasonal flowers and decorations in my gym? All of these things make a difference. It’s the whole feeling your customers get when they enter your facility. And most importantly, are you teaching the students something?

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TIME REVENUE

TIME REVENUE Are you really teaching them gymnastics skills through movement and adding other educational aspects to your classes?

You must have a list of skill progressions. You need teachers who can decide when it is time to teach the child the next skill. A regularly scheduled way to show the parents what you’re teaching the children is important. Parents can only understand the results of your teaching if you show and tell them. Bring the parents into the gym (yes, physically into the gym) several times during the year. Allow them to get to know the teachers, walk on your mats, and jump on your spring floor. (Aren’t they always amazed when they do that?) I recommend giving a list of skills each child has accomplished to the parents every eight weeks, basically six times during the year. You can have an “awards” ceremony at the end of the first eight weeks, near the end of October, and again in February, April, and August. Sometimes the weeks fall on a holiday and you can give a cute holiday certificate or ribbon.

My plan for handing out these “awards” usually looks like this. • OCTOBER Halloween or orange certificate • FEBRUARY Medal • APRIL Certificate in spring colors • JUNE Trophy • AUGUST Medal or trophy Three reasons we give “awards” are: 1. To compliment the child. 2. To encourage the child. 3. To retain them in class. We know we wouldn’t have the money to give all these “awards” if we didn’t have the enrollment numbers. Advertise in the beginning of the year when you will give out these “awards.” Promote the “awards” prior to the next month. So when Mom says, “You’ve got soccer starting, let’s drop gymnastics for this month,” the child realizes he/she has worked so hard for that “award,” he/she is not about to quit. It encourages them to stay in class!

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FEATURE

FEA TURE B Y

J O H N

H A Y E S

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FEATURE TURE

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R A N D Y

S I K O R A

KEEPING SCORE

I

magine you are at the flight controls of an aircraft and just entered the clouds. You look out the window and you are bathed in a sea of white. Fortunately, your aeronautical training kicks in and you begin your dutiful scan of your avionics instrumentation. First, you refer to the altitude indicator to make certain your wings are level and you are maintaining altitude. Then, you confirm altitude with your altimeter. Next, you peek at your heading indicator and GPS system to make sure you are headed toward your destination. You perform this instrument check in under 15 seconds because you are instrument current, instrument proficient, and very experienced. As the pilot in command of your business, how are your instrument flying skills? Do you have a set of instruments that you (and your fellow leaders) can scan quickly to check the current quantitative health of operations?

KISS

Keep it simple and safe! Designing your simple system will entail a bit of complexity to get started. The goal of a simple business “avionics suite” will necessitate boiling down each and ev-

ery staff member to agree on a final singular score. Yes, just one number that will measure an individual’s weekly operational performance. The key is simplicity (possibly as the result of a more complex formula) and creating a healthy agreement/acceptance of the metric by all. For example, an instructor can be scored based on the number of students they teach each week or a formula based on the number of students vs. the number of hours they teach. Instructional managers can be scored as a grand total of the instructors’ numbers.

COMPARED TO WHAT?

Building a data stream of “scores” will help monitor progress, identify trends and seasonal fluctuations, and provide an overall frame of reference. The goal of a weekly public posting of scores is to provide your organization with objective, factual data. This will help staff to see where they stand, both on their own ebbs and flows and where they stand compared to their fellow staff members.

SPIRITUAL COMPONENT

Before launching this system and assigning your people a number, meet with staff members to explain this process. More importantly, share your perspective on WHY you feel that experimenting with a weekly scorecard will help your organization. Reaching a healthy agreement with your staff on how you are going to utilize this new (potentially scary) tool is vital. Openly discuss some of the potential pitfalls of this process. Organizational involvement, buy-in and support will go a long way in implementing a successful scorecard.

FINAL WORD

It is paramount to track progress to know where you are at any given time to effectively reach a destination on time (and on budget). Using a weekly simple scorecard as a tool will create healthy organizational competition if implemented in a safe, collaborative fashion. Involving staff in productive conversations on how to reach agreed upon future targets is your ultimate goal. Now go huddle up with your crew and pitch your idea to “pilot” a weekly scorecard initiative. SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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WHAT’S NEW WHAT’S NEW B Y

J E F F

F U N

&

LU L L A

F I T

,

F O U N D E R

&

P R E S I D E N T,

G Y M N A S T I C S

THE BENEFITS A GYMNASTICS EDUCATION PROVIDES CHILDREN

When parents consider gymnastics, we want them to think about the many positive benefits a gymnastics education provides children. Here are just a few. PHYSICALLY

Strength, flexibility, balance, coordination, agility, inverted awareness and hand-eye coordination are all developed in gymnastics and lay the foundation for success in all sports later in life. The more frequently a child participates, the greater physical benefits that child experiences.

MENTALLY

Gymnastics stimulates the brain and nervous system of young children while they are growing through important developmental stages. Cross-body movements fire impulses between the two brain hemispheres. Mental focus is learned early in life as children attempt progressive challenges in the gym. When they succeed, they learn to expect more success — we call that confidence. For preschoolers, important perceptual concepts such as over/under and in/out, as well as math concepts, are introduced when crawling through tunnels, over mats, into pits filled with lose foam, and putting foam cubes or small balls into and out of buckets.

EMOTIONALLY

Fun and excitement are what brings students into gymnastics while achieving success keeps them enrolled. It’s fun to win, and defining success and winning as personal best helps us deliver achievement to all of our students. This can be done by using a progressive curriculum to set short-term and long-range “achievable” goals for students, tracking and rewarding those goals as they are achieved. Children also like to feel valued. Being a member of a peer group of students, be it a class, team or club, helps fulfill this emotional need. Helping your students bond as a group and feel special will add to their happiness and result in a longterm relationship and membership. SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS FOR SALE

OPEN POSITIONS

GK RISK FREE PROGRAM: NOW offering FREE outbound  shipping, plus new styles, fabrics and colors to give your pro shop the largest assortment of the best fitting gymnastics apparel. In addition, GK now offers free scrunchies with each leotard, price coded merchandise and an online order form to make it even easier to sell GK in your pro shop. There is nothing to lose, you only pay for what you sell. Sign up today! Call Risk-Free Customer Service 1-800-345-4087 for more information. Email: ProShopPros@gkelite.com

T&T TEAM & RECREATIONAL COACHES WANTED Full-time and Part-time T&T Team and Recreational Coaches wanted: Aspire Gymnastics Academy of Bentonville, AR, is adding to our growing Trampoline and Tumbling team and program. T&T knowledge and experience are required. Must have current USAG professional membership and safety certification. We expect our coaches to be self-motivated, proactive, organized, reliable, mature, professional, safety-minded & able to work well with others. Benefit opportunities include health insurance, holiday and vacation pay. Send resumes to karen.cherry@aspiregymnasticsacademy.com.

OPEN POSITIONS

GIRLS COACH NEEDED Girls Coach Needed at Massachusetts Elite Gymnastics Academy located in Millis, MA, 45 min from downtown Boston area. Looking for a passionate, energetic coach who has experience with all levels, Recreational, Excel, and Optional Teams. Part-time hourly position with potential to build towards full-time. Compensation based on experience. Visit our website MassEliteGymnastics.com and send resume to info@MassEliteGymnastics.com.

OPTIONAL HEAD COACH TRAINEE WANTED Paragon Gymnastics of Norwood, N.J. (Bergen County), is looking for an Optional Head Coach Trainee: USAG levels 6 and up. Full-time/Part-time, flexible hours available. Requirements: Positive attitudes, responsible, reliable, and enjoys working with children. Company-sponsored certifications (safety, CPR, First Aid, Concussion, seminars, USAG Congresses). Benefits: Medical/Prescription/Dental/Vision, paid vacations, Paid sick days, Matching Retirement Plan. Facility, approx. 11,000sq ft. Actively looking to expand into a larger facility. Located in the NY/NJ Metropolitan area, easily accessible from all major highways. Contact: email Paragonjobs@yahoo.com; website, paragongym.com; Tel, 201-767-6921; Address, 49 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Norwood, NJ 07648.

CHECK THIS OUT! WHAT’S NEW

TAKE THE USA GYMNASTICS TRAMPOLINE & TUMBLING CODE OF POINTS WHEREVER YOU GO — now available for Apple iBooks and Amazon Kindle!

SUMMER 2018 • TECHNIQUE

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USA Gymnastics 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700 Indianapolis, IN 46204

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit No. 7867

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Event Schedule Thursday, August 16

1:30 pm .....Junior Men’s Competition – Day 1 7:30 pm .....Senior Men’s Competition – Day 1

Friday, August 17

1:30 pm .....Junior Women’s Competition – Day 1 7:30 pm .....Senior Women’s Competition – Day 1

Saturday, August 18

10:30 am ...Junior Men’s Competition – Final Day 3:30 pm .....Senior Men’s Competition – Final Day

Sunday, August 19

1:30 pm .....Junior Women’s Competition – Final Day 7:30 pm .....Senior Women’s Competition – Final Day

Schedule subject to change. All times are eastern. Past champions are not confirmed to compete in 2018. Field will be announced at a later date.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Groups: 617.624.1805

• USAGymChampionships.com •

Technique Magazine - Summer 2018  
Technique Magazine - Summer 2018